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  • 1.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    et al.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Moati, Taha Ali
    General Surgery department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Aesthetic Outcome After Reconstruction of Complex SoftTissue Defects with Free Antero-Lateral Thigh Flap UsingSimple Equipment2015In: Journal of surgery, ISSN 2330-0914, Vol. 3, no 2-1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: We aimed to assess the aesthetic outcome of surgical reconstruction by free ALT flap using binocular single-refraction magnifying glasses and a modified post- operative surveillance protocol. Methods: 16 patients were operated for free antero-lateral thigh flap to reconstruct complex soft tissue defects with a close clinical follow up protocol for post operative care depending on the attending personnel in the Plastic surgery unit, Suez Canal University hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. Aesthetic outcome was assessed using a questionnaire based on Posch et al. 2005, including the following items colour, contour, presence of hair, overall appearance and donor site scar. Results: The patients’ assessed aesthetic outcome was acceptable in majority of the cases; median score was 4 for all assessed items. Complete flap loss occurred in one case, other complications as arterial thrombosis and hematomas and infection were detected and managed accordingly with flap salvage in the 3 complicated cases. Conclusion: The result suggests that the proposed protocol is sufficient as an alternative. The aesthetic outcome assessed by the patient and the failure rate was in line with other studies.

  • 2.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Validation of the burn intervention score in a National Burn Centre2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, no 5, p. 1159-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Linköping burn score has been used for two decades to calculate the cost to the hospital of each burned patient. Our aim was to validate the Burn Score in a dedicated Burn Centre by analysing the associations with burn-specific factors: percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA%), cause of injury, patients referred from other (non-specialist) centres, and survival, to find out which of these factors resulted in higher scores. Our second aim was to analyse the variation in scores of each category of care (surveillance, respiration, circulation, wound care, mobilisation, laboratory tests, infusions, and operation).

    We made a retrospective analysis of all burned patients admitted during the period 2000–15. Multivariable regression models were used to analyse predictive factors for an increased daily burn score, the cumulative burn score (the sum of the daily burn scores for each patient) and the total burn score (total sum of burn scores for the whole group throughout the study period) in addition to sub-analysis of the different categories of care that make up the burn score.

    We retrieved 22 301 daily recordings for inpatients. Mobilisation and care of the wound accounted for more than half of the total burn score during the study. Increased TBSA% and age over 45 years were associated with increased cumulative (model R2 0.43, p < 0.001) and daily (model R2 0.61, p < 0.001) burn scores. Patients who died had higher daily burn scores, while the cumulative burn score decreased with shorter duration of hospital stay (p < 0.001).

    To our knowledge this is the first long term analysis and validation of a system for scoring burn interventions in patients with burns that explores its association with the factors important for outcome. Calculations of costs are based on the score, and it provides an indicator of the nurses’ workload. It also gives important information about the different dimensions of the care provided from thorough investigation of the scores for each category.

  • 3.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Division of overall duration of stay into operative stay and postoperative stay improves the overall estimate as a measure of quality of outcome in burn care.2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients and Methods: Surgically managed burn patients admitted between 2010-14 were included. Operative stay was defined as the time from admission until the last operation, postoperative stay as the time from the last operation until discharge. The difference in variation was analysed with F-test. A retrospective review of medical records was done to explore reasons for extended postoperative stay. Multivariable regression was used to assess factors associated with operative stay and postoperative stay.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Operative stay/TBSA% showed less variation than total duration/TBSA% (F test = 2.38, pless than0.01). The size of the burn, and the number of operations, were the independent factors that influenced operative stay (R2 0.65). Except for the size of the burn other factors were associated with duration of postoperative stay: wound related, psychological and other medical causes, advanced medical support, and accommodation arrangements before discharge, of which the two last were the most important with an increase of (mean) 12 and 17 days (pless than0.001, R2 0.51).less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Adjusted operative stay showed less variation than total hospital stay and thus can be considered a more accurate outcome measure for surgically managed burns. The size of burn and number of operations are the factors affecting this outcome measure.

  • 4.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. a Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Improvement in mortality at a National Burn Centre since 2000: Was it the result of increased resources?2017In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 25, article id e6727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The aim of this study was to find out whether the charging costs (calculated using interventional burn score) increased as mortality decreased. During the last 2 decades, mortality has declined significantly in the Linköping Burn Centre. The burn score that we use has been validated as a measure of workload and is used to calculate the charging costs of each burned patient. We compared the charging costs and mortality in 2 time periods (2000–2007 and 2008–2015). A total of 1363 admissions were included. We investigated the change in the burn score, as a surrogate for total costs per patient. Multivariable regression was used to analyze risk-adjusted mortality and burn score. The median total body surface area % (TBSA%) was 6.5% (10–90 centile 1.0–31.0), age 33 years (1.3–72.2), duration of stay/ TBSA% was 1.4 days (0.3–5.3), and 960 (70%) were males. Crude mortality declined from 7.5% in 2000–2007 to 3.4% in 2008–2015, whereas the cumulative burn score was not increased (P=.08). Regression analysis showed that risk-adjusted mortality decreased (odds ratio 0.42, P=.02), whereas the adjusted burn score did not change (P=.14, model R2 0.86). Mortality decreased but there was no increase in the daily use of resources as measured by the interventional burn score. The data suggest that the improvements in quality obtained have been achieved within present routines for care of patients (multidisciplinary/ orientated to patients’ safety).

    Abbreviation: TBSA% = total body surface area %.

  • 5.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Moghazy, Amr
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abbas, Ashraf
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    A prospective randomized cost billing comparison of local fasciocutaneous perforator versus free Gracilis flap reconstruction for lower limb in a developing economy2016In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 1121-1127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distal half leg complex wounds are usually a formidable problem that necessitates either local or free flap coverage. The aim of this study was to compare cost billing charges in free Gracilis flap (fGF) and local fasciocutaneous perforator flap (lFPF) in reconstructing complex soft tissue leg and foot defects. Patients and methods: Thirty consecutive adult (amp;gt; 15-year-old) patients with soft tissue defects in the leg and/or foot requiring tissue coverage with a flap in the period between 2012 and 2015 were randomly assigned (block randomization) to either an fGF or lFPF procedure. The outcome measures addressed were total billed charges costs, perioperative billed charges cost, partial or complete flap loss, length of hospital stay, inpatient postsurgical care duration, complications, operating time and number of operative scrub staff. Results: One patient suffered from complete flap loss in each group. Reconstruction with lFPF showed total lower billed charges costs by 62% (2509 USD) (p amp;lt; 0.001) and perioperative billed charges cost by 54% (779 USD) (p amp;lt; 0.001), and shorter total hospital stay (36.5 days; p amp;lt; 0.001), inpatient postsurgical care duration (6.4 days; p amp;lt; 0.001), operating time (4.3 h; p amp;lt; 0.001) and fewer scrub staff (2.2 persons; p amp;lt; 0.001). Conclusion: These results suggest that neither flap is totally superior to the other; the choice should instead be based on the outcome sought and logistics. lFPF requires lower billed charges cost and resource use and saves operative time and personnel and reduces length of hospital stay. Our approach changed towards using perforator flaps in medium-sized defects, keeping the free flap option for larger defects. (C) 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Response to comments on: A prospective randomized cost billing comparison of local fasciocutaneous perforator versus free Gracilis flap reconstruction for lower limb in a developing economy2017In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 1307-1308Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Male Breast Glandular Liposculpture Challenges2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 1437-1437Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 8.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department Suez, Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Evaluation of Glandular Liposculpture as a Single Treatment for Grades I and II Gynaecomastia2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 1222-1230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Gynaecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, of which the psychological burden on the patient can be considerable, with the increased risk of disorders such as depression, anxiety, and social phobia. Minimal scarring can be achieved by liposuction alone, though it is known to have a limited effect on the dense glandular and fibroconnective tissues. We know of few studies published on “liposuction alone”, so we designed this study to evaluate the outcome of combining liposuction with glandular liposculpturing through two axillary incisions as a single treatment for the management of grades I and II gynaecomastia.

    Methods

    We made a retrospective analysis of 18 patients with grade I or II gynaecomastia who were operated on by combined liposuction and glandular liposculpturing using a fat disruptor cannula, without glandular excision, during the period 2014–2016. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Breast Evaluation Questionnaire (BEQ), which is a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very dissatisfied; 2 = dissatisfied; 3 = neither; 4 = satisfied; 5 = very satisfied). The post-operative aesthetic appearance of the chest was evaluated by five independent observers on a scale from 1 to 5 (5 = considerable improvement).

    Results

    The patient mean (SD) overall satisfaction score was 4.7 (0.7), in which 92% of the responders were “satisfied” to “very satisfied”. The mean (SD) BEQ for all questions answered increased from 2.1 (0.2) “dissatisfied” preoperatively to 4.1 (0.2) “satisfied” post-operatively. The observers’ mean (SD) rate for the improvement in the shape of the front chest wall was 4.1 (0.7). No haematomas were recorded, one patient developed a wound infection, and two patients complained of remnants of tissue. The median (IQR) body mass index was 27.4 (26.7–29.4), 11 patients had gynaecomastia grade I, and 7 patients grade II. The median (IQR) volume of aspirated fat was 700 ml (650–800), operating time was 67 (65–75) minutes, 14 patients had general anaesthesia, and hospital charges were US$ 538 (481–594).

    Conclusions

    Combined liposuction and liposculpturing using the fat disruptor cannula resulted in satisfied patients and acceptable outcomes according to the observers’ ratings. It could be a useful alternative with an outcome that corresponds to that of more expensive methods.

  • 9.
    Aboelnaga, Ahmed
    et al.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Salah, Omar
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Microbial cellulose dressing compared with silver sulphadiazine for the treatment of partial thickness burns: A prospective, randomised, clinical trial2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 1982-1988Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The current treatment for partial thickness burns at the trial site is silver sulphadiazine, as it minimises bacterial colonisation of wounds. Its deleterious effect on wound healing, together with the need for repeated, often painful, procedures, has brought about the search for a better treatment. Microbial cellulose has shown promising results that avoid these disadvantages. The aim of this study was therefore to compare microbial cellulose with silver sulphadiazine as a dressing for partial thickness burns.

    Method

    All patients who presented with partial thickness (superficial and deep dermal) burns from October 2014 to October 2016 were screened for this randomised clinical trial. Twenty patients were included in each group: the cellulose group was treated with microbial cellulose sheets and the control group with silver sulphadiazine cream 10 mg/g. The wound was evaluated every third day. Pain was assessed using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) scale during and after each procedure. Other variables recorded were age, sex, percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), clinical signs of infection, time for epithelialisation and hospital stay. Linear multivariable regression was used to analyse the significance of differences between the treatment groups by adjusting for the size and depth of the burn, and the patient’s age.

    Results

    Median TBSA% was 9% (IQR 5.5–12.5). The median number of dressing changes was 1 (IQR 1–2) in the cellulose group, which was lower than that in the control group (median 9.5, IQR 6–16) (p < 0.001). Multivariable regression analysis showed that the group treated with microbial cellulose spent 6.3 (95% CI 0.2–12.5) fewer days in hospital (p = 0.04), had a mean score that was 3.4 (95% CI 2.5–4.3) points lower during wound care (p < 0.001), and 2.2 (95% CI 1.6–2.7) afterwards (p < 0.001). Epithelialisation was quicker, but not significantly so.

    Conclusion

    These results suggest that the microbial cellulose dressing is a better first choice for treatment of partial thickness burns than silver sulphadiazine cream. Fewer dressings of the wound were done and, combined with the low pain scores, this is good for both the patients and the health care system. The differences in randomisation of the area of burns is, however, a concern that needs to be included in the interpretation of the results.

  • 10.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Recidivating thrombocytopenia, renal failure and thymitis2017In: Recidivating thrombocytopenia, renal failure and thymitis, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Recurrent thrombocytopenia, renal failure and thymitis of unknown cause. A case report2017In: Vaskulär medicin, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 24-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 45-year old man was admitted to an intensive care unit with flank pain and thrombocytopenia. He was treated for a suspected septicaemia but turned out to have signs of an unknown collagenosis which responded to plasma exchange, thymectomi and corticosteroids. Kidney biopsy revealed an intense tubulointerstitial reaction with suspected microthrombotic lesions in the vessels. The condition reoccurred with thrombocytopenia a couple of months later but responded to plasma exchange, corticosteroids and mycophenolate mofetil. An unknown collagenosis with findings of autoimmune thymitis and tubulointerstitial nephritis is the most probable cause of the condition.

  • 12.
    Bergkvist, Max
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Assessment of microcirculation of the skin using Tissue Viability Imaging: A promising technique for detecting venous stasis in the skin2015In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 101, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: : Venous occlusion in the skin is difficult to detect by existing measurement techniques. Our aim was to find out whether Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) was better at detecting venous occlusion by comparing it with results of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) during graded arterial and venous stasis in human forearm skin. Methods: : Arterial and venous occlusions were simulated in 10 healthy volunteers by inflating a blood pressure cuff around the upper right arm. Changes in the concentration of red blood cells (RBC) were measured using TiVi, while skin perfusion and concentration of moving red blood cells (CMBC) were measured using static indices of LDF during exsanguination and subsequent arterial occlusion, postocclusive reactive hyperaemia, and graded increasing and decreasing venous stasis. Results: : During arterial occlusion there was a significant reduction in the mean concentration of RBC from baseline, as well as in perfusion and CMBC (p less than 0.008). Venous occlusion resulted in a significant 28% increase in the concentration of RBC (p = 0.002), but no significant change in perfusion (mean change -14%) while CMBC decreased significantly by 24% (p = 0.02). With stepwise increasing occlusion pressures there was a significant rise in the TiVi index and reduction in perfusion (p = 0.008), while the reverse was seen when venous flow was gradually restored. Conclusion: : The concentration of RBC measured with TiVi changes rapidly and consistently during both total and partial arterial and venous occlusions, while the changes in perfusion, measured by LDF, were less consistent This suggests that TiVi could be a more useful, non-invasive clinical monitoring tool for detecting venous stasis in the skin than LDF.

  • 13.
    Bergkvist, Max
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Zötterman, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vascular Occlusion in a Porcine Flap Model: Effects on Blood Cell Concentration and Oxygenation.2017In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Global open, ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 5, no 11, article id e1531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Venous congestion in skin flaps is difficult to detect. This study evaluated the ability of tissue viability imaging (TiVi) to measure changes in the concentration of red blood cells (CRBC), oxygenation, and heterogeneity during vascular provocations in a porcine fasciocutaneous flap model.

    Methods: In 5 pigs, cranial gluteal artery perforator flaps were raised (8 flaps in 5 pigs). The arterial and venous blood flow was monitored with ultrasonic flow probes. CRBC, tissue oxygenation, and heterogeneity in the skin were monitored with TiVi during baseline, 50% and 100% venous occlusion, recovery, 100% arterial occlusion and final recovery, thereby simulating venous and arterial occlusion of a free fasciocutaneous flap. A laser Doppler probe was used as a reference for microvascular perfusion in the flap.

    Results: During partial and complete venous occlusion, increases in CRBC were seen in different regions of the flap. They were more pronounced in the distal part. During complete arterial occlusion, CRBC decreased in all but the most distal parts of the flap. There were also increases in tissue oxygenation and heterogeneity during venous occlusion.

    Conclusions: TiVi measures regional changes in CRBC in the skin of the flap during arterial and venous occlusion, as well as an increase in oxygenated hemoglobin during venous occlusion that may be the result of reduced metabolism and impaired delivery of oxygen to the tissue. TiVi may provide a promising method for measuring flap viability because it is hand-held, easy to-use, and provides spatial information on venous congestion.

  • 14.
    Bäckström, Denise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Larsen, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Deaths caused by injury among people of working age (18-64) are decreasing, while those among older people (64+) are increasing2018In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 589-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Injury is an important cause of death in all age groups worldwide, and contributes to many losses of human and economic resources. Currently, we know a few data about mortality from injury, particularly among the working population. The aim of the present study was to examine death from injury over a period of 14 years (1999-2012) using the Swedish Cause of Death Registry (CDR) and the National Patient Registry, which have complete national coverage.

    METHOD: CDR was used to identify injury-related deaths among adults (18 years or over) during the years 1999-2012. ICD-10 diagnoses from V01 to X39 were included. The significance of changes over time was analyzed by linear regression.

    RESULTS: The incidence of prehospital death decreased significantly (coefficient -0.22, r (2) = 0.30; p = 0.041) during the study period, while that of deaths in hospital increased significantly (coefficient 0.20, r (2) = 0.75; p < 0.001). Mortality/100,000 person-years in the working age group (18-64 years) decreased significantly (coefficient -0.40, r (2) = 0.37; p = 0.020), mainly as a result of decrease in traffic-related deaths (coefficient -0.34, r (2) = 0.85; p < 0.001). The incidence of deaths from injury among elderly (65 years and older) patients increased because of the increase in falls (coefficient 1.71, r (2) = 0.84; p < 0.001) and poisoning (coefficient 0.13, r (2) = 0.69; p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: The epidemiology of injury in Sweden has changed during recent years in that mortality from injury has declined in the working age group and increased among those people 64 years old and over.

  • 15.
    Bäckström, Denise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Change in child mortality patterns after injuries in Sweden: a nationwide 14-year study.2017In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 343-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Sweden has one of the world's lowest child injury mortality rates, but injuries are still the leading cause of death among children. Child injury mortality in the country has been declining, but this decline seems to decrease recently. Our objective was therefore to further examine changes in the mortality of children's death from injury over time and to assess the contribution of various effects on mortality. The underlying hypothesis for this investigation is that the incidence of lethal injuries in children, still is decreasing and that this may be sex specific.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied all deaths from injury in Sweden under-18-year-olds during the 14 years 1999-2012. We identified those aged under 18 whose underlying cause of death was recorded as International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) diagnosis from V01 to X39 in the Swedish cause of death, where all dead citizens are registered.

    RESULTS: From the 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2012, 1213 children under the age of 18 died of injuries in Sweden. The incidence declined during this period (r = -0.606, p = 0.02) to 3.3 deaths/100,000 children-years (95 % CI 2.6-4.2). Death from unintentional injury was more common than that after intentional injury (p < 0.0001). There was a reduction in the incidence of unintentional injuries during the study period (r = -0.757, p = 0.03). The most common causes of death were injury to the brain (n = 337, 41 %), followed by drowning (n = 109, 13 %). The number of deaths after intentional injury increased (r = 0.585, p = 0.03) and at the end of the period was 1.5 deaths/100,000 children-years. The most common causes of death after intentional injuries were asphyxia (n = 177, 45 %), followed by injury to the brain (n = 76, 19 %).

    DISCUSSION: Mortality patterns in injured children in Sweden have changed from being dominated by unintentional injuries to a more equal distribution between unintentional and intentional injuries as well as between sexes and the overall rate has declined further. These findings are important as they might contribute to the preventive work that is being done to further reduce mortality in injured children.

  • 16.
    Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland.
    Vilas Jain, Mayur
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna
    Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland.
    Ghavami, Saeid
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, Manitoba, Canada.
    Wiechec, Emilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The expression pattern of PFKFB3 enzyme distinguishes between induced-pluripotent stem cells and cancer stem cells.2015In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 6, no 30, p. 29753--29770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) have become crucial in medicine and biology. Several studies indicate their phenotypic similarities with cancer stem cells (CSCs) and a propensity to form tumors. Thus it is desirable to identify a trait which differentiates iPS populations and CSCs. Searching for such a feature, in this work we compare the restriction (R) point-governed regulation of cell cycle progression in different cell types (iPS, cancer, CSC and normal cells) based on the expression profile of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase3 (PFKFB3) and phosphofructokinase (PFK1). Our study reveals that PFKFB3 and PFK1 expression allows discrimination between iPS and CSCs. Moreover, cancer and iPS cells, when cultured under hypoxic conditions, alter their expression level of PFKFB3 and PFK1 to resemble those in CSCs. We also observed cell type-related differences in response to inhibition of PFKFB3. This possibility to distinguish CSC from iPS cells or non-stem cancer cells by PFKB3 and PFK1 expression improves the outlook for clinical application of stem cell-based therapies and for more precise detection of CSCs.

  • 17.
    Droog Tesselaar, Erik
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Changes in skin microcirculation during radiation therapy for breast cancer2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 8, p. 1072-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract:

    Background: The majority of breast cancer patients who receive radiation treatment are affected by acute radiation-induced skin changes. The assessment of these changes is usually done by subjective methods, which complicates the comparison between different treatments or patient groups. This study investigates the feasibility of new robust methods for monitoring skin microcirculation to objectively assess and quantify acute skin reactions during radiation treatment.

    Material and methods: Laser Doppler flowmetry, laser speckle contrast imaging, and polarized light spectroscopy imaging were used to measure radiation-induced changes in microvascular perfusion and red blood cell concentration (RBC) in the skin of 15 patients undergoing adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Measurements were made before treatment, once a week during treatment, and directly after the last fraction.

    Results: In the treated breast, perfusion and RBC concentration were increased after 1–5 fractions (2.66–13.3 Gy) compared to baseline. The largest effects were seen in the areola and the medial area. No changes in perfusion and RBC concentration were seen in the untreated breast. In contrast, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scores were increased only after 2 weeks of treatment, which demonstrates the potential of the proposed methods for early assessment of skin changes. Also, there was a moderate to good correlation between the perfusion (r = 0.52) and RBC concentration (r = 0.59) and the RTOG score given a week later.

    Conclusion: We conclude that radiation-induced microvascular changes in the skin can be objectively measured using novel camera-based techniques before visual changes in the skin are apparent. Objective measurement of microvascular changes in the skin may be valuable in the comparison of skin reactions between different radiation treatments and possibly in predicting acute skin effects at an earlier stage.

  • 18.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Changes in patterns of treatment of burned children at the Linkoping Burn Centre, Sweden, 2009-20142017In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 1111-1119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Children are a relatively large group among patients with burns in Sweden. We changed the management of childrens burns to a flexible, outpatient-based plan. The aim was to follow up the outpatient management for childrens burns during the period 20092014, and track it, to find out to what extent the patients had been treated flexibly as outpatients, and to clarify the reasons behind those who did not fit in the plan. Methods: Descriptive retrospective analysis dividing the patients into three groups: inpatients only, flexible management, and outpatients. Other variables recorded included: age, sex, percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), percentage full thickness burn (FTB%), cause of burn, county of residence, operations required, number of visits to the outpatient department, costs, and duration of overnight stay in the hospital. Results: The study group included 620 children: nine were managed strictly as inpatients, 204 as flexible outpatients, and 407 strictly as outpatients. Among the total there were 269 children who came from remote areas (43%), and of these 260 were treated as outpatients and flexible outpatients. Median TBSA% in the whole group was 1 (10th-90th centile 0-9) with the biggest median TBSA% 12 (5-38) in the inpatient group. The most common cause of injury was scalds (332/620,-54%). Costs/patient (US$) was lower in the flexible outpatient group than in the inpatient group (median 10 557 (3213-35802) and 35343 (7344-66554), respectively). Conclusion: Based on the results, we expect that the flexible outpatient treatment plan for children with minor to moderate burns can be expanded in the future. The results encourage us to continue the service and to further reduce duration of stay in hospital below the level already achieved (25% of the whole period of care). (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbas, A.H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, O.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nagi, M.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Scald management protocols - outcome differences in two different time periods using different treatment strategies.2016In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 139-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the years the treatment of scalds in our centre has changed, moving more towards the use of biological dressings (xenografts). Management of scalds with mid dermal or deep dermal injuries differs among centers using different types of dressings, and recently biological membrane dressings were recommended for this type of injury. Here we describe differences in treatment outcome in different periods of time. All patients with scalds who presented to the Linkoping Burn Centre during two periods, early (1997-98) and later (2010-12) were included. Data were collected in the unit database and analyzed retrospectively. A lower proportion of autograft operations was found in the later period, falling from 32% to 19%. Hospital stay was shorter in the later period (3.5 days shorter, p=0.01) and adjusted duration of hospital stay/TBSA% was shorter (1.2 to 0.7, p=0.07). The two study groups were similar in most of the studied variables: we could not report any significant differences regarding outcome except for unadjusted duration of hospital stay. Further studies are required to investigate functional and aesthetic outcome differences between the treatment modalities.

  • 20.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Plast Surg Unit, Dept Surg, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Treatment of Children With Scalds by Xenografts: Report From a Swedish Burn Centre2016In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 37, no 6, p. E586-E591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scalds are the most common type of burn in children, and one way to treat them is with xenografts with no topical antimicrobials in line with the recommendations of a recent review. However, this treatment has not been examined in detail. Our aim was to describe the treatment of such children when biological dressings (xenografts) were used without local antimicrobials. We reviewed the medical records of all children admitted to a Swedish National Burn Centre during the period 2010-2012 with scalds who were treated with xenografts. Percentage TBSA injured, age, length of hospital stay, number of operations, antibiotics given, duration of antibiotic treatment, and pain score during the first 3 days, application of xenografts, and clinical notes of wound infection were recorded. We studied 67 children, (43 of whom were boys), with a median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 1 (1-2) year and median (IQR) TBSA% 6.2 (4-11). Twenty children (30%) required operation. Twelve (18%) developed a wound infection, 29 (43%) had other infections, and 26 (39%) were free from infection. The median (IQR) duration of systemic antibiotics was 10 (6-13) days. On the day that the xenografts were applied 10 of the children had a Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) score between 3 and 7, and during the following 2 days, only four children scored in this range. The remaining 57 children had scores amp;lt;3 on the day that xenografts were applied and on the following 2 days. Median (IQR) length of stay/TBSA% was 0.7 (0.4-1.0). Treatment with xenografts was associated with median length of stay/TBSA% amp;lt; 1 and low pain scores. Despite a high rate of prescription of systemic antibiotics, most were for reasons other than wound infection.

  • 21.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Staged excisions of moderate-sized burns compared with total excision with immediate autograft: an evaluation of two strategies.2017In: International journal of burns and trauma, ISSN 2160-2026, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Different surgical techniques have evolved since excision and autografting became the treatment of choice for deep burns in the 1970s. The treatment plan at the Burn Center, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden, has shifted from single-stage excision and immediate autografting to staged excisions and temporary cover with xenografts before autografting. The aim of this study was to find out if the change in policy resulted in extended duration of hospital stay/total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA%).

    METHODS: Retrospective clinical cohort including surgically-managed patients with burns of 15%-60% TBSA% within each treatment group. The first had early full excisions of deep dermal and full thickness burns and immediate autografts (1997-98), excision and immediate autograft group) and the second had staged excisions before final autografts using xenografts for temporary cover (2010-11, staged excision group).

    RESULTS: The study included 57 patients with deep dermal and full-thickness burns, 28 of whom had excision and immediate autografting, and 29 of whom had staged excisions with xenografting before final autografting. Adjusted (LOS/TBSA%) was close to 1, and did not differ between groups. Mean operating time for the staged excision group was shorter and the excised area/operation was smaller. The total operating time/TBSA% did not differ between groups.

    CONCLUSION: Staged excisions with temporary cover did not affect adjusted LOS/TBSA% or total operating time. Staged excisions may be thought to be more expensive because of the cost of covering the wound between stages, but this needs to be further investigated as do the factors that predict long term outcome.

  • 22.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbas, A.H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, O.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Temporary coverage of burns with a xenograft and sequential excision, compared with total early excision and autograft2016In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 196-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 80s and 90s, early and total excision of full thickness burns followed by immediate autograft was the most common treatment, with repeated excision and grafting, mostly for failed grafts. It was hypothesized, therefore, that delayed coverage with an autograft preceded by a temporary xenograft after early and sequential smaller excisions would lead to a better wound bed with fewer failed grafts, a smaller donor site, and possibly also a shorter duration of stay in hospital. We carried out a case control study with retrospective analysis from our National Burn Centre registry for the period 1997-2011. Patients who had been managed with early total excision and autograft were compared with those who had had sequential smaller excisions covered with temporary xenografts until the burn was ready for the final autograft. The sequential excision and xenograft group (n=42) required one-third fewer autografts than patients in the total excision and autograft group (n=45), who needed more than one operation (p<0.001). We could not detect any differences in duration of stay in hospital / total body surface area burned% (duration of stay/TBSA%) (2.0 and 1.8) (p=0.83). The two groups showed no major differences in terms of adjusted duration of stay, but our findings suggest that doing early, smaller, sequential excisions using a xenograft for temporary cover can result in shorter operating times, saving us the trouble of making big excisions. However, costs tended to be higher when the burns were > 25% TBSA.

  • 23.
    El-Serafi, Ahmed T.
    et al.
    Sharjah Institute for Medical Research and College of Medicine, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, UAE(a); Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    El-Serafi, Ibrahim T.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Division of Experimental Cancer Medicine, Faculty of MDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Skin regeneration in three dimensions, current status, challenges and opportunities2017In: Differentiation, ISSN 0301-4681, E-ISSN 1432-0436, Vol. 96, p. 4p. 26-29Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin regeneration is a life-saving need for many patients, whom list is stretched from burn victims to motor-car accidents. Spraying cells, either keratinocytes or stem cells, were associated with variable results and, in many cases, unfavorable outcomes. As the spatial configuration of the skin is distinctive, many trials investigated the bio-printing or the construction of three dimensional skin models where different layers of the skin were preserved. Although some of these models showed the histological configuration of the skin, their acceptance by the wound was questionable as a consequence of delayed vascularization. In this mini-review, different models for three dimensional regeneration of the skin will be discussed with their main points of strength and challenges as well as their possible opportunities.

  • 24.
    Engerström, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Kramer, Andrew A.
    Prescient Healthcare Consulting, Charlottesville, VA.
    Nolin, Thomas
    The Swedish Intensive Care Registry, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Karlström, Göran
    The Swedish Intensive Care Registry, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Academic Research Center, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Walther, Sten M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Comparing Time-Fixed Mortality Prediction Models and Their Effect on ICU Performance Metrics Using the Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3.2016In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 44, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine ICU performance based on the Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 using 30-day, 90-day, or 180-day mortality as outcome measures and compare results with 30-day mortality as reference.

    DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study of ICU admissions from 2010 to 2014.

    SETTING: Sixty-three Swedish ICUs that submitted data to the Swedish Intensive Care Registry.

    PATIENTS: The development cohort was first admissions to ICU during 2011-2012 (n = 53,546), and the validation cohort was first admissions to ICU during 2013-2014 (n = 57,729).

    INTERVENTIONS: None.

    MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Logistic regression was used to develop predictive models based on a first level recalibration of the original Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 model but with 30-day, 90-day, or 180-day mortality as measures of outcome. Discrimination and calibration were excellent for the development dataset. Validation in the more recent 2013-2014 database showed good discrimination (C-statistic: 0.85, 0.84, and 0.83 for the 30-, 90-, and 180-d models, respectively), and good calibration (standardized mortality ratio: 0.99, 0.99, and 1.00; Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit H-statistic: 66.4, 63.7, and 81.4 for the 30-, 90-, and 180-d models, respectively). There were modest changes in an ICU's standardized mortality ratio grouping (< 1.00, not significant, > 1.00) when follow-up was extended from 30 to 90 days and 180 days, respectively; about 11-13% of all ICUs.

    CONCLUSIONS: The recalibrated Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 hospital outcome prediction model performed well on long-term outcomes. Evaluation of ICU performance using standardized mortality ratio was only modestly sensitive to the follow-up time. Our results suggest that 30-day mortality may be a good benchmark of ICU performance. However, the duration of follow-up must balance between what is most relevant for patients, most affected by ICU care, least affected by administrative policies and practically feasible for caregivers.

  • 25.
    Engerström, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nolin, Thomas
    Central Hospital Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Mårdh, Caroline
    Landstinget Värmland, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Karlström, Göran
    Landstinget Varmland, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Forum Östergötland.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Impact of Missing Physiologic Data on Performance of the Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 Risk-Prediction Model*2017In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 45, no 12, p. 2006-2013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The Simplified Acute Physiology 3 outcome prediction model has a narrow time window for recording physiologic measurements. Our objective was to examine the prevalence and impact of missing physiologic data on the Simplified Acute Physiology 3 models performance. Design: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Setting: Sixty-three ICUs in the Swedish Intensive Care Registry. Patients: Patients admitted during 2011-2014 (n = 107,310). Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Model performance was analyzed using the area under the receiver operating curve, scaled Briers score, and standardized mortality rate. We used a recalibrated Simplified Acute Physiology 3 model and examined model performance in the original dataset and in a dataset of complete records where missing data were generated (simulated dataset). One or more data were missing in 40.9% of the admissions, more common in survivors and low-risk admissions than in nonsurvivors and high-risk admissions. Discrimination did not decrease with one to two missing variables, but accuracy was highest with no missing data. Calibration was best in the original dataset with a mix of full records and records with some missing values (area under the receiver operating curve was 0.85, scaled Brier 27%, and standardized mortality rate 0.99). With zero, one, and two data missing, the scaled Brier was 31%, 26%, and 21%; area under the receiver operating curve was 0.84, 0.87, and 0.89; and standardized mortality rate was 0.92, 1.05 and 1.10, respectively. Datasets where the missing data were simulated for oxygenation or oxygenation and hydrogen ion concentration together performed worse than datasets with these data originally missing. Conclusions: There is a coupling between missing physiologic data, admission type, low risk, and survival. Increased loss of physiologic data reduced model performance and will deflate mortality risk, resulting in falsely high standardized mortality rates.

  • 26.
    Engstrand, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Hand function in patients with Dupuytren’s disease: Assessment, results & patients’ perspectives2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dupuytren’s Disease (DD) is a soft tissue disorder that leads to finger joint contractures affecting hand function. DD can be treated with surgery or injection and hand therapy to improve finger joint extension and thereby improve hand function. However, this does not cure the disease and recurrence is common. Previous research on DD has shown improvement in finger joint extension and in self-reported disability of the upper extremity after surgery and hand therapy for DD. However, this provides only a limited perspective on hand function, and multiple dimensions of changes in hand function (i.e. physical, psychosocial aspects and including the patients’ views of results) have not been reported as a whole.

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to explore hand function before and after surgery and hand therapy in patients with DD, including assessment, results and patients’ perspectives.

    Methods: The thesis comprises three studies: Study A was a methodological study of interrater reliability in goniometry of the finger joints. Study B was a prospective cohort study with a repeated measures design. Study C was a qualitative interview study, using the model of Patient Evaluation Process and content analysis.

    Results: Interrater reliability was high or very high for goniometer measurement of finger joint range of motion (ROM) in patients with DD when experienced raters follow our standardized guidelines developed for the study. Changes in hand function consisted of improvement of finger joint extension while active finger flexion was significantly impaired during the first year after surgery and hand therapy. No patient reached a normal ROM, but the majority reached a functional ROM. Sensibility remained unaffected. Patients with surgery on multiple fingers had worse scar pliability than patients with surgery on a single finger. Most patients had their expectations met and were pleased or delighted with their hand function at 12 months after surgery and hand therapy. Safety issues of hand function were of greater concern than social issues. Patients reported less disability and improved health-related quality of life after surgery and hand therapy. The three variables “need to take special precautions”, “avoid using the hand in social context”, and health-related quality of life had significant importance for patients’ rating of functional recovery. Together, these variables explained 62% of the variance in functional recovery. Patients’ perspectives of undergoing a surgical intervention process were described through five categories. Previous experiences of care influenced participants’ expectations of results and the care they were about to receive. Previous experiences and expectations were used as references for appraisal of results, which concerned perceived changes in hand function, the care process, competency, and organization. Appraisal of results could also vary in relation to  patient character. Appraisal of results of the intervention process influenced participants’ expectations of future hand function, health and care.

    Conclusions: Surgery and hand therapy for DD improve hand function and patients regain a functional ROM needed for performance of common daily activities. Despite the negative effect on finger flexion present during the first year after surgery, patients’ regards their hand function as recovered six to eight months after surgery and hand therapy. Measuring digital ROM in the finger joints with a goniometer is a reliable assessment method. However, from the patient’s perspective, it is not enough to evaluate results only in terms of digital extension or ROM. From their view, results of treatment concern consequences on daily use of the hand, what happens during the care process in terms of interaction between patient and health care provider, as well as their view of the competence and logistics of the organization providing the care.

    List of papers
    1. Interrater Reliability in Finger Joint Goniometer Measurement in Dupuytrens Disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interrater Reliability in Finger Joint Goniometer Measurement in Dupuytrens Disease
    2012 (English)In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated interrater reliability of range of motion (ROM) measurement in the finger joints of people with Dupuytrens disease. Eight raters measured flexion and extension of the three finger joints in one affected finger of each of 13 people with different levels of severity of Dupuytrens disease, giving 104 measures of joints and motions. Reliability measures, represented by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of the mean (SEM), and differences between raters with the highest and lowest mean scores, were calculated. ICCs ranged from .832 to .973 depending on joint and motion. The SEM was andlt;= 3 degrees for all joints and motions. Differences in mean between highest and lowest raters were larger for flexion than for extension; the largest difference was in the distal interphalangeal joint. The results indicate that following these standardized guidelines, the interrater reliability of goniometer measurements is high for digital ROM in people with Dupuytrens disease.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Occupational Therapy Association, 2012
    Keywords
    arthrometry, articular, Dupuytren contracture, finger joint, range of motion, articular, reproducibility of results
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75284 (URN)10.5014/ajot.2012.001925 (DOI)000299362000012 ()
    Available from: 2012-02-27 Created: 2012-02-24 Last updated: 2017-12-07
    2. Hand function and quality of life before and after fasciectomy for Dupuytren contracture
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hand function and quality of life before and after fasciectomy for Dupuytren contracture
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Hand Surgery-American Volume, ISSN 0363-5023, E-ISSN 1531-6564, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 1333-1343Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To describe changes in joint motion, sensibility, and scar pliability and to investigate the patients' expectations, self-reported recovery, and satisfaction with hand function, disability, and quality of life after surgery and hand therapy for Dupuytren disease.

    METHODS:

    This prospective cohort study collected measurements before surgery and 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery and hand therapy. Ninety patients with total active extension deficits of 60° or more from Dupuytren contracture were included. Outcomes measures were range of motion; sensibility; scar pliability; self-reported outcomes on expectations, recovery, and satisfaction with hand function; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores; safety and social issues of hand function; physical activity habits; and quality of life with the Euroqol.

    RESULTS:

    The extension deficit decreased, and there was a transient decrease in active finger flexion during the first year after surgery. Sensibility remained unaffected. Generally, patients with surgery on multiple fingers had worse scar pliability. The majority of the patients had their expectations met, and at 6 months, 32% considered hand function as fully recovered, and 73% were satisfied with their hand function. Fear of hurting the hand and worry about not trusting the hand function were of greatest concern among safety and social issues. The Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score and the Euroqol improved over time.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    After surgery and hand therapy, disability decreased independent of single or multiple operated fingers. The total active finger extension improved enough for the patients to reach a functional range of motion despite an impairment of active finger flexion still present 12 months after treatment.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Dupuytren contracture; surgical treatment; range of motion; satisfaction; occupational therapy
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109387 (URN)10.1016/j.jhsa.2014.04.029 (DOI)000338905000014 ()24969497 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-08-15 Created: 2014-08-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Factors affecting functional recovery after surgery and hand therapy in patients with Dupuytren's disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors affecting functional recovery after surgery and hand therapy in patients with Dupuytren's disease
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Hand Therapy, ISSN 0894-1130, E-ISSN 1545-004X, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 255-260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Study design: Prospective cohort study. Introduction: The evidence of the relationship between functional recovery and impairment after surgery and hand therapy are inconsistent. Purpose of the study: To explore factors that were most related to functional recovery as measured by DASH in patients with Dupuytrens disease. Methods: Eighty-one patients undergoing surgery and hand therapy were consecutively recruited. Functional recovery was measured by the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Explanatory variables: range of motion of the finger joints, five questions regarding safety and social issues of hand function, and health-related quality of life (Euroqol). Results: The three variables "need to take special precautions", "avoid using the hand in social context", and health-related quality of life (EQ-5D index) explained 62.1% of the variance in DASH, where the first variable had the greatest relative effect. Discussion: Safety and social issues of hand function and quality of life had an evident association with functional recovery. Level of evidence: IV.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2015
    Keywords
    Dupuytrens contracture; Emotional function; Range of motion; Recovery of function; Quality of life
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121325 (URN)10.1016/j.jht.2014.11.006 (DOI)000359329100005 ()25998546 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of southeast Sweden [FORSS-72231]; County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden [LIO-77311]

    Available from: 2015-09-14 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2017-12-04
    4. Patients'€™ perspective on surgical intervention for Dupuytren'€™s disease€: experiences, expectations and appraisal of results
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients'€™ perspective on surgical intervention for Dupuytren'€™s disease€: experiences, expectations and appraisal of results
    2016 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 38, no 24-26, p. 2538-2549Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To explore patients’ perspectives on surgical intervention for Dupuytren’s disease (DD), focusing on patients’ appraisal of results, involving previous experiences, expectations and patient characters.

    Method The participants were 21 men, mean age 66 years, scheduled for DD surgery. Qualitative interviews were conducted 2–4 weeks before surgery and 6–8 months after surgery. The model of the Patient Evaluation Process was used as theoretical framework. Data were analyzed using problem-driven content analysis.

    Results Five categories are described: previous experiences, expectations before surgery, appraisal of results, expectations of the future and patient character. Previous experiences influenced participants’ expectations, and these were used along with other aspects as references for appraisal of results. Participants’ appraisal of results concerned perceived changes in hand function, care process, competency and organization, and could vary in relation to patient character. The appraisal of results influenced participants’ expectations of future hand function, health and care.

    Conclusions Patients’ appraisal of results involved multidimensional reasoning reflecting on hand function, interaction with staff and organizational matters. Thus, it is not enough to evaluate results after DD surgery only by health outcomes as this provides only a limited perspective. Rather, evaluation of results should also cover process and structure aspects of care.

    Implications for Rehabilitation

    • To improve health care services, it is important to be aware of the role played by patient’s previous experiences, expectations as well as staff and organizational aspects of care.
    • Knowledge about patients’ experience and view of the results from surgery and rehabilitation should be established by assessment of care effects on health as well as structure and process aspects of care.
    • Evaluation of structure and process aspects of care can be done by using questions about if the patient felt listened to, received clear information and explanations, was included in decision-making, and their view of waiting time or continuity of care.
    • Improving health care services means not only providing the best treatment method available but also developing individualized care by ensuring good interaction with the patient, providing accurate information, and working to improve the structure of the care process.
    • Before treatment, health care providers should have a dialogue with the patient and consider previous experiences and expectations in order to ensure the patient has balanced expectations of the outcome.
    Keywords
    Care process; hand function; hand surgery; interviews; outcome
    National Category
    Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Nursing Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125964 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2015.1137981 (DOI)000385478900020 ()26878688 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2016-03-10 Created: 2016-03-10 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
  • 27.
    Engstrand, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Role of Hand Therapy in Dupuytren Disease2018In: Hand Clinics, ISSN 0749-0712, E-ISSN 1558-1969, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 395-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of hand therapy in the treatment of Dupuytren disease varies depending on the patient and the procedure. There is limited evidence for hand therapy as a preventive treatment of Dupuytren disease. Before corrective treatment, the hand therapist can contribute with assessments to promote evaluation of outcome. After corrective treatment, hand therapy is tailored to each patients needs and consists of orthoses, exercise, edema control, and pain or scar management. Orthoses are usually part of the hand therapy protocol after corrective procedures despite lack of strong supporting evidence and should be provided based on individual patient needs.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-07-14 10:28
  • 28.
    Engstrand, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Factors affecting functional recovery after surgery and hand therapy in patients with Dupuytren's disease2015In: Journal of Hand Therapy, ISSN 0894-1130, E-ISSN 1545-004X, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 255-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study design: Prospective cohort study. Introduction: The evidence of the relationship between functional recovery and impairment after surgery and hand therapy are inconsistent. Purpose of the study: To explore factors that were most related to functional recovery as measured by DASH in patients with Dupuytrens disease. Methods: Eighty-one patients undergoing surgery and hand therapy were consecutively recruited. Functional recovery was measured by the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Explanatory variables: range of motion of the finger joints, five questions regarding safety and social issues of hand function, and health-related quality of life (Euroqol). Results: The three variables "need to take special precautions", "avoid using the hand in social context", and health-related quality of life (EQ-5D index) explained 62.1% of the variance in DASH, where the first variable had the greatest relative effect. Discussion: Safety and social issues of hand function and quality of life had an evident association with functional recovery. Level of evidence: IV.

  • 29.
    Engstrand, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patients'€™ perspective on surgical intervention for Dupuytren'€™s disease€: experiences, expectations and appraisal of results2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 38, no 24-26, p. 2538-2549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To explore patients’ perspectives on surgical intervention for Dupuytren’s disease (DD), focusing on patients’ appraisal of results, involving previous experiences, expectations and patient characters.

    Method The participants were 21 men, mean age 66 years, scheduled for DD surgery. Qualitative interviews were conducted 2–4 weeks before surgery and 6–8 months after surgery. The model of the Patient Evaluation Process was used as theoretical framework. Data were analyzed using problem-driven content analysis.

    Results Five categories are described: previous experiences, expectations before surgery, appraisal of results, expectations of the future and patient character. Previous experiences influenced participants’ expectations, and these were used along with other aspects as references for appraisal of results. Participants’ appraisal of results concerned perceived changes in hand function, care process, competency and organization, and could vary in relation to patient character. The appraisal of results influenced participants’ expectations of future hand function, health and care.

    Conclusions Patients’ appraisal of results involved multidimensional reasoning reflecting on hand function, interaction with staff and organizational matters. Thus, it is not enough to evaluate results after DD surgery only by health outcomes as this provides only a limited perspective. Rather, evaluation of results should also cover process and structure aspects of care.

    Implications for Rehabilitation

    • To improve health care services, it is important to be aware of the role played by patient’s previous experiences, expectations as well as staff and organizational aspects of care.
    • Knowledge about patients’ experience and view of the results from surgery and rehabilitation should be established by assessment of care effects on health as well as structure and process aspects of care.
    • Evaluation of structure and process aspects of care can be done by using questions about if the patient felt listened to, received clear information and explanations, was included in decision-making, and their view of waiting time or continuity of care.
    • Improving health care services means not only providing the best treatment method available but also developing individualized care by ensuring good interaction with the patient, providing accurate information, and working to improve the structure of the care process.
    • Before treatment, health care providers should have a dialogue with the patient and consider previous experiences and expectations in order to ensure the patient has balanced expectations of the outcome.
  • 30.
    Ericsson, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Effect of Electrode Belt and Body Positions on Regional Pulmonary Ventilation- and Perfusion-Related Impedance Changes Measured by Electric Impedance Tomography2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, p. e0155913-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ventilator-induced or ventilator-associated lung injury (VILI/VALI) is common and there is an increasing demand for a tool that can optimize ventilator settings. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can detect changes in impedance caused by pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, but the effect of changes in the position of the body and in the placing of the electrode belt on the impedance signal have not to our knowledge been thoroughly evaluated. We therefore studied ventilation-related and perfusion-related changes in impedance during spontaneous breathing in 10 healthy subjects in five different body positions and with the electrode belt placed at three different thoracic positions using a 32-electrode EIT system. We found differences between regions of interest that could be attributed to changes in the position of the body, and differences in impedance amplitudes when the position of the electrode belt was changed. Ventilation-related changes in impedance could therefore be related to changes in the position of both the body and the electrode belt. Perfusion-related changes in impedance were probably related to the interference of major vessels. While these findings give us some insight into the sources of variation in impedance signals as a result of changes in the positions of both the body and the electrode belt, further studies on the origin of the perfusion-related impedance signal are needed to improve EIT further as a tool for the monitoring of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion.

  • 31.
    Farnebo, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Livermore, CA, USA.
    Farnebo, Lovisa
    Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Kim, Maxwell
    VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Livermore, CA, USA; Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Woon, Colin
    VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Livermore, CA, USA; Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Pham, Hung
    VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Livermore, CA, USA; Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Chang, James
    VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Livermore, CA, USA; Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Optimized Repopulation of Tendon Hydrogel: Synergistic Effects of Growth Factor Combinations and Adipose-Derived Stem Cells2017In: Hand (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 1558-9447, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 68-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tendon-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel has been shown to augment tendon healing in vivo. We hypothesized that reseeding of the gel with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) could further assist repopulation of the gel and that combinations of growth factors (GFs) would improve the survival of these cells after reseeding. Methods: A tendon-specific ECM solution was supplemented with varying concentrations of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB). Gels were then seeded with ASCs transfected with a green fluorescent protein/luciferin construct. Cell proliferation was determined using the MTT assay and histology, and GF and ASC augmented gels were injected into the back of Sprague Dawley rats. Bioluminescence of seeded gels was continuously followed after reseeding, and cell counts were performed after the gels were explanted at 14 days. Results: Synergistic effects of the GFs were seen, and an optimal combination was determined to be 10 ng/mL bFGF, 100 ng/mL IGF-1, and 100 ng/mL PDGF-BB (2.8-fold increase; P amp;lt; .05). In vivo bioluminescence showed an improved initial survival of cells in gels supplemented with the optimal concentration of GF compared with the control group (10.6-fold increase at 8 days; P amp;lt; .05). Cell counts of explants showed a dramatic endogenous repopulation of gels supplemented by GF + ASCs compared with both gels with GF but no ASCs (7.6-fold increase) and gels with ASCs but no GF (1.6-fold increase). Conclusion: Synergistic effects of GFs can be used to improve cellular proliferation of ASCs seeded to a tendon ECM gel. Reseeding with ASCs stimulates endogenous repopulation of the gel in vivo and may be used to further augment tendon healing.

  • 32.
    Farnebo, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Gerber Ekblom, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hand surgery in Sweden2017In: Journal of Hand Surgery, European Volume, ISSN 1753-1934, E-ISSN 2043-6289, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 537-539Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 33.
    Fornander, Lotta
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Brismar, Tom
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hansson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wikstroem, Heidi
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Cortical plasticity in patients with median nerve lesions studied with MEG2016In: Somatosensory & motor research, ISSN 0899-0220, E-ISSN 1369-1651, Vol. 33, no 3-4, p. 178-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown age- and time-dependent effects on brain activity in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of patients with median nerve injury. Whereas fMRI measures the hemodynamic changes in response to increased neural activity, magnetoencephalography (MEG) offers a more concise way of examining the evoked response, with superior temporal resolution. We therefore wanted to combine these imaging techniques to gain additional knowledge of the plasticity processes in response to median nerve injury. Nine patients with median nerve trauma at the wrist were examined with MEG. The N1 and P1 responses at stimulation of the injured median nerve at the wrist were lower in amplitude compared to the healthy side (pamp;lt;.04). Ulnar nerve stimulation of the injured hand resulted in larger N1 amplitude (pamp;lt;.04). The amplitude and latency of the response did not correlate with the sensory discrimination ability. There was no correlation between N1 amplitude and size of cortical activation in fMRI. There was no significant difference in N1 latency between the injured and healthy median nerve. N1 latency correlated positively with age in both the median and ulnar nerve, and in both the injured and the healthy hand (pamp;lt;.02 or pamp;lt;.001). It is concluded that conduction failure in the injured segment of the median nerve decreases the amplitude of the MEG response. Disinhibition of neighboring cortical areas may explain the increased MEG response amplitude to ulnar nerve stimulation. This can be interpreted as a sign of brain plasticity.

  • 34.
    Fornander, Lotta
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyman, Torbjörn
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Hansson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brismar, Tom
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Inter-hemispheric plasticity in patients with median nerve injury2016In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 628, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peripheral nerve injuries result in reorganization within the contralateral hemisphere. Furthermore, recent animal and human studies have suggested that the plastic changes in response to peripheral nerve injury also include several areas of the ipsilateral hemisphere. The objective of this study was to map the inter-hemispheric plasticity in response to median nerve injury, to investigate normal differences in contra- and ipsilateral activation, and to study the impact of event-related or blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design on ipsilateral activation. Four patients with median nerve injury at the wrist (injured and epineurally sutured amp;gt;2 years earlier) and ten healthy volunteers were included. 3T fMRI was used to map the hemodynamic response to brain activity during tactile stimulation of the fingers, and a laterality index (LI) was calculated. Stimulation of Digits II-III of the injured hand resulted in a reduction in contralateral activation in the somatosensory area SI. Patients had a lower LI (0.21 +/- 0.15) compared to healthy controls (0.60 +/- 0.26) indicating greater ipsilateral activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. The spatial dispersion of the coordinates for areas SI and SII was larger in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral hemisphere in the healthy controls, and was increased in the contralateral hemisphere of the patients compared to the healthy controls. There was no difference in LI between the event-related and blocked paradigms. In conclusion, patients with median nerve injury have increased ipsilateral SI area activation, and spatially more dispersed contralateral SI activation during tactile stimulation of their injured hand. In normal subjects ipsilateral activation has larger spatial distribution than the contralateral. Previous findings in patients performed with the blocked fMRI paradigm were confirmed. The increase in ipsilateral SI activation may be due to an interhemispheric disinhibition associated with changes in the afferent signal inflow to the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex.

  • 35.
    Fransen, Jian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Huss, Fredrik R. M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rydell, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Surveillance of antibiotic susceptibility in a Swedish Burn Center 1994-20122016In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 1295-1303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with burn trauma are at risk for infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria (ABR) with subsequent increase in morbidity and mortality. As part of the Swedish strategic program against antibiotic resistance in intensive care (ICU-Strama), we have surveyed the distribution of species and ABR in isolates from patients admitted to a Swedish burn center at Linkoping University Hospital from 1994 through 2012. In an international comparison Strama has been successful in reducing the antibiotic consumption among animals and humans in primary care. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibiotic consumption pressure and resistance rates in a Swedish burn unit. Methods: Microbiology data, total body surface area (TBSA), patient days, and mortality were collected from a hospital database for all patients admitted to the Burn Center at the University Hospital of Linkoping from April 1994 through December 2012. Results: A total of 1570 patients were admitted with a mean annual admission rate of 83 patients (range: 57-152). 15,006 microbiology cultures (approximately 10 per patient) were collected during the study period and of these 4531 were positive (approximately 3 per patient). The annual mean total body surface area (TBSA) was 13.4% (range 9.5-18.5) with an annual mortality rate of 5.4% (range 1-8%). The MRSA incidence was 1.7% (15/866) which corresponds to an MRSA incidence of 0.34/1000 admission days (TAD). Corresponding figures were for Escherichia coli resistant to 3rd generation cephalosporins (ESBL phenotype) 8% (13/170) and 0.3/TAD, Klebsiella spp. ESBL phenotype 5% (6/134) and 0.14/TAD, carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa 26% (56/209) and 1.28/TAD, and carbapenem resistant Acinetobacter spp. 3% (2/64) and 0.04/TAD. Conclusions: Our results show a sustained low risk for MRSA and high, although not increasing, risk for carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 36.
    Gauffin, Emelie
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Öster, Caisa
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Health-related quality of life (EQ-5D) early after injury predicts long-term pain after burn2016In: BURNS, ISSN 0305-4179, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 1781-1788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic pain after burn can have severe physical and psychological effects on former patients years after the initial injury. Although the issue of pain after burn has gained increased attention over the past years, prospective, longitudinal studies are scarce. Our aim was to prospectively investigate consecutive burn patients for pain severity over time and to evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of post-burn pain to 2-7 years after the burn. As an additional aim, the effects of burn and individual-related factors, especially health related Quality of Life (HRQoL), were investigated. Method: Sixty-seven consecutive burn patients were assessed during acute care at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months, as well as at 2-7 years post-burn. HRQoL, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other psychiatric disorders were investigated. During the interviews that took place 2-7 years after the injury (mean 4.6 1.9 years), current chronic post-burn pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF). Results: One-third of the patients still reported pain 2-7 years after the injury. Pain severity and interference with daily life were mainly mild to moderate though they were found to be associated with significantly lower HRQoL. Chronic pain after bum was associated with both burn- and individual-related factors. In logistic regression analysis HRQoL at 3 and 12 months and symptoms of PTSD at 12 months were independent factors in predicting chronic pain after burn. Conclusion: Pain after burn becomes a chronic burden for many former burn patients and decreases HRQoL. A novel finding in this study was that HRQoL assessed early after burn was a predictor for the development of chronic pain. This finding may help to predict future pain problems and serve as an indicator for pain preventive measures. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 37.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Högstedt, Alexandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Skin glucose metabolism and microvascular blood flow during local insulin delivery and after an oral glucose load2016In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 597-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin causes capillary recruitment in muscle and adipose tissue, but the metabolic and microvascular effects of insulin in the skin have not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to measure glucose metabolism and microvascular blood flow in the skin during local insulin delivery and after an oral glucose load.

    METHODS: Microdialysis catheters were inserted intracutanously in human subjects. In eight subjects two microdialysis catheters were inserted, one perfused with insulin and one with control solution. First the local effects of insulin was studied, followed by a systemic provocation by an oral glucose load. Additionally, as control experiment, six subjects did not recieve local delivery of insulin or the oral glucose load. During microdialysis the local blood flow was measured by urea clearance and by laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI).

    RESULTS: Within 15 minutes of local insulin delivery, microvascular blood flow in the skin increased (urea clearance: P=.047, LSCI: P=.002) paralleled by increases in pyruvate (P=.01) and lactate (P=.04), indicating an increase in glucose uptake. An oral glucose load increased urea clearance from the catheters, indicating an increase in skin perfusion, although no perfusion changes were detected with LSCI. The concentration of glucose, pyruvate and lactate increased in the skin after the oral glucose load.

    CONCLUSION: Insulin has metabolic and vasodilatory effects in the skin both when given locally and after systemic delivery through an oral glucose load.

  • 38.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Löfberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Non-Invasive Measurement of Skin Microvascular Response during Pharmacological and Physiological Provocations2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 1-15, article id e0133760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Microvascular changes in the skin due to pharmacological and physiological provocations can be used as a marker for vascular function. While laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been used extensively for measurement of skin microvascular responses, Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) and Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) are novel imaging techniques. TiVi measures red blood cell concentration, while LDF and LSCI measure perfusion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare responses to provocations in the skin using these different techniques. Method Changes in skin microcirculation were measured in healthy subjects during (1) iontophoresis of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and noradrenaline (NA), (2) local heating and (3) post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) using LDF, LSCI and TiVi. Results Iontophoresis of SNP increased perfusion (LSCI: baseline 40.9 +/- 6.2 PU; 10-min 100 +/- 25 PU; pless than0.001) and RBC concentration (TiVi: baseline 119 +/- 18; 10-min 150 +/- 41 AU; p = 0.011). No change in perfusion (LSCI) was observed after iontophoresis of NA (baseline 38.0 +/- 4.4 PU; 10-min 38.9 +/- 5.0 PU; p = 0.64), while RBC concentration decreased (TiVi: baseline 59.6 +/- 11.8 AU; 10-min 54.4 +/- 13.3 AU; p = 0.021). Local heating increased perfusion (LDF: baseline 8.8 +/- 3.6 PU; max 112 +/- 55 PU; pless than0.001, LSCI: baseline 50.8 +/- 8.0 PU; max 151 +/- 22 PU; pless than0.001) and RBC concentration (TiVi: baseline 49.2 +/- 32.9 AU; max 99.3 +/- 28.3 AU; pless than0.001). After 5 minutes of forearm occlusion with prior exsanguination, a decrease was seen in perfusion (LDF: p = 0.027; LSCI: pless than0.001) and in RBC concentration (p = 0.045). Only LSCI showed a significant decrease in perfusion after 5 minutes of occlusion without prior exsanguination (pless than0.001). Coefficients of variation were lower for LSCI and TiVi compared to LDF for most responses. Conclusion LSCI is more sensitive than TiVi for measuring microvascular changes during SNP-induced vasodilatation and forearm occlusion. TiVi is more sensitive to noradrenaline-induced vasoconstriction. LSCI and TiVi show lower inter-subject variability than LDF. These findings are important to consider when choosing measurement techniques for studying skin microvascular responses.

  • 39.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sadda, Veeranjaneyulu
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Ward, Liam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Hackethal, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. University of Appl Science, Austria.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Modeling Perfusion Dynamics in the Skin During Iontophoresis of Vasoactive Drugs Using Single-Pulse and Multiple-Pulse Protocols2015In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 446-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: After iontophoresis of vasoactive drugs into the skin, a decrease in perfusion is commonly observed. We delivered vasoactive drugs by iontophoresis using different delivery protocols to study how these affect this decrease in perfusion as measured using LDF. Methods: We measured skin perfusion during iontophoresis of (ACh), MCh, andNAusing a single pulse or separate pulses at different skin sites, and during repeated delivery of ACh at the same site. Results: Perfusion half-life was 6.1 (5.6-6.6) minutes for ACh and 41 (29-69) minutes for MCh (p less than 0.001). The maximum response with multiple pulses of ACh iontophoresis was lower than with a single pulse, 30 (22-37) PU vs. 43 (36-50) PU, p less than 0.001. Vasoconstriction to NA was more rapid with a single pulse than with multiple pulses. The perfusion half-life of ACh decreased with repeated delivery of ACh at the same site-first 16 (14-18), second 5.9 (5.1-6-9) and third 3.2 (2.9-3.5) minutes, p less than 0.001. Conclusions: The drug delivery protocol affects microvascular responses to iontophoresis, possibly as a result of differences in the dynamics of local drug concentrations. Perfusion half-life may be used as a measure to quantify the rate of perfusion recovery after iontophoresis of vasoactive drugs.

  • 40.
    Jarefors, Erik
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Hansson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Functional outcome in 17 patients whose mandibles were reconstructed with free fibular flaps2017In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 178-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The vascularised free fibular flap is considered to be a reliable choice for reconstruction of oromandibular defects, especially after resection of malignant tumours in the area. This study evaluates the functional outcome of this method.

    Method: From January 2001 - May 2014, 37 patients were treated at the University Hospital of Linköping using the free fibular flap. The authors present the results from 17. This study reviewed their records and used the University of Washington Quality-of-Life questionnaire (UW-QoL), the Head and Neck Performance Status Scale (PSS), and interviews to assess their outcome.

    Results and conclusions: Functional evaluation showed a significant decrease in chewing (16 out of 17 patients), appearance (n = 10), salivation (n = 6), sensitivity in the mouth and skin (n = 16), occlusive problems in the mouth (n = 13), and range of mouth opening (n = 12). The remaining domains showed acceptable results, although most of them probably could not compare with the preoperative function. Out of 17 patients, six had to adjust their eating in public significantly, three thought their activity to be considerably restricted and two their recreation to be notably diminished. Common postoperative complications were infections or fistula in the mandible (n = 6), partial or complete rejection of the cutaneous flap (n = 4), and rupture of some of the sutures (n = 3). Nine patients required at least one more operation to repair defects, and six required a new soft tissue flap.

  • 41.
    Johansson, J
    et al.
    Anestesiläkaravdelningen, Östersunds sjukhus, Östersund, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Response to the article by Jämsä Leukocyte receptor expression as a biomarker for severe sepsis.2016In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 60, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Johansson, Joakim
    et al.
    Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Östersund Hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Response to the article by Jämsä Leukocyte receptor expression as a biomarker for severe sepsis2015In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 407-408Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Johansson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Östersund Hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Herwald, Heiko
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindbom, Lennart
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Alteration of Leukocyte Count Correlates With Increased Pulmonary Vascular Permeability and Decreased PaO2:FiO(2) Ratio Early After Major Burns2015In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 484-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leukocytes are activated systemically and their numbers increase soon after a burn followed by a rapid decline to low normal or subnormal levels, possibly by increased extravasation. Experimental data support that an important target for such extravasation is the lungs and that leukocytes when they adhere to endothelial cells cause an increase in vascular permeability. The authors investigated a possible relation between early increased pulmonary vascular permeability or a decreased PaO2:FiO(2) ratio and the dynamic change in concentration of blood leukocytes after a burn. This is a prospective, exploratory, single-center study. The authors measured the dynamic changes of leukocytes in blood starting early after the burn, pulmonary vascular permeability index by thermodilution, and PaO2:FiO(2)-ratios in 20 patients during the first 21 days after a major burn (greater than20% TBSA%). Median TBSA was 40% interquartile range (IQR, 25-52) and full thickness burn 28% (IQR, 2-39). There was a correlation between the early (less than24 hours) alteration in white blood cell count and both early increased pulmonary vascular permeability (r = .63, P = .004) and the decreased oxygenation index defined as PaO2:FiO(2) less than 27 kPa (P = .004). The authors have documented a correlation between dynamic change of blood leukocytes and pulmonary failure early after burns.

  • 44.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Scarring At Donor Sites After Split-Thickness Skin Graft: A Prospective, Longitudinal, Randomized Trial2018In: Advances in Skin & Wound Care, ISSN 1527-7941, E-ISSN 1538-8654, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 183-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate scarring at split-thickness skin graft donor sites 8 years after surgery.

    METHODS: At surgery, 67 patients were randomized to hydrofiber, polyurethane foam, or porcine xenograft treatment. Scars were evaluated with the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale.

    RESULTS: Results showed significant differences in observed scar outcomes at donor sites, leaving the polyurethane foam–treated and the porcine xenograft–treated patients with the least satisfying scars. Multivariable regression analysis showed that the group treated with the xenografts had worse scores for overall opinion of the scar than did the other groups (P = .03), the most important factor being pigmentation. There was no correlation between duration of healing time and quality of the scar.

    CONCLUSIONS: There were significant differences among the groups, with the hydrofiber group being the most satisfied with the appearance of their scar.

  • 45.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Three Years Experience of a Novel Biosynthetic Cellulose Dressing in Burns2018In: ADVANCES IN WOUND CARE, ISSN 2162-1918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The use of porcine xenograft (PX) is widely spread in burn care. However, it may cause immunologic responses and other ethical and cultural considerations in different cultures. Therefore, there is a need for alternatives. The aim of this work is to test a novel biosynthetic cellulose dressing (Epiprotect((R))) on burn patients. Approach: Charts from 38 patients with superficial burns (SBs) (n=18) or excised burns (n=20) that got biosynthetic cellulose dressing instead of PX at a national burn center during 3 years were reviewed. Time to healing, length of stay, and wound infection were extracted from the medical records. Results: SBs hospitalization time was 11 days comparable to PXs reported by others. In the excised group, median duration of hospital stay was 35 days. Time to healing was 28 days. Seven wound infections were confirmed in the superficial group (39%) and 11 infections in the excised group (61%). Patients with superficial wounds reported pain relief on application. Innovation: A dressing (17x21cm) consisting of biosynthetic cellulose replacing PX. Conclusion: Outcome of treatment of SBs or temporary coverage of excised deep burns with biosynthetic cellulose is comparable to treatment with PX. However, biosynthetic cellulose has benefits such as providing pain relief on application and ethical or cultural issues with the material is nonexistent.

  • 46.
    Klaff, Rami
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Berglund, Anders
    EpiStat, Sweden.
    Olov Hedlund, Per
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Clinical presentation and predictors of survival related to extent of bone metastasis in 900 prostate cancer patients2016In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 352-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of bone metastasis on survival and quality of life (QoL) in men with hormone-naive prostate cancer. Materials and methods: The study included 900 patients from a randomized trial (No. 5) by the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group, comparing parenteral oestrogen with total androgen blockade. Extent of bone metastasis was categorized according to a modified Soloway score: score 1, n=319; score 2, n = 483; and score 3, n = 98 patients. The primary outcome measurements were mean differences in QoL and overall survival. Results: QoL rating scales showed a decrease with increasing extent of bone metastasis (p amp;lt; 0.001). The mean global health status decreased from 64.4 to 50.5 for Soloway score 1 and 3, respectively. Following adjustment for performance status, analgesic consumption, grade of malignancy, alkaline phosphatase, prostate-specific antigen, haemoglobin and global health status, Soloway score 2 and 3 had a 47% [hazard ratio (HR) 1.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21-1.80] and 78% (HR 1.78 95%, CI 1.32-2.42) increased mortality, respectively, compared to Soloway score 1. Independent predictive factors of mortality were assessed. Conclusions: Patient grouping based on three categories of extent of bone metastasis related to performance status, haemoglobin and global health status at presentation, as independent predictors of mortality, may provide improved accuracy of prognosis.

  • 47.
    Larsen, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Bäckström, Denise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Decreased risk adjusted 30-day mortality for hospital admitted injuries: a multi-centre longitudinal study2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 26, no 1, article id 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The interpretation of changes in injury-related mortality over time requires an understanding of changes in the incidence of the various types of injury, and adjustment for their severity. Our aim was to investigate changes over time in incidence of hospital admission for injuries caused by falls, traffic incidents, or assaults, and to assess the risk-adjusted short-term mortality for these patients.less thanbr /greater thanMethods: All patients admitted to hospital with injuries caused by falls, traffic incidents, or assaults during the years 2001-11 in Sweden were identified from the nationwide population-based Patient Registry. The trend in mortality over time for each cause of injury was adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity and severity of injury as classified from the International Classification of diseases, version 10 Injury Severity Score (ICISS).less thanbr /greater thanResults: Both the incidence of fall (689 to 636/100000 inhabitants: p = 0.047, coefficient - 4.71) and traffic related injuries (169 to 123/100000 inhabitants: p less than 0.0001, coefficient - 5.37) decreased over time while incidence of assault related injuries remained essentially unchanged during the study period. There was an overall decrease in risk-adjusted 30-day mortality in all three groups (OR 1.00; CI95% 0.99-1.00). Decreases in traffic (OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.93 to 0.97) and assault (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.87 to 0.99) related injuries was significant whereas falls were not during this 11-year period.less thanbr /greater thanDiscussion: Risk-adjustment is a good way to use big materials to find epidemiological changes. However after adjusting for age, year, sex and risk we find that a possible factor is left in the pre- and/or in-hospital care.less thanbr /greater thanConclusions: The decrease in risk-adjusted mortality may suggest changes over time in pre- and/or in-hospital care. A non-significantdecrease in risk-adjusted mortality was registered for falls, which may indicate that low-energy trauma has not benefited for the increased survivability as much as high-energy trauma, ie traffic- and assault related injuries.

  • 48.
    Lönnqvist, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Briheim, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Non-occlusive topical exposure of human skin in vitro as model for cytotoxicity testing of irritant compounds2016In: Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods, ISSN 1537-6516, E-ISSN 1537-6524, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 82-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Testing of irritant compounds has traditionally been performed on animals and human volunteers. Animal testing should always be restricted and for skin irritancy mice and rabbits hold poor predictive value for irritant potential in humans. Irritant testing on human volunteers is restricted by the duration subjects can be exposed, and by the subjectivity of interpreting the visual signs of skin irritation. We propose an irritant testing system using viable human full thickness skin with the loss of cell viability in the exposed skin area as end point measurement. Skin was exposed to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at 20% concentration by non-occluded topical exposure to establish a positive control response and subsequent test compounds were statistically compared with the 20% SDS response. Cell viability and metabolism were measured with 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The model presents correlation between increased concentration of SDS and decreased viability of cells in the exposed skin area (R2 = 0.76). We propose the model to be used for cytotoxicity testing of irritant compounds. With fully intact barrier function, the model comprises all cells present in the skin with quantifiable end point measurement.

  • 49.
    Lönnqvist, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Emanuelsson, Peter
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Influence of acidic pH on keratinocyte function and re-epithelialisation of human in vitro wounds2015In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 346-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic wounds are one of the greatest challenges for the healthcare system. Today, a plethora of dressings are used in the treatment of these wounds, each with specific influence on the wound environment. Due to differences in the permeability of the dressings the use will result in differences in the pH balance in the wound bed. However, little is known about how changes in the pH in the wound environment affect the different phases of the healing process. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acidic pH on the regeneration phase by studying keratinocyte function in vitro and re-epithelialisation in an in vitro model of human skin. Results:In vitro assays showed reduced viability and migration rates in human keratinocytes when pH was lowered. Real time PCR revealed differential expression of genes related to wound healing and environmental impairment. Tissue culture showed no re-epithelialisation of wounds subjected to pH 5.0 and moderate re-epithelialisation at pH 6.0, compared to controls at pH 7.4. Conclusion: The results indicate that lowering pH down to pH 5.0 in wounds is counterproductive in aspect of keratinocyte function which is crucial for successful wound healing.

  • 50.
    Lönnqvist, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tracing human keratinocytes and melanocytes with carboxyfluorescein hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Burn treatment and conditions of hypopigmentation may require autologous transplantation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. The tracing of transplanted cells presents a challenge. We report a methodology based on passive staining with carboxyfluorescein hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (CFSE) that enables localising cells in tissue sections to investigate the fate of transplanted cells in wound re-epithelialisation. CFSE-stained keratinocytes and CFSE-stained melanocytes were transplanted to human full thickness in vitro wounds either as cell suspension for keratinocytes, or with the aid of  macroporous gelatin microcarriers for both cells types in single and co-culture. Viability and migration of CFSE-stained keratinocytes and melanocytes were investigated, and proliferation of the cells cultured on microcarriers was measured with flow cytometry. Wounds with transplanted cells were harvested after seven, 14 and 21 days in culture, cryosectioned and investigated using fluorescence microscopy. Sections from wounds with transplanted co-cultured keratinocytes and melanocytes were stained for pancytokeratin to distinguish double stained keratinocytes. The CFSE-staining of keratinocytes and melanocytes did not affect the viability, migration or proliferation of the cells. Transplanted cells were traced in tissue sections after 21 days and wound re-epithelialisation was not affected. We propose a novel application of CFSE-staining in transplantation studies here presented with primary human keratinocytes and melanocytes.

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