liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 731
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aalto, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaworski, M
    Gustavsson, M
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurosurgery UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of Betainterferon treatment in Multiple Sclerosis Studied by Quantitative 1H MRS2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Bisphosphonates and implants in the jaw bone2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Insertion of metal implants in bone is one of the commonest of all surgical procedures. The success of these operations is dependent on the fixation of the implants, which, in turn, depends on the strength of the bone that holds them. If the quality of the bone holding the implant could be improved locally, surgical procedures would become simpler and rehabilitation would become faster. Bisphosphonates are anti-resorptive drugs that act specifically on osteoclasts, thereby maintaining bone density and strength. Once released from the surface of a coated implant, bisphosphonates reduce osteoclast activity, thereby changing the balance of bone turnover in favor of bone formation, leading to a net gain in local bone density. During the last decades, the effects of bisphosphonate treatment on the stability of implants have been tested in several clinical and animal studies, but not in human jaws. This may be because it has been suggested that there is a link between the use of bisphosphonates (especially those given intravenously) and a condition called osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). The pathophysiology and treatment of ONJ is controversial. The difficulty in treating ONJ has highlighted the importance of prevention.

    The overall aim of the present thesis was to evaluate the effect of local and systemic use of bisphosphonates on bone tissue. Could a thin, bisphosphonate-eluting fibrinogen coating improve the fixation of metal implants in the human jaw? Would it be possible to reproduce ONJ and prevent the development of this condition in an animal model?

    In two clinical studies, a total number of 96 implants were inserted in 21 patients. In a randomized trial with a paired design, one implant in each pair was coated with a thin fibrinogen layer containing two bisphosphonates (pamidronate and ibandronate). The bisphosphonate-coated implants showed better stability as measured by resonancefrequency analysis. Radiographic intraoral films also showed less bone loss. Three animal models were developed. In a study comparing local and systemic effects of bisphosphonates, zoledronate-coated screws inserted in rats showed better fixation in spite of a drug treatment that is known to induce ONJ-like lesions when given systemically. In another rat model, ONJ-like lesions were reproducibly induced at sites of tooth extraction whereas there were no signs of bone cell death in uninjured sites. Finally, rat experiments showed that the development of ONJ-like lesions after tooth extraction could be prevented by early mucoperiosteal coverage.

    In conclusion, a thin, bisphosphonate-eluting fibrinogen coating can improve the fixation of dental implants in human bone. This may lead to new possibilities in orthopaedic surgery and dentistry. The pathophysiology of ONJ is strongly linked to bone exposure in combination with drugs that reduce resorption.

    List of papers
    1. Bisphosphonate coating might improve fixation of dental implants in the maxilla: A pilot study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bisphosphonate coating might improve fixation of dental implants in the maxilla: A pilot study
    2010 (English)In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 673-677Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This pilot study evaluates the clinical stability of bisphosphonate-coated dental implants placed using a two-stage surgical procedure in five patients. Each patient received seven regular Branemark implants, one of which was coated with bisphosphonate in a fibrinogen matrix. The coated implant was inserted where the bone was expected to have the least favourable quality. The level of the marginal bone around each implant was measured by intraoral periapical radiographs and implant stability was recorded using resonance frequency measurements. Frequency values (ISQ) were obtained peroperatively before flap closure and after 6 months at abutment connection. At abutment connection the bisphosphonate-coated implants were removed en bloc in two patients for histological examination. An animal experiment had previously confirmed that gamma-sterilization did not reduce bioactivity of the bisphosphonate coating. In each patient, the bisphosphonate-coated implant showed the largest improvement in ISQ level of all implants. Their values at the start tended to be lower, and the absolute value at 6 months did not differ. No complications occurred with the coated implants. Histology showed no abnormalities. Improvement in ISQ values was an expected effect of the bisphosphonate coating, but could be due to the choice of insertion site. This finding warrants a randomized blinded study.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, 2010
    Keywords
    bisphosphonate coating; dental implants; fixation
    National Category
    Orthopaedics Other Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58193 (URN)10.1016/j.ijom.2010.04.002 (DOI)000279972500007 ()
    Available from: 2010-08-11 Created: 2010-08-09 Last updated: 2018-01-12
    2. A bisphosphonate-coating improves the fixation of metal implants in human bone. A randomized trial of dental implants
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A bisphosphonate-coating improves the fixation of metal implants in human bone. A randomized trial of dental implants
    2012 (English)In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 1148-1151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Many surgical procedures use metal implants in bone. The clinical results depend on the strength of the bone holding these implants. Our objective was to show that a drug released from the implant surface can improve parameters reflecting the quality or amount of this bone. Sixteen patients received paired dental titanium implants in the maxilla, in a randomized, double-blinded fashion. One implant in each pair was coated with a thin fibrinogen layer containing 2 bisphosphonates. The other implant was untreated. Fixation was evaluated by measurement of resonance frequency (implant stability quotient; ISQ) serving as a proxy for stiffness of the implant-bone construct. Increase in ISQ at 6 months of follow-up was the primary variable. None of the patients had any complications. The resonance frequency increased 6.9 ISQ units more for the coated implants (p = 0.0001; Cohens d = 1.3). The average difference in increase in ISQ and the effect size, suggested a clinically relevant improvement. X-ray showed less bone resorption at the margin of the implant both at 2 months (p = 0.012) and at 6 months (p = 0.012). In conclusion, a thin, bisphosphonate-eluting fibrinogen coating might improve the fixation of metal implants in human bone. This might lead to new possibilities for orthopedic surgery in osteoporotic bone and for dental implants.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2012
    Keywords
    Bone healing, Dental implant, Drug delivery, Mechanical test, Osseointegration bisphosphonates
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77527 (URN)10.1016/j.bone.2012.02.001 (DOI)000303274400018 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council|VR 2009-6725|

    Available from: 2012-05-28 Created: 2012-05-22 Last updated: 2017-12-07
    3. Bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw in a rat model arises first after the bone has become exposed. No primary necrosis in unexposed bone
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw in a rat model arises first after the bone has become exposed. No primary necrosis in unexposed bone
    2012 (English)In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 494-499Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    J Oral Pathol Med (2012) 41: 494499 Background: Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw was first described to start with sterile osteocyte death, similar to osteonecrosis in other parts of the skeleton. The typical chronic osteomyelitis was thought to develop when the dead bone was exposed to the oral cavity. An alternative explanation would be that the chronic osteomyelitis is a result of a bisphosphonate-related inability of infected bony lesions to heal. We tested the hypothesis that primary osteocyte death is not necessary for the development of jaw osteonecrosis. Material and methods: Forty rats were randomly allocated to four groups of 10. All animals underwent unilateral molar extraction and received the following drug treatments: Group I, controls with no drug treatment; Group II, 200 mu g/kg per day alendronate; Groups III and IV, 200 mu g/kg per day alendronate and 1 mg/kg of dexamethasone. All rats were euthanized after 14 days. Presence of osteonecrosis was determined by clinical and histological observations for groups IIII. For group IV, osteocyte viability at the contralateral uninjured site was examined using lactate dehydrogenase histochemistry (LDH). Results: All animals in the alendronate plus dexamethasone groups developed large ONJ-like lesions. Lactate dehydrogenase staining showed viable osteocytes in the contralateral jaw with no tooth extraction. No signs of osteonecosis were seen in the other groups. Conclusion: Bisphosphonates and dexamethasone caused no osteocyte death in uninjured bone, but large ONJ-like lesions after tooth extraction. Osteonecrosis of the jaw appears to arise first after the bone has been exposed. Possibly, bisphosphonates hamper the necessary resorption of bone that has become altered because of infection.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley and Sons, 2012
    Keywords
    bisphosphonates; bisphosphonate associated osteonecrosis of the jaw; osteonecrosis; rat
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79679 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0714.2011.01125.x (DOI)000305961100010 ()
    Available from: 2012-08-14 Created: 2012-08-13 Last updated: 2017-12-07
    4. Effect of Local vs. Systemic Bisphosphonate Delivery on Dental Implant Fixation in a Model of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of Local vs. Systemic Bisphosphonate Delivery on Dental Implant Fixation in a Model of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 279-283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Locally applied bisphosphonates may improve the fixation of metal implants in bone. However, systemic bisphosphonate treatment is associated with a risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). We hypothesized that local delivery of bisphosphonate from the implant surface improves the fixation of dental implants without complications in a setting where systemic treatment induces ONJ. Forty rats were randomly allocated to 4 groups of 10. All groups received a titanium implant inserted in an extraction socket. Group I received the implants only. Group II received dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg). Group III received dexamethasone as above plus alendronate (200 µg/kg). Group IV received zoledronate-coated implants and dexamethasone as above. The animals were sacrificed 2 weeks after tooth extraction. All 10 animals with systemic alendronate treatment developed large ONJ-like changes, while all with local treatment were completely healed. Implant removal torque was higher for the bisphosphonate-coated implants compared with the other groups (p < 0.03 for each comparison). Micro-computed tomography of the maxilla showed more bone loss in the systemic alendronate group compared with groups receiving local treatment (p = 0.001). Local bisphosphonate treatment appears to improve implant fixation in a setting where systemic treatment caused ONJ.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2013
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89667 (URN)10.1177/0022034512472335 (DOI)000314914100013 ()23264610 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-03-01 Created: 2013-03-01 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    5. Prevention of osteonecrosis of the jaw by mucoperiosteal coverage in a rat model
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevention of osteonecrosis of the jaw by mucoperiosteal coverage in a rat model
    2013 (English)In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 632-636Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    There is evidence for a link between the use of systemic bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). This condition has the appearance of chronic osteomyelitis, and antibiotics prevent the development of ONJ in animal models. Clinically, ONJ can sometimes be successfully treated by mucoperiosteal coverage. If ONJ is indeed primarily caused by bacterial infection, immediate coverage of the extraction alveolus might reduce the risk of ONJ development in risk patients. Therefore, we studied whether immediate mucoperiosteal coverage after tooth extraction could prevent ONJ development in a rat model. Thirty rats were randomly allocated to three groups of 10. Group I (controls): extraction, no drug treatment; Group II (non-coverage): extraction, dexamethasone plus alendronate; Group III (coverage): dexamethasone plus alendronate, plus coverage by a mucoperiosteal flap. Rats were examined for macroscopic ONJ-like wounds after 2 weeks. All animals in the non-coverage group developed large ONJ-like changes. The coverage and control groups showed an intact overlying mucosa in all rats. Findings were confirmed with histology. Bisphosphonates and dexamethasone caused ONJ-like lesions after tooth extraction in a rat model. This was prevented by immediate mucoperiosteal coverage. The risk of ONJ in patients using bisphosphonates might be reduced by mucoperiosteal coverage after tooth extraction.

    Keywords
    Bisphosphonates, osteonecrosis, jaw, rat, mucoperiosteal flap, antibiotics
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89668 (URN)10.1016/j.ijom.2013.02.007 (DOI)000318132600014 ()
    Available from: 2013-03-01 Created: 2013-03-01 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Agholme, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Prevention of osteonecrosis of the jaw by mucoperiosteal coverage in a rat model2013In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 632-636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is evidence for a link between the use of systemic bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). This condition has the appearance of chronic osteomyelitis, and antibiotics prevent the development of ONJ in animal models. Clinically, ONJ can sometimes be successfully treated by mucoperiosteal coverage. If ONJ is indeed primarily caused by bacterial infection, immediate coverage of the extraction alveolus might reduce the risk of ONJ development in risk patients. Therefore, we studied whether immediate mucoperiosteal coverage after tooth extraction could prevent ONJ development in a rat model. Thirty rats were randomly allocated to three groups of 10. Group I (controls): extraction, no drug treatment; Group II (non-coverage): extraction, dexamethasone plus alendronate; Group III (coverage): dexamethasone plus alendronate, plus coverage by a mucoperiosteal flap. Rats were examined for macroscopic ONJ-like wounds after 2 weeks. All animals in the non-coverage group developed large ONJ-like changes. The coverage and control groups showed an intact overlying mucosa in all rats. Findings were confirmed with histology. Bisphosphonates and dexamethasone caused ONJ-like lesions after tooth extraction in a rat model. This was prevented by immediate mucoperiosteal coverage. The risk of ONJ in patients using bisphosphonates might be reduced by mucoperiosteal coverage after tooth extraction.

  • 4.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Agholme, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw in a rat model arises first after the bone has become exposed. No primary necrosis in unexposed bone2012In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 494-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    J Oral Pathol Med (2012) 41: 494499 Background: Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw was first described to start with sterile osteocyte death, similar to osteonecrosis in other parts of the skeleton. The typical chronic osteomyelitis was thought to develop when the dead bone was exposed to the oral cavity. An alternative explanation would be that the chronic osteomyelitis is a result of a bisphosphonate-related inability of infected bony lesions to heal. We tested the hypothesis that primary osteocyte death is not necessary for the development of jaw osteonecrosis. Material and methods: Forty rats were randomly allocated to four groups of 10. All animals underwent unilateral molar extraction and received the following drug treatments: Group I, controls with no drug treatment; Group II, 200 mu g/kg per day alendronate; Groups III and IV, 200 mu g/kg per day alendronate and 1 mg/kg of dexamethasone. All rats were euthanized after 14 days. Presence of osteonecrosis was determined by clinical and histological observations for groups IIII. For group IV, osteocyte viability at the contralateral uninjured site was examined using lactate dehydrogenase histochemistry (LDH). Results: All animals in the alendronate plus dexamethasone groups developed large ONJ-like lesions. Lactate dehydrogenase staining showed viable osteocytes in the contralateral jaw with no tooth extraction. No signs of osteonecosis were seen in the other groups. Conclusion: Bisphosphonates and dexamethasone caused no osteocyte death in uninjured bone, but large ONJ-like lesions after tooth extraction. Osteonecrosis of the jaw appears to arise first after the bone has been exposed. Possibly, bisphosphonates hamper the necessary resorption of bone that has become altered because of infection.

  • 5.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Agholme, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Effect of Local vs. Systemic Bisphosphonate Delivery on Dental Implant Fixation in a Model of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw2013In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 279-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Locally applied bisphosphonates may improve the fixation of metal implants in bone. However, systemic bisphosphonate treatment is associated with a risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). We hypothesized that local delivery of bisphosphonate from the implant surface improves the fixation of dental implants without complications in a setting where systemic treatment induces ONJ. Forty rats were randomly allocated to 4 groups of 10. All groups received a titanium implant inserted in an extraction socket. Group I received the implants only. Group II received dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg). Group III received dexamethasone as above plus alendronate (200 µg/kg). Group IV received zoledronate-coated implants and dexamethasone as above. The animals were sacrificed 2 weeks after tooth extraction. All 10 animals with systemic alendronate treatment developed large ONJ-like changes, while all with local treatment were completely healed. Implant removal torque was higher for the bisphosphonate-coated implants compared with the other groups (p < 0.03 for each comparison). Micro-computed tomography of the maxilla showed more bone loss in the systemic alendronate group compared with groups receiving local treatment (p = 0.001). Local bisphosphonate treatment appears to improve implant fixation in a setting where systemic treatment caused ONJ.

  • 6.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Gothenburg University.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A bisphosphonate-coating improves the fixation of metal implants in human bone. A randomized trial of dental implants2012In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 1148-1151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many surgical procedures use metal implants in bone. The clinical results depend on the strength of the bone holding these implants. Our objective was to show that a drug released from the implant surface can improve parameters reflecting the quality or amount of this bone. Sixteen patients received paired dental titanium implants in the maxilla, in a randomized, double-blinded fashion. One implant in each pair was coated with a thin fibrinogen layer containing 2 bisphosphonates. The other implant was untreated. Fixation was evaluated by measurement of resonance frequency (implant stability quotient; ISQ) serving as a proxy for stiffness of the implant-bone construct. Increase in ISQ at 6 months of follow-up was the primary variable. None of the patients had any complications. The resonance frequency increased 6.9 ISQ units more for the coated implants (p = 0.0001; Cohens d = 1.3). The average difference in increase in ISQ and the effect size, suggested a clinically relevant improvement. X-ray showed less bone resorption at the margin of the implant both at 2 months (p = 0.012) and at 6 months (p = 0.012). In conclusion, a thin, bisphosphonate-eluting fibrinogen coating might improve the fixation of metal implants in human bone. This might lead to new possibilities for orthopedic surgery in osteoporotic bone and for dental implants.

  • 7. Ahlgren Andersson, E
    et al.
    Almerud Österberg, S
    Elneborg, K
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Johansson, E
    Minthon, L
    Pettersson, M
    Thulesius, H
    Wohlin, S
    Åberg, B
    Östberg, H
    Låg kognitiv hastighet före operation hade samband med postoperativ förvirring efter elektiv hjärtkirurgi2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Albrecht, Matthew A.
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia .
    Stuart, Geoffrey W.
    La Trobe University, Australia .
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Australia, Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Leung, Denise
    Curtin University, Australia .
    Foster, Jonathan K.
    Curtin University, Australia Health Department WA, Australia .
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Brief Report: Visual Acuity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders2014In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 2369-2374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there has been heightened interest in suggestions of enhanced visual acuity in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) which was sparked by evidence that was later accepted to be methodologically flawed. However, a recent study that claimed children with ASD have enhanced visual acuity (Brosnan et al. in J Autism Dev Disord 42:2491-2497, 2012) repeated a critical methodological flaw by using an inappropriate viewing distance for a computerised acuity test, placing the findings in doubt. We examined visual acuity in 31 children with ASD and 33 controls using the 2 m 2000 Series Revised Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart placed at twice the conventional distance to better evaluate possible enhanced acuity. Children with ASD did not demonstrate superior acuity. The current findings strengthen the argument that reports of enhanced acuity in ASD are due to methodological flaws and challenges the reported association between visual acuity and systemising type behaviours.

  • 9.
    Alföldi, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Wiklund, Tobias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Comorbid insomnia in patients with chronic pain: a study based on the Swedish quality registry for pain rehabilitation (SQRP)2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 20, p. 1661-1669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study investigates the prevalence of insomnia and its relationship to other symptoms and health aspects in patients with chronic pain. Methods: Patients with chronic pain conditions (n = 845) referred to a multidisciplinary pain centre completed surveys provided by the Swedish quality registry for pain rehabilitation (SQRP). The SQRP collects data on socio-demographics, health status, symptoms of pain, mood and insomnia and life satisfaction. Results: The majority of patients (65.3%) had clinical insomnia according to the insomnia severity index (ISI). Insomnia correlated significantly but weakly with pain, depression, anxiety and coping; the strongest multivariate correlations were found with depression and anxiety followed by pain interference and pain severity. Pain intensity, depression and anxiety correlated stronger than ISI with respect to the two investigated aspects of health. Conclusions: The prevalence of insomnia is high in patients with chronic pain conditions, but the level of importance in relation to other symptoms for health aspects is low, and the associations with other important symptoms are relatively weak. One way to increase the effects of multimodal rehabilitation programs may be to provide interventions directed specifically at insomnia rather than focusing only on interventions that address pain, depression and anxiety. Implications for Rehabilitation The prevalence of insomnia is high in patients with complex chronic pain conditions. Relatively low correlations existed between insomnia and pain intensity, depression, anxiety and other psychological aspects. Pain intensity, anxiety and depression were more important for perceived health aspects than insomnia. One way to increase the effects of multimodal rehabilitation programs may be to also include interventions directed directly to insomnia.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Elin
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Kroon, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Nationell kartläggning av farmakologiska rutiner och information i samband med tonsilloperation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Studien är en del i ett större nationellt projekt med syfte att kartlägga smärtbehandling vid tonsillkirurgi i samband med utformning av nationella farmakologiska riktlinjer. De vanligaste postoperativa komplikationerna vid tonsillkirurgi är postoperativt illamående och kräkningar (PONV), smärta, blödning och dehydrering. Tonsillkirurgin utförs idag antingen som dagkirurgiskt ingrepp eller som slutenvårdsingrepp med en vårdtid på ca ett dygn. Därmed sker den postoperativa vården i hemmet. Ett flertal studier har beskrivit patienternas upplevelse av höggradig smärta efter tonsillkirurgi. Obehandlad smärta leder till svårigheter att svälja och därmed otillräckligt dryckes- och matintag, vilket leder till dehydrering, ökad blödningsbenägenhet, sämre läkningsförmåga samt negativa  postoperativa beteendeförändringar hos barnet.

    Syftet var att i en nationell studie kartlägga farmakologiska rutiner och informationen i samband med tonsilloperation hos barn och ungdomar.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Elin
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Kroon, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Nationell kartläggning av farmakologiska rutiner och information i samband med tonsilloperation2013In: Ventilen, ISSN 0348-6257, Vol. 4, no 48, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Studien är en del i ett större nationellt projekt med syfte att kartlägga smärtbehandling vid tonsillkirurgi i samband med utformning av nationella farmakologiska riktlinjer. De vanligaste postoperativa komplikationerna vid tonsillkirurgi är postoperativt illamående och kräkningar (PONV), smärta, blödning och dehydrering. Tonsillkirurgin utförs idag antingen som dagkirurgiskt ingrepp eller som slutenvårdsingrepp med en vårdtid på ca ett dygn. Därmed sker den postoperativa vården i hemmet. Ett flertal studier har beskrivit patienternas upplevelse av höggradig smärta efter tonsillkirurgi. Obehandlad smärta leder till svårigheter att svälja och därmed otillräckligt dryckes- och matintag, vilket leder till dehydrering, ökad blödningsbenägenhet, sämre läkningsförmåga samt negativa  postoperativa beteendeförändringar hos barnet.

    Syftet var att i en nationell studie kartlägga farmakologiska rutiner och informationen i samband med tonsilloperation hos barn och ungdomar.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Elin
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Kroon, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Nationell kartläggning av farmakologiska rutiner och information i samband med tonsilloperation2012In: Nationellt kvalitetsregister Öron-, Näs- och Halssjukvård: Årsrapport 2012, Nationellt kvalitetsregister för Öron-, Näs- och Halssjukvård. , 2012, p. 77-81Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Studien är en del i ett större nationellt projekt med syfte att kartlägga smärtbehandling vid tonsillkirurgi i samband med utformning av nationella farmakologiska riktlinjer. De vanligaste postoperativa komplikationerna vid tonsillkirurgi är postoperativt illamående och kräkningar (PONV), smärta, blödning och dehydrering. Tonsillkirurgin utförs idag antingen som dagkirurgiskt ingrepp eller som slutenvårdsingrepp med en vårdtid på ca ett dygn. Därmed sker den postoperativa vården i hemmet. Ett flertal studier har beskrivit patienternas upplevelse av höggradig smärta efter tonsillkirurgi. Obehandlad smärta leder till svårigheter att svälja och därmed otillräckligt dryckes- och matintag, vilket leder till dehydrering, ökad blödningsbenägenhet, sämre läkningsförmåga samt negativa  postoperativa beteendeförändringar hos barnet.

    Syftet var att i en nationell studie kartlägga farmakologiska rutiner och informationen i samband med tonsilloperation hos barn och ungdomar.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Björnström-Karlsson, Karin
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Orexin A Phosphorylates the gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Type A Receptor beta(2) Subunit on a Serine Residue and Changes the Surface Expression of the Receptor in SH-SY5Y Cells Exposed to Propofol2015In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, ISSN 0360-4012, E-ISSN 1097-4547, Vol. 93, no 11, p. 1748-1755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Propofol activates the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) and causes a reversible neurite retraction, leaving a thin, thread-like structure behind; it also reverses the transport of vesicles in rat cortical neurons. The awakening peptide orexin A (OA) inhibits this retraction via phospholipase D (PLD) and protein kinase CE (PKCE). The human SH-SY5Y cells express both GABA(A)Rs and orexin 1 and 2 receptors. These cells are used to examine the interaction between OA and the GABAAR. The effects of OA are studied with flow cytometry and immunoblotting. This study shows that OA stimulates phosphorylation on the serine residues of the GABA(A)R beta(2) subunit and that the phosphorylation is caused by the activation of PLD and PKCE. OA administration followed by propofol reduces the cell surface expression of the GABA(A)R, whereas propofol stimulation before OA increases the surface expression. The GABA(A)R beta(2) subunit is important for receptor recirculation, and the effect of OA on propofol-stimulated cells may be due to a disturbed recirculation of the GABA(A)R. (C) 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 14.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jedlinski, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Epidermal growth factor is a biomarker for poor cetuximab response in tongue cancer cells2016In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 9-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target for treatment in tongue cancer. Here, EGFR ligands were evaluated for their potential uses as predictive biomarkers of cetuximab treatment response.

    Methods: In three tongue cancer cell lines the influences of epidermal growth factor (EGF), amphiregulin (AR), and epiregulin (EPR) on tumour cell proliferation and cetuximab response were evaluated by the addition of recombinant human (rh) proteins or the siRNA-mediated downregulation of endogenous ligand production.

    Results: EGF or AR downregulation suppressed the proliferation of all investigated cell lines. Furthermore, all cell lines displayed increased cetuximab resistance upon the addition of rhEGF, whereas EGF silencing resulted in an improved cetuximab response in one cell line.

    Conclusions: Our data suggest that EGF and AR are critical components of the EGFR signalling network required for full proliferative potential. Moreover, EGF is a potential predictive biomarker of poor cetuximab response and a possible treatment target.

  • 15.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kankainen, M.
    Institute of Biomedicine, Medical Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Genome-Scale Biology, Research Program, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Monni, O.
    Institute of Biomedicine, Medical Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Genome-Scale Biology, Research Program, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Molecular cross-talk between head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the main components of the tumor stroma and are known to increase tumor growth and stimulate  invasion and metastasis. Increasing evidence suggests that CAFs may also be an important determinant of the response to various treatments. In this study we aimed to characterize the molecular cross-talk between CAFs and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells.

    HNSCC cell lines were co-cultured with their patient-matched CAFs for seven days, after which the gene expression of tumor cells was investigated by Affymetrix microarray. 58 protein coding genes were found to be differentially expressed (Q≤0.05) in tumor cells cocultured with CAFs when compared to tumor cells cultured alone. The top functions of these genes were cancer, cellular movement, and embryonic development as analyzed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Nine genes were upregulated by ≥1.5-fold while the expression of 35 genes was found to be reduced by ≤ 0.67-fold. Several of the differentially expressed genes have been associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The change in the expression of POSTN, GREM1, COL1A2, VIM, and MMP7 was verified by qPCR analysis. Moreover, the influence of CAFs on the proliferation, migration and cetuximab sensitivity of tumor cells was investigated, and was found to vary among the tumor cell-CAF pairs.

    In conclusion, we demonstrate that CAF-derived signals cause changes in the expression of multiple genes, several of which are associated with an EMT phenotype of tumor cells. Furthermore, CAFs modulate the proliferation, migration and cetuximab treatment response of tumor cells.

  • 16.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Interleukin-8 is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid following high-voltage electrical injury with late-onset paraplegia suggesting neuronal damage at the microlevel as causative factor2010In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 36, no 3, p. e7-e9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patient, a 31-year-old male, sustained an electric burn injury (16 kV, AC/DC) while working with electric power lines. He was acutely admitted to a national burn center in Southeast Sweden, where burns equalling 29% of the total body surface area were noted. The burns were located at the front of the abdomen, upper arms bilaterally, and the left hip region, and the lesions were estimated to be mainly of the dermal type, what was believed initially to be caused mainly by an electric flash. There were no obvious entry or exit sites of the electric current. However, myoglobin in plasma was elevated as a sign of muscular degradation, suggesting that at least some current had passed through the tissues. According to the paramedic report there was an episode of a few minutes of unconsciousness immediately after the injury, but the patient was fully awake and alert on admission. There was no concomitant trauma.

  • 17.
    Anttila, Heidi
    et al.
    National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Injuries and Functional Capacity Unit, Assistive Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Salminen, Anna-Liisa
    Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland.
    Brandt, Åse
    Danish Centre for Assistive Technology, Department of Research & Development, Århus, Denmark.
    Quality of evidence of assistive technology interventions for people with disability: An overview of systematic reviews2012In: Technology and Disability, ISSN 1055-4181, E-ISSN 1878-643X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 9-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This overview summarizes the available evidence from systematic reviews of outcomes studies on various assistive technologies (AT) for persons with disabilities. Systematic reviews published between January 2000 and April 2010 were identified by comprehensive literature searches. Study selection, data extraction and methodological quality evaluation were done by two authors independently. The quality of evidence was summarized by explicit methods. Types of disabilities, settings, and AT interventions were recorded. Outcomes were mapped according to the Taxonomy of Assistive Technology Device Outcomes. Forty-four systematic reviews were included in this overview. High-quality evidence was found in single AT (positive effects of providing AT in connection with home assessment and hearing aids, no effects of hip protectors) for limited populations (older people at home, people with hearing loss, and older people in institutional care, respectively). Low-quality or unclear evidence was found for the effectiveness of the other evaluated AT interventions. Current gaps in AT outcomes research were identified. Many frequently used devices have not been systematically reviewed. Well-designed outcomes research to inform clinical decision-making is urgently needed. The systematic review methodology seems to be feasible for summarising AT outcomes research, but methodological development for grading and for primary studies is warranted.

  • 18.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björnström, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Intensive Care.
    Saftig, Paul
    Biochemical Institute, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Garner, Brett
    Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sensitivity to Lysosome-Dependent Cell Death is Directly Regulated by Lysosomal Cholesterol Content2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alterations in lipid homeostasis are implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, although the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. We evaluated the impact of cholesterol accumulation, induced by U18666A, quinacrine or mutations in the cholesterol transporting Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) protein, on lysosomal stability and sensitivity to lysosome-mediated cell death. We found that neurons with lysosomal cholesterol accumulation were protected from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. In addition, human fibroblasts with cholesterol-loaded lysosomes showed higher lysosomal membrane stability than controls. Previous studies have shown that cholesterol accumulation is accompanied by the storage of lipids such as sphingomyelin, glycosphingolipids and sphingosine and an up regulation of lysosomal associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2), which may also influence lysosomal stability. However, in this study the use of myriocin and LAMP deficient fibroblasts excluded these factors as responsible for the rescuing effect and instead suggested that primarily lysosomal cholesterol content determined the cellular sensitivity to toxic insults. Further strengthening this concept, depletion of cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin or 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased the stability of lysosomes and cells became more prone to undergo apoptosis. In conclusion, cholesterol content regulated lysosomal membrane permeabilization and thereby influenced cell death sensitivity. Our data suggests that lysosomal cholesterol modulation might be used as a therapeutic strategy for conditions associated with accelerated or repressed apoptosis.

  • 19.
    Arnardottir, E S
    et al.
    Landspitali University Hospital.
    Thorleifsdottir, B
    University of Iceland.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Olafsson, I
    Landspitali University Hospital.
    Gislason, T
    Landspitali University Hospital.
    INTERINDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION IN OTHERWISE HEALTHY OSA SUBJECTS in SLEEP, vol 34, issue , pp A155-A1552011In: SLEEP, American Academy of Sleep Medicine , 2011, Vol. 34, p. A155-A155Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 20.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Granlund, Mats
    Örebro University, Sweden; Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Important aspects of participation and participation restrictions in people with a mild intellectual disability2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 15, p. 1264-1272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explored a possibility to assess the concepts of participation and participation restrictions in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) by combining self-ratings of the perceived importance with the actual performance of different everyday activities in people with a mild intellectual disability. Method: Structured interviews regarding 68 items from the ICF activity/participation domain were conducted (n = 69). The items were ranked by perceived importance, performance and by combined measures. Furthermore, the measures were related to a single question about subjective general well-being. Results: Rankings of performance highlighted about the same items as "important participation", while rankings of low performance addressed quite different items compared with "important participation restriction". Significant correlations were found between subjective general well-being and high performance (r = 0.56), high performance/high importance (important participation) (r = 0.56), low performance (r = -0.56) and low performance/high importance (important participation restriction; r -0.55). Conclusions: The results support the clinical relevance of the ICF and the studied selection of 68 items. Although performance only may sometimes be a relevant aspect, knowledge about the relationship between the perceived importance and the actual performance is essential for clinical interventions and for research aiming to understand specific needs regarding participation.

  • 21.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Granlund, Mats
    University of Örebro, Sweden Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories explored for self-rated participation in Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 562-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore internal consistency and correlations between perceived ability, performance and perceived importance in a preliminary selection of self-reported items representing the activity/participation component of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Design: Structured interview study. Subjects: Fifty-five Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability. Methods: Questions about perceived ability, performance and perceived importance were asked on the basis of a 3-grade Likert-scale regarding each of 68 items representing the 9 ICF domains of activity/participation. Results: Internal consistency for perceived ability (Cron-bachs alpha for all 68 items): 0.95 (values for each domain varied between 0.57 and 0.85), for performance: 0.86 (between 0.27 and 0.66), for perceived importance: 0.84 (between 0.27 and 0.68). Seventy-two percent of the items showed correlations greater than0.5 (mean =0.59) for performance vs perceived importance, 41% greater than0.5 (mean =0.47) for perceived ability vs performance and 12% greater than0.5 (mean =0.28) for perceived ability vs perceived importance. Conclusion: Measures of performance and perceived importance may have to be based primarily on their estimated clinical relevance for describing aspects of the ICF participation concept. With a clinimetric approach, parts of the studied items and domains may be used to investigate factors related to different patterns and levels of participation, and outcomes of rehabilitation.

  • 22.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonköping University, Sweden; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    How are the activity and participation aspects of the ICF used? Examples from studies of people with intellectual disability2015In: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 45-49Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Interdisciplinary differences regarding understanding the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) concepts activity/participation may hinder its unifying purpose. In the ICF model, functioning (and disability) is described as a tripartite concept: 1) Body structures/functions, 2) Activities, and 3) Participation. Activities refer to an individual perspective on disability that does not tally with the basic structure of social models. OBJECTIVE: To review how activity and participation are actually used in studies of intellectual disability (ID). CONCLUSION: Based on 16 papers, four different usages of activity/participation were found. 1) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept with attempts to use it. 2) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept without actual use of activities. 3) "Atheoretical" approach with implicit focus on participation. 4) Theoretical reference to bipartite concept with corresponding use of terms. The highlighted studies have in common a focus on participation. However, the usage of the term "activity" differs both within and between studies. Such terminology will probably confuse interdisciplinary communication rather than facilitating it. Also, the use of an explicit underlying theory differs, from references to a tripartite to references to a bipartite concept of disability. This paper is focused on ID, but the discussed principles regarding the ICF and interdisciplinary disability theory are applicable to other diagnostic groups within rehabilitation practices.

  • 23.
    Asp, Filip
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Eskilsson, Gunnar
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bilateral versus unilateral cochlear implants in children: Speech recognition, sound localization, and parental reports2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 817-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet and in multi-source noise, and horizontal sound localization of low and high frequency sounds in children with bilateral cochlear implants. Design: Bilateral performance was compared to performance of the implanted side with the best monaural speech recognition in quiet result. Parental reports were collected in a questionnaire. Results from the CI children were compared to binaural and monaural performance of normal-hearing peers. Study sample: Sixty-four children aged 5.1-11.9 years who were daily users of bilateral cochlear implants. Thirty normal-hearing children aged 4.8-9.0 years were recruited as controls. Results and Conclusions : Group data showed a statistically significant bilateral speech recognition and sound localization benefit, both behaviorally and in parental reports. The bilateral speech recognition benefit was smaller in quiet than in noise. The majority of subjects localized high and low frequency sounds significantly better than chance using bilateral implants, while localization accuracy was close to chance using unilateral implants. Binaural normal-hearing performance was better than bilateral performance in implanted children across tests, while bilaterally implanted children showed better localization than normal-hearing children under acute monaural conditions.

  • 24.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    A bisphosphonate-coating improves the fixation of metal implants in human bone. A randomized trial with internal controls in BONE, vol 50, issue , pp S56-S562012In: BONE, Elsevier , 2012, Vol. 50, p. S56-S56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 25.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Agholme, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw in a rat model arises first after the bone has become exposed. no primary necrosis in unexposed bone in BONE, vol 50, issue , pp S173-S1732012In: BONE, Elsevier , 2012, Vol. 50, p. S173-S173Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 26.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Agholme, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dental implants in a rat model: Bisphosphonate coating improved fixation while systemic treatment caused osteonecrosis in BONE, vol 50, issue , pp S173-S1742012In: BONE, Elsevier , 2012, Vol. 50, p. S173-S174Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 27.
    Austeng, Dordi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden University of Trondheim Hospital, Norway .
    Kallen, Karin
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Hellstrom, Ann
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lundgren, Pia
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Tornqvist, Kristina
    University of Lund Hospital, Sweden .
    Wallin, Agneta
    St Eriks Eye Hospital, Sweden .
    Holmstrom, Gerd
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Regional differences in screening for retinopathy of prematurity in infants born before 27 weeks of gestation in Sweden - the EXPRESS study2014In: Acta Ophthalmologica, ISSN 1755-375X, E-ISSN 1755-3768, Vol. 92, no 4, p. 311-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The primary aim was to analyse regional incidences of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and frequencies of treatment and their relation to perinatal risk factors during a 3-year period. A secondary aim was to study adherence to the study screening protocol in the different regions. Methods: A population-based study of neonatal morbidity in extremely preterm infants in Sweden (EXPRESS) was performed during 2004-2007. Screening for ROP was to start at postnatal age 5weeks and to continue weekly until the retina was completely vascularized or until regression of ROP. Logistic regression analyses were used for evaluation of differences in incidence of Any ROP, ROP 3 or more and ROP Type 1 between the seven regions of the country. Results: The regional incidence of ROP varied between 54% and 92% for Any ROP, between 25% and 43% for ROP stage 3 or more and between 8% and 23% of infants with ROP Type 1, all of whom were treated. There was no significant difference between the regions regarding ROP Type 1, even when adjusting for known risk factors for ROP. Conclusion: The heterogeneity between the regions regarding the incidence of ROP was reduced with increasing severity of ROP, and there was no heterogeneity regarding frequency of treatment for ROP, which is the most important issue for the children. We cannot exclude observer bias regarding mild ROP and ROP stage 3 in this study.

  • 28.
    Backstrom, D.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Al-Ayoubi, Fawzi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Letter: Outcome of trauma patients2010In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 54, no 7, p. 902-903Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 29.
    Banck, M
    et al.
    Hallands Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Heller, Ute
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Samuelsson, C
    Hallands Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Wickerts, CJ
    Danderyd Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Women with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are less likely to receive therapeutic hypothermia and more likely to die than men: Swedish nationwide cohort study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Banck, M
    et al.
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Karlstad.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Karlström, G
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Karlstad.
    Nolin, T
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Kristianstad.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Samuelsson, C
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Karlstad.
    Är svensk intensivvård könsjämlik?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Banck, Malin
    et al.
    Hallands sjukhus, Halmstad.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Karlström, Göran
    Centralsjukhuset, Karlstad.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Samuelsson, Carolina
    Hallands sjukhus, Halmstad.
    Män intensivvårdas mer än kvinnor: Med det är ändå oklart om intensivvården i Sverige är könsojämlik2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 9-10, p. 388-390Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Barns, Angela
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Svanholm, Frida
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Living in the present: Women's everyday experiences of living with rheumatoid arthritis2015In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the findings from a qualitative research project exploring eight women’s experiences of living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Through semistructured interviews, the women provided insights into the physical, emotional, and social impacts of RA and the “work” involved in negotiating its influence in the everyday life. In narrating their experiences of adapting to RA, the women express a common desire for “normalcy,” to return to a time and space before the disruption of RA. The women’s accounts also emphasized the interrelatedness between bodily experience and constructions of self, highlighting the corporeal nature of RA and the constant shaping and reshaping of personal meanings and values.

  • 33.
    Bendelin, Nina
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahl, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Umea University.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Experiences of guided Internet-based cognitive-behavioural treatment for depression: A qualitative study2011In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 11, no 107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ackground: Internet-based self-help treatment with minimal therapist contact has been shown to have an effect in treating various conditions. The objective of this study was to explore participants views of Internet administrated guided self-help treatment for depression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 strategically selected participants and qualitative methods with components of both thematic analysis and grounded theory were used in the analyses. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Three distinct change processes relating to how participants worked with the treatment material emerged which were categorized as (a) Readers, (b) Strivers, and (c) Doers. These processes dealt with attitudes towards treatment, views on motivational aspects of the treatment, and perceptions of consequences of the treatment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: We conclude that the findings correspond with existing theoretical models of face-to-face psychotherapy within qualitative process research. Persons who take responsibility for the treatment and also attribute success to themselves appear to benefit more. Motivation is a crucial aspect of guided self-help in the treatment of depression.

  • 34.
    Bergek, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Zdolsek, Joachim H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Hahn, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Research Unit, Södertälje Hospital, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Non-invasive blood haemoglobin and plethysmographic variability index during brachial plexus block2015In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 114, no 5, p. 812-817Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Plethysmographic measurement of haemoglobin concentration (SpHb  ), pleth variability index (PVI), and perfusion index (PI) with the Radical-7 apparatus is growing in popularity. Previous studies have indicated that SpHb  has poor precision, particularly when PI is low. We wanted to study the effects of a sympathetic block on these measurements.

    Methods Twenty patients underwent hand surgery under brachial plexus block with one Radical-7 applied to each arm. Measurements were taken up to 20 min after the block had been initiated. Venous blood samples were also drawn from the non-blocked arm.

    Results During the last 10 min of the study, SpHb  had increased by 8.6%. The PVI decreased by 54%, and PI increased by 188% in the blocked arm (median values). All these changes were statistically significant. In the non-blocked arm, these parameters did not change significantly.

    Conclusions Brachial plexus block significantly altered SpHb  , PVI, and PI, which indicates that regional nervous control of the arm greatly affects plethysmographic measurements obtained by the Radical-7. After the brachial plexus block, SpHb  increased and PVI decreased.

  • 35.
    Bergek, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Hahn, Robert G
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Accuracy of noninvasive haemoglobin measurement by pulse oximetry depends on the type of infusion fluid2013In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 73-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Measurement of blood haemoglobin concentration by pulse oximetry could be of value in determining when erythrocytes should be transfused during surgery, but the effect of infusion fluids on the results is unclear.

    Objective: To study the effect of crystalloid and colloid fluid on the accuracy (bias) and precision of pulse oximetry haemoglobin estimation to indicate the venous haemoglobin concentration in volunteers.

    Design: Open interventional crossover study.

    Setting: Single university hospital.

    Participants: Ten male volunteers aged 18–28 (mean 22) years.

    Interventions: Each volunteer underwent three infusion experiments on separate days and in random order. The infusions were Ringer's acetate (20 ml kg−1), hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (10 ml kg−1) and a combination of both.

    Results: At the end of the infusions of Ringer's acetate, pulse oximetry haemoglobin concentration had decreased more than the true haemoglobin concentration (15 vs. 8%; P < 0.005; n  = 10) whereas starch solution decreased pulse oximetry haemoglobin concentration less than true haemoglobin concentration (7 vs. 11%; P < 0.02; n  = 20). The same differences were seen when the fluids were infused separately and when they were combined. The overall difference between all 956 pairs of pulse oximetry haemoglobin concentration and true haemoglobin concentrations (the bias) averaged only −0.7 g l−1 whereas the 95% prediction interval was wide, ranging from −24.9 to 23.7 g l−1. In addition to the choice of infusion fluid, the bias was strongly dependent on the volunteer (each factor, P < 0.001).

    Conclusion: The bias of measuring haemoglobin concentration by pulse oximetry is dependent on whether a crystalloid or a colloid fluid is infused.

  • 36.
    Bergek, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Hahn, Robert G
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Accuracy of noninvasive haemoglobin measurement by pulse oximetry depends on the type of infusion fluid2012In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 29, no 12, p. 586-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Measurement of blood haemoglobin concentration by pulse oximetry could be of value in determining when erythrocytes should be transfused during surgery, but the effect of infusion fluids on the results is unclear.

    Objective: To study the effect of crystalloid and colloid fluid on the accuracy (bias) and precision of pulse oximetry haemoglobin estimation to indicate the venous haemoglobin concentration in volunteers.

    Design: Open interventional crossover study.

    Setting: Single university hospital.

    Participants: Ten male volunteers aged 18–28 (mean 22) years.

    Interventions: Each volunteer underwent three infusion experiments on separate days and in random order. The infusions were Ringer's acetate (20 ml kg−1), hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (10 ml kg−1) and a combination of both.

    Results: At the end of the infusions of Ringer's acetate, pulse oximetry haemoglobin concentration had decreased more than the true haemoglobin concentration (15 vs. 8%; P < 0.005; n  = 10) whereas starch solution decreased pulse oximetry haemoglobin concentration less than true haemoglobin concentration (7 vs. 11%; P < 0.02; n  = 20). The same differences were seen when the fluids were infused separately and when they were combined. The overall difference between all 956 pairs of pulse oximetry haemoglobin concentration and true haemoglobin concentrations (the bias) averaged only −0.7 g l−1 whereas the 95% prediction interval was wide, ranging from −24.9 to 23.7 g l−1. In addition to the choice of infusion fluid, the bias was strongly dependent on the volunteer (each factor, P < 0.001).

    Conclusion: The bias of measuring haemoglobin concentration by pulse oximetry is dependent on whether a crystalloid or a colloid fluid is infused.

  • 37.
    Bergendal, B.
    et al.
    National Oral Disability Centre, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ahlborg, B.
    Mun-H-Center, National Orofacial Resource Center for Rare Disorders, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Knudsen, E.
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Nyberg, J.
    Department of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallenius, E.
    Swedish Association of Rare Disorders, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
    Gustafsson-Bonnier, K.
    Habilitation Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Living with facial disfigurement- Strategies for individuals and care management2011In: Special Care in Dentistry, ISSN 0275-1879, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 216-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals and families affected by craniofacial disorders have expressed dissatisfaction with their experiences in the healthcare system, with day care, and in school situations. To capture their views, focus group encounters were done in a group of young individuals with these disorders and in a group of parents whose children were affected. The aim was to synthesize their attitudes and experiences into improved strategies for parents, teenagers, and professionals in the healthcare system. Their views were compiled into a document that emphasizes the responsibilities of persons with craniofacial disorders and their parents to actively seek information on diagnosis and treatment options and to participate in decisions on therapy. The conclusion was that it is not lack of specific knowledge but rather a lack of implementation of existing recommendations that makes living with facial disfigurement difficult for many individuals and their families. © 2011 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 38.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    et al.
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden.
    Bakke, Merete
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sjogreen, Lotta
    National Orofacial Resource Centre Rare Disease, Sweden.
    Asten, Pamela
    Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital, Norway.
    Profiles of orofacial dysfunction in different diagnostic groups using the Nordic Orofacial Test (NOT-S)-A review2014In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 578-584Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S) was developed as a comprehensive method to assess orofacial function. Results from the screening protocol have been presented in 11 international publications to date. This study reviewed these publications in order to compile NOT-S screening data and create profiles of orofacial dysfunction that characterize various age groups and disorders. Materials and methods. NOT-S results of nine reports meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed. Seven of these studies not only provided data on the mean and range of total NOT-S scores, but also on the most common domains of orofacial dysfunction (highest rate of individuals with dysfunction scores), allowing the construction of orofacial dysfunction profiles based on the prevalence of dysfunction in each domain of NOT-S. Results. The compiled data comprised 669 individuals, which included healthy control subjects (n = 333) and various patient groups (n = 336). All studies reported differences between individuals with diagnosed disorders and healthy control subjects. The NOT-S data could measure treatment effects and provided dysfunction profiles characterizing the patterns of orofacial dysfunction in various diagnoses. Conclusions. This review corroborates previous results that the NOT-S differentiates well between patients and healthy controls and can also show changes in individuals after treatment. NOT-S could be used as a standard instrument to assess orofacial dysfunction, evaluate the outcomes of oral habilitation and rehabilitation and improve comparability in clinical practice and research.

  • 39.
    Bergstrand, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Källman, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Borås, Sweden.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pressure-induced vasodilation and reactive hyperemia at different depths in sacral tissue under clinically relevant conditions2014In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 761-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia at different sacral tissue depths in different populations under clinically relevant pressure exposure.

    METHODS: Forty-two subjects (< 65 years), 38 subjects (≥ 65 years), and 35 patients (≥ 65 years) participated. Interface pressure, skin temperature, and blood flow at tissue depths of 1 mm, 2 mm, and 10 mm (using laser Doppler flowmetry and photoplethysmography) were measured in the sacral tissue before, during, and after load in a supine position.

    RESULTS: pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia were observed at three tissue depths. At 10 mm depth, the proportion of subjects with a lack of pressure-induced vasodilatation was higher compared to superficial depths. The patients had higher interface pressure during load than the healthy individuals, but there were no significant differences in blood flow. Twenty-nine subjects in all three study groups were identified with a lack of pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia.

    CONCLUSIONS: pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia can be measured at different tissue depths. A lack of these responses was found in healthy individuals as well as in patients indicating an innate susceptibility in some individuals, and are potential important factors to evaluate in order to better understand the etiology of pressure ulcers.

  • 40.
    Berkius, J
    et al.
    Västervik, Sweden .
    Engerström, L
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN COPD PATIENTS FOLLOWED 24 MONTHS AFTER ICU CARE in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S228-S2282010In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 36, p. S228-S228Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 41.
    Berkius, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Västervik County Hospital, Västervik, Sweden.
    Engerström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping,.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten M
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A prospective longitudinal multicentre study of health related quality of life in ICU survivors with COPD2013In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. R211-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Mortality amongst COPD patients treated on the ICU is high. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) after intensive care is a relevant concern for COPD patients, their families and providers of health care. Still, there are few HRQL studies after intensive care of this patient group. Our hypothesis was that HRQL of COPD patients treated on the ICU declines rapidly with time.

    METHODS: Fifty-one COPD patients (COPD-ICU group) with an ICU stay longer than 24 hours received a questionnaire at 6, 12 and 24 months after discharge from ICU. HRQL was measured using two generic instruments: the EuroQoL instrument (EQ-5D and EQ-VAS) and the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). The results were compared to HRQL of two reference groups from the general population; an age- and sex-adjusted reference population (Non-COPD reference) and a reference group with COPD (COPD reference).

    RESULTS: HRQL of the COPD-ICU group at 6 months after discharge from ICU was lower compared to the COPD reference group: Median EQ-5D was 0.66 vs. 0.73, P=0.08 and median EQ-VAS was 50 vs.55, P<0.05. There were no significant differences in the SF-36 dimensions between the COPD-ICU and COPD-reference groups, although the difference in physical functioning (PF) approached statistical significance (P=0.059). Patients in the COPD-ICU group who were lost to follow-up after 6 months had low HRQL scores at 6 months. Scores for patients who died were generally lower compared to patients who failed to respond to the questionnaire. The PF and social functioning (SF) scores in those who died were significantly lower compared to patients with a complete follow up. HRQL of patients in the COPD-ICU group that survived a complete 24 months follow up was low but stable with no statistically significant decline from 6 to 24 months after ICU discharge. Their HRQL at 24 months was not significantly different from HRQL in the COPD reference group.

    CONCLUSIONS: HRQL in COPD survivors after intensive care was low but did not decline from 6 to 24 months after discharge from ICU. Furthermore, HRQL at 24 months was similar to patients with COPD who had not received ICU treatment.

  • 42.
    Bjelkemyr, Anna
    et al.
    SAFER Vehicle and Traffic Safety Centre at Chalmers, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dukic, Tania
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Owens, Rachel
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Support Systems Designed for Older Drivers to Achieve Safe and Comfortable Driving2013In: Journal of Transportation Technologies, ISSN 2160-0473, E-ISSN 2160-0481, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 233-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The number of older people is increasing. Many of them expect to maintain a rich social life and to con- tinue driving at an older age. Objective: The present study investigates the mechanisms behind self-regulation and driving cessation in order to suggest development of support systems to prolong older drivers’ safe mobility. Method: Three focus groups were conducted with 19 older active drivers aged 65+ who were divided according to annual mile- age driven. Results: A content analysis revealed broad self-regulatory behaviour as already reported in the literature, e.g., avoiding driving at rush hour and at night. The participants also reported difficulty in finding the way to their final destination and an increasing need to plan their travelling. Co-piloting was a behaviour applied by couples to cope with difficulties encountered in traffic. A large part of the discussion was focused on emerging feelings of stress, anxiety and fear when driving in recent years, a feeling induced by external factors e.g., other road users’ behaviour, traffic density or high speed. Apart from health problems, high levels of stress could explain driving cessation, especially for women. An increased feeling of safety and comfort could be achieved by an increased use of support systems specifically de- signed to respond to older drivers’ needs. Conclusion: Support systems for older drivers should increase comfort and decrease their stress levels. New systems, such as co-pilot function and more developed Global Positioning System (GPS) supporting of the entire travel from door to door, should be developed to respond to the market needs.

     

  • 43.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Katz, Patricia
    University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Validation and internal consistency of the Swedish version of the Valued Life Activities scale.2016In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 30, no 12, p. 1211-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to create a linguistically and culturally validated Swedish version of the Valued Life Activities scale. The aim was also to describe its content and concurrent validity and its internal consistency in persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    METHODS: The Valued Life Activities scale was translated to Swedish and culturally adapted. In order to describe the content validity, both the Swedish and original Valued Life Activities scale were linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The concurrent validity and internal consistency were evaluated in 737 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. To establish concurrent validity, the scale was correlated to disease activity, activity limitations, and life satisfaction. Internal consistency was assessed with Cronbach's alpha.

    RESULTS: The equivalence of meaning between the Swedish and the original Valued Life Activities scale was ensured by harmonization review. Content validity was high when linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Concurrent validity showed a strong correlation with the activity limitations (r = 0.87), moderate with life satisfaction (r = -0.61), and weak with disease activity (r = 0.38). Internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.97).

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish Valued Life Activities scale has been tested in a large and well-characterized sample and found to be a linguistically valid and culturally adapted self-reported measure of participation. Content validity of the Valued Life Activities scale was excellent, concurrent validity strong, and the internal consistency excellent. Since both individual preferences and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health concepts of disability are taken into account, the Swedish Valued Life Activities scale appears to be a promising new scale addressing important aspects of participation.

  • 44.
    Björnström-Karlsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Turina, Dean
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strid, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Orexin A Inhibits Propofol-Induced Neurite Retraction by a Phospholipase D/Protein Kinase C-epsilon-Dependent Mechanism in Neurons2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, p. e0097129-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The intravenous anaesthetic propofol retracts neurites and reverses the transport of vesicles in rat cortical neurons. Orexin A (OA) is an endogenous neuropeptide regulating wakefulness and may counterbalance anaesthesia. We aim to investigate if OA interacts with anaesthetics by inhibition of the propofol-induced neurite retraction. Methods: In primary cortical cell cultures from newborn rats brains, live cell light microscopy was used to measure neurite retraction after propofol (2 mu M) treatment with or without OA (10 nM) application. The intracellular signalling involved was tested using a protein kinase C (PKC) activator [phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)] and inhibitors of Rho-kinase (HA-1077), phospholipase D (PLD) [5-fluoro-2-indolyl des-chlorohalopemide (FIPI)], PKC (staurosporine), and a PKC epsilon translocation inhibitor peptide. Changes in PKC epsilon Ser(729) phosphorylation were detected with Western blot. Results: The neurite retraction induced by propofol is blocked by Rho-kinase and PMA. OA blocks neurite retraction induced by propofol, and this inhibitory effect could be prevented by FIPI, staurosporine and PKC epsilon translocation inhibitor peptide. OA increases via PLD and propofol decreases PKC epsilon Ser(729) phosphorylation, a crucial step in the activation of PKC epsilon. Conclusions: Rho-kinase is essential for propofol-induced neurite retraction in cortical neuronal cells. Activation of PKC inhibits neurite retraction caused by propofol. OA blocks propofol-induced neurite retraction by a PLD/PKC epsilon-mediated pathway, and PKC epsilon maybe the key enzyme where the wakefulness and anaesthesia signal pathways converge.

  • 45.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McMahon, Catherine M.
    Macquarie University, Sydney.
    Dowell, Richard C.
    University of Melbourne.
    Choice of Ear for Cochlear Implantation in Adults With Monaural Sound-Deprivation and Unilateral Hearing Aid2012In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 572-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To identify whether speech recognition outcomes are influenced by the choice of ear for cochlear implantation in adults with bilateral hearing loss who use a hearing aid in 1 ear but have long-term auditory deprivation in the other. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy Design: Retrospective matched cohort study. Speech recognition results were examined in 30 adults with monaural sound deprivation. Fifteen received the implant in the sound-deprived ear and 15 in the aided ear. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting: Tertiary referral centers with active cochlear implant programs. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPatients: Adults with bilateral hearing loss and a minimum of 15 years of monaural sound deprivation who received a cochlear implant after meeting the traditional implantation criteria of the referral centers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanIntervention: Cochlear implantation with devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMain Outcome Measure(s): Paired comparisons of postoperative monosyllabic word recognition scores obtained with the implant alone and in the usual listening condition (CI alone or bimodal). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: With the cochlear implant alone, individuals who received the implant in a sound-deprived ear obtained poorer scores than individuals who received the implant in the aided ear. There was no significant difference, however, in speech recognition results for the 2 groups when tested in their usual listening condition. In particular, poorer speech recognition scores were obtained with the cochlear implant alone by individuals using bimodal hearing. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Similar clinical outcomes of cochlear implantation can be achieved by adults with a long-term monaural sound deprivation when comparing the usual listening condition, irrespective of whether the implant is in the sound-deprived or in the aided ear.

  • 46.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    McMahon, Catherine M
    Macquarie University.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptat Deficience Phys Quebec.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Relative Importance of Monaural Sound Deprivation and Bilateral Significant Hearing Loss in Predicting Cochlear Implantation Outcomes2011In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 758-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Making evidence-based recommendations to prospective unilateral cochlear implant recipients on the potential benefits of implanting one or the other ear is challenging for cochlear implant teams. This particularly occurs in cases where a hearing aid has only been used in one ear for many years (referred to here as the "hearing ear"), and the contralateral ear has, in essence, been sound-deprived. In such cases, research to date is inconclusive, and little anecdotal evidence exists to inform the debate and support best clinical practice. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: Retrospective data on speech recognition outcomes of 16 adult participants who received a cochlear implant in an ear deprived of sound for a minimum of 15 yr were analyzed. All subjects were implanted through the Quebec Cochlear Implant Program and were provided with personalized intensive rehabilitation services. Data obtained from clinical records included demographic data and speech recognition scores measured after implantation with the sentences of a multimedia auditory test battery in the auditory-only condition. Speech recognition outcomes were compared with the duration of auditory deprivation in the implanted ear, bilateral significant hearing loss, and auditory stimulation before bilateral significant hearing loss. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Using nonparametric correlation analyses, a strong negative correlation was demonstrated between speech recognition scores and the duration of bilateral significant hearing loss and with the duration of auditory stimulation before bilateral significant hearing loss. No significant correlation with the duration of auditory deprivation or with the duration of prior auditory stimulation in the implanted ear was found. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: These findings suggest that functional outcomes of cochlear implantation for unilateral sound deprivation may be more strongly influenced by central processes than peripheral effects stemming from the deprivation per se. This indicates the relevance of considering the clients history of binaural hearing rather than the hearing in each ear individually when discussing possible outcomes with a cochlear implant.

  • 47.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Dowell, Richard
    Melbourne University, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Psarros, Colleen
    Sydney Area, Australia.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptation Deficience Phys Quebec, Canada.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How the non-implanted ear influences outcomes of cochlear implantation2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Dowell, Richard
    Melbourne University, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Psarros, Colleen
    Sydney Area, Australia.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptat Deficience Phys Quebec, Canada.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Contribution of the non-implanted ear to Cochlear implantation Outcomes2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptat Deficience Phys Quebec, Canada.
    Psarros, Colleen
    Sydney Area, Australia.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Multicenter Study of Cochlear Implantation Outcomes in Individuals with a Long Term Unilateral Sound Deprivation2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    The development of fast-track principles in gynecological surgery2013In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 17-27Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fast-track is a multimodal strategy aimed at reducing the physiological burden of surgery to achieve an enhanced postoperative recovery. The strategy combines unimodal evidence-based interventions in the areas of preoperative preparation, anesthesia, surgical factors and postoperative care. The advantages of fast-track most likely extend to gynecology, although so far have scarcely been reported. This review summarizes current evidence concerning use of fast-track in general and in gynecological surgery. The main findings of this review are that there are benefits within elective gynecological surgery, but studies of quality of life, patient satisfaction and health economics in elective surgery are needed. Studies of fast-track within the field of non-elective gynecological surgery are lacking. Widespread education is needed to improve the rate of implementation of fast-track. Close involvement of the entire surgical team is imperative to ensure a structured perioperative care aiming for enhanced postoperative recovery.

1234567 1 - 50 of 731
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf