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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Capodanno, Alessandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Downregulation of tumor suppressive microRNAs in vivo in dense breast tissue of postmenopausal women2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 54, p. 92134-92142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women with dense breast tissue on mammography are at higher risk of developing breast cancer but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. De-regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been associated with the onset of breast cancer. miRNAs in the extracellular space participate in the regulation of the local tissue microenvironment. Here, we recruited 39 healthy postmenopausal women attending their mammography-screen that were assessed having extreme dense or entirely fatty breasts (nondense). Microdialysis was performed in breast tissue and a reference catheter was inserted in abdominal subcutaneous fat for local sampling of extracellular compounds. Three miRNAs, associated with tumor suppression, miR-193b, miR-365a, and miR-452 were significantly down-regulated in dense breast tissue compared with nondense breast tissue. In addition, miR-452 exhibited significant negative correlations with several pro-inflammatory cytokines in vivo, which was confirmed in vitro by overexpression of miR-452 in breast cancer cells. No differences were found of miR-21, -29a, -30c, 146a, -148a, -203, or -451 in breast tissue and no miRs were different in plasma. Extracellular miRNAs may be among factors that should be included in studies of novel prevention strategies for breast cancer.

  • 2.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Tissue specific expression of extracellular microRNA in human breast cancers and normal human breast tissue in vivo2015In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 6, no 26, p. 22959-22969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extracellular circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to be biomarkers for disease monitoring but data are inconsistent, one reason being that blood miRNA is of heterogeneous origin. Here, we sampled extracellular microRNAs locally in situ using microdialysis. Three different cohorts of women were included; postmenopausal women with ongoing breast cancer investigated within the cancer and in normal adjacent breast tissue, postmenopausal women investigated in their normal healthy breast and subcutaneous fat before and after six weeks of tamoxifen therapy, premenopausal women during the menstrual cycle. Samples were initially screened using TaqMan array cards with subsequently absolute quantification. 124 miRNA were expressed in microdialysates. After absolute quantifications extracellular miRNA-21 was found to be significantly increased in breast cancer. In addition, the levels were significantly higher in pre-menopausal breast tissue compared with postmenopausal. In breast tissue of pre-menopausal women miRNA-21 exhibited a cyclic variation during the menstrual cycle and in postmenopausal women six weeks of tamoxifen treatment decreased miRNA-21 suggesting that this miRNA may be important for breast carcinogenesis. None of these changes were found in plasma or microdialysates from subcutaneous fat. Our data revealed tissue specific changes of extracellular circulating miRNAs that would be otherwise unraveled using blood samples.

  • 3.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Equal Pro-inflammatory Profiles of CCLs, CXCLs, and Matrix Metalloproteinases in the Extracellular Microenvironment In Vivo in Human Dense Breast Tissue and Breast Cancer2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, article id 1994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inflammatory microenvironment affects breast cancer progression. Proteins that govern the inflammatory response are secreted into the extracellular space, but this compartment still needs to be characterized in human breast tissues in vivo. Dense breast tissue is a major risk factor for breast cancer by yet unknown mechanisms and no non-toxic prevention for these patients exists. Here, we used the minimal invasive technique of microdialysis for sampling of extracellular proteins in live tissues in situ in breast cancers of women before surgery and in healthy women having dense or non-dense breast tissue on mammography. Proteins were profiled using a proximity extension assay. Out of the 32 proteins assessed, 26 exhibited similar profiles in breast cancers and dense breast tissues; CCL-4, -7, -8, -11, -15, -16, -22, -23, and -25, CXCL-5, -8, -9, -16 as well as sIL-6R, IL-18, vascular endothelial growth factor, TGF-a, fibroblast growth factor 19, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -3, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator were all increased, whereas CCL-3, CX3CL1, hepatocyte growth factor, and MMP-9 were unaltered in the two tissues. CCL-19 and -24, CXCL-1 and -10, and IL-6 were increased in dense breast tissue only, whereas IL-18BP was increased in breast cancer only. Our results provide novel insights in the inflammatory microenvironment in human breast cancer in situ and define potential novel therapeutic targets. Additionally, we show previously unrecognized similarities of the pro-inflammatory microenvironment in dense breast tissue and breast cancer in vivo suggesting that anti-inflammatory breast cancer prevention trials for women with dense breast tissue may be feasible.

  • 4.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Increased nutrient availability in dense breast tissue of postmenopausal women in vivo2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 42733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Nutrient availability in the tissue microenvironment determines cellular events and may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. High mammographic density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Whether nutrient availability differs in normal breast tissues with various densities is unknown. Therefore we investigated whether breast tissues with various densities exhibited differences in nutrient availability. Healthy postmenopausal women from the regular mammographic screening program who had either predominantly fatty breast tissue (nondense), n = 18, or extremely dense breast tissue (dense), n = 20, were included. Microdialysis was performed for the in vivo sampling of amino acids (AAs), analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectroscopy, glucose, lactate and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in breast tissues and, as a control, in abdominal subcutaneous (s.c.) fat. We found that dense breast tissue exhibited significantly increased levels of 20 proteinogenic AAs and that 18 of these AAs correlated significantly with VEGF. No differences were found in the s.c. fat, except for one AA, suggesting tissue-specific alterations in the breast. Glucose and lactate were unaltered. Our findings provide novel insights into the biology of dense breast tissue that may be explored for breast cancer prevention strategies.

  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Dense breast tissue in postmenopausal women is associated with a pro-inflammatory microenvironment in vivo2016In: Oncoimmunology, ISSN 2162-4011, E-ISSN 2162-402X, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e1229723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation is one of the hallmarks of carcinogenesis. High mammographic density has been associated with increased risk of breast cancer but the mechanisms behind are poorly understood. We evaluated whether breasts with different mammographic densities exhibited differences in the inflammatory microenvironment.Postmenopausal women attending the mammography-screening program were assessed having extreme dense, n = 20, or entirely fatty breasts (nondense), n = 19, on their regular mammograms. Thereafter, the women were invited for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), microdialysis for the collection of extracellular molecules in situ and a core tissue biopsy for research purposes. On the MRI, lean tissue fraction (LTF) was calculated for a continuous measurement of breast density. LTF confirmed the selection from the mammograms and gave a continuous measurement of breast density. Microdialysis revealed significantly increased extracellular in vivo levels of IL-6, IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor, and CCL5 in dense breast tissue as compared with nondense breasts. Moreover, the ratio IL-1Ra/IL-1 was decreased in dense breasts. No differences were found in levels of IL-1, IL-1Ra, CCL2, leptin, adiponectin, or leptin:adiponectin ratio between the two breast tissue types. Significant positive correlations between LTF and the pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as between the cytokines were detected. Stainings of the core biopsies exhibited increased levels of immune cells in dense breast tissue.Our data show that dense breast tissue in postmenopausal women is associated with a pro-inflammatory microenvironment and, if confirmed in a larger cohort, suggests novel targets for prevention therapies for women with dense breast tissue.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Ellen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Albertsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Holmqvist, Annica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    GRACE: Geriatric patients tReated with Avastin in CRC multiple linEs2017In: Clinical Practice, ISSN 2044-9038, E-ISSN 2044-9046, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 175-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous treatment with bevacizumab in elderly patients with mCRC: A phase IV prospective, open-label, single-arm trial to evaluate outcomes and safety with continuous bevacizumab treatment in combination with chemotherapy over disease progression.

  • 7.
    Apellániz-Ruiz, Maria
    et al.
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Tejero, Héctor
    Translational Bioinformatics Unit, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Inglada-Pérez, Lucía
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. ISCIII Center for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid, Spain.
    Sánchez-Barroso, Lara
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Gerardo
    Neurology Section, Hospital Universitario Infanta Sofía, Madrid, Spain.
    Calvo, Isabel
    Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Montepríncipe, Madrid, Spain. Medical Oncology Department, Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal, Madrid, Spain.
    Castelo, Beatriz
    Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain.
    Redondo, Andrés
    Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain.
    García-Donás, Jesus
    Gynecological and Genitourinary Tumors Programme, Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal, Madrid, Spain.
    Romero-Laorden, Nuria
    Gynecological and Genitourinary Tumors Programme, Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal, Madrid, Spain.
    Sereno, Maria
    Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Infanta Sofía, Madrid, Spain.
    Merino, María
    Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Infanta Sofía, Madrid, Spain.
    Currás-Freixes, Maria
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Montero-Conde, Cristina
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Mancikova, Veronika
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Al-Shahrour, Fatima
    Translational Bioinformatics Unit, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Cascon, Alberto
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. ISCIII Center for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid, Spain.
    Robledo, Mercedes
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.ISCIII Center for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid, Spain .
    Rodriguez-Antona, Cristina
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.ISCIII Center for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid, Spain .
    Targeted sequencing reveals low-frequency variants in EPHA genes as markers of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy.2017In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 1227-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Neuropathy is the dose limiting toxicity of paclitaxel and a major cause for decreased quality of life. Genetic factors have been shown to contribute to paclitaxel neuropathy susceptibility; however, the major causes for inter-individual differences remain unexplained. In this study we identified genetic markers associated with paclitaxel-induced neuropathy through massive sequencing of candidate genes.

    EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We sequenced the coding region of 4 EPHA genes, 5 genes involved in paclitaxel pharmacokinetics and 30 Charcot-Marie-Tooth genes, in 228 cancer patients with no/low neuropathy or high grade neuropathy during paclitaxel treatment. An independent validation series included 202 paclitaxel-treated patients. Variation-/ gene-based analyses were used to compare variant frequencies among neuropathy groups and Cox regression models were used to analyze neuropathy evolution along treatment.

    RESULTS: Gene-based analysis identified EPHA6 as the gene most significantly associated with paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Low frequency non-synonymous variants in EPHA6 were present exclusively in patients with high neuropathy and all affected the ligand binding domain. Accumulated dose analysis in the discovery series showed a significantly higher neuropathy risk for EPHA5/6/8 low-frequency non-synonymous variant carriers (HR=14.60, 95%CI=2.33-91.62, P=0.0042) and an independent cohort confirmed an increased neuropathy risk (HR=2.07, 95%CI=1.14-3.77, P=0.017). Combining the series gave an estimated 2.50-fold higher risk of neuropathy (95%CI=1.46-4.31; P=9.1x10(-4)).

    CONCLUSION: This first study sequencing EPHA genes revealed that low frequency variants in EPHA6, EPHA5 and EPHA8 contribute to the susceptibility to paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Furthermore, EPHAs neuronal injury repair function suggests that these genes might constitute important neuropathy markers for many neurotoxic drugs.

  • 8.
    Ardenfors, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Gudowska, Irena
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    The Skandion Clinic, Sweden.
    Impact of irradiation setup in proton spot scanning brain therapy on organ doses from secondary radiation2018In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 180, no 1-4, p. 261-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Monte Carlo model of a proton spot scanning pencil beam was used to simulate organ doses from secondary radiation produced from brain tumour treatments delivered with either a lateral field or a vertex field to one adult and one paediatric patient. Absorbed doses from secondary neutrons, photons and protons and neutron equivalent doses were higher for the vertex field in both patients, but the differences were low in absolute terms. Absorbed doses ranged between 0.1 and 43 μGy.Gy−1 in both patients with the paediatric patient receiving higher doses. The neutron equivalent doses to the organs ranged between 0.5 and 141 μSv.Gy−1 for the paediatric patient and between 0.2 and 134 μSv.Gy−1 for the adult. The highest neutron equivalent dose from the entire treatment was 7 mSv regardless of field setup and patient size. The results indicate that different field setups do not introduce large absolute variations in out-of-field doses produced in patients undergoing proton pencil beam scanning of centrally located brain tumours.

  • 9.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Österberg, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tagesson, Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Webster, Kate E.
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Satisfaction With Knee Function After Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Is Associated With Self-Efficacy, Quality of Life, and Returning to the Preinjury Physical Activity2016In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 1631-1638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess whether patient-reported outcomes (psychological factors, appraisals of knee function, and physical activity participation) were associated with satisfaction with knee function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods: Participants who were aged 18 to 45 years and a minimum 12 months post primary ACL reconstruction completed a questionnaire battery evaluating knee self-efficacy, knee-related quality of life, self-reported function, and physical activity participation. Participants responses to the question "If you were to spend the rest of your life with your knee just the way it has been in the last week, would you feel.... (7-point ordinal scale; 1 = happy, 7 = unhappy)" were categorized as satisfied, mostly satisfied, or dissatisfied and used as the primary outcome. Ordinal regression was used to examine associations between independent variables and the primary outcome. Results: A total of 177 participants were included at an average of 3 years after primary ACL reconstruction. At follow-up, 44% reported they would be satisfied, 28% mostly satisfied, and 28% dissatisfied with the outcome of ACL reconstruction. There were significant differences in psychological responses and appraisal of knee function between the 3 groups (P = .001), and significantly more people in the satisfied group had returned to their preinjury activity (58%) than in the mostly satisfied (28%) and dissatisfied (26%) groups (P = .001). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that the odds of being satisfied increased by a factor of 3 with higher self-efficacy, greater knee-related quality of life, and returning to the preinjury activity. Conclusions: People who had returned to their preinjury physical activity and who reported higher knee-related self-efficacy and quality of life were more likely to be satisfied with the outcome of ACL reconstruction.

  • 10.
    Berntsen, Sveinung
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Agder, Norway.
    Aaronson, Neil K.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Buffart, Laurien
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Demmelmaier, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hellbom, Maria
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hojman, Pernille
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Igelstrom, Helena
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Pingel, Ronnie
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Raastad, Truls
    Norwegian School Sport Science, Norway.
    Velikova, Galina
    University of Leeds, England.
    Asenlof, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nordin, Karin
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Agder, Norway.
    Design of a randomized controlled trial of physical training and cancer ( Phys-Can) the impact of exercise intensity on cancer related fatigue, quality of life and disease outcome2017In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 17, article id 218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cancer-related fatigue is a common problem in persons with cancer, influencing health-related quality of life and causing a considerable challenge to society. Current evidence supports the beneficial effects of physical exercise in reducing fatigue, but the results across studies are not consistent, especially in terms of exercise intensity. It is also unclear whether use of behaviour change techniques can further increase exercise adherence and maintain physical activity behaviour. This study will investigate whether exercise intensity affects fatigue and health related quality of life in persons undergoing adjuvant cancer treatment. In addition, to examine effects of exercise intensity on mood disturbance, adherence to oncological treatment, adverse effects from treatment, activities of daily living after treatment completion and return to work, and behaviour change techniques effect on exercise adherence. We will also investigate whether exercise intensity influences inflammatory markers and cytokines, and whether gene expressions following training serve as mediators for the effects of exercise on fatigue and health related quality of life. Methods/design: Six hundred newly diagnosed persons with breast, colorectal or prostate cancer undergoing adjuvant therapy will be randomized in a 2 x 2 factorial design to following conditions; A) individually tailored low-to-moderate intensity exercise with or without behaviour change techniques or B) individually tailored high intensity exercise with or without behaviour change techniques. The training consists of both resistance and endurance exercise sessions under the guidance of trained coaches. The primary outcomes, fatigue and health related quality of life, are measured by self-reports. Secondary outcomes include fitness, mood disturbance, adherence to the cancer treatment, adverse effects, return to activities of daily living after completed treatment, return to work as well as inflammatory markers, cytokines and gene expression. Discussion: The study will contribute to our understanding of the value of exercise and exercise intensity in reducing fatigue and improving health related quality of life and, potentially, clinical outcomes. The value of behaviour change techniques in terms of adherence to and maintenance of physical exercise behaviour in persons with cancer will be evaluated.

  • 11.
    Block, Keith I.
    et al.
    Block Centre Integrat Cancer Treatment, IL 60077 USA.
    Gyllenhaal, Charlotte
    Block Centre Integrat Cancer Treatment, IL 60077 USA; National Cancer Centre, South Korea.
    Lowe, Leroy
    Getting Know Canc, Canada; University of Lancaster, England.
    Amedei, Amedeo
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Ruhul Amin, A. R. M.
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Amin, Amr
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Aquilano, Katia
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Arbiser, Jack
    Atlanta Vet Adm Medical Centre, GA USA; Emory University, GA USA.
    Arreola, Alexandra
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Arzumanyan, Alla
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Salman Ashraf, S.
    Temple University, PA 19122 USA.
    Azmi, Asfar S.
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Benencia, Fabian
    Wayne State University, MI USA.
    Bhakta, Dipita
    Ohio University, OH 45701 USA.
    Bilsland, Alan
    SASTRA University, India.
    Bishayeen, Anupam
    University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Blain, Stacy W.
    Larkin Health Science Institute, FL USA.
    Block, Penny B.
    Block Centre Integrat Cancer Treatment, IL 60077 USA.
    Boosani, Chandra S.
    Suny Downstate Medical Centre, NY USA.
    Carey, Thomas E.
    Creighton University, NE 68178 USA.
    Carnero, Amancio
    University of Michigan, MI USA.
    Carotenuto, Marianeve
    CSIC, Spain; Centre Ingn Genet and Biotecnol Avanzate, Italy.
    Casey, Stephanie C.
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Chaturvedi, Rupesh
    University of S Carolina, SC USA.
    Zhuo Chen, Georgia
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Chenx, Helen
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, India.
    Chen, Sophie
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Charlie Chen, Yi
    Ovarian and Prostate Cancer Research Lab, England; Alderson Broaddus University, PA USA.
    Choi, Beom K.
    National Cancer Centre, South Korea.
    Rosa Ciriolo, Maria
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Coley, Helen M.
    University of Surrey, England.
    Collins, Andrew R.
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Connell, Marisa
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, India.
    Crawford, Sarah
    So Connecticut State University, CT 06515 USA.
    Curran, Colleen S.
    University of Wisconsin, WI USA.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Damia, Giovanna
    Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Italy.
    Dasgupta, Santanu
    University of Texas Health Science Centre Tyler, TX USA.
    DeBerardinis, Ralph J.
    University of Texas SW Medical Centre Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    Decker, William K.
    Baylor Coll Med, TX 77030 USA.
    Dhawan, Punita
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37212 USA.
    Diehl, Anna Mae E.
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Dong, Jin-Tang
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Ping Dou, Q.
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Drew, Janice E.
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Elkord, Eyad
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    El-Rayes, Bassel
    Emory University, GA 30322 USA.
    Feitelson, Mark A.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Felsher, Dean W.
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Ferguson, Lynnette R.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Fimognari, Carmela
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Firestone, Gary L.
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Frezza, Christian
    University of Calif Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Fujii, Hiromasa
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Fuster, Mark M.
    Nara Medical University, Japan.
    Generali, Daniele
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92103 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92103 USA.
    Georgakilas, Alexandros G.
    University of Trieste, Italy.
    Gieseler, Frank
    Azienda Osped Ist Ospitalieri Cremona, Italy.
    Gilbertson, Michael
    National Technical University of Athens, Greece.
    Green, Michelle F.
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Grue, Brendan
    Getting Know Canc, Canada.
    Guha, Gunjan
    Ohio University, OH 45701 USA.
    Halicka, Dorota
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Helferich, William G.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Heneberg, Petr
    New York Medical Coll, NY 10595 USA.
    Hentosh, Patricia
    University of Illinois, IL 61820 USA.
    Hirschey, Matthew D.
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Hofseth, Lorne J.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Holcombe, Randall F.
    Old Domin University, VA USA.
    Honoki, Kanya
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Nara, Japan.
    Hsu, Hsue-Yin
    University of S Carolina, SC 29208 USA.
    Huang, Gloria S.
    Mt Sinai School Med, NY USA.
    Jensen, Lasse D.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jiang, Wen G.
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Jones, Lee W.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Karpowicz, Phillip A.
    University of Windsor, Canada.
    Nicol Keith, W.
    SASTRA University, India.
    Kerkar, Sid P.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Khan, Gazala N.
    Henry Ford Hospital, MI 48202 USA.
    Khatami, Mahin
    National Institute Heatlh, MD USA.
    Ko, Young H.
    University of Maryland BioPark, MD USA.
    Kucuk, Omer
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Kulathinal, Rob J.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Kumar, Nagi B.
    University of S Florida, FL USA.
    Kwon, Byoung S.
    National Cancer Centre, South Korea; Tulane University, LA 70118 USA.
    Le, Anne
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Lea, Michael A.
    Rutgers State University, NJ USA.
    Lee, Ho-Young
    Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Lichtor, Terry
    Rush University, IL 60612 USA.
    Lin, Liang-Tzung
    Taipei Medical University, Taiwan.
    Locasale, Jason W.
    Cornell University, NY 14853 USA.
    Lokeshwar, Bal L.
    Georgia Regents University, GA USA.
    Longo, Valter D.
    University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Lyssiotis, Costas A.
    University of Michigan, MI USA; University of Michigan, MI USA.
    MacKenzie, Karen L.
    Childrens Cancer Institute Australia, Australia.
    Malhotra, Meenakshi
    McGill University, Canada.
    Marino, Maria
    University of Rome Tre, Italy.
    Martinez-Chantar, Maria L.
    Technology Pk Bizkaia, Spain.
    Matheu, Ander
    Biodonostia Institute, Spain.
    Maxwell, Christopher
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, India.
    McDonnell, Eoin
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Meeker, Alan K.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD 21205 USA.
    Mehrmohamadi, Mahya
    Cornell University, NY USA.
    Mehta, Kapil
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Michelotti, Gregory A.
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Mohammad, Ramzi M.
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Mohammed, Sulma I.
    Purdue University, IN 47907 USA.
    James Morre, D.
    Mor NuCo Inc, IN USA.
    Muqbil, Irfana
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Muralidhar, Vinayak
    Harvard University, MA USA; MIT, MA 02139 USA.
    Murphy, Michael P.
    MRC Mitochondrial Biol Unit, England.
    Purnachandra Nagaraju, Ganji
    Emory University, GA 30322 USA.
    Nahta, Rita
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Niccolai, Elena
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Nowsheen, Somaira
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Panis, Carolina
    State University of West Parana, Brazil.
    Pantano, Francesco
    University of Campus Bio Med, Italy.
    Parslow, Virginia R.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Pawelec, Graham
    University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Pedersen, Peter L.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Poore, Brad
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Poudyal, Deepak
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Prakash, Satya
    McGill University, Canada.
    Prince, Mark
    University of Michigan, MI USA.
    Raffaghello, Lizzia
    Ist Giannina Gaslini, Italy.
    Rathmell, Jeffrey C.
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Kimryn Rathmell, W.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Ray, Swapan K.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Reichrath, Joerg
    Saarland University Hospital, Germany.
    Rezazadeh, Sarallah
    University of Rochester, NY 14627 USA.
    Ribatti, Domenico
    University of Bari, Italy.
    Ricciardiello, Luigi
    National Cancer Institute Giovanni Paolo II, Italy.
    Brooks Robey, R.
    University of Bologna, Italy; White River Junct Vet Affairs Medical Centre, VT USA.
    Rodier, Francis
    Geisel School Medical Dartmouth, NH USA; University of Montreal, Canada.
    Vasantha Rupasinghe, H. P.
    Institute Cancer Montreal, Canada.
    Luigi Russo, Gian
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Ryan, Elizabeth P.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Samadi, Abbas K.
    Sanus Biosciences, San Diego, CA, United States.
    Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro
    CNR, Italy.
    Sanders, Andrew J.
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Santini, Daniele
    University of Campus Bio Med, Italy.
    Sarkar, Malancha
    Colorado State University, CO 80523 USA.
    Sasada, Tetsuro
    Department of Immunology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Saxena, Neeraj K.
    University of Salamanca, Spain.
    Shackelford, Rodney E.
    University of Miami, FL USA.
    Shantha Kumara, H. M. C.
    St Lukes Roosevelt Hospital, NY 10025 USA.
    Sharma, Dipali
    Kurume University, Japan.
    Shin, Dong M.
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Sidransky, David
    University of Maryland, MD 21201 USA.
    David Siegelin, Markus
    Louisiana State University, LA 71105 USA.
    Signori, Emanuela
    Johns Hopkins University, MD 21205 USA; Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Singh, Neetu
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA; King Georges Medical University, India.
    Sivanand, Sharanya
    Columbia University, NY USA; University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Sliva, Daniel
    Institute Translat Pharmacol, Italy; Purdue Research Pk, IN USA.
    Smythe, Carl
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Spagnuolo, Carmela
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Stafforini, Diana M.
    University of Utah, UT USA.
    Stagg, John
    University of Utah, UT USA.
    Subbarayan, Pochi R.
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Sundin, Tabetha
    University of Miami, FL USA.
    Talib, Wamidh H.
    Sentara Healthcare, VA USA.
    Thompson, Sarah K.
    Appl Science University, Jordan.
    Tran, Phuoc T.
    Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia.
    Ungefroren, Hendrik
    Azienda Osped Ist Ospitalieri Cremona, Italy.
    Vander Heiden, Matthew G.
    MIT, MA 02139 USA.
    Venkateswaran, Vasundara
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Vinay, Dass S.
    Tulane University, LA USA.
    Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA; New York University, NY USA.
    Wang, Zongwei
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA; Harvard University, MA USA.
    Wellendx, Kathryn E.
    Columbia University, NY USA; University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Whelan, Richard L.
    St Lukes Roosevelt Hospital, NY 10025 USA.
    Yang, Eddy S.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL USA.
    Yang, Huanjie
    Harbin Institute Technology, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Xujuan
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Yaswen, Paul
    Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, CA USA.
    Yedjou, Clement
    Jackson State University, MS USA.
    Yin, Xin
    Nara Medical University, Japan.
    Zhu, Jiyue
    Washington State University, WA USA.
    Zollo, Massimo
    CSIC, Spain; Centre Ingn Genet and Biotecnol Avanzate, Italy.
    Designing a broad-spectrum integrative approach for cancer prevention and treatment2015In: Seminars in Cancer Biology, ISSN 1044-579X, E-ISSN 1096-3650, Vol. 35, p. S276-S304Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Targeted therapies and the consequent adoption of "personalized" oncology have achieved notable successes in some cancers; however, significant problems remain with this approach. Many targeted therapies are highly toxic, costs are extremely high, and most patients experience relapse after a few disease-free months. Relapses arise from genetic heterogeneity in tumors, which harbor therapy-resistant immortalized cells that have adopted alternate and compensatory pathways (i.e., pathways that are not reliant upon the same mechanisms as those which have been targeted). To address these limitations, an international task force of 180 scientists was assembled to explore the concept of a low-toxicity "broadspectrum" therapeutic approach that could simultaneously target many key pathways and mechanisms. Using cancer hallmark phenotypes and the tumor microenvironment to account for the various aspects of relevant cancer biology, interdisciplinary teams reviewed each hallmark area and nominated a wide range of high-priority targets (74 in total) that could be modified to improve patient outcomes. For these targets, corresponding low-toxicity therapeutic approaches were then suggested, many of which were phytochemicals. Proposed actions on each target and all of the approaches were further reviewed for known effects on other hallmark areas and the tumor microenvironment Potential contrary or procarcinogenic effects were found for 3.9% of the relationships between targets and hallmarks, and mixed evidence of complementary and contrary relationships was found for 7.1%. Approximately 67% of the relationships revealed potentially complementary effects, and the remainder had no known relationship. Among the approaches, 1.1% had contrary, 2.8% had mixed and 62.1% had complementary relationships. These results suggest that a broad-spectrum approach should be feasible from a safety standpoint. This novel approach has potential to be relatively inexpensive, it should help us address stages and types of cancer that lack conventional treatment, and it may reduce relapse risks. A proposed agenda for future research is offered. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 12.
    Blockhuys, S.
    et al.
    Department Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Celauro, E.
    Department Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Feizi, A.
    Department Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fierro-González, J.C.
    Department Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Wittung-Stafshede, P.
    Department Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Defining the human copper proteome and analysis of its expression variation in cancers.2017In: Metallomics : integrated biometal science, ISSN 1756-591X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 112-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Copper (Cu) is essential for living organisms, and acts as a cofactor in many metabolic enzymes. To avoid the toxicity of free Cu, organisms have specific transport systems that 'chaperone' the metal to targets. Cancer progression is associated with increased cellular Cu concentrations, whereby proliferative immortality, angiogenesis and metastasis are cancer hallmarks with defined requirements for Cu. The aim of this study is to gather all known Cu-binding proteins and reveal their putative involvement in cancers using the available database resources of RNA transcript levels. Using the database along with manual curation, we identified a total of 54 Cu-binding proteins (named the human Cu proteome). Next, we retrieved RNA expression levels in cancer versus normal tissues from the TCGA database for the human Cu proteome in 18 cancer types, and noted an intricate pattern of up- and downregulation of the genes in different cancers. Hierarchical clustering in combination with bioinformatics and functional genomics analyses allowed for the prediction of cancer-related Cu-binding proteins; these were specifically inspected for the breast cancer data. Finally, for the Cu chaperone ATOX1, which is the only Cu-binding protein proposed to have transcription factor activities, we validated its predicted over-expression in patient breast cancer tissue at the protein level. This collection of Cu-binding proteins, with RNA expression patterns in different cancers, will serve as an excellent resource for mechanistic-molecular studies of Cu-dependent processes in cancer.

  • 13.
    Blockhuys, Stephanie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Chalmers, Sweden.
    Liu, Na
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rani Agarwal, Nisha
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Enejder, Annika
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Loitto, Vesa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    X-radiation enhances the collagen type I strap formation and migration potentials of colon cancer cells2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 44, p. 71390-71399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rectal cancer treatment still fails with local and distant relapses of the disease. It is hypothesized that radiotherapy could stimulate cancer cell dissemination and metastasis. In this study, we evaluated the effect of X-radiation on collagen type I strap formation potential, i.e. matrix remodeling associated with mesenchymal cell migration, and behaviors of SW480, SW620, HCT116 p53(+/+) and HCT116 p53(-/-) colon cancer cells. We determined a radiation-induced increase in collagen type I strap formation and migration potentials of SW480 and HCT116 p53(+/+). Further studies with HCT116 p53(+/+), indicated that after X-radiation strap forming cells have an increased motility. More, we detected a decrease in adhesion potential and mature integrin beta 1 expression, but no change in non-muscle myosin II expression for HCT116 p53(+/+) after X-radiation. Integrin beta 1 neutralization resulted in a decreased cell adhesion and collagen type I strap formation in both sham and X-radiated conditions. Our study indicates collagen type I strap formation as a potential mechanism of colon cancer cells with increased migration potential after X-radiation, and suggests that other molecules than integrin beta 1 and non-muscle myosin II are responsible for the radiation-induced collagen type I strap formation potential of colon cancer cells. This work encourages further molecular investigation of radiation-induced migration to improve rectal cancer treatment outcome.

  • 14.
    Blockhuys, Stephanie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Rani Agarwal, Nisha
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; McMaster University, Canada; McMaster University, Canada.
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Jarlsfelt, Ingvar
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Second harmonic generation for collagen I characterization in rectal cancer patients with and without preoperative radiotherapy2017In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, ISSN 1083-3668, E-ISSN 1560-2281, Vol. 22, no 10, article id 106006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rectal cancer is treated with preoperative radiotherapy (RT) to downstage the tumor, reduce local recurrence, and improve patient survival. Still, the treatment outcome varies significantly and new biomarkers are desired. Collagen I (Col-I) is a potential biomarker, which can be visualized label-free by second harmonic generation (SHG). Here, we used SHG to identify Col-I changes induced by RT in surgical tissue, with the aim to evaluate the clinical significance of RT-induced Col-I changes. First, we established a procedure for quantitative evaluation of Col-I by SHG in CDX2-stained tissue sections. Next, we evaluated Col-I properties in material from 31 non-RT and 29 RT rectal cancer patients. We discovered that the Col-I intensity and anisotropy were higher in the tumor invasive margin than in the inner tumor and normal mucosa, and RT increased and decreased the intensity in inner tumor and normal mucosa, respectively. Furthermore, higher Col-I intensity in the inner tumor was related to increased distant recurrence in the non-RT group but to longer survival in the RT group. In conclusion, we present a new application of SHG for quantitative analysis of Col-I in surgical material, and the first data suggest Col-I intensity as a putative prognostic biomarker in rectal cancer. (C) The Authors. Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

  • 15.
    Bojmar, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Haiying
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Costa da Silva, Bruno
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Vincent, Theresa
    Departments of Physiology and Biophysics and Cell and Developmental Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA / Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Lyden, David
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    miR-18a is regulated between progressive compartments of cancers, and incorporated in exosomes with the potential of creating premetastatic niches and predict cancer outcome2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultimate cause of death for many cancer patients is the spread of the cancer via metastasis. Even so, there are still a lack of knowledge regarding the metastasis process. This study was performed to investigate the role of metastamirs in exosomes and their metastatic patterns. We used the well-established isogeneic murine cancer model of low metastatic 67NR cells, mimicking luminal/basal breast tumors, and highly metastatic 4T1 cells with characteristics of basal breast  tumors. We studied the exosomal properties and pre-metastatic effects in this metastasis model and compared human materials and exosomes of several other tumor types. Our data clearly demonstrated that exosomes from the highly metastatic cells home to the metastatic organs of their parental cells whereas exosomes from cells with low metastatic potential mostly located to lymph nodes. The exosome protein cargos also resembled their parental cells and potentially affects their target organs, and cells, differently. Furthermore, the exosomes from the highly metastatic cells had a more pronounced effect on tumor growth and pre-metastatic changes than the low metastatic exosomes. The microRNA-18a, a predictor of metastasis, was present to a higher extent in metastatic exosomes as compared to low metastatic exosomes, and altered the tumor progressive properties. Our findings support the role of exomirs as important players in the metastatic process, the value as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets.

  • 16.
    Bostner, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alayev, Anya
    Yeshiva Univ, NY 10033 USA.
    Berman, Adi Y.
    Yeshiva Univ, NY 10033 USA.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Holz, Marina K.
    Yeshiva Univ, NY 10033 USA; Albert Einstein Coll Med, NY 10467 USA; Albert Einstein Coll Med, NY 10467 USA.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Raptor localization predicts prognosis and tamoxifen response in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer2018In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 168, no 1, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deregulated PI3K/mTOR signals can promote the growth of breast cancer and contribute to endocrine treatment resistance. This report aims to investigate raptor and its intracellular localization to further understand its role in ER-positive breast cancer. Raptor protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 756 primary breast tumors from postmenopausal patients randomized to tamoxifen or no tamoxifen. In vitro, the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cells were studied to track the raptor signaling changes upon resistance, and raptor localization in ER alpha-positive cell lines was compared with that in ER alpha-negative cell lines. Raptor protein expression in the nucleus was high in ER/PgR-positive and HER2-negative tumors with low grade, features associated with the luminal A subtype. Presence of raptor in the nucleus was connected with ER alpha signaling, here shown by a coupled increase of ER alpha phosphorylation at S167 and S305 with accumulation of nuclear raptor. In addition, the expression of ER alpha-activated gene products correlated with nuclear raptor. Similarly, in vitro we observed raptor in the nucleus of ER alpha-positive, but not of ER-negative cells. Interestingly, raptor localized to the nucleus could still be seen in tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cells. The clinical benefit from tamoxifen was inversely associated with an increase of nuclear raptor. High cytoplasmic raptor expression indicated worse prognosis on long-term follow-up. We present a connection between raptor localization to the nucleus and ER alpha-positive breast cancer, suggesting raptor as a player in stimulating the growth of the luminal A subtype and a possible target along with endocrine treatment.

  • 17.
    Bostner, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Bivik Eding, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Perez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Franzén, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Konstantinell, Aelita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    S6 kinase signaling: tamoxifen response and prognostic indication in two breast cancer cohorts2015In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 331-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection of signals in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) pathways may be a future clinical tool for the prediction of adjuvant treatment response in primary breast cancer. Using immunohistological staining, we investigated the value of the mTOR targets p70-S6 kinase (S6K) 1 and 2 as biomarkers for tamoxifen benefit in two independent clinical trials comparing adjuvant tamoxifen with no tamoxifen or 5 years versus 2 years of tamoxifen treatment. In addition, the prognostic value of the S6Ks was evaluated. We found that S6K1 correlated with proliferation, HER2 status, and cytoplasmic AKT activity, whereas high protein expression levels of S6K2 and phosphorylated (p) S6K were more common in ER-positive, and low-proliferative tumors with pAKT-s473 localized to the nucelus. Nuclear accumulation of S6K1 was indicative of a reduced tamoxifen effect (hazard ratio (HR): 1.07, 95% CI: 0.53-2.81, P=0.84), compared with a significant benefit from tamoxifen treatment in patients without tumor S6K1 nuclear accumulation (HR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.29-0.62, Pless than0.00001). Also S6K1 and S6K2 activation, indicated by pS6K-t389 expression, was associated with low benefit from tamoxifen (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.50-1.87, P=0.92). In addition, high protein expression of S6K1, independent of localization, predicted worse prognosis in a multivariate analysis, P=0.00041 (cytoplasm), P=0.016 (nucleus). In conclusion, the mTOR-activated kinases S6K1 and S6K2 interfere with proliferation and response to tamoxifen. Monitoring their activity and intracellular localization may provide biomarkers for breast cancer treatment, allowing the identification of a group of patients less likely to benefit from tamoxifen and thus in need of an alternative or additional targeted treatment.

  • 18.
    Bruun, Jarle
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Kolberg, Matthias
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Ahlquist, Terje C.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Royrvik, Ellen C.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; University of Oxford, England.
    Nome, Torfinn
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Leithe, Edward
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Lind, Guro E.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Merok, Marianne A.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Rognum, Torleiv O.
    University of Oslo, Norway; Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway.
    Bjorkoy, Geir
    University of Coll Sor Trondelag, Norway.
    Johansen, Terje
    University of Tromso, Norway.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Svindland, Aud
    University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Liestol, Knut
    University of Oslo, Norway; Fac Math and Nat Science, Norway.
    Nesbakken, Arild
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Skotheim, Rolf I.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Fac Math and Nat Science, Norway.
    Lothe, Ragnhild A.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Regulator of Chromosome Condensation 2 Identifies High-Risk Patients within Both Major Phenotypes of Colorectal Cancer2015In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 21, no 16, p. 3759-3770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Colorectal cancer has high incidence and mortality worldwide. Patients with microsatellite instable (MSI) tumors have significantly better prognosis than patients with microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. Considerable variation in disease outcome remains a challenge within each subgroup, and our purpose was to identify biomarkers that improve prediction of colorectal cancer prognosis. Experimental Design: Mutation analyses of 42 MSI target genes were performed in two independent MSI tumor series (n = 209). Markers that were significantly associated with prognosis in the test series were assessed in the validation series, followed by functional and genetic explorations. The clinical potential was further investigated by immunohistochemistry in a population-based colorectal cancer series (n = 903). Results: We identified the cell-cycle gene regulator of chromosome condensation 2 (RCC2) as a cancer biomarker. We found a mutation in the 50 UTR region of RCC2 that in univariate and multivariate analyses was significantly associated with improved outcome in the MSI group. This mutation caused reduction of protein expression in dual luciferase gene reporter assays. siRNA knockdown in MSI colon cancer cells (HCT15) caused reduced cell proliferation, cell-cycle arrest, and increased apoptosis. Massive parallel sequencing revealed few RCC2 mutations in MSS tumors. However, weak RCC2 protein expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis, independent of clinical highrisk parameters, and stratifies clinically important patient subgroups with MSS tumors, including elderly patients (greater than 75 years), stage II patients, and those with rectal cancer. Conclusions: Impaired RCC2 affects functional and clinical endpoints of colorectal cancer. High-risk patients with either MSI or MSS tumors can be identified with cost-effective routine RCC2 assays. (C) 2015 AACR.

  • 19.
    Busch, Susann
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Sims, Andrew H.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Landberg, Goran
    Gothenburg University, Sweden; University of Manchester, England.
    Loss of TGF beta Receptor Type 2 Expression Impairs Estrogen Response and Confers Tamoxifen Resistance2015In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 75, no 7, p. 1457-1469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One third of the patients with estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha)-positive breast cancer who are treated with the antiestrogen tamoxifen will either not respond to initial therapy or will develop drug resistance. Endocrine response involves crosstalk between ER alpha and TGF beta signaling, such that tamoxifen non-responsiveness or resistance in breast cancer might involve aberrant TGF beta signaling. In this study, we analyzed TGF beta receptor type 2 (TGFBR2) expression and correlated it with ER alpha status and phosphorylation in a cohort of 564 patients who had been randomized to tamoxifen or no-adjuvant treatment for invasive breast carcinoma. We also evaluated an additional four independent genetic datasets in invasive breast cancer. In all the cohorts we analyzed, we documented an association of low TGFBR2 protein and mRNA expression with tamoxifen resistance. Functional investigations confirmed that cell cycle or apoptosis responses to estrogen or tamoxifen in ER alpha-positive breast cancer cells were impaired by TGFBR2 silencing, as was ER alpha phosphorylation, tamoxifen-induced transcriptional activation of TGF beta, and upregulation of the multidrug resistance protein ABCG2. Acquisition of low TGFBR2 expression as a contributing factor to endocrine resistance was validated prospectively in a tamoxifen-resistant cell line generated by long-term drug treatment. Collectively, our results established a central contribution of TGF beta signaling in endocrine resistance in breast cancer and offered evidence that TGFBR2 can serve as an independent biomarker to predict treatment outcomes in ER alpha-positive forms of this disease.

  • 20.
    Chen, Ke-Ling
    et al.
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Lv, Zhao-Ying
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Hong-Wei
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yong
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Long, Fei-Wu
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Bin
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Peng, Zhi-Hai
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Zong-Guang
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Li, Yuan
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Effects of Tocilizumab on Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis and Associated Acute Lung Injury2016In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 44, no 8, p. E664-E677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the therapeutic effects of tocilizumab, an antibody against interleukin-6 receptor, on experimental severe acute pancreatitis and associated acute lung injury. The optimal dose of tocilizumab and the activation of interleukin-6 inflammatory signaling were also investigated. Design: Randomized experiment. Setting: Research laboratory at a university hospital. Subject: Experimental severe acute pancreatitis in rats. Interventions: Severe acute pancreatitis was induced by retrograde injection of sodium taurocholate (50 mg/kg) into the biliopancreatic duct. In dose-study, rats were administered with different doses of tocilizumab (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 mg/kg) through the tail vein after severe acute pancreatitis induction. In safety-study, rats without severe acute pancreatitis induction were treated with high doses of tocilizumab (8, 16, 32, and 64 mg/kg). Serum and tissue samples of rats in time-study were collected for biomolecular and histologic evaluations at different time points (2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 hr). Measurements and Main Results: 1) Under the administration of tocilizumab, histopathological scores of pancreas and lung were decreased, and severity parameters related to severe acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury, including serum amylase, C-reactive protein, lung surfactant protein level, and myeloperoxidase activity, were all significant alleviated in rat models. 2) Dose-study demonstrated that 2 mg/kg tocilizumab was the optimal treatment dose. 3) Basing on multi-organ pathologic evaluation, physiological and biochemical data, no adverse effect and toxicity of tocilizumab were observed in safety-study. 4) Pancreatic nuclear factor-kappa B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 were deactivated, and the serum chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 was down-regulated after tocilizumab administration. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated tocilizumab, as a marketed drug commonly used for immune-mediated diseases, was safe and effective for the treatment of experimental severe acute pancreatitis and associated acute lung injury. Our findings provide experimental evidences for potential clinical application of tocilizumab in severe acute pancreatitis and associated complications.

  • 21.
    Cheng, Dantong
    et al.
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Senlin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Tang, Huamei
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Dongyuan
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Hongcheng
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Yu, Fudong
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Jiang, Weiliang
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Yue, Ben
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Jingtao
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Meng
    Fudan University, Peoples R China.
    Yu, Yang
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Xisheng
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Zhou, Zongguang
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Qin, Xuebin
    Temple University, PA 19122 USA.
    Zhang, Xin
    Zhejiang Prov Peoples Hospital, Peoples R China.
    Yan, Dongwang
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Wen, Yugang
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Peng, Zhihai
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    MicroRNA-20a-5p promotes colorectal cancer invasion and metastasis by downregulating Smad42016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 29, p. 45199-45213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tumor metastasis is one of the leading causes of poor prognosis for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Loss of Smad4 contributes to aggression process in many human cancers. However, the underlying precise mechanism of aberrant Smad4 expression in CRC development is still little known. Results: miR-20a-5p negatively regulated Smad4 by directly targeting its 3UTR in human colorectal cancer cells. miR-20a-5p not only promoted CRC cells aggression capacity in vitro and liver metastasis in vivo, but also promoted the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition process by downregulating Smad4 expression. In addition, tissue microarray analysis obtained from 544 CRC patients clinical characters showed that miR-20a-5p was upregulated in human CRC tissues, especially in the tissues with metastasis. High level of miR-20a-5p predicted poor prognosis in CRC patients. Methods: Five miRNA target prediction programs were applied to identify potential miRNA(s) that target(s) Smad4 in CRC. Luciferase reporter assay and transfection technique were used to validate the correlation between miR-20a-5p and Smad4 in CRC. Wound healing, transwell and tumorigenesis assays were used to explore the function of miR-20a-5p and Smad4 in CRC progression in vitro and in vivo. The association between miR-20a-5p expression and the prognosis of CRC patients was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate cox proportional hazard analyses based on tissue microarray data. Conclusions: miR-20a-5p, as an onco-miRNA, promoted the invasion and metastasis ability by suppressing Smad4 expression in CRC cells, and high miR-20a-5p predicted poor prognosis for CRC patients, providing a novel and promising therapeutic target in human colorectal cancer.

  • 22.
    Cibula, David
    et al.
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Gen Univ Hosp, Czech Republic.
    Poetter, Richard
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Planchamp, Francois
    Inst Bergoni, France.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fischerova, Daniela
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Gen Univ Hosp, Czech Republic.
    Haie-Meder, Christine
    Inst Gustave Roussy, France.
    Koehler, Christhardt
    Asklepios Hambourg Altona and Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Landoni, Fabio
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Lax, Sigurd
    Gen Hosp Graz Sued West, Austria.
    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Mahantshetty, Umesh
    Tata Mem Hosp, India.
    Mathevet, Patrice
    Lausanne Univ, Switzerland.
    McCluggage, W. Glenn
    Belfast Hlth and Social Care Trust, North Ireland.
    McCormack, Mary
    Univ Coll London Hosp, England.
    Naik, Raj
    Queen Elizabeth Hosp, England.
    Nout, Remi
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Pignata, Sandro
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Ponce, Jordi
    Univ Hosp Bellvitge IDIBELL, Spain.
    Querleu, Denis
    Inst Bergoni, France.
    Raspagliesi, Francesco
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Rodolakis, Alexandros
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Tamussino, Karl
    Med Univ Graz, Austria.
    Wimberger, Pauline
    Dresden Univ, Germany.
    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria
    Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Correction: The European Society of Gynaecological Oncology/European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology/European Society of Pathology Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Cervical Cancer (vol 472, pg 919, 2018)2018In: Virchows Archiv, ISSN 0945-6317, E-ISSN 1432-2307, Vol. 472, no 6, p. 937-938Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 23.
    Cibula, David
    et al.
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Gen Univ Hosp, Czech Republic.
    Poetter, Richard
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Planchamp, Francois
    Inst Bergonie, France.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fischerova, Daniela
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Gen Univ Hosp, Czech Republic.
    Haie-Meder, Christine
    Inst Gustave Roussy, France.
    Koehler, Christhardt
    Asklepios Hambourg Altona, Germany; Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Landoni, Fabio
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Lax, Sigurd
    Gen Hosp Graz Sued West, Austria.
    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Mahantshetty, Umesh
    Tata Mem Hosp, India.
    Mathevet, Patrice
    Lausanne Univ, Switzerland.
    McCluggage, W. Glenn
    Belfast Hlth and Social Care Trust, North Ireland.
    McCormack, Mary
    Univ Coll London Hosp, England.
    Naik, Raj
    Queen Elizabeth Hosp, England.
    Nout, Remi
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Pignata, Sandro
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Ponce, Jordi
    Univ Hosp Bellvitge IDIBELL, Spain.
    Querleu, Denis
    Inst Bergonie, France.
    Raspagliesi, Francesco
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Rodolakis, Alexandros
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Tamussino, Karl
    Med Univ Graz, Austria.
    Wimberger, Pauline
    Dresden Univ, Germany.
    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria
    Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Correction to: Correction: The European Society of Gynaecological Oncology/European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology/European Society of Pathology Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Cervical Cancer (vol 472, pg 919, 2018)2018In: Virchows Archiv, ISSN 0945-6317, E-ISSN 1432-2307, Vol. 473, no 3, p. 391-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 24.
    Cibula, David
    et al.
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Gen Univ Hosp, Czech Republic.
    Poetter, Richard
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Planchamp, Francois
    Inst Bergoni, France.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fischerova, Daniela
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Gen Univ Hosp, Czech Republic.
    Haie-Meder, Christine
    Inst Gustave Roussy, France.
    Koehler, Christhardt
    Asklepios Hambourg Altona and Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Landoni, Fabio
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Lax, Sigurd
    Gen Hosp Graz Sued West, Austria.
    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Mahantshetty, Umesh
    Tata Mem Hosp, India.
    Mathevet, Patrice
    Lausanne Univ, Switzerland.
    McCluggage, W. Glenn
    Belfast Hlth and Social Care Tmst, North Ireland.
    McCormack, Mary
    Univ Coll London Hosp, England.
    Naik, Raj
    Queen Elizabeth Hosp, England.
    Nout, Remi
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Pignata, Sandro
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Ponce, Jordi
    Univ Hosp Bellvitge IDIBELL, Spain.
    Querleu, Denis
    Inst Bergoni, France.
    Raspagliesi, Francesco
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Rodolakis, Alexandros
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Tamussino, Karl
    Med Univ Graz, Austria.
    Wimberger, Pauline
    Dresden Univ, Germany.
    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria
    Univ Hosp, Italy.
    The European Society of Gynaecological Oncology/European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology/European Society of Pathology Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Cervical Cancer2018In: Virchows Archiv, ISSN 0945-6317, E-ISSN 1432-2307, Vol. 472, no 6, p. 919-936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Society of Gynecological Oncology (ESGO), the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), and the European Society of Pathology (ESP) jointly develop clinically relevant and evidence-based guidelines in order to improve the quality of care for women with cervical cancer across Europe and worldwide. The ESGO/ESTRO/ESP nominated an international multidisciplinary development group consisting of practicing clinicians and researchers who have demonstrated leadership and expertise in the care and research of cervical cancer (23 experts across Europe). To ensure that the guidelines are evidence based, the current literature identified from a systematic search was reviewed and critically appraised. In the absence of any clear scientific evidence, judgment was based on the professional experience and consensus of the development group. The guidelines are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Prior to publication, the guidelines were reviewed by 159 international reviewers, selected through ESGO/ESTRO/ESP and including patient representatives. The guidelines cover comprehensively staging, management, and follow-up for patients with cervical cancer. Management includes fertility sparing treatment; stage T1a, T1b1/T2a1, clinically occult cervical cancer diagnosed after simple hysterectomy; early and locally advanced cervical cancer; primary distant metastatic disease; cervical cancer in pregnancy; and recurrent disease. Principles of radiotherapy and pathological evaluation are defined.

  • 25.
    Cibula, David
    et al.
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Gen Univ Hosp, Czech Republic.
    Poetter, Richard
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Planchamp, Francois
    Inst Bergonie, France.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fischerova, Daniela
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Gen Univ Hosp, Czech Republic.
    Meder, Christine Haie
    Inst Gustave Roussy, France.
    Koehler, Christhardt
    Asklepios Hambourg Altona, Germany; Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Landoni, Fabio
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Lax, Sigurd
    Gen Hosp Graz Sued West, Austria.
    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Mahantshetty, Umesh
    Tata Mem Hosp, India.
    Mathevet, Patrice
    Lausanne Univ, Switzerland.
    McCluggage, W. Glenn
    Belfast Hlth and Social Care Trust, North Ireland.
    McCormack, Mary
    Univ Coll London Hosp, England.
    Naik, Raj
    Queen Elizabeth Hosp, England.
    Nout, Remi
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Pignata, Sandro
    Ist Nazl Studio and Cura Tumori, Italy.
    Ponce, Jordi
    Univ Hosp Bellvitge IDIBELL, Spain.
    Querleu, Denis
    Inst Bergonie, France.
    Raspagliesi, Francesco
    Not Found:[Cibula, David; Fischerova, Daniela] Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med 1, Gynecol Oncol Ctr, Dept Obstet and Gynecol, Prague, Czech Republic; [Cibula, David; Fischerova, Daniela] Gen Univ Hosp, Prague, Czech Republic; [Poetter, Richard] Med Univ Vienna, Dept Radiotherapy, Vienna, Austria; [Planchamp, Francois; Querleu, Denis] Inst Bergonie, Bordeaux, France; [Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth] Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden; [Meder, Christine Haie] Inst Gustave Roussy, Dept Radiotherapy, Villejuif, France; [Koehler, Christhardt] Asklepios Hambourg Altona, Hamburg, Germany; [Koehler, Christhardt] Univ Cologne, Med Fac, Dept Gynecol, Cologne, Germany; [Landoni, Fabio] Univ Milano Bicocca, Monza, Italy; [Lax, Sigurd] Gen Hosp Graz Sued West, Graz, Austria; [Lindegaard, Jacob Christian] Aarhus Univ, Dept Oncol, Aarhus, Denmark; [Mahantshetty, Umesh] Tata Mem Hosp, Dept Radiat Oncol, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India; [Mathevet, Patrice] Lausanne Univ, Lausanne, Switzerland; [McCluggage, W. Glenn] Belfast Hlth and Social Care Trust, Dept Pathol, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland; [McCormack, Mary] Univ Coll London Hosp, London, England; [Naik, Raj] Queen Elizabeth Hosp, Gateshead, England; [Nout, Remi] Leiden Univ, Dept Radiat Oncol, Leiden, Netherlands; [Pignata, Sandro] Ist Nazl Studio and Cura Tumori, IRCCS, Fdn G Pascale, Naples, Italy; [Ponce, Jordi] Univ Hosp Bellvitge IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain; [Rodolakis, Alexandros] Ist Nazl Tumori, Fdn IRCCS, Milan, Italy; [Tamussino, Karl] Univ Athens, Athens, Greece; [Wimberger, Pauline] Med Univ Graz, Graz, Austria; [Wimberger, Pauline] Dresden Univ, TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany; [Raspollini, Maria Rosaria] Univ Hosp, Florence, Italy;.
    Rodolakis, Alexandros
    Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Tamussino, Karl
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Wimberger, Pauline
    Med Univ Graz, Austria; Dresden Univ, Germany.
    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria
    Univ Hosp, Italy.
    The European Society of Gynaecological Oncology/European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology/European Society of Pathology Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Cervical Cancer2018In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, ISSN 1048-891X, E-ISSN 1525-1438, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 641-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Despite significant advances in the screening, detection, and treatment of preinvasive cervical lesions, invasive cervical cancer is the fifth most common cancer in European women. There are large disparities in Europe and worldwide in the incidence, management, and mortality of cervical cancer. Objective The European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO), the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), and the European Society of Pathology (ESP) jointly develop clinically relevant and evidence-based guidelines in order to improve the quality of care for women with cervical cancer across Europe and worldwide. Methods The ESGO/ESTRO/ESP nominated an international multidisciplinary development group consisting of practicing clinicians and researchers who have demonstrated leadership and expertise in the care and research of cervical cancer (23 experts across Europe). To ensure that the guidelines are evidence based, the current literature identified from a systematic search was reviewed and critically appraised. In the absence of any clear scientific evidence, judgment was based on the professional experience and consensus of the development group. The guidelines are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Prior to publication, the guidelines were reviewed by 159 international reviewers, selected through ESGO/ESTRO/ESP and including patient representatives. Results The guidelines cover comprehensively staging, management, and follow-up for patients with cervical cancer. Management includes fertility sparing treatment; stage T1a, T1b1/T2a1, clinically occult cervical cancer diagnosed after simple hysterectomy; early and locally advanced cervical cancer; primary distant metastatic disease; cervical cancer in pregnancy; and recurrent disease. Principles of radiotherapy and pathological evaluation are defined.

  • 26.
    Cibula, David
    et al.
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Gen Univ Hosp, Czech Republic.
    Poetter, Richard
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Planchamp, Francois
    Inst Bergonie, France.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fischerova, Daniela
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Gen Univ Hosp, Czech Republic.
    Meder, Christine Haie
    Inst Gustave Roussy, France.
    Koehler, Christhardt
    Asklepios Hambourg Altona, Germany; Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Landoni, Fabio
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Lax, Sigurd
    Gen Hosp Graz Sued West, Austria.
    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Mahantshetty, Umesh
    Tata Mem Hosp, India.
    Mathevet, Patrice
    Lausanne Univ, Switzerland.
    McCluggage, W. Glenn
    Belfast Hlth and Social Care Trust, North Ireland.
    McCormack, Mary
    Univ Coll Hosp London, England.
    Naik, Raj
    Queen Elizabeth Hosp, England.
    Nout, Remi
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Pignata, Sandro
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Ponce, Jordi
    Univ Hosp Bellvitge IDIBELL, Spain.
    Querleu, Denis
    Inst Bergonie, France.
    Raspagliesi, Francesco
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Rodolakis, Alexandros
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Tamussino, Karl
    Med Univ Graz, Austria.
    Wimberger, Pauline
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria
    Univ Hosp, Italy.
    The European Society of Gynaecological Oncology/European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology/European Society of Pathology guidelines for the management of patients with cervical cancer2018In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 127, no 3, p. 404-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite significant advances in the screening, detection, and treatment of preinvasive cervical lesions, invasive cervical cancer is the fifth most common cancer in European women. There are large disparities in Europe and worldwide in the incidence, management, and mortality of cervical cancer. Objective: The European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO), the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), and the European Society of Pathology (ESP) jointly develop clinically relevant and evidence-based guidelines in order to improve the quality of care for women with cervical cancer across Europe and worldwide. Methods: The ESGO/ESTRO/ESP nominated an international multidisciplinary development group consisting of practicing clinicians and researchers who have demonstrated leadership and expertise in the care and research of cervical cancer (23 experts across Europe). To ensure that the guidelines are evidence based, the current literature identified from a systematic search was reviewed and critically appraised. In the absence of any clear scientific evidence, judgment was based on the professional experience and consensus of the development group. The guidelines are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Prior to publication, the guidelines were reviewed by 159 international reviewers, selected through ESGO/ESTRO/ESP and including patient representatives. Results: The guidelines cover comprehensively staging, management, and follow-up for patients with cervical cancer. Management includes fertility sparing treatment; stage T1a, T1b1/T2a1, clinically occult cervical cancer diagnosed after simple hysterectomy; early and locally advanced cervical cancer; primary distant metastatic disease; cervical cancer in pregnancy; and recurrent disease. Principles of radiotherapy and pathological evaluation are defined. (C) 2018 European Society for Gynaecological Oncology, European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology, and the European Society of Pathology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 27.
    Clark-Snow, Rebecca A.
    et al.
    Univ Kansas, KS 66205 USA.
    Vidall, Cheryl
    Alcura UK Ltd, England.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Jahn, Patrick
    Univ Hosp Halle, Germany.
    Fixed Combination Antiemetic A literature review on prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting using netupitant/palonosetron2018In: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1092-1095, E-ISSN 1538-067X, Vol. 22, no 2, p. E52-E63Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) can be improved with guideline-consistent use of antiemetics. However, adherence to antiemetic guidelines remains often insufficient. Therefore, new strategies that improve adherence are needed. OBJECTIVES: To review the latest antiemetic guideline recommendations and provide an update on the use of NEPA, a fixed combination antiemetic composed of the neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (RA) netupitant and the 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 RA palonosetron (Akynzeo (R)). METHODS: Analysis of the literature was performed, including guidelines, published literature, congress data on NEPA, and relevant articles on CINV. FINDINGS: Nurses are in a unique position to promote guideline-consistent antiemetic prophylaxis and are central in the education of patients and caregivers. Thus, nurses continuous education on antiemetic treatments is key for the prevention and management of CINV. NEPA offers a simplified antiemetic therapy with the potential to increase guideline adherence.

  • 28.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    An overview of pregnancy and fertility issues in breast cancer patients2015In: Annals of Medicine, ISSN 0785-3890, E-ISSN 1365-2060, Vol. 47, no 8, p. 673-678Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies of women in the reproductive years. In the Western world there is a trend towards delaying pregnancy to later in life, and in combination with an increased incidence of breast cancer an increased number of women are diagnosed with breast cancer before they have completed their reproductive plans. In addition, breast cancer during pregnancy may affect an increased number of women as the childbearing years are delayed. The survival rate after breast cancer has improved during the last decades, and many young breast cancer survivors will consider a pregnancy subsequent to the completion of adjuvant breast cancer therapy. Traditionally, many women are advised against a pregnancy due to a fear of increased risk of recurrence, especially women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Due to feasibility issues, evidence from large prospective randomized trials is missing regarding the safety of pregnancy after breast cancer. Today guidelines are based on cohort studies and population-based registry evidence with its limitations. Overall, data suggest that pregnancy after breast cancer therapy is safe, and the current evidence is summarized in this overview.

  • 29.
    Dahm-Kähler, Pernilla
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Regional Cancer Center Western Sweden, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Staf, Christian
    Regional Cancer Center Western Sweden, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falconer, Henrik
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjurberg, Maria
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stålberg, Karin
    Department of Women's and Children's health Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högberg, Thomas
    Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Population-based study of survival for women with serous cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube, peritoneum or undesignated origin - on behalf of the Swedish gynecological cancer group (SweGCG).2017In: Gynecologic Oncology, ISSN 0090-8258, E-ISSN 1095-6859, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 167-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine survival outcome in patients with serous cancer in the ovary, fallopian tube, peritoneum and of undesignated origin.

    METHODS: Nation-wide population-based study of women≥18years with histologically verified non-uterine serous cancer, included in the Swedish Quality Registry for primary cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube and peritoneum diagnosed 2009-2013. Relative survival (RS) was estimated using the Ederer II method. Simple and multivariable analyses were estimated by Poisson regression models.

    RESULTS: Of 5627 women identified, 1246 (22%) had borderline tumors and 4381 had malignant tumors. In total, 2359 women had serous cancer; 71% originated in the ovary (OC), 9% in the fallopian tube (FTC), 9% in the peritoneum (PPC) and 11% at an undesignated primary site (UPS). Estimated RS at 5-years was 37%; for FTC 54%, 40% for OC, 34% for PPC and 13% for UPS. In multivariable regression analyses restricted to women who had undergone primary or interval debulking surgery for OC, FTC and PPC, site of origin was not independently associated with survival. Significant associations with worse survival were found for advanced stages (RR 2.63, P<0.001), moderate (RR 1.90, P<0.047) and poor differentiation (RR 2.20, P<0.009), neoadjuvant chemotherapy (RR1.33, P<0.022), residual tumor (RR 2.65, P<0.001) and platinum single (2.34, P<0.001) compared to platinum combination chemotherapy.

    CONCLUSION: Survival was poorer for serous cancer at UPS than for ovarian, fallopian tube and peritoneal cancer. Serous cancer at UPS needs to be addressed when reporting and comparing survival rates of ovarian cancer.

  • 30.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    et al.
    The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Anneli
    Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Witt Nyström, Petra
    The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Normal tissue sparing potential of scanned proton beams with and without respiratory gating for the treatment of internal mammary nodes in breast cancer radiotherapy2018In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 52, p. 81-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proton therapy has shown potential for reducing doses to normal tissues in breast cancer radiotherapy. However data on the impact of protons when including internal mammary nodes (IMN) in the target for breast radiotherapy is comparatively scarce. This study aimed to evaluate normal tissue doses when including the IMN in regional RT with scanned proton beams, with and without respiratory gating. The study cohort was composed of ten left-sided breast patients CT-scanned during enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) and free-breathing (FB). Proton plans were designed for the target including or excluding the IMN. Targets and organs-at-risk were delineated according to RTOG guidelines. Comparison was performed between dosimetric parameters characterizing target coverage and OAR radiation burden. Statistical significance of differences was tested using a paired, two-tailed Student’s t-test. Inclusion of the IMN in the target volume led to a small increase of the cardiopulmonary burden. The largest differences were seen for the ipsilateral lung where the mean dose increased from 6.1 to 6.6 Gy (RBE) (P < 0.0001) in FB plans and from 6.9 to 7.4 Gy (RBE) (P = 0.003) in EIG plans. Target coverage parameters were very little affected by the inclusion of IMN into the treatment target. Radiotherapy with scanned proton beams has the potential of maintaining low cardiovascular burden when including the IMN into the target, irrespective of whether respiratory gating is used or not.

  • 31.
    Dostalek, Lukas
    et al.
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Creutzberg, Carien L.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Kurdiani, Dina
    Tbilisi Canc Ctr, Rep of Georgia.
    Ponce, Jordi
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Dostalkova, Iva
    Univ South Bohemia, Czech Republic.
    Cibula, David
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    ESGO Survey on Current Practice in the Management of Cervical Cancer2018In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, ISSN 1048-891X, E-ISSN 1525-1438, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 1226-1231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of this survey was to acquire an overview of the current management of cervical cancer with an emphasis on the early disease stages. Materials and Methods A hyperlink to the survey was sent to the European Society of Gynaecological Oncology Office database. The survey contained 6 groups of questions regarding the characteristics of respondents, pretreatment workup, management of the early stages of cervical cancer, adjuvant treatment, fertility-sparing treatment, and surveillance. Results In total, 566 responses were collected. The most frequent imaging method used in the workup was magnetic resonance imaging (74%), followed by computed tomography (54%) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (25%). Conization or simple hysterectomy was a preferred procedure in stage T1a1 lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI)-positive for 79% of respondents, in stage T1a2 LVSI-negative for 58%, and in stage T1a2 LVSI-positive for 28%. Sentinel lymph node biopsy alone was reported in stage T1a1 by 17% and in stage T1b1 less than 2 cm by 9%, whereas systematic lymphadenectomy by 29% and 90% of respondents. Macrometastases, micrometastases, and isolated tumor cells in lymph nodes were considered indications for adjuvant treatment by 96%, 93%, and 68% of respondents, respectively. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was reported by 28% and 19% of respondents in fertility-sparing and nonsparing management in stage T1b1. Over 60% of respondents recommend primary surgery for their patients with T1b2 N0 disease and 81% of them use a combination of adverse prognostic factors as indication for adjuvant radiotherapy in pN0 disease. Conclusions The results of this survey indicate considerable differences in the workup and treatment of cervical cancer in current clinical practice.

  • 32.
    Droog Tesselaar, Erik
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Changes in skin microcirculation during radiation therapy for breast cancer2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 8, p. 1072-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract:

    Background: The majority of breast cancer patients who receive radiation treatment are affected by acute radiation-induced skin changes. The assessment of these changes is usually done by subjective methods, which complicates the comparison between different treatments or patient groups. This study investigates the feasibility of new robust methods for monitoring skin microcirculation to objectively assess and quantify acute skin reactions during radiation treatment.

    Material and methods: Laser Doppler flowmetry, laser speckle contrast imaging, and polarized light spectroscopy imaging were used to measure radiation-induced changes in microvascular perfusion and red blood cell concentration (RBC) in the skin of 15 patients undergoing adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Measurements were made before treatment, once a week during treatment, and directly after the last fraction.

    Results: In the treated breast, perfusion and RBC concentration were increased after 1–5 fractions (2.66–13.3 Gy) compared to baseline. The largest effects were seen in the areola and the medial area. No changes in perfusion and RBC concentration were seen in the untreated breast. In contrast, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scores were increased only after 2 weeks of treatment, which demonstrates the potential of the proposed methods for early assessment of skin changes. Also, there was a moderate to good correlation between the perfusion (r = 0.52) and RBC concentration (r = 0.59) and the RTOG score given a week later.

    Conclusion: We conclude that radiation-induced microvascular changes in the skin can be objectively measured using novel camera-based techniques before visual changes in the skin are apparent. Objective measurement of microvascular changes in the skin may be valuable in the comparison of skin reactions between different radiation treatments and possibly in predicting acute skin effects at an earlier stage.

  • 33.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin I.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Oxaliplatin-Induced Neurotoxic Side Effects and Their Impact on Daily Activities2019In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oxaliplatin (OXA) is frequently used in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, and OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects are common. Reports on real-time patient-reported neurotoxic side effects and impact on the patient's daily activities are sparse in existing studies. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify and assess patient-reported OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects and their impact on the patient's daily activities, during and after chemotherapy. Methods: In a multicenter prospective longitudinal study, 46 chemo-naïve patients with colorectal cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant OXA-based chemotherapy were monitored during treatment and at 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-ups. Patients were recruited from September 2013 to June 2016. In total, 370 Oxaliplatin-Associated Neurotoxicity Questionnaire responses were available for analysis. A mobile phone-based system was used to receive real-time assessments. Results: All patients reported neurotoxic side effects and impact on daily activities during treatment. The side effects changed in character and body location over time and had an impact on the daily activities. Conclusions: The high prevalence of OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects significantly interfered with the patients' daily activities. We found significant differences between baseline data and follow-up time points for neurotoxicity, and the patients had not returned to baseline after 1 year. Implications for Practice: The real-time assessment using mobile phone technology seems to be a valuable tool for monitoring patient-reported neurotoxicity and interventions for tailored care. Effectively identifying neurotoxicity and its impact on the patient's daily activities is important in supportive cancer care.

  • 34.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The trajectory of neurotoxic side effects' impact on daily life: a qualitative study2016In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 3455-3461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxic side effects among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and how these side effects influenced their daily lives over time.

    METHODS:

    To assess neurotoxic side effects, ten patients were repeatedly interviewed. The patients were recruited from two hospitals in south of Sweden, had stage II-III CRC, and had been treated with adjuvant oxaliplatin postoperatively, from November 2013 to October 2015. They had received FOLFOX and XELOX, with a mean total dose of 791 mg oxaliplatin. After completed chemotherapy, at 3, 6, and 12 months into the post-treatment phase, 25 interviews were conducted and thematic analysis was used according to Braun and Clarke.

    RESULTS:

    Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity affects patients in several ways in the long term. Four themes were identified: Expectation of cure, Dubiety, Normalization, and Learn to live with neurotoxicity. The findings of this study describe the trajectory of neurotoxicity and its impact on these patients' life situation. The findings confirmed that neurotoxicity is multi-faceted and that the experience of it changes over time.

    CONCLUSION:

    The desire to survive stimulates adaptations and strategies to manage daily life, and patients learn to live with the neurotoxic side effects. This study provides evidence that these patients need individual attention and support during the trajectory of neurotoxic side effects. Current care provision is inadequate due to a lack of knowledge of the ways in which neurotoxicity impacts the patient's daily life. This study provides insights that could be used to develop a more person-centered care.

  • 35.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin I.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Neurotoxic Side Effects Early in the Oxaliplatin Treatment Period in Patients With Colorectal Cancer2018In: Oncology Nursing Forum, ISSN 0190-535X, E-ISSN 1538-0688, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 690-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To identify and describe experiences of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) who have neurotoxic side effects early in the oxaliplatin treatment period, and how neurotoxicity affects their daily lives.

    PARTICIPANTS & SETTING: 10 patients with stage II-III CRC were included. All were treated with adjuvant oxaliplatin postoperatively and assessed neurotoxicity via a platform-independent mobile phone-based system. Patients were recruited from two hospitals in southern Sweden from November 2013 to August 2014.

    METHODOLOGIC APPROACH: Qualitative interview study conducted through open-ended, face-to-face, qualitative interviews. Thematic analysis was used.

    FINDINGS: A main theme was identified.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Nurses have an obligation to communicate the importance of early detection of neurotoxicity. Mobile phone technology seems to be a valuable tool for monitoring patient-reported neurotoxicity to improve communication and supportive care.

  • 36.
    Ehinger, Anna
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Blekinge County Hospital, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bendahl, Pär-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Elston, Christopher W.
    Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust, England.
    Falck, Anna-Karin
    Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Forsare, Carina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Grabau, Dorthe
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Histological grade provides significant prognostic information in addition to breast cancer subtypes defined according to St Gallen 20132017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 68-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The St Gallen surrogate definition of the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer consist of five subgroups based on estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and Ki-67. PgR and Ki-67 are used for discriminating between the Luminal A-like and Luminal B-like (HER2-negative) subtypes. Histological grade (G) has prognostic value in breast cancer; however, its relationship to the St Gallen subtypes is not clear. Based on a previous pilot study, we hypothesized that G could be a primary discriminator for ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancers that were G1 or G3, whereas Ki-67 and PgR could provide additional prognostic information specifically for patients with G2 tumors. To test this hypothesis, a larger patient cohort was examined. Patients and methods: Six hundred seventy-one patients (amp;gt;= 35 years of age, pT1-2, pN0-1) with ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer and complete data for PgR, Ki-67, G, lymph node status, tumor size, age, and distant disease-free survival (DDFS; median follow-up 9.2 years) were included. Results: Luminal A-like tumors were mostly G1 or G2 (90%) whereas Luminal B-like tumors were mostly G2 or G3 (87%) and corresponded with good and poor DDFS, respectively. In Luminal B-like tumors that were G1 (n = 23), no metastasis occurred, whereas 14 of 40 Luminal A-like tumors that were G3 metastasized. In the G2 subgroup, low PgR and high Ki-67 were associated with an increased risk of distant metastases, hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8 (0.95-3.4) and 1.5 (0.80-2.8), respectively. Conclusions: Patients with ER-positive/HER2-negative/G1 breast cancer have a good prognosis, similar to that of Luminal A-like, while those with ER-positive/HER2-negative/G3 breast cancer have a worse prognosis, similar to that of Luminal B-like, when assessed independently of PgR and Ki-67. Therapy decisions based on Ki-67 and PgR might thus be restricted to the subgroup G2.

  • 37.
    Ekholm, Maria
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Two Years of Adjuvant Tamoxifen Provides a Survival Benefit Compared With No Systemic Treatment in Premenopausal Patients With Primary Breast Cancer: Long-Term Follow-Up (> 25 years) of the Phase III SBII:2pre Trial2016In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 34, no 19, p. 2232-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen compared with no systemic treatment (control) in premenopausal patients with breast cancer over different time periods through long-term (amp;gt; 25 years) follow-up. Patients and Methods Premenopausal patients with primary breast cancer (N = 564) were randomly assigned to 2 years of tamoxifen (n = 276) or no systemic treatment (n = 288). Data regarding date and cause of death were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Register. End points were cumulative mortality (CM) and cumulative breast cancer-related mortality (CBCM). The median follow-up for the 250 patients still alive in April 2014 was 26.3 years (range, 22.7 to 29.7 years). Results In patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors (n = 362), tamoxifen was associated with a marginal reduction in CM (hazard ratio [HR], 0.77; 95% CI, 0.58 to 1.03; P = .075) and a significant reduction in CBCM (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.99; P = .046). The effect seemed to vary over time (CM years 0 to 5: HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.73; years amp;gt;5 to 15: HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.91; and after 15 years: HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.42; CBCM years 0 to 5: HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.82; years amp;gt;5 to 15: HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.86; and after 15 years: HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.36 to 1.44). Conclusion Two years of adjuvant tamoxifen resulted in a long-term survival benefit in premenopausal patients with estrogen receptor-positive primary breast cancer. (C) 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

  • 38.
    Ekholm, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Dept Oncol, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bendahl, P. O.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ferno, M.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ryden, L.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Effects of adjuvant tamoxifen over three decades on breast cancerefree and distant recurrence-free interval among premenopausal women with oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer randomised in the Swedish SBII:2pre trial2019In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 110, p. 53-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The primary aim was to compare 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen versus no systemic treatment in premenopausal patients with oestrogen receptor (ER) epositive tumours, regarding breast cancerefree interval (BCFi) and distant recurrenceefree interval (D-RFi), with 30 years of follow-up and for specified intervals. Moreover, we aimed to investigate the effects of adjuvant tamoxifen on the incidence of secondary malignancies and survival after distant recurrence. Methods: Premenopausal patients with primary breast cancer were randomised to 2 years of tamoxifen (n=277) or no systemic treatment (n=287), irrespective of ER status. Information regarding events was collected by a review of medical records and from national registers. Results: The median follow-up for all patients without events was 28 years, and only four of the patients alive had a follow-up of amp;lt;20 years. With 30 years of follow-up, tamoxifen prolonged BCFi in the intention-to-treat population (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-0.94, p = 0.011) compared with no treatment. In patients with ER-positive tumours (n = 362), tamoxifen prolonged BCFi (HR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.47-0.82, p = 0.001) and D-RFi (HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.54-0.99, p = 0.043). The positive effect on BCFi was significant also for the interval amp;gt; 15-30 years (HR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.28-0.98, p = 0.042). For patients with ER-positive tumours who were diagnosed with distant recurrence (n=165), survival after distant recurrence was shorter among tamoxifen-treated patients (median, 29 months versus 43 months). The incidence of contralateral breast cancer was 42% lower in the tamoxifen group (HR=0.58, 95% CI 0.35-0.96, p=0.035), whereas no differences were observed regarding other secondary malignancies. Conclusions: With three decades of follow-up, 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen reduced the incidence of breast cancererelated events and distant recurrence, and the carryover effect seems to extend beyond 15 years. Moreover, adjuvant tamoxifen seems to be associated with shorter survival after diagnosis of distant recurrence. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 39.
    Ellegård, Sander
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Veenstra, Cynthia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Pérez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fagerström, Victor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Department of Surgery, Kalmar Hospital, Kalmar.
    Garsjo, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Gert, Krista
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sundquist, Marie
    Department of Surgery, Kalmar Hospital, Kalmar.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Wingren, Sten
    Department of Clinical Medicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Elander, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    ERBB2 and PTPN2 gene copy numbers as prognostic factors in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer treated with trastuzumab2019In: Oncology Letters, ISSN 1792-1074, E-ISSN 1792-1082, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 3371-3381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trastuzumab has markedly improved the treatment and long-term prognosis of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. A frequent clinical challenge in patients with relapsing and/or metastatic disease is de novo or acquired trastuzumab resistance, and to date no predictive biomarkers for palliative trastuzumab have been established. In the present study, the prognostic values of factors involved in the HER2-associated PI3K/Akt signalling pathway were explored. The first 46 consecutive patients treated at the Department of Oncology, Linkoping University Hospital between 2000 and 2007 with trastuzumab for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer were retrospectively included. The gene copy number variation and protein expression of several components of the PI3K/Akt pathway were assessed in the tumour tissue and biopsy samples using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Patients with tumours displaying a high-grade ERBB2 (HER2) amplification level of amp;gt;= 6 copies had a significantly improved overall survival hazard ratio [(HR)=0.4; 95%, confidence interval (CI): 0.2-0.9] and progression-free survival (HR=0.3; 95% CI: 0.1-0.7) compared with patients with tumours harbouring fewer ERBB2 copies. High-grade ERBB2 amplification was significantly associated with the development of central nervous system metastases during palliative treatment. Copy gain (amp;gt;= 3 copies) of the gene encoding the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN2 was associated with a shorter overall survival (HR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.0-4.0) and shorter progression-free survival (HR=2.1; 95% CI: 1.0-4.1). In conclusion, high ERBB2 amplification level is a potential positive prognostic factor in trastuzumab-treated HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, whereas PTPN2 gain is a potential negative prognostic factor. Further studies are warranted on the role of PTPN2 in HER2 signalling.

  • 40.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Complementary and alternative medicine self-care strategies for nausea in patients undergoing abdominal or pelvic irradiation for cancer: A longitudinal observational study of implementation in routine care2017In: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, ISSN 0965-2299, E-ISSN 1873-6963, Vol. 34, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To longitudinally describe practice of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) self-care strategies for nausea during radiotherapy. Methods: Two hundred patients daily registered nausea and practice of CAM self-care strategies, beside conventional antiemetic medications, for nausea during abdominal/pelvic irradiation (median five weeks) for gynecological (69%) colorectal (27%) or other tumors (4%). Results: During radiotherapy, 131 (66%) experienced nausea, and 50 (25%) practiced self-care for nausea at least once, for a mean (m) of 15.9 days. The six of 50 patients who stayed free from nausea practiced self-care more frequent (m = 25.8 days) than the 44 patients experiencing nausea (m = 14.5) (p = 0.013). The CAM self-care strategies were: modifying eating (80% of all self-care practicing patients, 80% of the nauseous patients versus 83% of the patients free from nausea; ns) or drinking habits (38%, 41% vs 17%; ns), taking rests (18%, 20% vs 0%; ns), physical exercising (6%, 2% vs 33%; p = 0.035), acupressure (4%, 5% vs 0%; ns) and self-induced vomiting (2%, 2% vs 0%; ns). Conclusion: A fourth of patients undergoing emetogenic radiotherapy practiced CAM self-care for nausea, mostly by modifying eating or drinking habits. The CAM self-care practicing patients who did not become nauseous practiced self-care more frequent than the nauseous patients did. To make such self-care evidence based, we need studies evaluating its efficacy.

  • 41.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Osher centrum för integrativ medicin, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Institutionen för onkologi-patologi, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, avdelning för onkologi, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Reduced Need for Rescue Antiemetics and Improved Capacity to Eat in Patients Receiving Acupuncture Compared to Patients Receiving Sham Acupuncture or Standard Care during Radiotherapy.2017In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, Vol. 2017, article id 5806351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate if consumption of emesis-related care and eating capacity differed between patients receiving verum acupuncture, sham acupuncture, or standard care only during radiotherapy. Methods. Patients were randomized to verum (n = 100) or sham (n = 100) acupuncture (telescopic blunt sham needle) (median 12 sessions) and registered daily their consumption of antiemetics and eating capacity. A standard care group (n = 62) received standard care only and delivered these data once. Results. More patients in the verum (n = 73 of 89 patients still undergoing radiotherapy; 82%, Relative Risk (RR) 1.23, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.01-1.50) and the sham acupuncture group (n = 79 of 95; 83%, RR 1.24, CI 1.03-1.52) did not need any antiemetic medications, as compared to the standard care group (n = 42 out of 63; 67%) after receiving 27 Gray dose of radiotherapy. More patients in the verum (n = 50 of 89; 56%, RR 1.78, CI 1.31-2.42) and the sham acupuncture group (n = 58 of 94 answering patients; 62%, RR 1.83, CI 1.20-2.80) were capable of eating as usual, compared to the standard care group (n = 20 of 63; 39%). Conclusion. Patients receiving acupuncture had lower consumption of antiemetics and better eating capacity than patients receiving standard antiemetic care, plausible by nonspecific effects of the extra care during acupuncture.

  • 42.
    Esserman, Laura J.
    et al.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94115 USA.
    Yau, Christina
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94115 USA; Buck Institute Research Aging, CA USA.
    Thompson, Carlie K.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94115 USA.
    vant Veer, Laura J.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94115 USA.
    Borowsky, Alexander D.
    University of Calif Davis, CA 95616 USA.
    Hoadley, Katherine A.
    University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    Tobin, Nicholas P.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Benz, Christopher C.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94115 USA; Buck Institute Research Aging, CA USA.
    Lindstrom, Linda S.
    University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Use of Molecular Tools to Identify Patients With Indolent Breast Cancers With Ultralow Risk Over 2 Decades2017In: JAMA Oncology, ISSN 2374-2437, E-ISSN 2374-2445, Vol. 3, no 11, p. 1503-1510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE The frequency of cancers with indolent behavior has increased with screening. Better tools to identify indolent tumors are needed to avoid overtreatment. OBJECTIVE To determine if a multigene classifier is associated with indolent behavior of invasive breast cancers in women followed for 2 decades. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This is a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of tamoxifen vs no systemic therapy, with more than 20-year follow-up. An indolent threshold (ultralow risk) of the US Food and Drug Administration-cleared MammaPrint 70-gene expression score was established above which no breast cancer deaths occurred after 15 years in the absence of systemic therapy. Immunohistochemical markers (n = 727 women) and Agilent microarrays, for MammaPrint risk scoring (n = 652 women), were performed from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary tumor blocks. Participants were postmenopausal women with clinically detected node-negative breast cancers treated with mastectomy or lumpectomy and radiation enrolled in the Stockholm tamoxifen (STO-3) trial, 1976 to 1990. EXPOSURES After 2 years of tamoxifen vs no systemic therapy, regardless of hormone receptor status, patients without relapse who reconsented were further randomized to 3 additional years or none. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Breast cancer-specific survival assessed by Kaplan-Meier analyses and multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling, adjusted for treatment, patient age, year of diagnosis, tumor size, grade, hormone receptors, and ERBB2/HER2 and Ki67 status. RESULTS In this secondary analysis of node-negative postmenopausal women, conducted in the era before mammography screening, among the 652 women with MammaPrint scoring available (median age, 62.8 years of age), 377 (58%) and 275 (42%) were MammaPrint low and high risk, respectively, while 98 (15%) were ultralow risk. At 20 years, women with 70-gene high and low tumors but not ultralow tumors had a significantly higher risk of disease-specific death compared with ultralow-risk patients by Cox analysis (hazard ratios, 4.73 [95% CI, 1.38-16.22] and 4.54 [95% CI, 1.40-14.80], respectively). There were no deaths in the ultralow-risk tamoxifen-treated arm at 15 years, and these patients had a 20-year disease-specific survival rate of 97%, whereas for untreated patients the survival rate was 94%. Recursive partitioning identified ultralow risk as the most significant predictor of good outcome. In tumors "not ultralow risk," tumor size greater than 2 cm was the most predictive of outcome. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The ultralow-risk threshold of the 70-gene MammaPrint assay can identify patients whose long-term systemic risk of death from breast cancer after surgery alone is exceedingly low.

  • 43.
    Evert, Jasmine
    et al.
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pathak, Surajit
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chettinad Academy of Research and Education, Kelambakkam, India.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Zhang, Hong
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    A Study on Effect of Oxaliplatin in MicroRNA Expression in Human Colon Cancer2018In: Journal of Cancer, ISSN 1837-9664, E-ISSN 1837-9664, Vol. 9, no 11, p. 2046-2053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer is a commonly diagnosed malignancy and also the major cause of death worldwide. Chemotherapy is the primary therapy for advanced colorectal cancer. Although oxaliplatin has potential effect in colorectal cancer therapy, the molecular mechanisms involved in its cytotoxic effects are not well elucidated. This study outlines the regulatory effects of oxaliplatin on miRNAs expression in colon cancer cells and correlates it with the changing microRNA expression with p53 and p73 expression status in cells. HCT116(p53+/+) and HCT116(p53-/-) cells were exposed to oxaliplatin, and the cellular viability was determined by XTT. p73 was knocked down using siRNA and the tumor cells were then treated with oxaliplatin. The expression profile of 384 miRNAs was determined by TaqMan (R) human miRNA array and calculated by the Delta Delta C-t method. Cellular viability was found to decrease after the treatment with oxaliplatin in a dose-dependent manner. The wild-type p53 cells were found to be more sensitive than the null-p53 derivatives. A selective set of miRNAs were either up-regulated or down-regulated in response to the oxaliplatin treatment with a presumable role of p53 and p73 proteins. The miRNAs expression is known to influence the pharmacodynamic mechanisms of oxaliplatin and these effects have been observed to be regulated by p53 and p73. Our results may therefore provide more evidence for identifying a suitable biomarker for the diagnosis of colon cancer.

  • 44.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Radiation burden from modern radiation therapy techniques including proton therapy for breast cancer treatment - clinical implications2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis was to study the clinical implications of modern radiotherapy techniques for breast cancer treatment. This was investigated in several individual studies.

    Study I investigated the implications of using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) from the perspective of clinical recommendations for breast cancer radiotherapy. Pencil beam convolution plans of 40 breast cancer patients were recalculated with AAA. The latter plans had a significantly worse coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) with the 93% isodose, higher maximum dose in hotspots, higher volumes of the ipsilateral lung receiving doses below 25 Gy and smaller volumes with doses above 25 Gy. AAA also predicted lower doses to the heart.

    Study II investigated the implications of using the irregular surface compensator (ISC), an electronic compensation algorithm, in comparison to three‐dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D‐CRT) for breast cancer treatment. Ten breast cancer patients were planned with both techniques. The ISC technique led to better coverage of the clinical target volume of the tumour bed (CTV‐T) and PTV in almost all patients with significant improvement in homogeneity.

    Study III investigated the feasibility of using scanning pencil beam proton therapy for regional and loco‐regional breast cancer with comparison of ISC photon planning. Ten patients were included in the study, all with dose heterogeneity in the target and/or hotspots in the normal tissues outside the PTV. The proton plans showed comparable or better CTV‐T and PTV coverage, with large reductions in the mean doses to the heart and the ipsilateral lung.

    Study IV investigated the added value of enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) for proton therapy. Twenty patients were planned on CT datasets acquired during EIG and freebreathing (FB) using photon 3D‐CRT and scanning proton therapy. Proton spot scanning has a high potential to reduce the irradiation of organs‐at‐risk for most patients, beyond what could be achieved with EIG and photon therapy, especially in terms of mean doses to the heart and the left anterior descending artery.

    Study V investigated the impact of physiological breathing motion during proton radiotherapy for breast cancer. Twelve thoracic patients were planned on CT datasets during breath‐hold at inhalation phase and breath‐hold at exhalation phase. Between inhalation and exhalation phase there were very small differences in dose delivered to the target and cardiovascular structures, with very small clinical implication.

    The results of these studies showed the potential of various radiotherapy techniques to improve the quality of life for breast cancer patients by limiting the dose burden for normal tissues.

    List of papers
    1. Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm versus Pencil Beam Convolution for treatment planning of breast cancer: implications for target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissue
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm versus Pencil Beam Convolution for treatment planning of breast cancer: implications for target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissue
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 2841-2848Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the implications of using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for calculation of target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissues. Most model parameters, recommendations and planning guidelines associated with a certain outcome are from the era of pencil beam convolution (PBC) calculations on relatively simple assumptions of energy transport in media. Their relevance for AAA calculations that predict more realistic dose distributions needs to be evaluated. Patients and Methods: Forty patients with left-sided breast cancer receiving 3D conformal radiation therapy were planned using PBC with a standard protocol with 50 Gy in 25 fractions according to existing re-commendations. The plans were subsequently recalculated with the AAA and relevant dose parameters were determined and compared to their PBC equivalents. Results: The majority of the AAA-based plans had a significantly worse coverage of the planning target volume and also a higher maximum dose in hotspots near sensitive structures, suggesting that these criteria could be relaxed for AAA-calculated plans. Furthermore, the AAA predicts higher volumes of the ipsilateral lung will receive doses below 25 Gy and smaller volume doses above 25 Gy. These results indicate that lung tolerance criteria might also have to be relaxed for AAA planning in order to maintain the level of normal tissue toxicity. The AAA also predicts lower doses to the heart, thus indicating that this organ might be more sensitive to radiation than thought from PBC-based calculations. Conclusion: The AAA should be preferred over the PBC algorithm for breast cancer radiotherapy as it gives more realistic dose distributions. Guidelines for plan acceptance might have to be re-evaluated to account for differences in dose predictions in order to maintain the current levels of control and complication rates. The results also suggest an increased radiosensitivity of the heart, thus indicating that a revision of the current models for cardiovascular complications may be needed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    International Institute of Anticancer Research, 2015
    Keywords
    breast radiotherapy, dose calculation algorithm, analytical anisotropic algorithm, pencil beam convolution, planning guidelines
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117854 (URN)000354267200045 ()25964565 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-05-11 Created: 2015-05-11 Last updated: 2017-12-04
    2. Clinical implications of the ISC technique for breast cancer radiotherapy and comparison with clinical recommendations
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical implications of the ISC technique for breast cancer radiotherapy and comparison with clinical recommendations
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    2014 (English)In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 3563-3568Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The project studied the implications of using the irregular surface compensator (ISC) technique in comparison to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for breast cancer treatment. ISC is an electronic compensation algorithm that modulates the fluence across the radiation fields to compensate for irregularly shaped surfaces and deliver a homogeneous dose to a compensation plane. Methods: Ten breast cancer patients (five left- and five right-sided) were planned with both techniques. The planning was done for 50 Gy in 25 fractions with 2 Gy per fraction in all patients. Physical parameters such as doses to the clinical target volume (CTV-T) and the planned target volume (PTV), heterogeneity index and doses to lung and heart were determined and compared for the treatment plans. Results: The ISC technique led to significantly better coverage of the CTV-T and PTV in almost all patients with statistically significant better homogeneity of the dose distribution. The contralateral lung and the heart receive the same doses with both ISC and 3D-CRT plans. However, ISC showed a trend towards decreasing the volumes of the ipsilateral lung irradiated with high doses. Consequently this led to better compliance with the national recommendations for breast radiotherapy. Conclusion: The ISC technique leads to an improvement of the target coverage and the radiation burden of the ipsilateral lung thus allowing better compliance with the national recommendations and increasing the potential for improved quality of life for breast cancer patients. It should therefore be preferred over 3D-CRT for breast cases with difficult dose homogeneity to the PTV or CTV-T.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    International Institute of Anticancer Research, 2014
    Keywords
    breast radiotherapy, irregular surface compensator, fractionated radiotherapy, irradiation technique
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106944 (URN)000338780300044 ()24982370 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-05-28 Created: 2014-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Potential benefit of scanned proton beam versus photons as adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential benefit of scanned proton beam versus photons as adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer
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    2015 (English)In: International Journal of Particle Therapy, ISSN 2331-5180, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 845-855Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using scanned proton beams as adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Long-term cardiopulmonary complications may worsen the quality of life and reduce the positive contribution of radiation therapy, which has been known to improve long-term control of locoregional disease as well as the long-term survival for these patients.

    Materials and Methods: Ten patients with stage I-III cancer (either after mastectomy or lumpectomy, left- or right-sided) were included in the study. The patients were identified from a larger group where dose heterogeneity in the target and/or hotspots in the normal tissues qualified them for irregular surface compensator planning with photons. The patients underwent planning with 2 scanned proton beam planning techniques, single-field uniform dose and intensity-modulated proton therapy, and the results were compared with those from irregular surface compensator. All volumes of interest were delineated and reviewed by experienced radio-oncologists. The patients were prescribed 50 GyRBE in 25 fractions. Dosimetric parameters of interest were compared with a paired, 2-tailed Student t test.

    Results: The proton plans showed comparable or better target coverage than the original photon plans. There were also large reductions with protons in mean doses to the heart (0.2 versus 1.3 GyRBE), left anterior descending artery (1.4 versus 6.4 GyRBE), and the ipsilateral lung (6.3 versus 7.7 GyRBE). This reduction is important from the point of view of the quality of life of the patients after radiation therapy. No significant differences were found between single-field uniform dose and intensity-modulated proton therapy plans.

    Conclusion: Spot scanning technique with protons may improve target dose homogeneity and further reduce doses to the organs at risk compared with advanced photon techniques. The results from this study indicate a potential for protons as adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer and a further step toward the individualization of treatment based on anatomic and comorbidity characteristics.

    Keywords
    breast radiation therapy, proton radiation therapy, pencil beam scanning, irregular surface compensator, fractionated radiation therapy
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112949 (URN)10.14338/IJPT-14-00013.1 (DOI)
    Available from: 2014-12-31 Created: 2014-12-31 Last updated: 2016-04-27
    4. Respiratory gating for proton beam scanning versus photon 3D-CRT for breast cancer radiotherapy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Respiratory gating for proton beam scanning versus photon 3D-CRT for breast cancer radiotherapy
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    2016 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 577-583Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background Respiratory gating and proton therapy have both been proposed to reduce the cardiopulmonary burden in breast cancer radiotherapy. This study aims to investigate the additional benefit of proton radiotherapy for breast cancer with and without respiratory gating.

    Material and methods Twenty left-sided patients were planned on computed tomography (CT)-datasets acquired during enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) and free-breathing (FB), using photon three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and scanned proton beams. Ten patients received treatment to the whole breast only (WBO) and 10 were treated to the breast and the regional lymph nodes (BRN). Dosimetric parameters characterizing the coverage of target volumes and the cardiopulmonary burden were compared using a paired, two-tailed Student’s t-test.

    Results Protons ensured comparable or better target coverage than photons in all patients during both EIG and FB. The heterogeneity index decreased from 12% with photons to about 5% with protons. The mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was reduced in BRN patients from 12 Gy to 7 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 14 Gy to 6-7 Gy (RBE) in FB, while for WBO patients all values were about 5-6 Gy (RBE). The mean dose to heart decreased by a factor of four in WBO patients [from 1.1 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 2.1 Gy to 0.5 Gy (RBE) in FB] and 10 in BRN patients [from 2.1 Gy to 0.2 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 3.4 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in FB]. Similarly, the mean and the near maximum dose to left anterior descending artery (LAD) were significantly lower (p<0.05) with protons in comparison with photons.

    Conclusion Proton spot scanning has a high potential to reduce the irradiation of organs at risk and other normal tissues for most patients, beyond what could be achieved with EIG and photon therapy. The largest dose sparing has been seen for BRN patients, both in terms of cardiopulmonary burden and integral dose.

    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123274 (URN)10.3109/0284186X.2015.1120883 (DOI)000375566700008 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies:  LiU Cancer research network at Linkoping University; Region Ostergotland; ALF Grants from Region Ostergotland (Sweden)

    Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2017-04-24
    5. Impact of physiological breathing motion for breast cancer radiotherapy with proton beam scanning: An in silico study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of physiological breathing motion for breast cancer radiotherapy with proton beam scanning: An in silico study
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    2017 (English)In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 39, p. 88-94Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the impact of breathing motion on proton breast treatment plans. Twelve patients with CT datasets acquired during breath-hold-at-inhalation (BHI), breath-hold-at-exhalation (BHE) and in free-breathing (FB) were included in the study. Proton plans were designed for the left breast for BHI and subsequently recalculated for BHE or designed for FB and recalculated for the extreme breath-hold phases. The plans were compared from the point of view of their target coverage and doses to organs-at-risk. The median amplitude of breathing motion determined from the positions of the sternum was 4.7 mm (range 0.5-14.6 mm). Breathing motion led to a degradation of the dose coverage of the target (heterogeneity index increased from 4-7% to 8-11%), but the degraded values of the dosimetric parameters of interest fulfilled the clinical criteria for plan acceptance. Exhalation decreased the lung burden [average dose 3.1-4.5 Gy (RBE)], while inhalation increased it [average dose 5.8-6.8 Gy (RBE)]. The individual values depended on the field arrangement. Smaller differences were seen for the heart [average dose 0.1-0.2 Gy (RBE)] and the LAD [1.9-4.6 Gy (RBE)]. Weak correlations were generally found between changes in dosimetric parameters and respiratory motion. The differences between dosimetric parameters for various breathing phases were small and their expected clinical impact is consequently quite small. The results indicated that the dosimetric parameters of the plans corresponding to the extreme breathing phases are little affected by breathing motion, thus suggesting that this motion might have little impact for the chosen beam orientations with scanned proton beams.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127369 (URN)10.1016/j.ejmp.2017.06.001 (DOI)000405493200012 ()28606833 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: LiU Cancer research network at Linkoping University and Region Ostergotland (Sweden)

    Available from: 2016-04-23 Created: 2016-04-23 Last updated: 2018-05-02Bibliographically approved
  • 45.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Chehrazi, Behnaz
    Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Impact of physiological breathing motion for breast cancer radiotherapy with proton beam scanning: An in silico study2017In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 39, p. 88-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the impact of breathing motion on proton breast treatment plans. Twelve patients with CT datasets acquired during breath-hold-at-inhalation (BHI), breath-hold-at-exhalation (BHE) and in free-breathing (FB) were included in the study. Proton plans were designed for the left breast for BHI and subsequently recalculated for BHE or designed for FB and recalculated for the extreme breath-hold phases. The plans were compared from the point of view of their target coverage and doses to organs-at-risk. The median amplitude of breathing motion determined from the positions of the sternum was 4.7 mm (range 0.5-14.6 mm). Breathing motion led to a degradation of the dose coverage of the target (heterogeneity index increased from 4-7% to 8-11%), but the degraded values of the dosimetric parameters of interest fulfilled the clinical criteria for plan acceptance. Exhalation decreased the lung burden [average dose 3.1-4.5 Gy (RBE)], while inhalation increased it [average dose 5.8-6.8 Gy (RBE)]. The individual values depended on the field arrangement. Smaller differences were seen for the heart [average dose 0.1-0.2 Gy (RBE)] and the LAD [1.9-4.6 Gy (RBE)]. Weak correlations were generally found between changes in dosimetric parameters and respiratory motion. The differences between dosimetric parameters for various breathing phases were small and their expected clinical impact is consequently quite small. The results indicated that the dosimetric parameters of the plans corresponding to the extreme breathing phases are little affected by breathing motion, thus suggesting that this motion might have little impact for the chosen beam orientations with scanned proton beams.

  • 46.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Dohlmar, Frida
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm versus Pencil Beam Convolution for treatment planning of breast cancer: implications for target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissue2015In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 2841-2848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the implications of using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for calculation of target coverage and radiation burden of normal tissues. Most model parameters, recommendations and planning guidelines associated with a certain outcome are from the era of pencil beam convolution (PBC) calculations on relatively simple assumptions of energy transport in media. Their relevance for AAA calculations that predict more realistic dose distributions needs to be evaluated. Patients and Methods: Forty patients with left-sided breast cancer receiving 3D conformal radiation therapy were planned using PBC with a standard protocol with 50 Gy in 25 fractions according to existing re-commendations. The plans were subsequently recalculated with the AAA and relevant dose parameters were determined and compared to their PBC equivalents. Results: The majority of the AAA-based plans had a significantly worse coverage of the planning target volume and also a higher maximum dose in hotspots near sensitive structures, suggesting that these criteria could be relaxed for AAA-calculated plans. Furthermore, the AAA predicts higher volumes of the ipsilateral lung will receive doses below 25 Gy and smaller volume doses above 25 Gy. These results indicate that lung tolerance criteria might also have to be relaxed for AAA planning in order to maintain the level of normal tissue toxicity. The AAA also predicts lower doses to the heart, thus indicating that this organ might be more sensitive to radiation than thought from PBC-based calculations. Conclusion: The AAA should be preferred over the PBC algorithm for breast cancer radiotherapy as it gives more realistic dose distributions. Guidelines for plan acceptance might have to be re-evaluated to account for differences in dose predictions in order to maintain the current levels of control and complication rates. The results also suggest an increased radiosensitivity of the heart, thus indicating that a revision of the current models for cardiovascular complications may be needed.

  • 47.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Witt Nyström, Petra
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Dohlmar, Frida
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Potential benefit of scanned proton beam versus photons as adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer2015In: International Journal of Particle Therapy, ISSN 2331-5180, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 845-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using scanned proton beams as adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Long-term cardiopulmonary complications may worsen the quality of life and reduce the positive contribution of radiation therapy, which has been known to improve long-term control of locoregional disease as well as the long-term survival for these patients.

    Materials and Methods: Ten patients with stage I-III cancer (either after mastectomy or lumpectomy, left- or right-sided) were included in the study. The patients were identified from a larger group where dose heterogeneity in the target and/or hotspots in the normal tissues qualified them for irregular surface compensator planning with photons. The patients underwent planning with 2 scanned proton beam planning techniques, single-field uniform dose and intensity-modulated proton therapy, and the results were compared with those from irregular surface compensator. All volumes of interest were delineated and reviewed by experienced radio-oncologists. The patients were prescribed 50 GyRBE in 25 fractions. Dosimetric parameters of interest were compared with a paired, 2-tailed Student t test.

    Results: The proton plans showed comparable or better target coverage than the original photon plans. There were also large reductions with protons in mean doses to the heart (0.2 versus 1.3 GyRBE), left anterior descending artery (1.4 versus 6.4 GyRBE), and the ipsilateral lung (6.3 versus 7.7 GyRBE). This reduction is important from the point of view of the quality of life of the patients after radiation therapy. No significant differences were found between single-field uniform dose and intensity-modulated proton therapy plans.

    Conclusion: Spot scanning technique with protons may improve target dose homogeneity and further reduce doses to the organs at risk compared with advanced photon techniques. The results from this study indicate a potential for protons as adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer and a further step toward the individualization of treatment based on anatomic and comorbidity characteristics.

  • 48.
    Forsare, Carina
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bak, Martin
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Falck, Anna-Karin
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Grabau, Dorthe
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Killander, Fredrika
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sundqvist, Marie
    Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Non-linear transformations of age at diagnosis, tumor size, and number of positive lymph nodes in prediction of clinical outcome in breast cancer2018In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 18, article id 1226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundPrognostic factors in breast cancer are often measured on a continuous scale, but categorized for clinical decision-making. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate if accounting for continuous non-linear effects of the three factors age at diagnosis, tumor size, and number of positive lymph nodes improves prognostication. These factors will most likely be included in the management of breast cancer patients also in the future, after an expected implementation of gene expression profiling for adjuvant treatment decision-making.MethodsFour thousand four hundred forty seven and 1132 women with primary breast cancer constituted the derivation and validation set, respectively. Potential non-linear effects on the log hazard of distant recurrences of the three factors were evaluated during 10years of follow-up. Cox-models of successively increasing complexity: dichotomized predictors, predictors categorized into three or four groups, and predictors transformed using fractional polynomials (FPs) or restricted cubic splines (RCS), were used. Predictive performance was evaluated by Harrells C-index.ResultsUsing FP-transformations, non-linear effects were detected for tumor size and number of positive lymph nodes in univariable analyses. For age, non-linear transformations did, however, not improve the model fit significantly compared to the linear identity transformation. As expected, the C-index increased with increasing model complexity for multivariable models including the three factors. By allowing more than one cut-point per factor, the C-index increased from 0.628 to 0.674. The additional gain, as measured by the C-index, when using FP- or RCS-transformations was modest (0.695 and 0.696, respectively). The corresponding C-indices for these four models in the validation set, based on the same transformations and parameter estimates from the derivation set, were 0.675, 0.700, 0.706, and 0.701.ConclusionsCategorization of each factor into three to four groups was found to improve prognostication compared to dichotomization. The additional gain by allowing continuous non-linear effects modeled by FPs or RCS was modest. However, the continuous nature of these transformations has the advantage of making it possible to form risk groups of any size.