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  • 1.
    Berggren, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Letter: The nasal alar elevator: An effective tool in the presurgical treatment of infants born with cleft lip2005In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), ISSN 0032-1052, E-ISSN 1529-4242, Vol. 115, no 6, p. 1785-1787Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 2. Bergkvist, Göran
    et al.
    Sahlholm, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Karlsson, Ulf
    Nilner, Krister
    Lindh, Christina
    Immediately loaded implants supporting fixed prostheses in the edentulous maxilla: A preliminary clinical and radiologic report2005In: International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants, ISSN 0882-2786, E-ISSN 1942-4434, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 399-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival rate of immediately loaded ITI sand-blasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) solid-screw dental implants in the edentulous maxilla after 8 months of loading. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight patients (mean age 63 years) with edentulous maxillae each received 6 implants and 1 implant-supported fixed provisional prosthesis within 24 hours after surgery. After a mean healing time of 15 weeks, the patient received a definitive, screw-retained, implant-supported fixed prosthesis. A total of 168 implants were placed. Clinical parameters were registered after 1 month of loading with the implant-supported fixed prostheses as well as 8 months after implant place ment. Radiologic examinations and assessments were made at implant placement and after 8 months. Results: The mean marginal bone level at implant placement was 1.6 mm (range 0 to 5.1, SD 1.1) apical of the reference point (the implant shoulder). The mean marginal bone level at the 8-month follow-up was 3.2 mm (range 0.4 to 5.9, SD 1.1) apical of the reference point. Three implants failed during the healing period. Discussion: The improved results in the present study might be a result of the positive effect of splinting the implants immediately after placement Conclusion: ITI SLA solid-screw implants immediately loaded (ie, loaded within 24 hours of placement) and supporting fixed prostheses had successful survival rates after 8 months. The present results constitute a solid base line for future follow-up studies.

  • 3. Bergkvist, Göran
    et al.
    Sahlmholm, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Nilner, Krister
    Lindh, Christina
    Implant-supported fixed prostheses in the edentulous maxilla. A 2-year clinical and radiological follow-up of treatment with non-submerged ITI implants2004In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 15, p. 351-359Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bondemark, L.
    et al.
    Faculty of Odontology, Malmoe University, Department of Orthodontics, Malmoe, Sweden, Faculty of Odontology, Malmoe University, Department of Orthodontics, Carl Gustavs väg 34, Scania SE-20506 Malmoe, Sweden.
    Holm, A.-K.
    Umeå University, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hansen, K.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Orthodontics, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, S.
    Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohlin, B.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Goteborg University, Faculty of Odontology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brattstrom, V.
    National Health Service, Uppland County Council, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Pietila, T.
    Health Centre of Pori, Pori, Finland.
    Long-term stability of orthodontic treatment and patient satisfaction: A systematic review2007In: Angle orthodontist, ISSN 0003-3219, E-ISSN 1945-7103, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 181-191Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate morphologic stability and patient satisfaction at least 5 years after orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: Published literature was searched through the PubMed and Cochrane Library electronic databases from 1966 to January 2005. The search was performed by an information specialist at the Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care. The inclusion criteria consisted of a follow-up period of at least 5 years postretention, randomized clinical trials, prospective or retrospective clinical controlled studies, and cohort studies, and orthodontic treatment including fixed or removable appliances, selective grinding, or extractions. Two reviewers extracted the data independently and also assessed the quality of the studies. Results: The search strategy resulted in 1004 abstracts or full-text articles, of which 38 met the inclusion criteria. Treatment of crowding resulted in successful dental alignment. However, the mandibular arch length and width gradually decreased, and crowding of the lower anterior teeth reoccurred postretention. This condition was unpredictable at the individual level (limited evidence). Treatment of Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion with Herbst appliance normalized the occlusion. Relapse occurred but could not be predicted at the individual level (limited evidence). The scientific evidence was insufficient for conclusions on treatment of cross-bite, Angle Class III, open bite, and various other malocclusions as well as on patient satisfaction in a long-term perspective. Conclusions: This review has exposed the difficulties in drawing meaningful evidence-based conclusions often because of the inherent problems of retrospective and uncontrolled study design. © 2006 by The EH Angle Education and Research Foundation, Inc.

  • 5. Engquist, Bo
    et al.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Anzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Dahlgren, Simon
    Engquist, Eva
    Feldmann, Hartmut
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Karlsson, Ulf
    Nord, Per Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Sahlholm, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Svärdström, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Simplified methods of implant treatment in the edentulous lower jaw. Part II: Early loading2004In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 90-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most implant treatment is performed with a two-stage surgical procedure. A disadvantage of these implant treatments is that they are time-consuming. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the results of early loading in the edentulous mandible and to compare those results with treatment results of one-stage surgery followed by a healing period and with two-stage surgery. Material and Methods: The material comprises four treatment groups with a total of 108 patients with edentulous lower jaws and 432 implants. All patients were treated with Brånemark implants (Nobel Biocare AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) with a turned surface and fixed prostheses in the lower jaw, supported by four implants. The patients in group A were treated with a one-stage procedure, a two-piece implant, and a 3-month healing period before loading. Group B (control group) had a two-stage procedure, a two-piece implant, and a 3-month healing period. Group C had a one-stage procedure, a one-piece implant, and a 3-month healing period. Group D was treated with a one-stage surgical procedure, a two-piece implant, and early loading (within 3 weeks). All patients were provided with a Procera® Implant Bridge (Nobel Biocare) with a framework made by computer-assisted milling of one piece of pure titanium. All patients have been followed up for 1 year. Results: The survival rates were 93.2 to 93.3% in the experimental groups and 97.5% in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant. The measurements of the marginal bone level demonstrated a mean bone loss of 0.8 mm between fixture insertion and the 1-year examination in patients with early loading (group D) whereas the bone loss in patients who underwent a healing period before loading was 1.3 to 1.6 mm. The difference between the control group and the group with early loading was significant. Conclusions: Survival rates for patients treated with a one-stage procedure were lower than survival rates for patients treated according to a "classical concept," but the differences were not statistically significant. There was no difference between treatment results with one-piece and two-piece implants. The implant loss in patients with early loading was probably caused by overloading, and careful supervision of occlusal loading is recommended. Early loading gave significantly less marginal bone loss when compared with two-stage surgery.

  • 6. Engquist, Bo
    et al.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Anzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Engquist, Eva
    Feldmann, Hartmut
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Nord, Per Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Sahlholm, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Svärdström, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Simplified methods of implant treatment in the edentulous lower jaw: A 3-year follow-up report of a controlled prospective study of one-stage versus two-stage surgery and early loading2005In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 95-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Interest in the use of one-stage surgery and immediate loading of oral implants has lately been increasing. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the 3-year results of one-stage surgery versus two-stage surgery, early loading versus loading after a 3-month healing period, and the use of one-piece implants versus the use of two-piece implants. Materials and Methods: The study included 108 patients with edentulous mandibles. Each patient was treated with four Brånemark System® implants (Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden) and with full fixed prostheses. Patients were consecutively treated and were distributed in four groups: group A (one-stage surgery), group B (control group with two-stage surgery), group C (one-piece implants), and group D (early loading). In groups A and B Brånemark Standard implants and standard abutments were used. In group C the conical one-piece Brånemark implant was used, and in group D the patients had Brånemark System Mk III implants together with multiunit abutments. All patients were observed for 3 years. Results: Of the 432 inserted implants, 24 were lost. Survival rates in the three experimental groups ranged from 93.2 to 93.3% whereas the survival rate in group B (the control group with two-stage surgery) was 97.5%. The differences between the groups were not statistically significant. The changes in marginal bone level were measured from fixture insertion to the final follow-up at 3 years. The bone loss in group D (early loading) was significantly less than in group B (the control group) whereas there were no differences in marginal bone change between the other groups. Conclusions: Early loading seemed to give good results in the anterior part of the mandible. The survival rate of the early-loaded implants did not significantly differ from that of implants inserted with the conventional two-stage procedure, but the mean marginal bone loss around the surviving implants was less with early loading. ©2005 BC Decker Inc.

  • 7.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    LundeborgHammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Mc Allister, Anita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Graf, Jonas
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Oralmotorik, artikulation och livskvalitet. Sexmånadersuppföljning efter tonsillotomi respektive tonsillektomi2007In: Rikstämman 2007,2007, 2007, p. 53-53Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Fermergard, R.
    et al.
    Fermergård, R., Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Västervik Hospital, Västervik, Sweden, Department Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Västervik Hospital, SE-593 81 Västervik, Sweden.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Osteotome sinus floor elevation and simultaneous placement of implants - A 1-year retrospective study with astra tech implants2008In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 62-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The bone support for implants in the posterior part of the maxilla is often poor. This condition may be treated with augmentation of the maxillary sinus floor. The most common technique used is to elevate the sinus floor by inserting a bone graft through a window opened in the lateral antral wall, although less invasive techniques with osteotomes have been used since 1994. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome of implants placed in the posterior maxilla with the osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE) technique without grafting. Materials and Methods: The study population comprised 36 consecutive patients in whom 53 implants were inserted with the OSFE technique. The indication for sinus floor elevation was that the bone height below the maxillary sinus was considered to be 10 mm or less. Results: The mean height of the alveolar process in the intended implant sites was 6.3 ± 0.3 mm, and the mean elevation of the sinus floor was 4.4 ± 0.2 mm. At the 1-year follow-up, two implants had been lost, both in edentulous patients. The remaining 51 implants inserted were in function, giving a 1-year cumulative survival rate of 96%. Implants used in single-tooth replacements and in partially edentulous cases had a 100% survival rate. The mean marginal bone level at the time of loading of the implants was 0.1 ± 0.04 mm below the reference point. One year later, the corresponding value was 0.5 ± 0.06 mm. The mean bone loss between the two examinations was 0.4 ± 0.05 mm. Conclusions: The OSFE technique, without bone grafts, was found to produce predictable results in the treatment of 36 patients with restricted bone volume in the posterior part of the maxilla. © 2007, Blackwell Publishing.

  • 9. Hallman, Mats
    et al.
    Mordenfeld, Arne
    Strandqvist, Tomas
    Lindgren, Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Holmquist, Per
    Benersättning vid implantatkirurgi2007In: Tandläkartidningen, ISSN 0039-6982, Vol. 99, p. 48-55Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Hellem, Sölve
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Engquist, Bo
    Bengtsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Dahlgren, Simon
    Implant treatment in combination with lateral augmentation of the alveolar process: A 3-year prospective study2004In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 5, p. 233-240Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Küseler, A
    et al.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Hurmerinta, K
    Soft tissue changes in patients with complete cleft lip and palate after maxillary distraction osteogenesis and orthognatic bimaxillary surgery2005In: 10 International congress on cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies,2005, 2005, p. 107-107Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12. Larsson, P.
    et al.
    List, T.
    Lundstroem, I.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Ohrbach, R.
    Reliability and validity of a Swedish version of the oral health impact profile.2003In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 82, p. 1873-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13. Larsson, P
    et al.
    List, T
    Lundström, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Ohrbach, R
    Reliability and validity of a Swedish version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-S)2004In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 147-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to translate the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) into Swedish and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Swedish version (OHIP-S). The CHIP is a 49-item, self-administered questionnaire divided into 7 different subscales. The original version in English was translated into Swedish, accompanied by back-translation into English, after which the Swedish version was revised. A total of 145 consecutive patients participated and answered a questionnaire. The patients comprised five clinically separate groups: temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) (n = 30), Primary Sjogren's Syndrome (SS) (n = 30), burning sensation and pain in the oral mucosa (oral mucosal pain, OMP) (n = 28), skeletal malocclusion (malocclusion) (n = 2 7), and healthy dental recall patients (Controls) (n = 30). The TMD group and the control group participated in a test-retest procedure. The internal reliability of each subscale was calculated with Cronbach's alpha and found to be high and to range from 0.83-0.91. The stability (test-retest) of the instrument, calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient, ranged from 0.87 to 0.98. The construct validity of OHIP-S was compared with subscales of the Symptom Check List (SCL-90) (rho 0.65) and the jaw Function Limitation Scale JFLS) (rho 0.76) and analyzed with Spearman's correlation coefficient. Convergent validity was evaluated by comparing CHIP with self-reported health using Spearman's correlation coefficient and was found to be acceptable (rho 0.61). In the evaluation of the discriminative ability of the instrument, significant differences were found in the total OHIP-S score between the controls and the other four groups (P < 0.001). We conclude that the reliability and validity of OHIP-S is excellent. The instrument can be recommended for assessing the impact of oral health on masticatory ability and psychosocial function.

  • 14.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Does teasing affect satisfaction with facial appearance in subjects with treated cleft lip and palate2005In: 10 International congress on cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies,2005, 2005, p. 120-120Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Evaluation of the eurocran yardstick for study model rating with and without lateral cephalogram2005In: 10 International congress on cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies,2005, 2005, p. 119-199Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Changes in occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with treated unilateral complete cleft lip and palate2005In: 10 International congress on cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies,2005, 2005, p. 119-119Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 17.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Changes in occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with treated unilateral complete cleft lip and palate: A follow-up study2004In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 385-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with repaired complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and to investigate the patterns of change in early adulthood. Study models from 39 patients (25 men, 14 women, mean age 24.7 years, range 20.2-29.3 years) with a diagnosis of complete UCLP taken at a follow-up examination were analysed and compared with the study models taken at baseline examination (mean age 19.1 years, range 16.0-20.6 years). Lip closure was carried out according to the Millard technique and palatal closure according to the Wardill-Kilner technique. All patients had received orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. The patients were divided into three groups according to the type of retention in the upper arch: no retention (n = 15), retention with a bonded twisted retainer (n = 13), an onlay or fixed bridge (n = 11). Occlusion was evaluated according to a scoring system. The maxillary dental arch dimensions were measured with a video imaging system. There was a significant deterioration in the total occlusal score during the follow-up period and this was larger on the cleft than on the non-cleft side. There were no significant differences in the anterior scores. A comparison of the transversal and sagittal maxillary arch dimensions revealed significant differences in all measurements during the follow-up interval. The reduction was largest for the maxillary second premolar width, followed by the first molar width. The overjet differed significantly between the registrations. The occlusal score and the maxillary arch dimensions were reduced in all of the three subgroups, but there were no differences between the groups.

  • 18.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östrup, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Facial appearance in adults who had cleft lip and palate treated in childhood2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 16-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sixty-eight adults (44 men and 24 women) with treated total cleft lip and palate were compared with a group of 66 adults (49 men and 17 women) without clefts, matched by sex and age. The outcome measures included a self-report questionnaire about body image, quality of life in general, health-related quality of life, somatisation, and depression. The group with clefts were also asked if they had further need of treatment. They reported significantly more dissatisfaction with their facial appearance (nose, lips, mouth, profile, and overall facial appearance) than the group without clefts. Satisfaction with facial appearance was significantly correlated with a better quality of life in both groups, and significantly correlated with a better health-related quality of life and a lower grade of somatisation in the group with clefts. Dissatisfaction with facial appearance was the most significant predictor of depression in both groups. A panel of four professionals from a cleft lip and palate treatment team judged the outcome of treatment in 64 of the subjects on colour slides. The professionals and the subjects with clefts were generally not very satisfied with the results of the surgical outcome. Thirty of the subjects with clefts (47%) wished to have more operations. The professional group recommended further operations in 38 of the cases (59%), in particular, rhinoplasties. We conclude that the subjects with treated clefts were not satisfied with their facial appearance, although they seem to be psychosocially well-adjusted to their disability.

  • 19.
    Mohlin, Bengt
    et al.
    Department of Orthodontics, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Faculty of Odontology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Susanna
    Department of Occlusion, The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pietila, Terttu
    Department of Orthodontics, Health Centre of Pori, Pori, Finland.
    Bondemark, Lars
    Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmo University, Malmo, Sweden.
    Brattstrom, Viveca
    Department of Orthodontics, National Health Service Uppland County Council, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hansen, Ken
    Department of Orthodontics, University of Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Holm, Anna-Karin
    Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    TMD in Relation to Malocclusion and Orthodontic Treatment2007In: Angle orthodontist, ISSN 0003-3219, E-ISSN 1945-7103, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 542-548Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this systematic literature review was to evaluate associations between different malocclusions, orthodontic treatment, and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD).

    Materials and Methods: This review was part of a project at the Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care focusing on malocclusion and orthodontic treatment from a health perspective. As a first step, the literature was searched in the Medline and Cochrane Library databases from 1966 to May 2003. A later update was made in January 2005. Human studies in English or in Scandinavian languages were included.

    Results: Associations between certain malocclusions and TMD were found in some studies, whereas the majority of the reviewed articles failed to identify significant and clinically important associations. TMD could not be correlated to any specific type of malocclusion, and there was no support for the belief that orthodontic treatment may cause TMD. Obvious individual variations in signs and symptoms of TMD over time according to some longitudinal studies further emphasized the difficulty in establishing malocclusion as a significant risk factor for TMD. A considerable reduction in signs and symptoms of TMD between the teenage period and young adulthood has been shown in some recent longitudinal studies.

    Conclusions: Associations between specific types of malocclusions and development of significant signs and symptoms of TMD could not be verified. There is still a need for longitudinal studies.

  • 20.
    Åstrand, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Engqusit, Bo
    Dahlgren, Simon
    Gröndal, Kerstin
    Engquist, Eva
    Feldmann, Hartmut
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Astra Tech and Brånemark system implants: A 5-year prospective study of marginal bone reactions2004In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 413-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the 5-year results of a comparative study between Astra Tech and Brånemark system implants. The aim was to compare the systems primarily with regard to bone level changes, and also with regard to other variables of interest. Sixty-six patients with edentulous jaws were included in the study. Randomisation schedules were used to allocate the patients to the two implant systems. 184 Astra Tech implants with a titanium-blasted surface and 187 Brånemark implants with a turned surface were used. The implants were inserted with a two-stage technique and the insertion followed the routines for the respective implant system. All patients were provided with full-arch fixed bridges. All patients were followed up with clinical and radiographic examinations from fixture insertion to the 5-year follow-up. The total mean bone level change in the upper jaw between fixture insertion and the 5-year examination was - 1.74±0.45 mm at the Astra implants and - 1.98±0.21 at the Brånemark implants. The corresponding values for the lower jaw were - 1.06±0.19 for Astra and - 1.38±0.17 for Brånemark. The major postoperative changes of the marginal bone level took place between fixture insertion and baseline. During this period, there was also a different pattern of bone remodelling between the implant systems. Between baseline (prosthesis connection) and the 5-year examination, the marginal bone level changes were small, with no difference between the implant systems. The implant stability was examined with the supraconstructions removed. At the 5-year examination, the survival rate for Astra Tech implants was 98.4% and for the Brånemark implants it was 94.6%. The difference was not statistically significant.

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