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  • 1.
    Alkaissi, Aidah
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Postoperative Symptoms After Gynaecological Surgery: How They Are Influenced by Prophylactic Antiemetics Sensory Stimulation (P6-Acupressure)2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Symptoms after surgery and anaesthesia influence the patient´s ability to resume daily activities. If postoperative symptoms are controlled rehabilitation may be accelerated. The aims of this dissertation were to identify disturbing symptoms reported by patients after gynaecological surgery, to investigate what effect prohylactic treatment with antiemetics has on these symptoms and whether or not sensory simulation of the P6-acupressure has an effect on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and motion sickness.

    Methods: Total 1138 women participated in three clinical trials (Studies I, II, III) and one experimental study (Study IV). A questionnaire investigating postoperative symptoms was constructed and validated. The questionnaire was used in a prospective, consecutive, doubleblind, randomised, multicentre, and controlled study to identify incidence, and intensity of postoperative symptoms and the effect of common antiemetics (droperidol and granisetron) (Study III). The patients were followed for 24 h. In two studies (I, II) P6-acupressure was compared (prospective, double-blind, ransomised, controlled) with placebo acupressure and a reference group where the effect on PONV was followed over 24 h. The effect of P6-acupressure and placebo acupressure on motion sickness induced by a nauseogenic motion challenge was studied (Study III).

    Results: A high incidence and severity of postoperative symptoms were found after gynaecological surgery in a group with a high risk (>30%) for PONV. Sixty-four per cent (107/165) of the patients experienced disturbing symptoms after surgery and 46 % (76/165) scored their symptoms as moderate to very severe. Fourty-eight per cent (79/165) had two or more symptoms. A higher incidence of symptoms were reported in the groups with prophylactic treatment, granisetron 74% (123/165) and droperidol 80% (133/165) compared to the control group 41% (69/165) (P <0.05). The relative risk reduction for PONV with granisetron or droperidol prophylaxis is 27% respective 22%. The relative risk increase for headache is 63% after granisetron, and 44% for difficulty with accommodation after droperidol. Less PONV was seen after P6-acupressure, 33% (44/135) compared to reference group 46% (63/136) (p = 0.019), number needed to treat (NNT) was 7 [95% confidence interval (CI) 4- 6]. When comparing laparoscopic and vaginal surgery (subgroup analysis) the main effect was in the vaginal group (day-case surgery), 36% (27/75) in the reference group to 27% (23/86) in the placebo group and to 20% (17/84) in the P6-acupressure group, (P = 0.017), NNT for the vaginal group was 6 [95% CI 3-18]. P6-acupressure increased time to nausea after a laboratory motion challenge and reduced the total number of symptoms reported (p <0.009).

    Conclusions: There is no clinical efficacy in the form of reduced postoperative symptoms after prophylactic antiemetics (droperidol and granisetron) in females with a high risk (>30%) for PONV undergoing gynaecological surgery. P6-acupressure reduces the incidence of PONV after gynaecological surgery in females with a high (>30%) risk for PONV. The effect seems to be most prominent after vaginal surgery. P6-acupressure increased tolerance to experimental nausogenic stimuli and reduced the total number of symptoms reported in females with a history of motion sickness.

    List of papers
    1. Effect and placebo effect of acupressure (P6) on nausea and vomiting after outpatientgynaecological surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect and placebo effect of acupressure (P6) on nausea and vomiting after outpatientgynaecological surgery
    1999 (English)In: Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 270-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Acupuncture and acupressure have previously been reported to possess antiemetic effect. We wanted to investigate the "true" and placebo effect of acupressure in prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty women undergoing outpatient minor gynaecological surgery were entered into a double-blind and randomised study. One group received acupressure with bilateral stimulation of P6 (A), a second group received bilateral placebo stimulation (P) and a third group received no acupressure wrist band and served as a reference group (R). PONV was evaluated as number of patients with complete response (no PONV), nausea only or vomiting. In addition, the need for rescue antiemetic medication and nausea after 24 h was registered. RESULTS: Complete response was obtained in 11, 11 and 9 patients in groups, A, P and R, respectively. Nine, 7 and 6 patients had nausea before discharge home, and 1, 1 and 8 patients were nauseated (8 vs 1 patient: P < 0.05) 24 h after operation in A, P and R groups, respectively. When compared to placebo acupressure (2 patients vomited and 5 needed rescue), significantly (P < 0.05) fewer needed rescue antiemetic medication after acupressure at P6 (no vomiting or rescue medication). When compared to the observation group (5 vomited and 4 needed rescue antiemetics), significantly fewer vomited after acupressure (P < 0.05) CONCLUSION: In patients undergoing brief gynaecological surgery, placebo effect of acupressure decreased nausea after 24 h but vomiting and need of rescue antiemetics was reduced only by acupressure with the correct P6 point stimulation.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13648 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-08-17
    2. P6 acupressure may relieve nausea and vomiting after gynecological surgery: an effectiveness study in 410 women
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>P6 acupressure may relieve nausea and vomiting after gynecological surgery: an effectiveness study in 410 women
    Show others...
    2002 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, ISSN 0832-610X, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 1034-1039Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of sensory stimulation of the P6 point on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) after gynecological surgery in the everyday clinical setting (effectiveness study).

    Methods: Four hundred and ten women undergoing general anesthesia for elective gynecological surgery were included in a prospective, consecutive, randomized, multicentre, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial with a reference group. One group was given bilateral P6 acupressure (n = 135), a second group similar pressure on bilateral non-acupressure points (n = 139), and a third group (n = 136) served as reference group. Nausea (scale 0–6), vomiting, pain, and satisfaction with the treatment were recorded. Primary outcome was complete response, i.e., no nausea, vomiting or rescue medication for 24 hr. Results were analyzed by applying logistic regression with indicators of treatments, type of operation and risk score for PONV as explanatory variables.

    Results: Complete response was more frequent in the P6 acupressure group than in the reference group (P = 0.0194) Conversely, the incidence of PONV was 46% in the reference group, 38% after pressure on a non-acupoint and 33% after P6 acupressure. The decrease from 46% to 33% was statistically significant. When considering vaginal cases separately, the decrease in PONV was from 36% to 20% (P = 0.0168). The corresponding decrease from 59% to 55% in the laparoscopic surgery group was not statistically significant.

    Conclusion: P6 acupressure is a non-invasive method that may have a place as prophylactic antiemetic therapy during gynecological surgery.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13649 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-08-17
    3. Disturbing postoperative symptoms are not reduced by prophylactic antiemetric treatment in patients at high risk for post-operative nausea and vomiting
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disturbing postoperative symptoms are not reduced by prophylactic antiemetric treatment in patients at high risk for post-operative nausea and vomiting
    Show others...
    2004 (English)In: Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 761-71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To give prophylactics or timely treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is the question. We compared the intensity and number of disturbing post-operative symptoms (i.e. pain, PONV, headache, fatigue, etc.) after prophylactic antiemetic treatment in a group of patients with >30% risk for post-operative vomiting. METHODS: Four hundred and ninety-five patients, from three hospitals, planned for gynaecological surgery were randomized double blind. They were given granisetron 3 mg, droperidol 1.25 mg or no prophylactic antiemetic. Post-operative symptoms were followed for 24 h using a questionnaire. Symptoms were analyzed both according to their intensity and in a dichotomous fashion. RESULTS: The intensity of different symptoms differed depending on whether droperidol, granisetron or no antiemetic had been given (P = 0.005) but the overall incidence of moderate to very severe symptoms was similar in all groups. No group fared better in general. The total number of symptoms was higher in the groups given prophylactic treatment (P < 0.05). The relative risk reduction for PONV with granisetron or droperidol prophylaxis was 27%[95% confidence interval (CI) 8-43] and 22% (2-38), respectively. The NNT (number needed to treat) for granisetron (0-24 h) was 7 and for droperidol 8. The NNH (number needed to harm) (0-24 h) for headache and visual disturbances was 6 and 13 (NS) for granisteron and, 50 (NS) and 6 for droperidol. CONCLUSION: The intensity of symptoms or the total number of disturbing symptoms did not decrease after prophylactic antiemetic treatment in a group of patients, but the profile of disturbing symptoms changed. The relevance of post-operative symptoms in terms of patients' well-being needs to be addressed.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13650 (URN)10.1111/j.0001-5172.2004.00403.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-10-14
    4. P6 acupressure increases tolerance to nausogenic motion stimulation in women with high risk for PONV
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>P6 acupressure increases tolerance to nausogenic motion stimulation in women with high risk for PONV
    2005 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, ISSN 1496-8975, Vol. 52, p. 703-709Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In a previous study we noticed that P6 acupressure decreased postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) more markedly after discharge. As motion sickness susceptibility is increased by, for example, opioids we hypothesized that P6 acu-pressure decreased PONV by decreasing motion sickness susceptibility. We studied time to nausea by a laboratory motion challenge in a group of volunteers, during P6 and placebo acupressure.

    Methods: 60 women with high and low susceptibilities for motion sickness participated in a randomized and double-blind study with an active P6 acupressure, placebo acupressure, and a control group (n = 20 in each group). The risk score for PONV was over 50%. The motion challenge was by eccentric rotation in a chair, blindfolded and with chin to chest movements of the head. The challenge was stopped when women reported moderate nausea. Symptoms were recorded.

    Results: Mean time to moderate nausea was longer in the P6 acu-pressure group compared to the control group. P6 acupressure = 352 (259–445), mean (95% confidence interval) in seconds, control = 151 (121–181) and placebo acupressure = 280 (161–340); (P = 0.006). No difference was found between P6 and placebo acupressure or placebo acupressure and control groups. Previous severity of motion sickness did not influence time to nausea (P = 0.107). The cumulative number of symptoms differed between the three groups (P < 0.05). Fewer symptoms were reported in the P6 acupressure compared to the control group P < 0.009. Overall, P6 acupressure was only marginally more effective than placebo acupressure on the forearms.

    Conclusion: In females with a history of motion sickness P6 acu-pressure increased tolerance to experimental nauseogenic stimuli, and reduced the total number of symptoms reported.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13651 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-08-17
  • 2.
    Alkaissi, Aidah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Evertsson, Karin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Johnsson, Vivi-Ann
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Västervik Hospital .
    Ofenbartl, Lilli
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Eksjö Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kalman, Sigga
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    P6 acupressure may relieve nausea and vomiting after gynecological surgery: an effectiveness study in 410 women2002In: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, ISSN 0832-610X, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 1034-1039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of sensory stimulation of the P6 point on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) after gynecological surgery in the everyday clinical setting (effectiveness study).

    Methods: Four hundred and ten women undergoing general anesthesia for elective gynecological surgery were included in a prospective, consecutive, randomized, multicentre, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial with a reference group. One group was given bilateral P6 acupressure (n = 135), a second group similar pressure on bilateral non-acupressure points (n = 139), and a third group (n = 136) served as reference group. Nausea (scale 0–6), vomiting, pain, and satisfaction with the treatment were recorded. Primary outcome was complete response, i.e., no nausea, vomiting or rescue medication for 24 hr. Results were analyzed by applying logistic regression with indicators of treatments, type of operation and risk score for PONV as explanatory variables.

    Results: Complete response was more frequent in the P6 acupressure group than in the reference group (P = 0.0194) Conversely, the incidence of PONV was 46% in the reference group, 38% after pressure on a non-acupoint and 33% after P6 acupressure. The decrease from 46% to 33% was statistically significant. When considering vaginal cases separately, the decrease in PONV was from 36% to 20% (P = 0.0168). The corresponding decrease from 59% to 55% in the laparoscopic surgery group was not statistically significant.

    Conclusion: P6 acupressure is a non-invasive method that may have a place as prophylactic antiemetic therapy during gynecological surgery.

  • 3.
    Alkaissi, Aidah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Gunnarsson, H.
    Department of Anesthesiology, Västervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Evertsson, Karin
    Department of Anesthesiology, Västervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Johnsson, V.
    Department of Anesthesiology, Västervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Ofenbartl, L.
    Department of Anesthesiology, Eksjö Hospital, Sweden.
    Kalman, Sigga
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Disturbing postoperative symptoms are not reduced by prophylactic antiemetric treatment in patients at high risk for post-operative nausea and vomiting2004In: Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 761-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To give prophylactics or timely treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is the question. We compared the intensity and number of disturbing post-operative symptoms (i.e. pain, PONV, headache, fatigue, etc.) after prophylactic antiemetic treatment in a group of patients with >30% risk for post-operative vomiting. METHODS: Four hundred and ninety-five patients, from three hospitals, planned for gynaecological surgery were randomized double blind. They were given granisetron 3 mg, droperidol 1.25 mg or no prophylactic antiemetic. Post-operative symptoms were followed for 24 h using a questionnaire. Symptoms were analyzed both according to their intensity and in a dichotomous fashion. RESULTS: The intensity of different symptoms differed depending on whether droperidol, granisetron or no antiemetic had been given (P = 0.005) but the overall incidence of moderate to very severe symptoms was similar in all groups. No group fared better in general. The total number of symptoms was higher in the groups given prophylactic treatment (P < 0.05). The relative risk reduction for PONV with granisetron or droperidol prophylaxis was 27%[95% confidence interval (CI) 8-43] and 22% (2-38), respectively. The NNT (number needed to treat) for granisetron (0-24 h) was 7 and for droperidol 8. The NNH (number needed to harm) (0-24 h) for headache and visual disturbances was 6 and 13 (NS) for granisteron and, 50 (NS) and 6 for droperidol. CONCLUSION: The intensity of symptoms or the total number of disturbing symptoms did not decrease after prophylactic antiemetic treatment in a group of patients, but the profile of disturbing symptoms changed. The relevance of post-operative symptoms in terms of patients' well-being needs to be addressed.

  • 4.
    Alkaissi, Aidah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Kalman, Sigga
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    P6 acupressure increases tolerance to nausogenic motion stimulation in women with high risk for PONV2005In: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, ISSN 1496-8975, Vol. 52, p. 703-709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In a previous study we noticed that P6 acupressure decreased postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) more markedly after discharge. As motion sickness susceptibility is increased by, for example, opioids we hypothesized that P6 acu-pressure decreased PONV by decreasing motion sickness susceptibility. We studied time to nausea by a laboratory motion challenge in a group of volunteers, during P6 and placebo acupressure.

    Methods: 60 women with high and low susceptibilities for motion sickness participated in a randomized and double-blind study with an active P6 acupressure, placebo acupressure, and a control group (n = 20 in each group). The risk score for PONV was over 50%. The motion challenge was by eccentric rotation in a chair, blindfolded and with chin to chest movements of the head. The challenge was stopped when women reported moderate nausea. Symptoms were recorded.

    Results: Mean time to moderate nausea was longer in the P6 acu-pressure group compared to the control group. P6 acupressure = 352 (259–445), mean (95% confidence interval) in seconds, control = 151 (121–181) and placebo acupressure = 280 (161–340); (P = 0.006). No difference was found between P6 and placebo acupressure or placebo acupressure and control groups. Previous severity of motion sickness did not influence time to nausea (P = 0.107). The cumulative number of symptoms differed between the three groups (P < 0.05). Fewer symptoms were reported in the P6 acupressure compared to the control group P < 0.009. Overall, P6 acupressure was only marginally more effective than placebo acupressure on the forearms.

    Conclusion: In females with a history of motion sickness P6 acu-pressure increased tolerance to experimental nauseogenic stimuli, and reduced the total number of symptoms reported.

  • 5.
    Alkaissi, Aidah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Stålnert, Monica
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalman, Sigga
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Effect and placebo effect of acupressure (P6) on nausea and vomiting after outpatientgynaecological surgery1999In: Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 270-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Acupuncture and acupressure have previously been reported to possess antiemetic effect. We wanted to investigate the "true" and placebo effect of acupressure in prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty women undergoing outpatient minor gynaecological surgery were entered into a double-blind and randomised study. One group received acupressure with bilateral stimulation of P6 (A), a second group received bilateral placebo stimulation (P) and a third group received no acupressure wrist band and served as a reference group (R). PONV was evaluated as number of patients with complete response (no PONV), nausea only or vomiting. In addition, the need for rescue antiemetic medication and nausea after 24 h was registered. RESULTS: Complete response was obtained in 11, 11 and 9 patients in groups, A, P and R, respectively. Nine, 7 and 6 patients had nausea before discharge home, and 1, 1 and 8 patients were nauseated (8 vs 1 patient: P < 0.05) 24 h after operation in A, P and R groups, respectively. When compared to placebo acupressure (2 patients vomited and 5 needed rescue), significantly (P < 0.05) fewer needed rescue antiemetic medication after acupressure at P6 (no vomiting or rescue medication). When compared to the observation group (5 vomited and 4 needed rescue antiemetics), significantly fewer vomited after acupressure (P < 0.05) CONCLUSION: In patients undergoing brief gynaecological surgery, placebo effect of acupressure decreased nausea after 24 h but vomiting and need of rescue antiemetics was reduced only by acupressure with the correct P6 point stimulation.

  • 6.
    Babic, Ankica
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Lönn, Urban
    Linköping Heart Center Linköping University.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hemopump treatment in patients with postcardiotomy heart failure1995In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 60, p. 1067-1071Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Läkarutbildningen i Linköpings förnyas. Problembaserat lärande, basvetenskap och folkhälsa förstärks2005In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 102, no 38, p. 2654-2658Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Björnström, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Turina, Dean
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology .
    Loverock, A.
    Department of Anaesthesiology Linköping University.
    Lundgren, S.
    Department of Anaesthesiology Linköping University.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine .
    Lindroth, Margaretha
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology .
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Characterisation of the signal transduction cascade caused by propofol in rat neurons: From the GABAA receptor to the cytoskeleton2008In: Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, ISSN 0867-5910, E-ISSN 1899-1505, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 617-632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The anaesthetic propofol interacts with the GABAA receptor, but its cellular signalling pathways are not fully understood. Propofol causes reorganisation of the actin cytoskeleton into ring structures in neurons. Is this reorganisation a specific effect of propofol as apposed to GABA, and which cellular pathways are involved? We used fluorescence-marked actin in cultured rat neurons to evaluate the percentage of actin rings caused by propofol or GABA in combination with rho, rho kinase (ROK), PI3-kinase or tyrosine kinase inhibitors, with or without the presence of extracellular calcium. Confocal microscopy was performed on propofol-stimulated cells and changes in actin between cellular compartments were studied with Western blot. Propofol (3 μg·ml-1), but not GABA (5 μM), caused transcellular actin ring formation, that was dependent on influx of extracellular calcium and blocked by rho, ROK, PI3-kinase or tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Propofol uses rho/ROK to translocate actin from the cytoskeleton to the membrane and its actin ring formation is dependent on an interaction site close to the GABA site on the GABAA receptor. GABA does not cause actin rings, implying that this is a specific effect of propofol.

  • 9.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Naidu-Sjöswärd, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Lundman, Lena
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Quantitative Assessment and Repeatability of Chlorine in Exhaled Breath Condensate: Comparison of Two Types of Condensators2005In: Respiration, ISSN 0025-7931, E-ISSN 1423-0356, Vol. 72, no 5, p. 529-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Airway condition is presumably reflected in epithelial lining fluid (ELF). Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has been used as a surrogate marker of the composition of ELF.

    Objectives: This study aimed at assessing the technical repeatability of chlorine measurements in EBC and comparing two separate condensators (Ecoscreen® and R Tube) regarding recovery and repeatability. Furthermore, the association between condensate recoveries and variations in the airway status were scrutinized.

    Methods: EBC was collected using two condensators from 10 healthy volunteers. In addition, 13 asthmatic patients produced EBC with or without an added resistance of 5 cm H2O (Res5), applied to the outflow tract of Ecoscreen. All tests were done in random order. Chlorine levels (analyzed by a coulometric technique) in EBC served as a tool for investigation.

    Results: Chlorine was measurable in all samples. The coefficient of repeatability of chlorine measurements was <10%. Chlorine levels were higher in EBC obtained from R Tube (p < 0.001), and differences in recoveries and variability in chlorine levels were presumably related to technical differences in the condensators and not to the repeatability of chlorine measurements per se. Air-flow-dependent chlorine levels were obtained from healthy volunteers. Application of Res5, recruiting additional alveoli, resulted in increased recovery of the EBC volume, but not of chlorine, from those that had the most pronounced airway obstruction (p = 0.05).

    Conclusion: We conclude that by employing a sensitive analysis technique, chlorine is repeatedly measurable in EBC. We suggest that the bulk of chlorine in EBC originates from large airways and not from the alveolar area. Both condensators were comparable regarding repeatability but differed regarding chlorine recover

  • 10.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Söderström, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Naidu Sjöswärd, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Chlorine in Breath Condensate: A Measure of Airway Affection in Pollinosis?2007In: Respiration, ISSN 0025-7931, E-ISSN 1423-0356, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 184-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Infiltration of inflammatory cells in bronchial mucosa and glandular hypersecretion are hallmarks of asthma. It has been postulated that exhaled breath condensate (EBC) mirrors events in epithelial lining fluid of airways, such as presence of local inflammation as well as glandular hypersecretion. It is also well known that eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LT) are released by circulating inflammatory cells when triggered by antigen stimulation in asthma patients.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether chlorine and/or cys-LT in EBC would reflect changes of exposure of airborne pollen in patients with asthma.

    Methods: EBC and serum were collected from 23 patients with allergic asthma during a pollen season and repeated 5 months later during a period with no aeroallergens. Chlorine was measured by means of a sensitive coulometric technique and cys-LT by an EIA technique. Serum ECP was measured and lung function tests were performed and symptoms noted during both occasions.

    Results: Significantly higher concentrations of chlorine in EBC (p = 0.007) and ECP in serum (p = 0.003) were found during the pollen season compared to post-season. Chlorine levels tended to be higher in patients who reported of chest symptoms compared to those who denied symptoms during the pollen season (p = 0.06). Areas under the receiver-operated characteristic curves (AUCROC) were compared and similar discriminative power to identify exacerbations of asthma was recorded by chlorine in EBC (range 0.67-0.78) and ECP in serum (range 0.64-0.78).

    Conclusion: It is concluded that chlorine in EBC and ECP in serum decreased significantly post-season, and this is suggested to mirror the decrement in airborne antigen. It is furthermore proposed that chlorine in EBC and ECP in serum tend to have a similar capacity to identify seasonal variations in airborne pollen in patients with asthma.

  • 11.
    Davidsson, Antette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Naidu Sjöswärd, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Efficacy of Two Breath Condensers: An in Vitro Comparative Study2008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Examination of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has been suggested to give information about inflammatory airway diseases.

    The aim of the present study was to compare efficacy and variability in gain of two commercially available condensers, ECoScreen® [E] and RTube [R] in an in vitro experimental set up.

    Methods: Test-fluids containing myeloperoxidase (MPO) or human neutrophil lipocalin (HNL) in addition to saline and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were nebulized. The aerosol was intermittently driven forward by a servoventilator fed by room tempered air, to reach the condenser. Two different concentrations of saline were also dispensed via the same equipment. Analyses of MPO, HNL and chlorine were done by means of ELISA, RIA or a modified adsorbed organic halogen technique (AOX), respectively.

    Results: Significantly higher volumes were recovered by ECoScreen than by RTube during 20-minutes experiments (p<0.001) but not in ten-minute experiments (p>0.05). Based on changes of source concentrations in the nebulizer cup, resulting from nebulization per se, recoveries of HNL tended to be higher by E than by R (p<0.05). In contrast there were no significant differences between condensers in recoveries of MPO or chlorine. The spread of data was wide regarding all tested compounds and of similar degree for both condensers, despite acceptable inter-assay coefficients of variations of all analyses.

    Conclusion: Condensing efficacy tended to be larger using E than R but there was a large variability in results from both condensers. Individual biomolecules may have their specific characteristics, and this must be taken into consideration when planning studies on EBC. We suggest that further methodological studies of the EBC method are warranted.

  • 12.
    Eintrei, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Revising a medical PBL-curriculum - the Linköping strategy2004In: Association for Medical Education in Europe,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13. Ekman, A
    et al.
    Lindholm, ML
    Lennmarken, Claes
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sandin, R
    Reduction in the incidence of awareness using BIS monitoring2004In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Explicit recall (ER) is evident in approximately 0.2% of patients given general anaesthesia including muscle relaxants. This prospective study was performed to evaluate if cerebral monitoring using BIS to guide the conduction of anaesthesia could reduce this incidence significantly. Patients and methods: A prospective cohort of 4945 consecutive surgical patients requiring muscle relaxants and/or intubation were monitored with BIS and subsequently interviewed for ER on three occasions. BIS values between 40 and 60 were recommended. The results from the BIS-monitored group of patients was compared with a historical group of 7826 similar cases in a previous study when no cerebral monitoring was used. Results: Two patients in the BIS-monitored group, 0.04%, had ER as compared with 0.18% in the control group (P < 0.038). Both BIS-monitored patients with ER were aware during intubation when they had high BIS values (>60) for 4 min and more than 10 min, respectively. However, periods with high BIS = 4 min were also evident in other patients with no ER. Episodes with high BIS, 4 min or more, were found in 19% of the monitored patients during induction, and in 8% of cases during maintenance. Conclusions: The use of BIS monitoring during general anaesthesia requiring endotracheal intubation and/or muscle relaxants was associated with a significantly reduced incidence of awareness as compared with a historical control population.

  • 14.
    Enlund, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Johansson, M
    Vegfors, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Photoplethysmography (PPG) reflexts changes in blood flow at different vascular levels1997In: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering,1997, 1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Farnebo, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Samuelsson, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Henriksson, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol and Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlander, Lars-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Urea clearance: a new method to register local changes in blood flow in rat skeletal muscle based on microdialysis2010In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 57-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pgreater thanIncreasing evidence suggests that local blood flow should be monitored during microdialysis (MD) as the recovery of analytes is affected by local blood flow. At present ethanol clearance is the standard technique for this purpose, but it is not functional at very low perfusion velocities. Here, we introduce a technique for MD whereby local tissue blood flow is recorded by the use of urea clearance (changes inflow/outflow concentration), in conjunction with measurements of tissue metabolism (glucose, lactate and puruvate). MD probes were inserted into the gracilis muscle of 15 rats and perfused with a medium containing urea (20 mmol l-1). Changes in muscle blood flow were made by addition of noradrenaline (5 mu g ml-1) to the perfusion medium at two perfusion velocities (0 center dot 6 and 0 center dot 4 mu l min-1). The clearance of urea from the perfusion medium was then calculated and examined in relation to the dose of noradrenaline and to the coexisting changes in extracellular metabolites. The results showed reproducible and dose-dependent changes in blood flow that were induced by noradrenaline. These were characterized by dose-dependent changes in the urea clearance as well as blood-flow-specific changes in the MD metabolic markers (reduction in glucose and increase in lactate). The sensitivity for blood flow changes as assessed by urea clearance (MD) was increased at 0 center dot 4 compared with the 0 center dot 6 mu l min-1 perfusion speed. The results indicate that inclusion of urea to the perfusion medium may be used to monitor changes in skeletal muscle blood flow at low perfusion velocities and in parallel assess metabolic variables with a high recovery (greater than 90%).

  • 16.
    Good, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Peterson, E
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Lisander, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Tranexamic acid decreases external blood loss but not hidden blood loss in total knee replacement2003In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 90, no 5, p. 596-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often carried out using a tourniquet and shed blood is collected in drains. Tranexamic acid decreases the external blood loss. Some blood loss may be concealed, and the overall effect of tranexamic acid on the haemoglobin (Hb) balance is not known. Methods. Patients with osteoarthrosis had unilateral cemented TKA using spinal anaesthesia. In a double-blind fashion, they received either placebo (n=24) or tranexamic acid 10 mg kg-1 (n=27) i.v. just before tourniquet release and 3 h later. The decrease in circulating Hb on the fifth day after surgery, after correction for Hb transfused, was used to calculate the loss of Hb in grams. This value was then expressed as ml of blood loss. Results. The groups had similar characteristics. The median volume of drainage fluid after placebo was 845 (interquartile range 523-990) ml and after tranexamic acid was 385 (331-586) ml (P<0.001). Placebo patients received 2 (0-2) units and tranexamic acid patients 0 (0-0) units of packed red cells (P<0.001). The estimated blood loss was 1426 (1135-1977) ml and 1045 (792-1292) ml, respectively (P<0.001). The hidden loss of blood (calculated as loss minus drainage volume) was 618 (330-1347) ml and 524 (330-9620) ml, respectively (P=0.41). Two patients in each group developed deep vein thrombosis. Conclusions. Tranexamic acid decreased total blood loss by nearly 30%, drainage volume by ~50% and drastically reduced transfusion. However, concealed loss was only marginally influenced by tranexamic acid and was at least as large as the drainage volume.

  • 17.
    Gårdelöf, Bror
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Att lindra och trösta2004In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 101, p. 3534-3535Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Gårdelöf, Bror
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Frågan om chkelhjälm inte enbart den resandes ensak2004In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 26-27, p. 2294-2294Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Gårdelöf, Bror
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    I huvudet på Göran Greider2004In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 101, p. 3947-3947Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Gårdelöf, Bror
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    När kan vi avsluta försök med hjärt-lungräddning?2004In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 40, p. 3093-3094Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Gårdelöf, Bror
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Svarte Petter i den svenska sjukvården.2003In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 100, p. 2464-2464Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Gårdelöf, Bror
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Vasopressi9n förstahandspreparat vid hjärtstopp?2004In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 35, p. 2631-2631Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Asp, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Maller, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    A new program for better clinical supervision of students. A joint project at the Halsouniversitet and county council in Ostergotland2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, p. 649-654Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Asp, Malin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Maller, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Ny handlingsplan för bättre klinisk handledning av studenter.2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, p. 649-654Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

        

  • 25.
    Kalman, Sigga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Ekbäck, Gustav
    Örebro.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Metcalf, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Ranklev Twetman, Eva
    Anestesiläkarnas arbetsmiljö kan förbättras. Slutrapport från ett arbetsmiljöprojekt2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, p. 1603-1610Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Kalman, Sigga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Linderfalk, C
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Lisander, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology.
    Differential effect on vasodilatation and pain after intradermal capsaicin in humans during decay of intravenous regional anesthesia with mepivacaine1998In: Regional anesthesia and pain medicine, ISSN 1098-7339, E-ISSN 1532-8651, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 402-408Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Lennmarken, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sandin, R
    Neuromonitoring for awareness during surgery2004In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 363, no 9423, p. 1747-1748Other (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Lennmarken, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sandin, R
    Neuromonitoring for awareness during surgery2004In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 29, p. 1747-1748Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Lennmarken, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Psychological consequences of awareness and their treatment2007In: Best Practice & Research Clinical Anaesthesiology, ISSN 1521-6896, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 357-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intraoperative awareness with subsequent recall is a rare but serious complication with an incidence of 0.1-0.2%. In approximately one third of the patients who have experienced awareness, late severe psychiatric sequelae may develop. The psychiatric symptoms in these patients fulfil the diagnostic criteria for post traumatic stress disorder. To prevent awareness as a negative outcome after anaesthesia, a thorough perioperative management of anaesthesia is necessary. The definite risk for post traumatic stress disorder following awareness indicates the necessity of postoperative clinical routines to identify awareness patients. The problem must be acknowledged. Professional psychiatric assessment and follow up should constitute standard practice. The treatments of choice are Eye Movement Desensitisation Reprocessing and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 30.
    Lennmarken, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Vegfors, Magnus
    Perioperativ övervakning2000In: Anestesi / [ed] Matts Halldin; Sten Lindahl, Stockholm: Liber , 2000, 1, p. 341-351Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31. Liffner, G
    et al.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Reske, A
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Inhalation injury assessed by score does not contribute to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome in burn victims2005In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To establish the incidence, mortality, and time of onset of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in relation to extent of burn and inhalation injury in patients who required mechanical ventilation. Design: Data about burn and inhalation injury were recorded prospectively whereas ARDS and multiple organ dysfunction were assessed by review of patient charts. Setting: National burn intensive care unit at Linköping University Hospital, Sweden (a tertiary referral hospital). Patients: Between 1993 and 1999, we studied all patients with thermal injury (n = 553) who required mechanical ventilation for more than two days (n = 91). Measurements and results: Out of the thirty-six burn victims who developed ARDS (40%), 25 (70%) did so early post burn (in less than 6 days). Patients with ARDS had higher multiple organ dysfunction scores (mean 10.5) than those who did not develop ARDS (mean 5.6) (p < 0.01). The probable presence of inhalation injury as assessed by an inhalation lung injury score (ILIS) did not contribute to the development of ARDS. Mortality tended to be higher in patients who developed ARDS (14%) compared to those who did not (6%, p = 0.2). Conclusions: In our burn patients the incidence of ARDS was high whereas mortality was low. We found no association between inhalation injury as assessed using the ILIS and development of ARDS. Our data support a multi-factorial origin of ARDS in burn victims as a part of a multiple organ failure event. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 32.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Lennmarken, Claes
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Vegfors, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Pulse oximetry-clinical implications and recent technical developments1995In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 39, p. 279-287Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Vegfors, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Lennmarken, Claes
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Pulse oximeter signal at various blood flow conditions in an In vitro model1995In: Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, Vol. 33, p. 87-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Lindfors, Sara
    et al.
    Alexandersson, Kristina
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Gotthard, Ricci
    Nordström, Louise
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Stressande faktorer bland disputerade specialistläkare anställda på ett universitetssjukhus2005Report (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Lindfors, Sara
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Stress factors affecting academic physicians at a university hospital.2009In: Work (Reading, Mass.), ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 305-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research is limited regarding occupational stress in academic physicians; professionals whose work situation includes the three areas of clinical practice, research, and teaching. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge of factors experienced as stressful by academic physicians employed by a university hospital. A questionnaire assessing the frequency and intensity of 36 potentially stressful factors was sent to all 157 academic physicians who were employed at the Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. The response rate was 77%. Both a high frequency and intensity of stress was experienced by 66% of the academic physicians in relation to "time pressure" and by almost 50% in connection with both "find time for research" and having "conflict of interest between different work assignments". Moreover, physicians in the higher age group and those who had attained a higher academic position experienced less stress. The female participants experienced more stress than the males due to gender-related problems and to variables associated with relationships at work. More knowledge is needed to determine the consequences of this finding and to identify coping strategies used for handling such stress.

  • 36.
    Lisander, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Johansson, T
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Do we know all about hypothermia and are studies on the subject unethical?2003In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 851-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Lönn, Urban
    et al.
    Thoraxklin Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping.
    Wulff, J
    Keck, K-Y
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Flow characteristics of the hemopump: An experimental in Vitro study1997In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 162-166Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Naidu-Sjöswärd, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Mounira, H
    Davidsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Single-isomer R-salbutamol is not superior to racemate regarding protection for bronchial hyperresponsiveness2004In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 98, no 10, p. 990-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bronchial hyper-reactivity (BHR) has been suggested to follow cessation of regular medication with racemic salbutamol. This study aimed at investigating the effects from medication with R,S- and R-salbutamol on bronchial response to provocation with isocapnic hyperventilation of cold air (IHCA). Twenty-six patients with mild to moderate asthma were enrolled in a double-blind, randomised, cross-over study. Bronchial response to provocation was measured before and after 1 week's medication. Doses of 0.63 mg R-salbutamol or 1.25 mg R/S-salbutamol were inhaled three times daily during medication-weeks and a wash-out week intervened. Tests were performed 6 h after the last dose of test drug. Impulse oscillometry and forced expiratory volume during one second were methods used to identify bronchial response to provocation. Two patients withdrew from the investigation due to side-effects, one from R- the other from R,S-salbutamol. Comparable resting bronchial conditions were indicated by differences in baseline lung function values of <2% between study days. No statistically significant medication-dependent differences in BHR could be demonstrated between treatment groups. However, 15 patients exhibited higher (P=0.03) post-treatment BHR after pure R-salbutamol than after R,S-salbutamol. Furthermore, plasma concentrations of R-salbutamol tended to be lower (P=0.08) after medication with R- than after R,S-salbutamol despite equal doses of R-salbutamol given during the two separate treatment periods. We also found that considerable amounts of S-salbutamol were retrieved in plasma after medication with pure R-salbutamol. We conclude that we were unable to demonstrate favourable effects of R-salbutamol over R,S-salbutamol regarding response to provocation with IHCA after regular medication of 1 week's duration.

  • 39.
    Orman, J
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Westerdahl, E
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Chest physiotherapy with positive expiratory pressure breathing after abdominal and thoracic surgery: a systematic review2010In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 261-267Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A variety of chest physiotherapy techniques are used following abdominal and thoracic surgery to prevent or reduce post-operative complications. Breathing techniques with a positive expiratory pressure (PEP) are used to increase airway pressure and improve pulmonary function. No systematic review of the effects of PEP in surgery patients has been performed previously. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effect of PEP breathing after an open upper abdominal or thoracic surgery. A literature search of randomised-controlled trials (RCT) was performed in five databases. The trials included were systematically reviewed by two independent observers and critically assessed for methodological quality. We selected six RCT evaluating the PEP technique performed with a mechanical device in spontaneously breathing adult patients after abdominal or thoracic surgery via thoracotomy. The methodological quality score varied between 4 and 6 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database score. The studies were published between 1979 and 1993. Only one of the included trials showed any positive effects of PEP compared to other breathing techniques. Today, there is scarce scientific evidence that PEP treatment is better than other physiotherapy breathing techniques in patients undergoing abdominal or thoracic surgery. There is a lack of studies investigating the effect of PEP over placebo or no physiotherapy treatment.

  • 40.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Juhas, M.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sjolander, A.
    Sjölander, A., Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    The effect of propofol on actin, ERK-1/2 and GABAA receptor content in neurones2007In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 51, no 9, p. 1184-1189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Interaction with the ?-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA AR) complex is recognized as an important component of the mechanism of many anaesthetic agents, including propofol. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of propofol on GABAAR, to determine whether exposure of neurones to propofol influences the localization of GABA AR within the cell and to look for cytoskeletal changes that may be connected with activation, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Methods: Primary cortical cell cultures from rat, with and without pre-incubation with the GABAAR antagonist bicuculline, were exposed to propofol. The cells were lysed and separated into membrane and cytosolic fractions. Immunoblot analyses of filamentous actin (F-actin), the GABA A ß2-subunit receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK-1/2) were performed. Results: Propofol triggers an increase in GABAAR, actin content and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation in the cytosolic fraction. In the membrane fraction, there is a decrease in GABAA ß2-subunit content and an increase in both actin content and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation. The GABAAR antagonist bicuculline blocks the propofol-induced changes in F-actin, ERK and GABA A ß2-subunit content, and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation. Conclusion: We believe that propofol triggers a dose-dependent internalization of the GABAA ß2-subunit. The increase in internal GABAA ß2-subunit content exhibits a close relationship to actin polymerization and to an increase in ERK-1/2 activation. Actin contributes to the internalization sequestering of the GABAA ß2-subunit. © 2007 Acta Anaesthesiol Scand.

  • 41.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Massoumi, R.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sjolander, A.
    Sjölander, A., Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Reorganization of actin in neurons after propofol exposure2001In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 1215-1220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It has previously been shown that propofol in clinically relevant concentrations induces a calcium-dependent conformational change in the cytoskeleton. The aim of this study was to further clarify the effect of propofol on the actin cytoskeleton and to determine if this conformational change is mediated by the interaction between the GABAA-receptor and propofol. Methods: Primary cultured cortical neurons from newborn rats were treated with propofol 3 µg·ml-1 in a time-response titration, with and without preincubation with the GABAA-receptor antagonist, bicuculline. Actin-protein content was detected by Western blot analysis and the cellular content of F-actin measured by a spectrophotometric technique. Results: Propofol triggers a relatively slow statistically significant increase in the intracellular F-actin content, maximum after 20-min incubation (160%±16.3) (mean±SEM) P

  • 42.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Anskär, S
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engdahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fagerström, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Per
    Anestesikliniken, Ryhov.
    Fredriksson, M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Troponin T-values provide long-term prognosis in elderly patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.2004In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1071-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of elevated postoperative Troponin T (TnT) levels in an elderly population undergoing non-cardiac surgery. METHODS: Five hundred and forty-six consecutive patients aged 70 years or older undergoing non-cardiac surgery of >30-min duration were enrolled in this prospective, observational study. A postoperative TnT measurement was obtained on the 5th to 7th postoperative day. Troponin T values greater than 0.02 ng ml(-1) were considered positive. Patients were followed over a 1-year period, and mortality and non-fatal cardiac events (acute myocardial infarction and coronary interventions) were recorded. RESULTS: Troponin T concentrations greater than 0.02 ng ml(-1) were detected in 53 of the study subjects (9.7%). Eleven per cent of the patients with elevated TnT had electrocardiographic or clinical signs of myocardial ischemia. One year after surgery, 17 (32%) of the patients with abnormal TnT concentrations had died. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis adjusting for baseline and perioperative data, a TnT value >0.02 ng ml(-1) was an independent correlate of the mortality adjusted hazard ratio (HR): 14.9 (95% CI 3.7-60.3). Other independent predictors of death were tachycardia (HR, 14.9 95% CI 3.45-64.8), ASA 4 (HR, 8.1 95% CI 1.3-50.0), reoperation (HR, 6.4 95% CI 1.1-36.9), and use of diuretics (HR, 4.2 95% CI 1.3-13.8). CONCLUSION: We conclude that elevated TnT levels in the postoperative period confer a 15-fold increase in mortality during the first year after surgery. Our findings also provide evidence that silent myocardial ischemia is common in an elderly population. Routine perioperative surveillance for TnT might therefore be of use in detecting patients at an increased risk of mortality during the first postoperative year.

  • 43.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sorliden, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anskär, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide is a predictor of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing acute hip fracture surgery2009In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, ISSN 0007-0912, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 206-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the incidence of elevated N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and its relation to outcome defined as perioperative adverse cardiac events and all-cause mortality in high-risk patients undergoing non-elective surgery for hip fracture. A cohort of patients with hip fractures were extracted from a prospective observational study of high-risk patients (ASA class III or IV) undergoing emergency surgery. NT-proBNP and troponin I were measured before operation. An NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) was set as the cut-off level for significance. Perioperative adverse cardiac events and 30 day and 3 month mortality were recorded. Sixty-nine subjects were included. Thirty-four subjects (49%) had an NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) before surgery. Thirty-four subjects (49%) had a perioperative adverse cardiac event. Of these, 22 subjects (65%) had NT-proBNP above the diagnostic threshold compared with 12 subjects (34%) who had an NT-proBNP below the diagnostic threshold (P=0.01). Preoperative NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) [odds ratio (OR) 3.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-8.9] and congestive heart failure (OR 3.0; 95% CI 1.0-9.0) were independent predictors of perioperative adverse cardiac events. A total of eight subjects (12%) died within 30 days after operation. There is a high incidence of elevated NT-proBNP in subjects undergoing non-elective hip fracture surgery. Preoperative NT-proBNP is a valuable predictor of cardiac complications in the perioperative period.

  • 44.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sorliden, M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anskär, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gupta, Anil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Predictors of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing emergency surgery2009In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 986-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of myocardial damage and left ventricular myocardial dysfunction and their influence on outcome in high-risk patients undergoing non-elective surgery.

    Methods: In this prospective observational study, 211 patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists classification III or IV undergoing emergent or urgent surgery were included. Troponin I (TnI) was measured pre-operatively, 12 and 48 h post-operatively. Pre-operative N-terminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), as a marker for left ventricular systolic dysfunction, was analyzed. The diagnostic thresholds were set to TnI andgt; 0.06 mu g/l and NT-proBNP andgt; 1800 pg/ml, respectively. Post-operative major adverse cardiac events (MACE), 30-day and 3-months mortality were recorded.

    Results: Elevated TnI levels were detected in 33% of the patients post-operatively. A TnI elevation increased the risk of MACE (35% vs. 3% in patients with normal TnI levels, P andlt; 0.001) and 30-day mortality (23% vs. 7%, P=0.003). Increased concentrations of NT-proBNP were seen in 59% of the patients. Elevated NT-proBNP was an independent predictor of myocardial damage post-operatively, odds ratio, 6.2 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1-18.0] and resulted in an increased risk of MACE (21% vs. 2.5% in patients with NT-proBNP andlt; 1800 pg/ml, P andlt; 0.001).

    Conclusion: Myocardial damage is common in a high-risk population undergoing unscheduled surgery. These results suggest a close correlation between myocardial damage in the post-operative period and increased concentration of NT-proBNP before surgery. The combinations of TnI and NT-proBNP are reliable markers for monitoring patients at risk in the peri-operative period as well as useful tools in our risk assessment pre-operatively in emergency surgery.

  • 45. Reske, A
    et al.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Morales, Olallo
    Seiwerts, M
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Computed tomography - A possible aid in the diagnosis of smoke inhalation injury?2005In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 257-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhalation injury is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in burn victims and can trigger acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (1-3). Early diagnosis and treatment of inhalation injury are important, but a major problem in planning treatment and evaluating the prognosis has been the lack of consensus about diagnostic criteria (4). Chest radiographs on admission are often non-specific (5, 6), but indicators include indoor fires, facial burns, bronchoscopic findings of soot in the airways, and detection of carbon monoxide or cyanide in the blood (7). Changes in the lungs may be detected by bronchoscopy with biopsy, xenon imaging, or measurement of pulmonary extracellular fluid (4, 5, 8). These methods have, however, been associated with low sensitivity and specificity, as exemplified by the 50% predictive value in the study of Masanes et al. (8). Computed tomographs (CTs) are better than normal chest radiographs in the detection of other pulmonary lesions such as pulmonary contusion (9, 10). The importance of CT scans in patients with ARDS has been reviewed recently (9), but unfortunately there has been no experience of CT in patients with smoke inhalation injury. To our knowledge, there are only two animal studies reporting that smoke inhalation injury can be detected by CT (4, 11), specific changes in human CT scans have not yet been described. Therefore, confronted with a patient with severe respiratory failure after a burn who from the history and physical examination showed the classic risk factors for inhalation injury, we decided to request a CT. © Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 49 (2005).

  • 46.
    Reske, A.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Seiwerts, M.
    Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 20, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.
    Reske, A.
    Surgical Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 20, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.
    Gottschaldt, U.
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 20, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.
    Schreiter, D.
    Surgical Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 20, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.
    Early recovery from post-traumatic acute respiratory distress syndrome2006In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 376-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To present and discuss the rationale and possible benefits of timely alveolar recruitment in early post-traumatic acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods: A 17-year-old patient who had sustained blunt thoracic trauma presented with severe hypoxaemia on admission and whole body computed tomography showed pulmonary contusion and substantial bilateral atelectasis. Oxygenation and lung mechanics did not improve with low tidal volume ventilation using high positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEPs). Therefore we applied an alveolar recruitment manoeuvre 7 h after admission. After alveolar recruitment, PEEP was titrated to the lowest level which prevented alveolar derecruitment. Results: Oxygenation and lung compliance improved rapidly and aeration of the entire lung was confirmed by computed tomography 27 h after the recruitment manoeuvre. The patient recovered completely and was discharged after 17 days. Conclusion: Although robust evidence is stilllacking, several lines of evidence suggest potential benefits of timely alveolar recruitment. Patients with early post-traumatic respiratory failure seem to most readily respond to alveolar recruitment manoeuvres and could thus benefit from the gain in functional lung volume and oxygenation. Moreover the probability of ventilator associated complications may be reduced. © 2006 The Authors Journal compilation 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 47.
    Ridderstolpe, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gill, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Åhlfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Ruthberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Superficial and deep sternal wound complications: Incidence, risk factors and mortality2001In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 1168-1175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Sternal wound complications often have a late onset and are detected after patients are discharged from the hospital. In an effort to catch all sternal wound complications, different postdischarge surveillance methods have to be used. Together with this long-term follow-up an analysis of risk factors may help to identify patients at risk and can lead to more effective preventive and control measures.

    Methods: This retrospective study of 3008 adult patients who underwent consecutive cardiac surgery from January 1996 through September 1999 at Link÷ping University Hospital, Sweden, evaluated 42 potential risk factors by univariate analysis followed by backward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis.

    Results: Two-thirds of the 291 (9.7%) sternal wound complications that occurred were identified after discharge. Of the 291 patients, 47 (1.6%) had deep sternal infections, 50 (1.7%) had postoperative mediastinitis, and 194 (6.4%) had superficial sternal wound complications. Twenty-three variables were selected by univariate analysis (P<0.15) and included in a multivariate analysis where eight variables emerged as significant (P<0.05). Preoperative risk factors for deep sternal infections/mediastinitis were obesity, insulin-dependent diabetes, smoking, peripheral vascular disease, and high New York Heart Association score. An intraoperative risk factor was bilateral use of internal mammary arteries, and a postoperative risk factor was prolonged ventilator support. Risk factors for superficial sternal wound complications were obesity, and an age of

  • 48.
    Samuelsson, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring in severe burn patients [11]2007Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 49.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Förgiftningar2005In: Intensivvård / [ed] Anders Larsson och Sten Rubertsson, Sverige: Liber AB , 2005, 1, p. -696Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Intensivvård kommer nu i en andra, grundligt omarbetad och utökad upplaga. Den bygger på samma framgångsrika koncept som första upplagan från 2005 med inledande kapitel om basala mekanismer följt av kapitel som tar upp modern diagnostik och behandling av akut intensivvårdskrävande organsvikt. Boken blandar konkreta råd vid specifika sjukdomstillstånd med beskrivningar av bakomliggande patofysiologi och kan därför användas både "bedside" och som en informationskälla om modern intensivvård. Varje kapitel hänvisar till aktuella referenser för vidare läsning.Läs merBoken riktar sig till läkare och sjuksköterskor under utbildning i intensivvård, men kan med fördel också användas under grundutbildningen. Den är även värdefull för färdiga specialister inom specialiteten och övriga läkare och sjuksköterskor som vill inhämta aktuell kunskap om modern intensivvård. Intensivvård är skriven av ledande experter från Skandinavien som alla arbetar inom sina specialområden kliniskt eller forskningsmässigt med intensivvård.

  • 50.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Wackenfors, Angelica
    Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery Linköpings Universitet.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Serotonin kinetics in patients with burn injuries: A comparison between the local and systemic responses measured by microdialysis-A pilot study2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 617-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate serotonin (5HT) locally in burned and uninjured skin (intracutaneous) by microdialysis, and simultaneously record urinary and blood values in the same subjects. For comparison, serotonin values were also measured in skin of healthy controls. Design and setting: An experimental study in burned patients with of more than 25% TBSA (total burn surface area) % in an 8-bed tertiary burns unit, serving about 3.5 million persons. Patients and methods: Six subjects with a median TBSA% of 59% (range 33.5-90), and five healthy controls were examined by intracutaneous microdialysis of the skin. Results: 5HT was increased in burned patients, compared with controls. This increase was tenfold in skin and was noted both in uninjured and burned skin. The highest values were recorded on day 1 (median 16.1 nmol in uninjured and 9.5 nmol in burned skin) and day 2 (15.6 nmol in uninjured and 13.4 nmol in burned skin). A rapid reduction was noted on day 3 (4.9 nmol in uninjured and 3.8 nmol in burned skin). The corresponding value for control subjects was 1.3 nmol. The 5HT in blood was twice normal on day 2, and gradually reduced on days 3 and 4 (3189, 3035 and 2573 nmol, respectively). Urinary 5HT concentrations were increased only on day 2 at 1755 nmol and thereafter returned to the normal range on days 3 and 4 (1248 and 1344 nmol, respectively). Conclusions: We showed that microdialysis may be used in the critical care of burns, and local skin serotonin concentrations examined continuously for several days. The findings of significantly raised tissue serotonin concentrations, compared to that in blood and urine, suggests that serotonin may be important in local vascular control and formation of oedema. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

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