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  • 1.
    Andersen Amofah, Hege
    et al.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Bergen University of Coll, Norway; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; Bergen University of Coll, Norway; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Bjorvatn, Bjorn
    Norwegian Competence Centre Sleep Disorders, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Haaverstad, Rune
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Ove Hufthammer, Karl
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Kuiper, Karel K. J.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Hylen Ranhoff, Anette
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haraldsplass Hospital, Norway.
    Norekval, Tone M.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; Bergen University of Coll, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Sleep in octogenarians during the postoperative phase after transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement2016In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 168-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Octogenarians with aortic stenosis are an increasing population of patients admitted for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Although adequate sleep is important after illness and surgery, it has scarcely been studied in the immediate postoperative phase. Aims: To determine and compare the nature of self-reported sleep and insomnia, and recorded sleep-wake patterns in octogenarians during the in-hospital postoperative phase after SAVR or TAVI. Methods: A prospective cohort design was used that included octogenarian patients undergoing SAVR or TAVI at a regional university hospital. Self-reports were used to document sleep and insomnia, and actigraphy was used to record sleep-wake patterns. Data were collected at baseline preoperatively, and then daily for the first five postoperative days. Results: SAVR patients experienced the most insomnia on postoperative nights later in recovery, while TAVI patients experienced the most insomnia on postoperative nights early in recovery. The median total sleep time, as measured by actigraphy, was 6.4 h, and the median sleep efficiency was 79% for the five postoperative nights, but no differences were found between SAVR and TAVI patients on this parameter. All patients slept more during daytime than at night, with SAVR patients having significantly more total sleep hours for all five days than TAVI patients (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Octogenarians with aortic stenosis had disturbed self-reported sleep, increased insomnia, and disturbed sleep-wake patterns postoperatively, resulting in more daytime sleep and inactivity. In patients undergoing SAVR or TAVI, sleep evolves differently during the in-hospital postoperative phase.

  • 2.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping Academic Qual Improvement and Leadership Heatlh, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Communication between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the initial visit to a continuous positive airway pressure clinic2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 3-4, p. 568-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To describe facilitators and barriers from a patient perspective in communications between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the first meeting when continuous positive airway pressure is initiated. Background. Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment tends to be poor, especially at the initial phase of treatment. Communication between the patient and healthcare personnel has not been studied from the patient perspective, as either a barrier or facilitator for adherence. Methods. A descriptive design using qualitative content analysis was used. Interviews with 25 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome took place after their initial visit at four continuous positive airway pressure clinics. A deductive analysis based on The 4 Habits Model (i.e. emphasise the importance of investing in the beginning of the consultation, elicit the patients perspective, demonstrate empathy and invest in the end of the consultation) was conducted. Results. Building confidence (i.e. structure building, information transfer, commitment) or hindering confidence (i.e. organisational insufficiency, stress behaviour, interaction deficit) was associated with investing in the beginning. Motivating (i.e. situational insight, knowledge transfer, practical training) or demotivating (i.e. expectations, dominance and power asymmetry, barriers) was associated with eliciting the patients perspective. Building hope (i.e. awareness, sensitivity, demonstration of understanding) or hindering hope (i.e. unprepared, uncommitted, incomprehension) was associated with showing empathy. Agreement (i.e. confirmation, responsibilities, comprehensive information) or disagreement (i.e. structural obscurity, irresponsibility, absent-mindedness) was associated with investing in the end. Conclusions. Understanding of facilitators and barriers, as described by patients, can be used to improve contextual conditions and communication skills among healthcare personnel. Relevance to clinical practice. A patient-centred communication technique should be used in relation to all stages of The 4 Habits Model to facilitate shared decision-making and improve adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

  • 3.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gardner, Benjamin
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Promoting CPAP adherence in clinical practice: A survey of Swedish and Norwegian CPAP practitioners beliefs and practices2018In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 27, no 6, article id UNSP e12675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The benefits of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea are well established, but adherence tends to be low. Research exploring CPAP practitioners beliefs around determinants of CPAP adherence, and the actions they use in clinical practice to promote CPAP adherence is lacking. This study aimed to: (i) develop and validate a questionnaire to assess beliefs and current practices among CPAP practitioners; (ii) explore practitioners beliefs regarding the main determinants of patient adherence, and the actions practitioners most commonly use to promote CPAP adherence; and (iii) explore the associations between perceived determinants and adherence-promotion actions. One-hundred and forty-two CPAP practitioners in Sweden and Norway, representing 93% of all Swedish and 62% of all Norwegian CPAP centres, were surveyed via a questionnaire exploring potential determinants (18 items) and adherence-promotion actions (20 items). Confirmatory factor analysis and second-order structural equational modelling were used to identify patterns of beliefs, and potential associations with adherence-promotion actions. Patients knowledge, motivation and attitudes were perceived by practitioners to be the main determinants of CPAP adherence, and educating patients about effects, management and treatment adjustments were the most common practices. Knowledge was shown to predict educational and informational actions (e.g. education about obstructive sleep apnea and CPAP). Educational and informational actions were associated with medical actions (e.g. treatment adjustment), but knowledge, attitude and support had no association with medical actions. These findings indicate that a wide variety of determinants and actions are considered important, though the only relationship observed between beliefs and actions was found for knowledge and educational and informational actions.

  • 4.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Development and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish propensity to achieve healthy lifestyle scale in patients with hypertension2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 21-22, p. 4040-4049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeTo develop and validate a Swedish questionnaire to measure propensity for behaviour change regarding food habits, physical activity and weight reduction in patients with hypertension. DesignCross-sectional design. MethodsA total of 270 consecutive patients with hypertension diagnosed at four primary care centres in Sweden were included. The 6-item Swedish version of the Propensity to Achieve Healthy Lifestyle Scale (PAHLS) was developed to measure propensity for behaviour change regarding food habits, physical activity and weight reduction. The PAHLS (i.e., including three items for preparedness and three items for capacity) was developed by three multiprofessional researchers inspired by the transtheoretical model of behaviour change in collaboration with clinically active nurses. Data were collected by questionnaires on food habits (i.e., the Food Frequency Questionnaire), physical activity (the International Physical Activity Questionnaire), propensity for a healthy lifestyle (the PHLQ), as well as during a clinical examination. Exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA), as well as Rasch analysis, were used. ResultsOf the 270 patients (50% women), 27% scored low levels of physical activity on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and 34% of the patients were obese (body mass index 30kg/m(2)). The EFA (explaining 54% of the variance) showed unidimensionality for the PAHLS that was supported by both CFA and Rasch analyses. No floor and 1.9% ceiling effects were found. Multiple group CFA (an extension of structural equationmodelling) showed that the PAHLS operated equivalently across both male and female patients. Internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha 0.83) and composite reliability (0.89) were good. ConclusionThe initial testing of PAHLS provided good validity and reliability scores to measure propensity for behaviour change in patients with hypertension. Relevance to Clinical PracticeThe PAHLS can be used by nurses as a tool to simplify shared decision-making in relation to behavioural changes.

  • 5.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Ake
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sex-specific associations between self-reported sleep duration, depression, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness in an older community-dwelling population2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to explore whether associations between self-reported sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness differed in older community-dwelling men and women. DesignCross-sectional. MethodsA community-dwelling sample of 675 older men and women (mean age 77.7years, SD 3.8years) was used. All participants underwent a clinical examination by a cardiologist. Validated questionnaires were used to investigate sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness. Subjects were divided into short sleepers (6hours), n=231; normal sleepers (7-8hours), n=338; and long sleepers (9hours), n=61. ancovas were used to explore sex-specific effects. ResultsDepressive symptoms were associated with short sleep in men, but not in women. Fatigue was associated with both short and long sleep duration in men. No sex-specific associations of sleep duration with daytime sleepiness or anxiety were found. ConclusionNurses investigating sleep duration and its correlates, or effects, in clinical practice need to take sex into account, as some associations may be sex specific. Depressive symptoms and fatigue can be used as indicators to identify older men with sleep complaints.

  • 6.
    Case, Laura K
    et al.
    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH , Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
    Čeko, Marta
    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH , Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
    Gracely, John L
    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH , Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
    Richards, Emily A
    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH , Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Bushnell, M Catherine
    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH , Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
    Touch Perception Altered by Chronic Pain and by Opioid Blockade.2016In: eNeuro, ISSN 2373-2822, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Touch plays a significant role in human social behavior and social communication, and its rewarding nature has been suggested to involve opioids. Opioid blockade in monkeys leads to increased solicitation and receipt of grooming, suggesting heightened enjoyment of touch. We sought to study the role of endogenous opioids in perception of affective touch in healthy adults and in patients with fibromyalgia, a chronic pain condition shown to involve reduced opioid receptor availability. The pleasantness of touch has been linked to the activation of C-tactile fibers, which respond maximally to slow gentle touch and correlate with ratings of pleasantness. We administered naloxone to patients and healthy controls to directly observe the consequences of µ-opioid blockade on the perceived pleasantness and intensity of touch. We found that at baseline chronic pain patients showed a blunted distinction between slow and fast brushing for both intensity and pleasantness, suggesting reduced C-tactile touch processing. In addition, we found a differential effect of opioid blockade on touch perception in healthy subjects and pain patients. In healthy individuals, opioid blockade showed a trend toward increased ratings of touch pleasantness, while in chronic pain patients it significantly decreased ratings of touch intensity. Further, in healthy individuals, naloxone-induced increase in touch pleasantness was associated with naloxone-induced decreased preference for slow touch, suggesting a possible effect of opioid levels on processing of C-tactile fiber input. These findings suggest a role for endogenous opioids in touch processing, and provide further evidence for altered opioid functioning in chronic pain patients.

  • 7.
    Eleftheriou, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Lundin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Circadian rhythm in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus2018In: Clinical neurology and neurosurgery (Dutch-Flemish ed. Print), ISSN 0303-8467, E-ISSN 1872-6968, Vol. 164, p. 72-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The pathogenesis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) takes place in structures close to the cerebral ventricular system. Suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), situated close to the third ventricle, is involved in circadian rhythm. Diurnal disturbances are well-known in demented patients. The cognitive decline in iNPH is potentially reversible after a shunt operation. Diurnal rhythm has never been studied in iNPH. We hypothesize that there is a disturbance of circadian rhythm in iNPH-patients and the aim was to study any changes of the diurnal rhythm (mesor and circadian period) as well as any changes of the diurnal amplitude and acrophase of the activity in iNPH-patients before and after a shunt operation. Patients and methods: Twenty consecutive iNPH-patients fulfilling the criteria of the American iNPH-guidelines, 9 males and 11 females, mean age 73 (49-81) years were included. The patients underwent a pre-operative clinical work-up including 10 m walk time (w10mt) steps (w10 ms), TUG-time (TUGt) and steps (TUGs) and for cognitive function an MMSE score was measured. In order to receive circadian rhythm data actigraphic recordings were performed using the SenseWear 2 (BodyMedia Inc Pittsburgh, PA, USA) actigraph. Cosinor analyses of accelerometry data were performed in "R" using non-linear regression with Levenburg-Marquardt estimation. Pre- and post-operative data regarding mesor, amplitude and circadian period were compared using Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test for paired data. Results: Twenty patients were evaluated before and three month post-operatively. Motor function (w10mt, w10 ms, TUGt, TUGs) was significantly improved while MMSE was not significantly changed. Actigraphic measurements (mesor, amplitude and circadian period) showed no significant changes after shunt operation. Conclusion: This is the first systematic study of circadian rhythm in iNPH-patients. We found no significant changes in circadian rhythm after shunt surgery. The conceptual idea of diurnal rhythm changes in hydrocephalus is still interesting from a theoretical standpoint and warrants further studies that could include a combination of better designed actigraphic studies in combination with neuroendocrine markers and imaging methods

  • 8.
    Eneling, Johanna
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Karlsson, Per M.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Rossitti, Sandro
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sphenopalatine arteriovenous fistula complicating transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A rare cause of delayed epistaxis treatable by endovascular embolization.2016In: Surgical Neurology International, ISSN 2152-7806, E-ISSN 2152-7806, Vol. 7, no Suppl 41, p. S1053-S1056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Vascular injuries in transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas are uncommon but can result in serious disability or death.

    CASE DESCRIPTION:

    A 46-year-old man, who underwent resection of a pituitary adenoma with suprasellar extension via a transsphenoidal approach, presented with massive epistaxis five days postoperatively. Angiography revealed an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) between the right sphenopalatine artery and a deep vein draining to the right internal jugular vein, as well as contrast agent extravasation at the fistula point. The AVF was catheterized and successfully occluded with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Transsphenoidal pituitary surgery can be complicated by massive epistaxis from a lesion of a small branch of the external carotid artery. Airway protection through intubation and investigation with conventional digital subtraction angiography is recommended. The treatment of choice is endovascular embolization because it can be done immediately at the angiography suite.

  • 9.
    Eriksson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Wikstrom, Lotta
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden; Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Association of pain ratings with the prediction of early physical recovery after general and orthopaedic surgery-A quantitative study with repeated measures2017In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 73, no 11, p. 2664-2675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To compare different levels of self-rated pain and determine if they predict anticipated early physical recovery in patients undergoing general and orthopaedic surgery. Background: Previous research has indicated that average self-rated pain reflects patients ability to recover the same day. However, there is a knowledge gap about the feasibility of using average pain ratings to predict patients physical recovery for the next day. Design: Descriptive, quantitative repeated measures. Methods: General and orthopaedic inpatients (n = 479) completed a questionnaire (October 2012-January 2015) about pain and recovery. Average pain intensity at rest and during activity was based on the Numeric Rating Scale and divided into three levels (0-3, 4-6, 7-10). Three out of five dimensions from the tool "Postoperative Recovery Profile" were used. Because few suffered severe pain, general and orthopaedic patients were analysed together. Results: Binary logistic regression analysis showed that average pain intensity postoperative day 1 significantly predicted the impact on recovery day 2, except nausea, gastrointestinal function and bladder function when pain at rest and also nausea, appetite changes, and bladder function when pain during activity. High pain ratings (NRS 7-10) demonstrated to be a better predictor for recovery compared with moderate ratings (NRS 4-6), day 2, as it significantly predicted more items in recovery. Conclusion: Pain intensity reflected general and orthopaedic patients physical recovery postoperative day 1 and predicted recovery for day 2. By monitoring patients pain and impact on recovery, patients need for support becomes visible which is valuable during hospital stays.

  • 10.
    Eriksson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Wikström, Lotta
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Patients experiences and actions when describing pain after surgery - A critical incident technique analysis2016In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 56, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Postoperative pain assessment remains a significant problem in clinical care despite patients wanting to describe their pain and be treated as unique individuals. Deeper knowledge about variations in patients experiences and actions could help healthcare professionals to improve pain management and could increase patients participation in pain assessments. Objective: The aim of this study was, through an examination of critical incidents, to describe patients experiences and actions when needing to describe pain after surgery. Methods: An explorative design involving the critical incident technique was used. Patients from one university and three county hospitals in both urban and rural areas were included. To ensure variation of patients a strategic sampling was made according to age, gender, education and surgery. A total of 25 patients who had undergone orthopaedic or general surgery was asked to participate in an interview, of whom three declined. Findings: Pain experiences were described according to two main areas: "Patients resources when in need of pain assessment" and "Ward resources for performing pain assessments". Patients were affected by their expectations and tolerance for pain. Ability to describe pain could be limited by a fear of coming into conflict with healthcare professionals or being perceived as whining. Furthermore, attitudes from healthcare professionals and their lack of adherence to procedures affected patients ability to describe pain. Two main areas regarding actions emerged: "Patients used active strategies when needing to describe pain" and "Patients used passive strategies when needing to describe pain". Patients informed healthcare professionals about their pain and asked questions in order to make decisions about their pain situation. Selfcare was performed by distraction and avoiding pain or treating pain by themselves, while others were passive and endured pain or refrained from contact with healthcare professionals due to healthcare professionals large work load. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Gustafsson, Greta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Occurrence of epileptiform discharges and sleep during EEG recordings in children after melatonin intake versus sleep-deprivation2015In: Clinical Neurophysiology, ISSN 1388-2457, E-ISSN 1872-8952, Vol. 126, no 8, p. 1493-1497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To determine if melatonin is equally efficient as partial sleep deprivation in inducing sleep without interfering with epileptiform discharges in EEG recordings in children 1-16years old.

    METHODS:

    We retrospectively analysed 129 EEGs recorded after melatonin intake and 113 EEGs recorded after partial sleep deprivation. Comparisons were made concerning occurrence of epileptiform discharges, the number of children who fell asleep and the technical quality of EEG recordings. Comparison between different age groups was also made.

    RESULTS:

    No significant differences were found regarding occurrence of epileptiform discharges (33% after melatonin intake, 36% after sleep deprivation), or proportion of unsuccessful EEGs (8% and 10%, respectively). Melatonin and sleep deprivation were equally efficient in inducing sleep (70% in both groups). Significantly more children aged 1-4years obtained sleep after melatonin intake in comparison to sleep deprivation (82% vs. 58%, p⩽0.01), and in comparison to older children with melatonin induced sleep (58-67%, p⩽0.05). Sleep deprived children 9-12years old had higher percentage of epileptiform discharges (62%, p⩽0.05) compared to younger sleep deprived children.

    CONCLUSION:

    Melatonin is equally efficient as partial sleep deprivation to induce sleep and does not affect the occurrence of epileptiform discharges in the EEG recording. Sleep deprivation could still be preferable in older children as melatonin probably has less sleep inducing effect.

    SIGNIFICANCE:

    Melatonin induced sleep have advantages, especially in younger children as they fall asleep easier than after sleep deprivation. The procedure is easier for the parents than keeping a young child awake for half the night.

  • 12.
    Hedberg, Berith
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Futurum, Sweden.
    Malm, Dan
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Factors associated with confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication among patients with atrial fibrillation2018In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 446-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Atrial fibrillation is a prevalent cardiac arrhythmia. Effective communication of risks (e.g. stroke risk) and benefits of treatment (e.g. oral anticoagulants) is crucial for the process of shared decision making. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore factors associated with confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication after a follow-up visit among patients who three months earlier had visited an emergency room for atrial fibrillation related symptoms. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used and 322 patients (34% women), mean age 66.1 years (SD 10.5 years) with atrial fibrillation were included in the south of Sweden. Clinical examinations were done post an atrial fibrillation episode. Self-rating scales for communication (Combined Outcome Measure for Risk Communication and Treatment Decision Making Effectiveness), uncertainty in illness (Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale-Community), mastery of daily life (Mastery Scale), depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and vitality, physical health and mental health (36-item Short Form Health Survey) were used to collect data. Results: Decreased vitality and mastery of daily life, as well as increased uncertainty in illness, were independently associated with lower confidence in decision making. Absence of hypertension and increased uncertainty in illness were independently associated with lower satisfaction with risk communication. Clinical atrial fibrillation variables or depressive symptoms were not associated with satisfaction with confidence in decision making or satisfaction with risk communication. The final models explained 29.1% and 29.5% of the variance in confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication. Conclusion: Confidence in decision making is associated with decreased vitality and mastery of daily life, as well as increased uncertainty in illness, while absence of hypertension and increased uncertainty in illness are associated with risk communication satisfaction.

  • 13.
    Hernar, Ingvild
    et al.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; Western Norway University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Haltbakk, Johannes
    Western Norway University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Western Norway University of Appl Science, Norway; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Differences in depression, treatment satisfaction and injection behaviour in adults with type 1 diabetes and different degrees of lipohypertrophy2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 4583-4596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo assess the prevalence of lipohypertrophy, and to compare differences in external, personal and regimen factors in adults with type 1 diabetes and different degrees of lipohypertrophy. BackgroundSuboptimal insulin injection behaviour is associated with lipohypertrophy, which may affect insulin absorption and lead to blood glucose fluctuations. Few, if any studies have investigated how external, personal and regimen factors differ in people with type 1 diabetes and different degrees of lipohypertrophy. DesignA cross-sectional study including adults with type 1 diabetes at a diabetes outpatient clinic in a Norwegian university hospital. MethodsParticipants (n=215) were included consecutively at scheduled appointments. Sociodemographic, diabetes and insulin treatment data, and self-report questionnaires concerning patient activation (Patient Activation Measure), depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-2), diabetes distress (Diabetes Distress Scale), type D personality (14-item Type D scale), treatment satisfaction (Insulin Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire) and motivation (Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire), were collected. Lipohypertrophic injection sites were identified by palpation by diabetes specialist nurses. ResultsLipohypertrophy was present in 53% and was more frequent in insulin pen users (63%) compared to insulin pump users (34%). Participants with two or more lipohypertrophic areas had higher depression scores, lower treatment satisfaction with glycaemic control, higher bolus doses and reported suboptimal injection behaviour compared to those with no lipohypertrophic areas. There were no differences in patient activation, diabetes distress, type D personality or motivation between the groups. Discussion and conclusionCompared to pump treatment, pen treatment requires greater awareness of injection technique. Symptoms of depression and lower treatment satisfaction might affect diabetes self-management and glycaemic control, but the association with lipohypertrophy needs further exploration. Relevance to clinical practiceLipohypertrophy is more frequent in insulin pen users compared to pump users. Nurses should focus on injection technique education, and should also consider screening for depressive symptoms and treatment satisfaction as these factors could be associated with development of lipohypertrophy.

  • 14.
    Hjelm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Riegel, Barbara
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The association between self-care and cognitive dysfunction in patients with chronic heart failure2015In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To test the relationship between cognitive function and self-care in patients with heart failure after adjusting for the contribution of age, education, functional status, myocardial stress, sleep and depression. Further, the relationship between cognitive function and self-care was explored with depression and sleep as moderators.

    Background: Self-care can significantly impact functional capacity, well-being, morbidity, and prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF). However, self-care requires the cognitive ability to learn, perceive, interpret and respond. The influence of demographics and clinical symptoms on the relationship between cognition and self-care needs to be further understood.

    Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional study.

    Methods: The study included 142 patients with chronic HF (68% male, median age 72 years, 61% in NYHA II). Self-care was measured with the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior Scale. Cognitive function was evaluated with neuropsychological tests measuring global cognitive dysfunction, psychomotor speed, executive function, visual-spatial perception/construct, spatial performance, semantic and episodic memory.

    Findings: Psychomotor function (speed and attention) measured with the Trail Making A was the only dimension of cognitive function significantly associated with self-care. Neither depressive symptoms, nor sleep disturbances  moderated the relation between cognitive function and selfcare.

    Conclusion: Deficits in psychomotor speed have implications for how patients should be educated and supported to perform self-care. A decrease in sustained attention and ability to carry out more than one task at a same time could lead to difficulties in self-care. Screening for psychomotor speed is therefore advocated for patients with HF.

  • 15.
    Huang-Link, Yu-Min
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Al-Hawasi, Abbas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Acute optic neuritis: retinal ganglion cell loss precedes retinal nerve fiber thinning.2015In: Neurological Sciences, ISSN 1590-1874, E-ISSN 1590-3478, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 617-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optic neuritis (ON) causes axonal loss as reflected by thinning of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and can be tracked by optical coherence tomography (OCT) about 6 months after ON onset, when swelling of optic nerve head (ONH) has vanished. Changes of macular ganglion cell layer (GCL) thickness provide another window to track the disease process in ON. GCL thinning over time in relation to RNFL change after ON remains elusive. Using OCT, we followed 4 patients with acute unilateral isolated ON for more than 9 months. A diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) was established in all 4 patients. First follow-up was 2-3 weeks after ON onset, and thereafter every 2-3 months. RNFL swelling peaked during first month after acute ON, followed by rapidly reduced swelling (pseudoatrophy) during following 2 months, and thereafter successively vanished 6 months after ON onset. GCL thinning was observed 1-3 months after ON onset, i.e. already during optic disk swelling and before real RNFL thinning. The results imply that quantifying GCL thickness provides opportunities to monitor early axonal loss and ON-to-MS progression, and facilitates distinguishing real atrophy from pseudoatrophy of RNFL after acute ON.

  • 16.
    Iversen, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Balancing task focus and relationship building: asking sleepy patients about traffic risk in treatment initiation consultations2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 895-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe use of traffic risk assessment questions is an understudied area in nursing research. Obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with an increased risk of traffic accidents. Therefore, traffic safety authorities demand adherent continuous positive airway pressure use. Nurses act as coaches to achieve treatment adherence, but they are also obliged to act as state agents by prohibiting obstructive sleep apnoea patients from drowsy driving. ObjectiveTo examine how nurses and obstructive sleep apnoea patients manage traffic risk assessment questions in the relation-building context of treatment initiation consultations. MethodsTo study, in detail, the actual practice of risk assessment, we used conversation analysis of 19 video-recorded initial treatment consultations with nurses and recently diagnosed obstructive sleep apnoea patients. EthicsThe study received ethical approval from the Central Ethical Review Board in Linkoping (registration number 214/231-32) and follows the ethical guidelines for qualitative research. ResultsPatients influence how nurses phrase questions about traffic risk by taking a stance to daytime sleepiness prior to the risk question. Nurses ask traffic risk questions in a way that assumes that driving is unproblematic if patients have not previously indicated problems. It may pose a significant problem when nurses, by accepting patients prior stance when asking about traffic risk, orient to relationship building rather than task focus. ConclusionTo clarify the difference between their two potentially conflicting roles, nurses need to refer to existing laws and official guidelines when they raise the issue of risk in treatment initiation consultations. Nurses should also ask risk assessment questions in a problem-oriented communicative environment. Traffic risk assessment is sensitive yet important, as obstructive sleep apnoea is a highly prevalent problem causing excessive sleepiness. It is essential to acknowledge nurses double roles with regard to coaching continuous positive airway pressure treatment and assessing traffic risk.

  • 17.
    Iversen, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Traffic risk work with sleepy patients: from rationality to practice2018In: Health, Risk and Society, ISSN 1369-8575, E-ISSN 1469-8331, Vol. 20, no 1-2, p. 23-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we aim to contribute to the emerging field of risk-work studies by examining the relationship between risk rationality and risk practices in nurses conversations with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients about traffic risks. Legislation in Sweden towards traffic risk involves clinicians making risk assessment of patients prone to falling asleep while driving. In contrast to an overall care rationale, this means that the health of the patient is not the only risk object in treatment consultations. However, guidelines on how to implement legislation are missing. To examine the practical reality of nurses traffic-risk work, we draw on an analysis of data from a Swedish study in 2015. This study included qualitative interviews with specialist nurses and video-recorded interactions between nurses and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients. We found that a lack of clarity in traffic-risk guidelines on how risk should be addressed was evident in both interview accounts and in observed practice. While nurses primarily accounted for risk work as treatment-relevant education, they practised risk work as interrogation. Patients also treated nurses inquiries as assessment - not education - by responding defensively. We conclude that while confusing risk work and treatment enables clinicians to treat patients as competent actors, it obscures the controlling aspects of traffic-risk questions for individual patients and downplays the implications of drowsy driving for general traffic safety.

  • 18.
    Joensson, Emma H.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Backlund Wasling, Helena
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wagnbeck, Vicktoria
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dimitriadis, Menelaos
    University of Medical Centre Groningen, Netherlands.
    Georgiadis, Janniko R.
    University of Medical Centre Groningen, Netherlands.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Croy, Ilona
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Unmyelinated Tactile Cutaneous Nerves Signal Erotic Sensations2015In: Journal of Sexual Medicine, ISSN 1743-6095, E-ISSN 1743-6109, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 1338-1345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Intrapersonal touch is a powerful tool for communicating emotions and can among many things evoke feelings of eroticism and sexual arousal. The peripheral neural mechanisms of erotic touch signaling have been less studied. C tactile afferents (unmyelinated low-threshold mechanoreceptors), known to underpin pleasant aspects of touch processing, have been posited to play an important role. MethodIn two studies, we investigated the relationship between C tactile activation and the perception of erotic and pleasant touch, using tactile brushing stimulation. In total, 66 healthy subjects (37 women, age range 19-51 years) were examined. In study 1 (n=20), five different stroking velocities were applied to the forearm and the inner thigh. The participants answered questions about partnership, mood, and touch. In study 2 (n=46), the same five stroking velocities were applied to the forearm. The participants answered questions about partnership, touch, and sexuality. ResultsBoth touch eroticism and pleasantness were rated significantly higher for C tactile optimal velocities compared with suboptimal velocities. No difference was found between the ratings of the thigh and the forearm. The velocity-dependent rating curves of pleasantness, intensity, and eroticism differed from each other. Pleasantness was best explained by a quadratic fit, intensity by a linear fit, and eroticism by both. A linear transformation of pleasantness and intensity predicted the observed eroticism ratings reliably. Eroticism ratings were negatively correlated with length of relationship. ConclusionTouch was rated most erotic when perceived as pleasant and weak. In human hairy skin, perception of pleasantness is correlated with the firing rate of C tactile afferents, and perception of intensity is correlated with the firing rate of A afferents. Accordingly, eroticism may be perceived most readily for touch stimuli that induce high activity in C tactile fibers and low activity in A fibers. Jonsson EH, Backlund Wasling H, Wagnbeck V, Dimitriadis M, Georgiadis JR, Olausson H, and Croy I. Unmyelinated tactile cutaneous nerves signal erotic sensations. J Sex Med 2015;12:1338-1345.

  • 19.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Sanderman, Robbert
    Health Psychology Section, Department of Health Sciences, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Course of Sleep Problems in Patients With Heart Failure and Associations to Rehospitalizations.2015In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 403-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Sleep problems are common in patients with heart failure (HF) and might be associated with patient outcomes.

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to describe the course of sleep problems in HF patients over 1 year and the association between sleep problems and rehospitalization.

    METHODS: Data from 499 HF patients (mean age, 70 years) were used in this analysis. Sleep problems were assessed with the item "Was your sleep restless" from the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale during hospitalization for HF (baseline) and after 1 year.

    RESULTS: A total of 43% of patients (n = 215) reported sleep problems at baseline, and 21% of patients (n = 105), after 1 year. Among the 215 patients with problems with sleep at baseline, 30% (n = 65) continued to have sleep problems over time. Among the 284 patients without sleep problems at baseline, 14% (n = 40) reported sleep problems after 1 year. After adjustments for potential cofounders, patients with continued sleep problems had an almost 2-fold increased risk for all-cause hospitalizations (hazard ratio, 2.1; P = .002) and cardiovascular hospitalizations (hazard ratio, 2.2; P = .004).

    CONCLUSION: One-third of HF patients with sleep problems at discharge experienced persistent sleep problems at follow-up. Continued sleep problems were associated with all-cause and cardiovascular rehospitalizations.

  • 20.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, Linköping .
    Alehagen, Urban
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Sleep disordered breathing, hypoxia and inflammation: associations with sickness behaviour in community dwelling elderly with and without cardiovascular disease2015In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Inflammation can induce a cluster of symptoms, referred to as sickness behaviour (e.g., depressive symptoms, sleep disturbances, pain and fatigue). Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) are common in older adults. CVD is associated with an increased inflammatory activity and in SDB, hypoxia can also increase inflammation. The purpose of this study is to explore if SDB-related hypoxia is associated differently with inflammation and the presence of sickness behaviour in older adults with and without CVD.

    METHODS: Three hundred and thirty-one older adults, whose mean age is 78 years, underwent one-night polygraphic recording to measure SDB and hypoxia. CVD was established by a clinical investigation. Questionnaires were used to measure sickness behaviour and depressive symptoms. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was used as a marker of inflammation.

    RESULTS: Structural Equation Modelling showed that SDB-related hypoxia was associated with inflammation (β > 0.40) which mediated indirect associations with sickness behaviour (β = 0.19) and depressive symptoms (β = 0.11), but only in those with CVD (n = 119). In this model, inflammation had a direct effect on sickness behaviour (β = 0.43) and an indirect effect on depressive symptoms (β = 0.24). Hypoxia had the strongest effect (i.e., β = 0.41; significant) on inflammation, whereas the AHI or ODI had weak and non-significant effects (β = 0.03 and β = 0.15).

    CONCLUSIONS: Older adults with CVD and SDB are at a particular risk of developing sickness behaviour and depressive symptoms. The effect of SDB was mainly caused by hypoxia, suggesting that hypoxia is an important marker of SDB severity in older adults with CVD.

  • 21.
    Lee, In-Seon
    et al.
    Kyung Hee University, South Korea; University of Tubingen, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Lee, Bombi
    Kyung Hee University, South Korea.
    Park, Hi-Joon
    Kyung Hee University, South Korea.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Enck, Paul
    University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Chae, Younbyoung
    Kyung Hee University, South Korea.
    A new animal model of placebo analgesia: involvement of the dopaminergic system in reward learning2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, no 17140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We suggest a new placebo analgesia animal model and investigated the role of the dopamine and opioid systems in placebo analgesia. Before and after the conditioning, we conducted a conditioned place preference (CPP) test to measure preferences for the cues (Rooms 1 and 2), and a hot plate test (HPT) to measure the pain responses to high level-pain after the cues. In addition, we quantified the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and c-Fos in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) as a response to reward learning and pain response. We found an enhanced preference for the low level-pain paired cue and enhanced TH expression in the VTA of the Placebo and Placebo + Naloxone groups. Haloperidol, a dopamine antagonist, blocked these effects in the Placebo + Haloperidol group. An increased pain threshold to high-heat pain and reduced c-Fos expression in the ACC were observed in the Placebo group only. Haloperidol blocked the place preference effect, and naloxone and haloperidol blocked the placebo analgesia. Cue preference is mediated by reward learning via the dopamine system, whereas the expression of placebo analgesia is mediated by the dopamine and opioid systems.

  • 22.
    McGlone, Francis
    et al.
    Liverpool John Moores University, England University of Liverpool, England .
    Wessberg, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Discriminative and Affective Touch: Sensing and Feeling2014In: Neuron, ISSN 0896-6273, E-ISSN 1097-4199, Vol. 82, no 4, p. 737-755Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multimodal properties of the human somatosensory system continue to be unravelled. There is mounting evidence that one of these submodalities-touch-has another dimension, providing not only its well-recognized discriminative input to the brain, but also an affective input. It has long been recognized that touch plays an important role in many forms of social communication and a number of theories have been proposed to explain observations and beliefs about the "power of touch." Here, we propose that a class of low-threshold mechanosensitive C fibers that innervate the hairy skin represent the neurobiological substrate for the affective and rewarding properties of touch.

  • 23.
    Mellergård, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Blystad, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Grönqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Blennow,, K.
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institution of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsson,, B.
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institution of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Cerebrospinal fluid levels of neurofilament and tau correlate with brain atrophy in natalizumab-treated multiple sclerosis2017In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 112-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose

    Brain atrophy is related to clinical deterioration in multiple sclerosis (MS) but its association with intrathecal markers of inflammation or neurodegeneration is unclear. Our aim was to investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of inflammation or neurodegeneration are associated with brain volume change in natalizumab-treated MS and whether this change is reflected in non-lesional white matter metabolites.

    Methods

    About 25 patients with natalizumab-treated MS were followed for 3 years with assessment of percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and absolute quantification of metabolites with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS). Analyses of inflammatory [interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, C-X-C motif chemokine 8 (CXCL8), CXCL10, CXCL11, C-C motif chemokine 22] and neurodegenerative [neurofilament light protein (NFL), glial fibrillary acidic protein, myelin basic protein, tau proteins] markers were done at baseline and 1-year follow-up.

    Results

    The mean decline in PBVC was 3% at the 3-year follow-up, although mean 1H MRS metabolite levels in non-lesional white matter were unchanged. CSF levels of NFL and tau at baseline correlated negatively with PBVC over 3 years (r = −0.564, P = 0.012, and r = −0.592, P = 0.010, respectively).

    Conclusions

    A significant 3-year whole-brain atrophy was not reflected in mean metabolite change of non-lesional white matter. In addition, our results suggest that CSF levels of NFL and tau correlate with brain atrophy development and may be used for evaluating treatment response in inflammatory active MS.

  • 24.
    Morales Drissi, Natasha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Szakacs, Attila
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Witt, Suzanne
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wretman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Ståhlbrandt, Henriettae
    Highland Hospital, Sweden.
    Darin, Niklas
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallbook, Tove
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Altered Brain Microstate Dynamics in Adolescents with Narcolepsy2016In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 10, no 369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder caused by a loss of hypocretin-1 producing neurons in the hypothalamus. Previous neuroimaging studies have investigated brain function in narcolepsy during rest using positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In addition to hypothalamic and thalamic dysfunction they showed aberrant prefrontal perfusion and glucose metabolism in narcolepsy. Given these findings in brain structure and metabolism in narcolepsy, we anticipated that changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) resting state network (RSN) dynamics might also be apparent in patients with narcolepsy. The objective of this study was to investigate and describe brain microstate activity in adolescents with narcolepsy and correlate these to RSNs using simultaneous fMRI and electroencephalography (EEG). Sixteen adolescents (ages 13-20) with a confirmed diagnosis of narcolepsy were recruited and compared to age-matched healthy controls. Simultaneous EEG and fMRI data were collected during 10 min of wakeful rest. EEG data were analyzed for microstates, which are discrete epochs of stable global brain states obtained from topographical EEG analysis. Functional fMRI data were analyzed for RSNs. Data showed that narcolepsy patients were less likely than controls to spend time in a microstate which we found to be related to the default mode network and may suggest a disruption of this network that is disease specific. We concluded that adolescents with narcolepsy have altered resting state brain dynamics.

  • 25.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Neher, Margit
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Towards internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for patients with cardiovascular disease and comorbid depression and insomnia?2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 565-566Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 26.
    Perini, Irene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Morrison, India
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Seeking pleasant touch: neural correlates of behavioral preferences for skin stroking2015In: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5153, E-ISSN 1662-5153, Vol. 9, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affective touch is a dynamic process. In this fMRI study we investigated affective touch by exploring its effects on overt behavior. Arm and palm skin were stroked with a soft brush at five different velocities (0.3, 1, 10, 3, and 30 cm s(-1)), using a novel feedback-based paradigm. Following stimulation in each trial, participants actively chose whether the caress they would receive in the next trial would be the same speed ("repeat") or different ("change"). Since preferred stroking speeds should be sought with greater frequency than non-preferred speeds, this paradigm provided a measure of such preferences in the form of active choices. The stimulation velocities were implemented with respect to the differential subjective pleasantness ratings they elicit in healthy subjects, with intermediate velocities (1, 10, and 3 cm s(-1)) considered more pleasant than very slow or very fast ones. Such pleasantness ratings linearly correlate with changes in mean firing rates of unmyelinated low-threshold C-tactile (CT) afferent nerves in the skin. Here, gentle, dynamic stimulation optimal for activating CT-afferents not only affected behavioral choices, but engaged brain regions involved in reward-related behavior and decision-making. This was the case for both hairy skin of the arm, where CTs are abundant, and glabrous skin of the palm, where CTs are absent. These findings provide insights on central and behavioral mechanisms underlying the perception of affective touch, and indicate that seeking affective touch involves value-based neural processing that is ultimately reflected in behavioral preferences.

  • 27.
    Sarberg, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Sleepiness and sleep disordered breathing during pregnancy2016In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1231-1237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study objectives: To investigate if sleep recordings show differences in prevalence of sleep-disturbed breathing among pregnant women compared to non-pregnant controls. To compare the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) scores between the two groups. To evaluate obstetric outcomes.

    Setting: At one antenatal care center at an outpatient unit in Linköping, Sweden.

    Participants: One hundred pregnant women (gestational week 24-34) and 80 non-pregnant women age- and body mass index-matched as controls.

    Interventions: Whole-night respiratory recordings were performed in the homes of all participants, who also answered the same questionnaire, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale.

    Measurements and results: Objectively recorded snoring was more common among the pregnant women (median value 10% of total estimated sleep time) than among the non-pregnant controls (2.5% of total sleep time, p<0.001). The prevalence of obstructive events was low and similar in pregnant and non-pregnant women (1% vs. 3% had obstructive apnea-hypopnea index ≥5). The total ESS score was higher among pregnant women than controls (median 9 vs. 7, p<0.001) but no significant differences were found between the two groups in the scores for the separate items of the ESS. Sleep-disturbed breathing and snoring showed no impact on obstetric outcome. There were no significant associations between either subjectively reported or objectively recorded snoring and ESS scores.

    Conclusion: Snoring increases during pregnancy, but sleep recordings could not verify an increased prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among pregnant women. Development of obstructive sleep apnea is not a likely explanation for the increased daytime sleepiness seen in pregnant women.

  • 28.
    Sarberg, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Postpartum depressive symptoms and its association to daytime sleepiness and restless legs during pregnancy2016In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, article id 137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the possible association between depressive symptoms in the postpartum period and sleep related problems during pregnancy, using screening instruments.

    Methods: In a prospective study 293 women in the last trimester of pregnancy answered a questionnaire about sleep related problems in terms of symptoms of restless legs, snoring and daytime sleepiness. They also completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). The same women were screened for depressive symptoms using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) four to ten weeks after giving birth. Additional information about social data, pregnancy and delivery was received from the medical charts.

    Results: Women with postpartum depressive symptoms had higher prevalence of sleep related problems including excessive daytime sleepiness defined as ESS score ≥10 (OR 3.84, CI 1.57-9.39), and restless legs syndrome (OR 2.837 CI 1.18-6.84) in last trimester of pregnancy, when adjusted for sociodemographic factors and obstetric risk factors.

    Conclusions: Depressive symptoms after childbirth are preceded by disturbed sleep already during pregnancy. The results from Epworth Sleepiness Scale completed during pregnancy might be used for detecting women at risk, enabling preventive interventions.

  • 29.
    Selassie, Gunilla Rejno-Habte
    et al.
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp, Sweden.
    Pegenius, Goran
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Viggedal, Gerd
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallbook, Tove
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thordstein, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation for preoperative cortical mapping of expressive language in children: Development of a method2018In: Epilepsy & Behavior, ISSN 1525-5050, E-ISSN 1525-5069, Vol. 87, p. 180-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We adjusted an object-naming task with repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rnTMS) originally developed for preoperative cortical language mapping in adults in order for it to be used in children. Two series of pictures were chosen for children above and below 10 years of age, respectively. Firstly, the series of pictures and the preferred speed of presentation were assessed for their applicability in children of different ages and abilities. Secondly, these series were used with rnTMS preoperatively in five children with epilepsy. Naming errors induced by the stimulation comprised no response, delayed response, semantic error, phonological error, and self-correction. Language laterality was compared with the results of a dichotic listening test and with neuropsychological tests with respect to general laterality, and general language abilities were considered with respect to the results of stimulation. One participant had below normal general language abilities, two had below-normal rapid naming, and three had slow and indistinct articulation. Laterality was only clear in two of the participants. All children required breaks of various durations during the process, and individual adjustments of the interpicture interval and other stimulation parameters were also made. We conclude that, after adjustment, rnTMS combined with an object-naming task can be useful for preoperative language mapping in children. (C) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 30.
    Siouta, Eleni
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Sophiahemmet University, Sweden.
    Hellstrom Muhli, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jonköping Academic Qual Improvement and Leadership Heatlh, Sweden; Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jönköping University, Sweden; Bergen University of Coll, Norway.
    Fossum, Bjoorn
    Sophiahemmet University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Patients experiences of communication and involvement in decision-making about atrial fibrillation treatment in consultations with nurses and physicians2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 535-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInsights in consultations across patient interactions with physicians and nurses are of vital importance for strengthening the patients involvement in the treatment decision-making process. The experience of involvement and communication in decision-making from the patients perspective has been sparsely explored. ObjectiveTo examine how patients describe involvement in and communication about decision-making regarding treatment in consultations with nurses and physicians. MethodTwenty-two patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), aged 37-90 years, were interviewed directly after their consultations with nurses and physicians in outpatient AF clinics in six Swedish hospitals. ResultsIn consultations with nurses, the patients felt involved when obtaining clarifications about AF as a disease and its treatment and when preparing for and building up confidence in decision-making. In consultations with physicians, the patients felt involved when they could cooperate in decision-making, when acquiring knowledge, and when they felt that they were being understood. One shared category was found in consultations with both nurses and physicians, and the patients felt involved when they had a sense of trust and felt secure during and between consultations. ConclusionsPatients with AF stated that they would need to acquire knowledge and build up confidence and ability in order to be effectively involved in the decision-making about treatment. Despite not being actively involved in decision-making, patients felt involved through experiencing supportive and confirming communication. Practice implicationsAttention must be given to the relationship with the patient to create the conditions for patient involvement in the consultation. This can be achieved through supportive communication attempting to create a feeling of clarity and building confidence. This will support involvement in decision-making concerning AF treatment and feelings of being understood and of trust in physicians and/or nurses.

  • 31.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Nordin, Maria
    Stockholm University, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Information and communication technology demands at work: the association with job strain, effort-reward imbalance and self-rated health in different socio-economic strata2016In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 89, no 7, p. 1049-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) is common in modern working life. ICT demands may give rise to experience of work-related stress. Knowledge about ICT demands in relation to other types of work-related stress and to self-rated health is limited. Consequently, the aim of this study was to examine the association between ICT demands and two types of work-related stress [job strain and effort-reward imbalance (ERI)] and to evaluate the association between these work-related stress measures and self-rated health, in general and in different SES strata. This study is based on cross-sectional data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health collected in 2014, from 14,873 gainfully employed people. ICT demands, job strain, ERI and self-rated health were analysed as the main measures. Sex, age, SES, lifestyle factors and BMI were used as covariates. ICT demands correlated significantly with the dimensions of the job strain and ERI models, especially with the demands (r = 0.42; p amp;lt; 0.01) and effort (r = 0.51; p amp;lt; 0.01) dimensions. ICT demands were associated with suboptimal self-rated health, also after adjustment for age, sex, SES, lifestyle and BMI (OR 1.49 [95 % CI 1.36-1.63]), but job strain (OR 1.93 [95 % CI 1.74-2.14) and ERI (OR 2.15 [95 % CI 1.95-2.35]) showed somewhat stronger associations with suboptimal self-rated health. ICT demands are common among people with intermediate and high SES and associated with job strain, ERI and suboptimal self-rated health. ICT demands should thus be acknowledged as a potential stressor of work-related stress in modern working life.

  • 32.
    Steinke, E.
    et al.
    Wichita State University, KS 67260 USA.
    Palm Johansen, P.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark; Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Fridlund, B.
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Determinants of sexual dysfunction and interventions for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea: a systematic review2016In: International journal of clinical practice (Esher), ISSN 1368-5031, E-ISSN 1742-1241, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 5-19Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) may negatively affect a couples sexual relationship. This systematic review evaluated what characteristics are determinants of sexual function and dysfunction in women and men with OSA, and what interventions are shown to be effective. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted using PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane and TRIP, and articles published between January 2004 and December 2014 in English; original research; adults &gt;= 18 years; and both experimental and non-experimental designs. The Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies was used to assess study quality. Of 21 studies, six studies (no randomised control trials, RCTs) included women and 15 (with six RCTs) studies included men. Extracted data were scrutinised and adjusted until consensus was reached; suitable quantitative data were pooled in statistical meta-analysis. Results: Sexual function was affected similarly in both genders, but effective interventions were reported only for men. In some studies, OSA severity and medications contributed to greater sexual dysfunction. In women, menopausal status, hormone levels and SaO(2) &lt; 90% were determinants of sexual dysfunction, while for men factors included BMI, hormonal status and inflammatory markers. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) not only improved clinical measures such as excessive daytime sleepiness but also the erectile and orgasmic function. Nevertheless, sildenafil was superior CPAP with regard to erectile dysfunction. Conclusions: The findings illustrate important contributors to sexual dysfunction; however, firm generalisations cannot be made. There were limited RCTs and none for women, indicating further RCTs are needed to determine how OSA affects sexual function.

  • 33.
    Ulander, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Letter: Response to Akar et al., regarding our study "Side effects to continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea" in SLEEP AND BREATHING, vol 19, issue 4, pp 1345-13452015In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 1345-1345Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 34.
    Westhall, E.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Rosen, I.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Rundgren, M.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bro-Jeppesen, J.
    Rigshosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kjaergaard, J.
    Rigshosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hassager, C.
    Rigshosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Horn, J.
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Ullen, S.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nielsen, N.
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Friberg, H.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Cronberg, T.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Time to epileptiform activity and EEG background recovery are independent predictors after cardiac arrest2018In: Clinical Neurophysiology, ISSN 1388-2457, E-ISSN 1872-8952, Vol. 129, no 8, p. 1660-1668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Investigate the temporal development of EEG and prognosis. Methods: Prospective observational substudy of the Target Temperature Management trial. Six sites performed simplified continuous EEG-monitoring (cEEG) on comatose patients after cardiac arrest, blinded to treating physicians. We determined time-points of recovery of a normal-voltage continuous background activity and the appearance of an epileptiform EEG, defined as abundant epileptiform discharges, periodic/rhythmic discharges or electrographic seizure activity. Results: 134 patients were included, 65 had a good outcome. Early recovery of continuous background activity (within 24 h) occurred in 72 patients and predicted good outcome since 55 (76%) had good outcome, increasing the odds for a good outcome seven times compared to a late background recovery. Early appearance of an epileptiform EEG occurred in 38 patients and 34 (89%) had a poor outcome, increasing the odds for a poor outcome six times compared to a late debut. The time to background recovery and the time to epileptiform activity were highly associated with outcome and levels of neuron-specific enolase. Multiple regression analysis showed that both variables were independent predictors. Conclusions: Time to epileptiform activity and background recovery are independent prognostic indicators. Significance: Patients with early background recovery combined with late appearance of epileptiform activity may have a good outcome. (C) 2018 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 35.
    Wikstrom, Lotta
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Kerstin
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Futurum Academic Health and Care, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    The clinical applicability of a daily summary of patients self-reported postoperative painA repeated measure analysis2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 4675-4684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives(i) To determine whether a central tendency, median, based on patients self-rated pain is a clinically applicable daily measure to show patients postoperative pain on the first day after major surgery (ii) and to determine the number of self-ratings required for the calculation of this measure. BackgroundPerioperative pain traits in medical records are difficult to overview. The clinical applicability of a daily documented summarising measure of patients self-rated pain scores is little explored. DesignA repeated measure design was carried out at three Swedish country hospitals. MethodsAssociations between the measures were analysed with nonparametric statistical methods; systematic and individual group changes were analysed separately. Measure I: pain scores at rest and activity postoperative day 1; measure II: retrospective average pain from postoperative day 1. ResultsThe sample consisted of 190 general surgery patients and 289 orthopaedic surgery patients with a mean age of 65; 56% were men. Forty-four percent had a pre-operative daily intake of analgesia, and 77% used postoperative opioids. A range of 49 pain scores seem to be eligible for the calculation of the daily measures of pain. Rank correlations for individual median scores, based on four ratings, vs. retrospective self-rated average pain, were moderate and strengthened with increased numbers of ratings. A systematic group change towards a higher level of reported retrospective pain was significant. ConclusionsThe median values were clinically applicable daily measures. The risk of obtaining a higher value than was recalled by patients seemed to be low. Applicability increased with increased frequency of self-rated pain scores and with high-quality pain assessments. Relevance to clinical practiceThe documenting of daily median pain scores at rest and during activity could constitute the basis for obtaining patients experiences by showing their pain severity trajectories. The measures could also be an important key to predicting postoperative health-related consequences.

  • 36.
    Wikstrom, Lotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Kerstin
    Jönköping University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Healthcare professionals descriptions of care experiences and actions when assessing postoperative pain - a critical incident technique analysis2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 802-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pain is a common postoperative symptom, and length of hospital stay after surgery is short which highlights the importance of pain assessments. Experiences of assessing pain are mainly described from the perspective of nurses. In postoperative care, enrolled nurses and physicians also assess pain. It is therefore important to take note of their experiences to improve postoperative pain assessments. Objectives: The aim of this study was, through considering critical incidents, to describe care experiences and actions taken by healthcare professionals when assessing postoperative pain. Methods: An explorative design employing critical incidents technique analysis was used. A total of 24 strategically selected enrolled nurses, nurses and physicians employed at orthopaedic or general surgery wards in four Swedish hospitals were interviewed. The intention was to reach variation in age, sex, profession and professional experience. Findings: In pain assessments, patient-related facilitators were patients verbal and emotional expressions including pain ratings, while lack of consistency with observed behaviours was a barrier. Clinical competence, continuity in care and time were healthcare-related facilitators. The actions healthcare professionals took were gathering facts about patients pain manifestations and adapting to patients communication abilities. Patient observations, either passive or active were used to confirm or detect pain. Collaboration between healthcare professionals, including consultations with pain experts, social workers and relatives, strengthened understanding of pain. Conclusions: Communication skills and working conditions have an impact on performance of pain assessment. Patient comfort without compromising safety is reached by including healthcare professionals dissimilar responsibilities when collecting patients and relatives perspectives on current pain.

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