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  • 1.
    Nordwall, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Abrahamsson, Mariann
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dhir, Meryl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Norrköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Impact of HbA(1c), Followed From Onset of Type 1 Diabetes, on the Development of Severe Retinopathy and Nephropathy: The VISS Study (Vascular Diabetic Complications in Southeast Sweden)2015In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 308-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVEHbA(1c) is strongly related to the development of diabetes complications, but it is still controversial which HbA(1c) level to strive for in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate HbA(1c), followed from diagnosis, as a predictor of severe microvascular complications and to formulate HbA(1c) target levels for treatment.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSA longitudinal observation study followed an unselected population of 451 patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes during 1983-1987 before the age of 35 years in a region of Southeast Sweden. Retinopathy was evaluated by fundus photography and nephropathy data collected from medical records. HbA(1c) was measured starting from diagnosis and during the whole follow-up period of 20-24 years. Long-term weighted mean HbA(1c) was then calculated. Complications were analyzed in relation to HbA(1c) levels.RESULTSThe incidence of proliferative retinopathy and persistent macroalbuminuria increased sharply and occurred earlier with increasing long-term mean HbA(1c). None of the 451 patients developed proliferative retinopathy or persistent macroalbuminuria below long-term weighted mean HbA(1c) 7.6% (60 mmol/mol); 51% of the patients with long-term mean HbA(1c) above 9.5% (80 mmol/mol) developed proliferative retinopathy and 23% persistent macroalbuminuria.CONCLUSIONSLong-term weighted mean HbA(1c), measured from diagnosis, is closely associated with the development of severe complications in type 1 diabetes. Keeping HbA(1c) below 7.6% (60 mmol/mol) as a treatment target seems to prevent proliferative retinopathy and persistent macroalbuminuria for up to 20 years.

  • 2.
    Nordwall, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Abrahamsson, Mariann
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dhir, Meryl
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Arnqvist, Hans J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Comment: Response to Comment on Nordwall et al. Impact of HbA1c, Followed From Onset of Type 1 Diabetes, on the Development of Severe Retinopathy and Nephropathy: The VISS Study (Vascular Diabetic Complications in Southeast Sweden). Diabetes Care 2015;38:308-3152015In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 38, no 8, p. e124-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We thank Dr. Takahara (1) for the comment on our recent article exploring the impact of HbA1c, followed from diabetes onset, on the development of severe microvascular complications (2). As suggested, we have validated our results with Cox hazards analysis with severe microvascular events, i.e., laser-treated proliferative retinopathy and macroalbuminuria as a dependent variable and HbA1c (mmol/mol) as a time-dependent covariate.

    For laser-treated proliferative retinopathy, we found a hazard ratio of 1.038 (95% CI 1.025–1.052, P < 0.001) and for macroalbuminuria, a hazard ratio of 1.075 (95% CI 1.050–1.100, P < 0.001).

    Analyzing our data with Cox hazards analysis thus shows the strong influence of long-term HbA1c on severe microvascular complications, in agreement with our previous conclusions.

    In our article, we chose to analyze and present the results in a way that was perhaps easier for a clinician to interpret and apply in clinical routine. With life-table analysis we found that the incidence of both laser-treated proliferative retinopathy and macroalbuminuria increased sharply and occurred earlier with increasing long-term weighted mean HbA1c. In the same manner, the prevalence of microvascular complications increased steeply with higher long-term weighted mean HbA1c, categorized in different groups.

    In conclusion, our study irrespective of statistical methods shows a strong association between development of late complications and long-term mean HbA1c, and keeping the average HbA1c below 7.6% (60 mmol/mol) seemed sufficient to prevent microvascular complications for at least up to 20 years.

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