liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 36 of 36
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Placental Immune Milieu is Characterized by a Th2- and Anti-Inflammatory Transcription Profile, Regardless of Maternal Allergy, and Associates with Neonatal Immunity2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 445-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM: How maternal allergy affects the systemic and local immunological environment during pregnancy and the immune development of the offspring is unclear.

    METHOD OF STUDY: Expression of 40 genes was quantified by PCR arrays in placenta, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) from 7 allergic and 12 non-allergic women and their offspring.

    RESULTS: Placental gene expression was dominated by a Th2-/anti-inflammatory profile, irrespectively of maternal allergy, as compared to gene expression in PBMC. p35 expression in placenta correlated with fetal Tbx21 (ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001) and IL-5 expression in PBMC with fetal galectin1 (ρ = 0.91, P < 0.001). Increased expression of Th2-associated CCL22 in CBMC preceded allergy development.

    CONCLUSIONS: Gene expression locally and systemically during pregnancy was partly associated with the offspring's gene expression, possibly indicating that the immunological milieu is important for fetal immune development. Maternal allergy was not associated with an enhanced Th2 immunity in placenta or PBMC, while a marked prenatal Th2 skewing, shown as increased CCL22 mRNA expression, might contribute to postnatal allergy development.

  • 2.
    Ahlbeck, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Ahlberg, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nyström Kronander, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Björkander, Janne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Intralymphatic allergen immunotherapy against pollen allergy. A 3-year open follow-up study of 10 patients2018In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ISSN 1081-1206, E-ISSN 1534-4436, Vol. 121, no 5, p. 626-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the only treatment that affects the long-term development of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and induces clinical tolerance primarily by stimulating regulatory T (Treg) cells, attenuating T helper 2 (Th2) responses and synthesis of blocking antibodies1. Conventional AIT with subcutaneous injections, sublingual tablets or drops is effective, but consumes time and resources 2.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-09-13 10:35
  • 3.
    Auffray, Charles
    et al.
    European Institute Syst Biol and Med, France; University of Lyon, France.
    Balling, Rudi
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Barroso, Ines
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, England.
    Bencze, Laszlo
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Bergeron, Jay
    Pfizer Inc, MA 02139 USA.
    Bernal-Delgado, Enrique
    IACS IIS Aragon, Spain.
    Blomberg, Niklas
    EL IXIR, England.
    Bock, Christoph
    Austrian Academic Science, Austria; Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Max Planck Institute Informat, Germany.
    Conesa, Ana
    Principe Felipe Research Centre, Spain; University of Florida, FL 32610 USA.
    Del Signore, Susanna
    Bluecompan Ltd, England.
    Delogne, Christophe
    KPMG Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Di Meglio, Alberto
    European Org Nucl Research CERN, Switzerland.
    Eijkemans, Marinus
    University of Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Flicek, Paul
    European Bioinformat Institute EMBL EBI, England.
    Graf, Norbert
    University of Saarland, Germany.
    Grimm, Vera
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Germany.
    Guchelaar, Henk-Jan
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Guo, Yi-Ke
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Glynne Gut, Ivo
    BIST, Spain.
    Hanbury, Allan
    TU Wien, Austria.
    Hanif, Shahid
    Assoc British Pharmaceut Ind, England.
    Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter
    University of Klinikum Aachen, Germany.
    Honrado, Angel
    SYNAPSE Research Management Partners, Spain.
    Rod Hose, D.
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine
    University of Leeds, England.
    Hubbard, Tim
    Kings Coll London, England; Genom England, England.
    Helen Janacek, Sophie
    European Bioinformat Institute EMBL EBI, England.
    Karanikas, Haralampos
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Kievits, Tim
    Vitr Healthcare Holding BV, Netherlands.
    Kohler, Manfred
    Fraunhofer Institute Molecular Biol and Appl Ecol ScreeningPor, Germany.
    Kremer, Andreas
    ITTM SA, Luxembourg.
    Lanfear, Jerry
    Pfizer Ltd, England.
    Lengauer, Thomas
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Saarbrucken, Germany.
    Maes, Edith
    Health Econ and Outcomes Research, Belgium.
    Meert, Theo
    Janssen Pharmaceut NV, Belgium.
    Mueller, Werner
    University of Manchester, England.
    Nickel, Dorthe
    Institute Curie, France.
    Oledzki, Peter
    Linguamat Ltd, England.
    Pedersen, Bertrand
    PwC Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Petkovic, Milan
    Philips, Netherlands.
    Pliakos, Konstantinos
    KU Leuven Kulak, Belgium.
    Rattray, Magnus
    University of Manchester, England.
    Redon i Mas, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Schneider, Reinhard
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Sengstag, Thierry
    SIB, Switzerland; University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Serra-Picamal, Xavier
    Agency Health Qual and Assessment Catalonia AQuAS, Spain.
    Spek, Wouter
    EuroBioForum Fdn, Netherlands.
    Vaas, Lea A. I.
    Fraunhofer Institute Molecular Biol and Appl Ecol ScreeningPor, Germany.
    van Batenburg, Okker
    EuroBioForum Fdn, Netherlands.
    Vandelaer, Marc
    Integrated BioBank Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Varnai, Peter
    Technopolis Grp, England.
    Villoslada, Pablo
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Antonio Vizcaino, Juan
    European Bioinformat Institute EMBL EBI, England.
    Peter Mary Wubbe, John
    European Platform Patients Org Science and Ind Epposi, Belgium.
    Zanetti, Gianluigi
    CRS4, Italy; BBMRI ERIC, Austria.
    Making sense of big data in health research: Towards an EU action plan2016In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 8, no 71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medicine and healthcare are undergoing profound changes. Whole-genome sequencing and high-resolution imaging technologies are key drivers of this rapid and crucial transformation. Technological innovation combined with automation and miniaturization has triggered an explosion in data production that will soon reach exabyte proportions. How are we going to deal with this exponential increase in data production? The potential of "big data" for improving health is enormous but, at the same time, we face a wide range of challenges to overcome urgently. Europe is very proud of its cultural diversity; however, exploitation of the data made available through advances in genomic medicine, imaging, and a wide range of mobile health applications or connected devices is hampered by numerous historical, technical, legal, and political barriers. European health systems and databases are diverse and fragmented. There is a lack of harmonization of data formats, processing, analysis, and data transfer, which leads to incompatibilities and lost opportunities. Legal frameworks for data sharing are evolving. Clinicians, researchers, and citizens need improved methods, tools, and training to generate, analyze, and query data effectively. Addressing these barriers will contribute to creating the European Single Market for health, which will improve health arid healthcare for all Europearis.

  • 4.
    Auffray, Charles
    et al.
    European Institute Syst Biol and Med, France; University of Lyon, France.
    Balling, Rudi
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Barroso, Ines
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, England.
    Bencze, Laszlo
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Bergeron, Jay
    Pfizer Inc, MA 02139 USA.
    Bernal-Delgado, Enrique
    IACS IIS Aragon, Spain.
    Blomberg, Niklas
    ELIXIR, England.
    Bock, Christoph
    Austrian Academic Science, Austria; Austrian Academic Science, Austria; Max Planck Institute Informat, Germany.
    Conesa, Ana
    Principe Felipe Research Centre, Spain; University of Florida, FL 32610 USA.
    Del Signore, Susanna
    Bluecompan Ltd, England.
    Delogne, Christophe
    KPMG Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Di Meglio, Alberto
    European Org Nucl Research, Switzerland.
    Eijkemans, Marinus
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Flicek, Paul
    EMBL EBI, England.
    Graf, Norbert
    University of Saarland, Germany.
    Grimm, Vera
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Germany.
    Guchelaar, Henk-Jan
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Guo, Yi-Ke
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Glynne Gut, Ivo
    BIST, Spain.
    Hanbury, Allan
    TU Wien, Austria.
    Hanif, Shahid
    Assoc British Pharmaceut Ind, England.
    Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    Honrado, Angel
    SYNAPSE Research Management Partners, Spain.
    Rod Hose, D.
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine
    University of Leeds, England.
    Hubbard, Tim
    Kings Coll London, England; Genom England, England.
    Helen Janacek, Sophie
    EMBL EBI, England.
    Karanikas, Haralampos
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Kievits, Tim
    Vitromics Healthcare Holding BV, Netherlands.
    Kohler, Manfred
    Fraunhofer Institute Molecular Biol and Appl Ecol ScreeningPor, Germany.
    Kremer, Andreas
    ITTM SA, Luxembourg.
    Lanfear, Jerry
    Pfizer Ltd, England.
    Lengauer, Thomas
    Max Planck Institute Informat, Germany.
    Maes, Edith
    Deloitte Belgium, Belgium.
    Meert, Theo
    Janssen Pharmaceut NV, Belgium.
    Muller, Werner
    University of Manchester, England.
    Nickel, Dothe
    Institute Curie, France.
    Oledzki, Peter
    Linguamat Ltd, England.
    Pedersen, Bertrand
    PwC Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Petkovic, Milan
    Philips, Netherlands.
    Pliakos, Konstantinos
    KU Leuven Kulak, Belgium.
    Rattray, Magnus
    University of Manchester, England.
    Redon i Mas, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Schneider, Reinhard
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Sengstag, Thierry
    SIB, Switzerland; University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Serra-Picamal, Xavier
    Agency Health Qual and Assessment Catalonia AQuAS, Spain.
    Spek, Wouter
    EuroBioForum Fdn, Netherlands.
    Vaas, Lea A. I.
    Fraunhofer Institute Molecular Biol and Appl Ecol ScreeningPor, Germany.
    van Batenburg, Okker
    EuroBioForum Fdn, Netherlands.
    Vandelaer, Marc
    Integrated BioBank Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Varnai, Peter
    Technopolis Grp, England.
    Villoslada, Pablo
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Antonio Vizcaino, Juan
    EMBL EBI, England.
    Peter Mary Wubbe, John
    Epposi, Belgium.
    Zanetti, Gianluigi
    CRS4, Italy; BBMRI ERIC, Austria.
    Correction: Making sense of big data in health research: towards an EU action plan (vol 8, pg 71, 2016)2016In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 8, article id 118Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Clinical implications of omics and systems medicine: focus on predictive and individualized treatment2016In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 279, no 3, p. 229-240Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many patients with common diseases do not respond to treatment. This is a key challenge to modern health care, which causes both suffering and enormous costs. One important reason for the lack of treatment response is that common diseases are associated with altered interactions between thousands of genes, in combinations that differ between subgroups of patients who do or do not respond to a given treatment. Such subgroups, or even distinct disease entities, have been described recently in asthma, diabetes, autoimmune diseases and cancer. High-throughput techniques (omics) allow identification and characterization of such subgroups or entities. This may have important clinical implications, such as identification of diagnostic markers for individualized medicine, as well as new therapeutic targets for patients who do not respond to existing drugs. For example, whole-genome sequencing may be applied to more accurately guide treatment of neurodevelopmental diseases, or to identify drugs specifically targeting mutated genes in cancer. A study published in 2015 showed that 28% of hepatocellular carcinomas contained mutated genes that potentially could be targeted by drugs already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. A translational study, which is described in detail, showed how combined omics, computational, functional and clinical studies could identify and validate a novel diagnostic and therapeutic candidate gene in allergy. Another important clinical implication is the identification of potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for predictive and preventative medicine. By combining computational and experimental methods, early disease regulators may be identified and potentially used to predict and treat disease before it becomes symptomatic. Systems medicine is an emerging discipline, which may contribute to such developments through combining omics with computational, functional and clinical studies. The aims of this review are to provide a brief introduction to systems medicine and discuss how it may contribute to the clinical implementation of individualized treatment, using clinically relevant examples.

  • 6.
    Bernfort, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Rahmqvist, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chronic pain in an elderly population in Sweden: Impact on costs and quality of life2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic pain among elderly people has long been a well-known problem, in terms of both societal costs and the quality of life of affected individuals. To estimate the magnitude of the problems associated with chronic pain in an elderly population, data on both costs and quality of life were gathered. A postal questionnaire was sent out to a stratified sample of 10 000 inhabitants 65 years and older in Linköping and Norrköping. The survey included questions on demographics, habits, and life situation, and different kinds of questions and instruments related to well-being (e.g., quality-of-life and pain-specific questions). In the questionnaire respondents were asked whether they were receiving any help—informal care—from a relative. If they answered yes, they were asked for permission to contact the informal caregiver and to provide contact details. The amount of informal care provided by relatives to persons with chronic pain was investigated by use of a questionnaire directed to the caregiving relatives, containing questions about time spent providing informal care.

    Data on costs were collected from registers of consumption of health care, drugs, and municipal services.

    The results of the study showed a very clear association between existence and severity of chronic pain and societal costs. The study population was subdivided into three groups with respect to having chronic pain or not, and a pain intensity during the last week of 0–4 (mild), 5–7 (moderate), or 8–10 (severe) on a scale of 0–10. Taking all costs (health care, drugs, municipal services, and informal care) into account, persons in the severe chronic pain group consumed on average 72% more resources than persons in the moderate chronic pain group and 143% more than those in the no or mild chronic pain group. Differences were most pronounced concerning municipal services and informal care costs.

    Even more alarming are the results on the quality of life of persons in the different groups. On the EQ-5D index, the average value for persons in the no or mild chronic pain group was 0.82. For those in the moderate chronic pain group the average value was 0.64, and for those in the severe chronic pain group the average value was only 0.38. EQ-VAS resulted in less pronounced but still clearly significant differences.

    It is concluded that this study, reaching a rather large part of the target population, shows that existence and severity of chronic pain among people 65 years and older affects costs to society and the quality of life of affected individuals in a massive way.

  • 7.
    Bernfort, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Rahmqvist, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Severity of chronic pain in an elderly population in Sweden-impact on costs and quality of life2015In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 156, no 3, p. 521-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic pain is associated with large societal costs, but few studies have investigated the total costs of chronic pain with respect to elderly subjects. The elderly usually require informal care, care performed by municipalities, and care for chronic diseases, all factors that can result in extensive financial burdens on elderly patients, their families, and the social services provided by the state. This study aims to quantify the societal cost of chronic pain in people of age 65 years and older and to assess the impact of chronic pain on quality of life. This study collected data from 3 registers concerning health care, drugs, and municipal services and from 2 surveys. A postal questionnaire was used to collect data from a stratified sample of the population 65 years and older in southeastern Sweden. The questionnaire addressed pain intensity and quality of life variables (EQ-5D). A second postal questionnaire was used to collect data from relatives of the elderly patients suffering from chronic pain. A total of 66.5% valid responses of the 10,000 subjects was achieved; 76.9% were categorized as having no or mild chronic pain, 18.9% as having moderate chronic pain, and 4.2% as having severe chronic pain. Consumed resources increased with the severity of chronic pain. Clear differences in EQ-5D were found with respect to the severity of pain. This study found an association between resource use and severity of chronic pain in elderly subjects: the more severe the chronic pain, the more extensive (and expensive) the use of resources.

  • 8.
    Bousquet, J.
    et al.
    University Hospital, France; European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; INSERM, France; University of Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Bewick, M.
    iQ4U Consultants Ltd, England.
    Cano, A.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Eklund, P.
    Umeå University, Sweden; Four Comp Oy, Finland.
    Fico, G.
    University of Politecn Madrid, Spain.
    Goswami, N.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Guldemond, N. A.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Henderson, D.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, Scotland.
    Hinkema, M. J.
    TNO, Netherlands.
    Liotta, G.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Mair, A.
    Scottish Govt Health Department, Scotland.
    Molloy, W.
    University of Coll, Ireland.
    Monaco, A.
    AIFA Agenzia Italiana Farmaco, Italy.
    Monsonis-Paya, I.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Nizinska, A.
    University of Lower Silesia, Poland.
    Papadopoulos, H.
    National Centre Science Research, Greece.
    Pavlickova, A.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, Scotland.
    Pecorelli, S.
    University of Brescia, Italy.
    Prados-Torres, A.
    IIS Aragon Aragon Health Science Institute IACS, Spain.
    Roller-Wirnsberger, R. E.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Somekh, D.
    European Health Futures Forum, England.
    Vera-Munoz, C.
    University of Politecn Madrid, Spain.
    Visser, F.
    Avisco, Netherlands.
    Farrell, J.
    Department Health Social Serv and Public Safety, North Ireland.
    Malva, J.
    University of Coimbra, Portugal; Ageing Coimbra EIP AHA, Portugal.
    Andersen Ranberg, K.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Camuzat, T.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; Regional Languedoc Roussillon Midi Pyrenees, France.
    Carriazo, A. M.
    Regional Minist Health Andalusia, Spain.
    Crooks, G.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, Scotland.
    Gutter, Z.
    University Hospital Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Iaccarino, G.
    University of Salerno, Italy.
    Manuel De Keenoy, E.
    Kronikgune, Spain.
    Moda, G.
    Regional Piemonte, Italy.
    Rodriguez-Manas, L.
    Getafe University Hospital, Spain.
    Vontetsianos, T.
    Sotiria Hospital, Greece.
    Abreu, C.
    Coimbra School Nursing, Portugal.
    Alonso, J.
    IMIM Institute Hospital Mar Invest Mediques, Spain.
    Alonso-Bouzon, C.
    Getafe University Hospital, Spain.
    Ankri, J.
    INSERM, France; University of Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Arredondo, M. T.
    University of Politecn Madrid, Spain.
    Avolio, F.
    Regional Puglia, Italy.
    Bedbrook, A.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France.
    Bialoszewski, A. Z.
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Blain, H.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; Montpellier University Hospital, France; University of Montpellier, France.
    Bourret, R.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Cabrera-Umpierrez, M. F.
    University of Politecn Madrid, Spain; University of Politecn Madrid, Spain.
    Catala, A.
    Technical University of Catalonia, Spain.
    OCaoimh, R.
    University of Coll, Ireland.
    Cesari, M.
    Gerontopole Toulouse, France.
    Chavannes, N. H.
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Correia-Da-Sousa, J.
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Dedeu, T.
    European Regional and Local Health Assoc, Belgium; University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Ferrando, M.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Ferri, M.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Fokkens, W. J.
    Academic Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Garcia-Lizana, F.
    Institute Health Carlos III, Spain.
    Guerin, O.
    CHRU Nice, France.
    Hellings, P. W.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Haahtela, T.
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Illario, M.
    Federico II University Hospital Naples, Italy.
    Inzerilli, M. C.
    Community St Egidio Long Live Elderly Program, Italy.
    Lodrup Carlsen, K. C.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Kardas, P.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Keil, T.
    Charite, Germany; University of Wurzburg, Germany.
    Maggio, M.
    University of Parma, Italy.
    Mendez-Zorrilla, A.
    University of Deusto, Spain.
    Menditto, E.
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Mercier, J.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; University of Montpellier, France.
    Michel, J. P.
    European Union Geriatr Medical Soc, Switzerland; European Geriatr Med, Switzerland.
    Murray, R.
    NHS Scotland, Scotland.
    Nogues, M.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    OByrne-Maguire, I.
    AFFINITY, Ireland.
    Pappa, D.
    National Centre Science Research, Greece.
    Parent, A. S.
    AGE Platform Europe, Belgium.
    Pastorino, M.
    University of Politecn Madrid, Spain.
    Robalo-Cordeiro, C.
    Coimbra University Hospital, Portugal.
    Samolinski, B.
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Siciliano, P.
    CNR, Italy; INNOVAAL, Italy.
    Teixeira, A. M.
    University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Tsartara, S. I.
    South East Europe Healthcare Integrated Care and Sr, Greece.
    Valiulis, A.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania; European Academic Paediat EAP UEMS SP, Belgium; European Academic Paediat, Belgium.
    Vandenplas, O.
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Vasankari, T.
    Finnish Lung Assoc, Finland.
    Vellas, B.
    Gerontopole Toulouse, France.
    Vollenbroek-Hutten, M.
    Telemed Grp, Netherlands; University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Wickman, M.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yorgancioglu, A.
    A Celal Bayar University, Turkey; GARD Execut Comm, Turkey.
    Zuberbier, T.
    Charite, Germany; Global Allergy and Asthma European Network, Germany.
    Barbagallo, M.
    University of Palermo, Italy.
    Canonica, G. W.
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Klimek, L.
    KLIMEK, Germany.
    Maggi, S.
    CNR Aging Branch, Italy.
    Aberer, W.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Akdis, C.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Adcock, I. M.
    Imperial Coll London, England; Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, England.
    Agache, I.
    Transylvania University of Brasov, Romania.
    Albera, C.
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Alonso-Trujillo, F.
    Andalusian Agency Social Serv and Dependency, Spain.
    Angel Guarcia, M.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Annesi-Maesano, I.
    INSERM, France; UPMC, France.
    Apostolo, J.
    Coimbra School Nursing, Portugal.
    Arshad, S. H.
    David Hide Asthma and Allergy Research Centre, England.
    Attalin, V.
    Aviitam, France.
    Avignon, A.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Bachert, C.
    Ghent University Hospital, Belgium.
    Baroni, I.
    Telbios, Italy.
    Bel, E.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Bescos, C.
    Phillips Research Institute, Netherlands.
    Blasi, F.
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Barbara, C.
    Portuguese National Programme Resp Disease, Portugal.
    Bergmann, K. C.
    Charite, Germany; Global Allergy and Asthma European Network, Germany.
    Bernard, P. L.
    University of Montpellier, France.
    Bonini, S.
    University of Naples 2, Italy; Italian National Research Council, Italy.
    Bousquet, P. J.
    INSERM, France; UPMC, France.
    Branchini, B.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Brightling, C. E.
    University Hospital Leicester NHS Trust, England; University of Leicester, England.
    Bruguiere, V.
    Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    Bunu, C.
    University of Medical and Farm Timisoara, Romania.
    Bush, A.
    Bush A Imperial Coll, England; Royal Brompton Hospital, England.
    Caimmi, D. P.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Calderon, M. A.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Canovas, G.
    Maire, France.
    Cardona, V.
    Hospital Valle De Hebron, Spain.
    Carlsen, K. H.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Cesario, A.
    IRCCS Azienda Osped Santa Maria Nuova, Italy.
    Chkhartishvili, E.
    Grigol Robakidze University, Rep of Georgia.
    Chiron, R.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Chivato, T.
    University of CEU San Pablo, Spain.
    Chung, K. F.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    DAngelantonio, M.
    Health Informat Management SA, Belgium.
    De Carlo, G.
    EFA European Federat Allergy and Airways Disease Patien, Belgium.
    Cholley, D.
    Direct Regional Serv Med, France.
    Chorin, F.
    CIU Sante, France.
    Combe, B.
    University Hospital, France.
    Compas, B.
    Conseil Dep Herault, France.
    Costa, D. J.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France.
    Costa, E.
    University of Porto, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal.
    Coste, O.
    Direct Regional Jeunesse Sports and Cohes Sociale, France.
    Coupet, A. -L.
    Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    Crepaldi, G.
    CNR, Italy.
    Custovic, A.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Dahl, R.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Dahlen, S. E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Demoly, P.
    INSERM, France; UPMC, France; Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Devillier, P.
    Suresnes University of Versailles St Quentin, France.
    Didier, A.
    Rangueil Larrey Hospital, France.
    Dinh-Xuan, A. T.
    University of Paris 05, France.
    Djukanovic, R.
    University of Southampton, England; NIHR Southampton Resp Biomed Research Unit, England.
    Dokic, D.
    University of Clin Pulmol and Allergy, Macedonia.
    Du Toit, G.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Dubakiene, R.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Dupeyron, A.
    University of Montpellier, France; University of Nimes Hospital, France.
    Emuzyte, R.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Fiocchi, A.
    Bambino Gesu Childrens Research Hospital, Italy.
    Wagner, A.
    Global Allergy and Asthma Platform GAAPP, Austria.
    Fletcher, M.
    Educ Heatlh, England.
    Fonseca, J.
    Institute CUF Porto Hospital CUF Porto, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal.
    Fougere, B.
    Gerontopole Toulouse, France.
    Gamkrelidze, A.
    National Centre Disease Control and Public Health Georgia, Rep of Georgia.
    Garces, G.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Garcia-Aymeric, J.
    ISGLoBAL, Spain.
    Garcia-Zapirain, B.
    University of Deusto, Spain.
    Gemicioglu, B.
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Gouder, C.
    Resident Medical Specialist Medical Mater Dei Hospital, Malta.
    Hellquist-Dahl, B.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Hermosilla-Gimeno, I.
    Institute Salud Carlos III, Spain.
    Heve, D.
    Agence Regional Sante, France.
    Holland, C.
    Aston University, England.
    Humbert, M.
    University of Paris 11, France.
    Hyland, M.
    University of Plymouth, England.
    Johnston, S. L.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; MRC and Asthma UK Centre Allerg Mech Asthma, England.
    Just, J.
    University of Paris 06, France.
    Jutel, M.
    Wroclaw Medical University, Poland.
    Kaidashev, I. P.
    Ukrainina Medical Stomatol Acad, Ukraine.
    Khaitov, M.
    National Research Centre, Russia.
    Kalayci, O.
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Kalyoncu, A. F.
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Keijser, W.
    University of Twente, Netherlands; Health Informat Management Spain SL, Spain.
    Kerstjens, H.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Knezovic, J.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kowalski, M.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland; HARC, Poland.
    Koppelman, G. H.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Kotska, T.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Kovac, M.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kull, I.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kuna, P.
    Barlicki University Hospital, Poland.
    Kvedariene, V.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Lepore, V.
    AReS Puglia, Italy.
    Macnee, W.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Maggio, M.
    University of Parma, Italy.
    Magnan, A.
    University of Nantes, France; Institute Thorax, France.
    Majer, I.
    University of Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Manning, P.
    Bon Secours Hospital, Ireland.
    Marcucci, M.
    University of Milan, Italy; University of Milan, Italy.
    Marti, T.
    Generalitat Catalunya, Spain.
    Masoli, M.
    University of Plymouth, England.
    Melen, E.
    Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Miculinic, N.
    Croatian Pulm Soc, Croatia.
    Mihaltan, F.
    National Institute Pneumol M Nasta, Romania.
    Milenkovic, B.
    University of Belgrade, Serbia.
    Millot-Keurinck, J.
    Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    Mlinaric, H.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Momas, I.
    Paris Descartes University, France; Paris Municipal Department Social Act Childhood and Heatlh, France.
    Montefort, S.
    University of Malta, Malta.
    Morais-Almeida, M.
    Hospital CUF Descobertas, Portugal; Soc Portuguesa Alergol and Imunol Clin, Portugal.
    Moreno-Casbas, T.
    Institute Health Carlos III, Spain.
    Moesges, R.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Mullol, J.
    CIBERES, Spain; CIBERES, Spain.
    Nadif, R.
    INSERM, France; University of Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Nalin, M.
    Telbios, Italy.
    Navarro-Pardo, E.
    University of Valencia, Spain; University of Valencia, Spain.
    Nekam, K.
    Hospital Hospitaller Brothers Buda, Hungary.
    Ninot, G.
    University of Montpellier I, France.
    Paccard, D.
    Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    Pais, S.
    University of Algarve, Portugal.
    Palummeri, E.
    Gakkiera Hospital, Italy.
    Panzner, P.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Papadopoulos, N. K.
    University of Manchester, England; University of Athens, Greece.
    Papanikolaou, C.
    Laikon Gen Hospital Athens, Greece.
    Passalacqua, G.
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Pastor, E.
    LETAPE, France; Conseil Regional Ordre Masseurs Kinesitherapeutes, France.
    Perrot, M.
    Regime Social Independants, France.
    Plavec, D.
    University of JJ Strossmayer, Croatia.
    Popov, T. A.
    Alexanders University Hospital, Bulgaria.
    Postma, D. S.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Price, D.
    Optimum Patient Care, England; University of Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Raffort, N.
    Soc Public Locale Exploitat Balaruc Les Bains, France.
    Reuzeau, J. C.
    Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    Robine, J. M.
    INSERM, France; INSERM, France; Ecole Prat Hautes Etud, France.
    Rodenas, F.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Robusto, F.
    AReS Puglia, Italy.
    Roche, N.
    Hop University of Paris, India.
    Romano, A.
    Complesso Integrato Columbus, Italy.
    Romano, V.
    Piedmonte Reference Site, Italy.
    Rosado-Pinto, J.
    Serv Imunoalergol Hospital Luz Lisboa, Portugal.
    Roubille, F.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Ruiz, F.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Ryan, D.
    Woodbrook Medical Centre, England; University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Salcedo, T.
    University of Politecn Valencia, Spain.
    Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Schulz, H.
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Germany.
    Schunemann, H. J.
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Serrano, E.
    CHU Rangueil Larrey, France.
    Sheikh, A.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Shields, M.
    Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland; Royal Belfast Hospital Sick Children, North Ireland.
    Siafakas, N.
    University Hospital Heraklion, Greece.
    Scichilone, N.
    University of Palermo, Italy.
    Siciliano, P.
    CNR, Italy; INNOVAAL, Italy.
    Skrindo, I.
    Akershun University Hospital, Norway.
    Smit, H. A.
    University of Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Sourdet, S.
    Gerontopole Toulouse, France.
    Sousa-Costa, E.
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Spranger, O.
    Global Allergy and Asthma Platform GAAPP, Austria.
    Sooronbaev, T.
    Euro Asian Resp Soc, Kyrgyzstan.
    Sruk, V.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Sterk, P. J.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Todo-Bom, A.
    University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Touchon, J.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France.
    Tramontano, D.
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy; GENS Fdn, Italy.
    Triggiani, M.
    University of Salerno, Italy.
    Tsartara, S. I.
    South East Europe Healthcare Integrated Care and Sr, Greece.
    Valero, A. L.
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    Valovirta, E.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Van Ganse, E.
    University of Lyon 1, France.
    Van Hage, M.
    Karolinska Institute and University Hospital, Sweden.
    Van den Berge, M.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Vandenplas, O.
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Ventura, M. T.
    University of Bari, Italy.
    Vergara, I.
    VERGARA Itziar Kronikgune, Spain.
    Vezzani, G.
    Research Hospital, Italy; Regional Agency Health and Social Care, Italy.
    Vidal, D.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Viegi, G.
    CNR, Italy.
    Wagemann, M.
    University of Klinikum Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Whalley, B.
    University of Plymouth, England.
    Wickman, M.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wilson, N.
    North England EU Health Partnership, Australia.
    Yiallouros, P. K.
    Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus; Hospital Archbishop Makarios III, Cyprus.
    Zagar, M.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Zaidi, A.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Zidarn, M.
    University of Clin Resp and Allerg Disease, Slovenia.
    Hoogerwerf, E. J.
    Funka, Sweden.
    Usero, J.
    Funka, Sweden.
    Zuffada, R.
    Funka, Sweden.
    Senn, A.
    European Commiss, Belgium.
    De Oliveira-Alves, B.
    European Commiss, Belgium.
    BUILDING BRIDGES FOR INNOVATION IN AGEING: SYNERGIES BETWEEN ACTION GROUPS OF THE EIP ON AHA2017In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 92-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Strategic Implementation Plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) proposed six Action Groups. After almost three years of activity, many achievements have been obtained through commitments or collaborative work of the Action Groups. However, they have often worked in silos and, consequently, synergies between Action Groups have been proposed to strengthen the triple win of the EIP on AHA. The paper presents the methodology and current status of the Task Force on EIP on AHA synergies. Synergies are in line with the Action Groups new Renovated Action Plan (2016-2018) to ensure that their future objectives are coherent and fully connected. The outcomes and impact of synergies are using the Monitoring and Assessment Framework for the EIP on AHA (MAFEIP). Eight proposals for synergies have been approved by the Task Force: Five cross-cutting synergies which can be used for all current and future synergies as they consider overarching domains (appropriate polypharmacy, citizen empowerment, teaching and coaching on AHA, deployment of synergies to EU regions, Responsible Research and Innovation), and three cross-cutting synergies focussing on current Action Group activities (falls, frailty, integrated care and chronic respiratory diseases).

  • 9.
    Bousquet, J.
    et al.
    CHRU, France; MACVIA LR, France; INSERM, France; University of Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Farrell, J.
    Department Health Social Serv and Public Safety, North Ireland.
    Crooks, G.
    Scottish Centre Telehealth and Telecare, Scotland.
    Hellings, P.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; European Academic Allergy and Clin Immunol, Switzerland.
    Bel, E. H.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; European Resp Soc, Switzerland.
    Bewick, M.
    iQ4U Consultants Ltd, England.
    Chavannes, N. H.
    Leiden University, Netherlands; Global Alliance Chron Resp Disease GARD, South Africa; Int Primary Care Resp Grp, Scotland.
    Correia de Sousa, J.
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Cruz, A. A.
    Global Alliance Chron Resp Disease GARD, South Africa; University of Federal Bahia, Brazil; GARD Execut Comm, Brazil.
    Haahtela, T.
    EIP AHA Commitment Act, Portugal; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Joos, G.
    Ghent University Hospital, Belgium.
    Khaltaev, N.
    Global Alliance Chron Resp Disease GARD, South Africa.
    Malva, J.
    University of Coimbra, Portugal; Ageing Coimbra Reference Site, Portugal.
    Muraro, A.
    European Academic Allergy and Clin Immunol, Switzerland; Padua Gen University Hospital, Italy.
    Nogues, M.
    CARSAT LR, France.
    Palkonen, S.
    EFA European Federat Allergy and Airways Disease Patien, Belgium.
    Pedersen, S.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Robalo-Cordeiro, C.
    Coimbra University Hospital, Portugal.
    Samolinski, B.
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Strandberg, T.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland; EUGMS, Norway.
    Valiulis, A.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania; European Assoc Pediat EAP UEMS SP, Belgium.
    Yorgancioglu, A.
    Global Alliance Chron Resp Disease GARD, South Africa; EIP AHA Commitment Act, Portugal; Celal Bayar University, Turkey; Turkish Thorac Soc, Turkey.
    Zuberbier, T.
    Charite, Germany; GA2LEN, Germany.
    Bedbrook, A.
    MACVIA LR, France.
    Aberer, W.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Adachi, M.
    Sanno Hospital, Japan.
    Agusti, A.
    University of Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Enfermedades Resp, Spain.
    Akdis, C. A.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Akdis, M.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Ankri, J.
    INSERM, France; University of Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Alonso, A.
    University of Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Enfermedades Resp, Spain.
    Annesi-Maesano, I.
    European Assoc Pediat EAP UEMS SP, Belgium; INSERM, France.
    Ansotegui, I. J.
    Hospital Quiron Bizkaia, Spain.
    Anto, J. M.
    Centre Research Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Spain; Hospital del Mar, Spain; CIBERESP, Spain; UPF, Spain.
    Arnavielhe, S.
    Digi Heatlh, France.
    Arshad, H.
    David Hide Asthma and Allergy Research Centre, England.
    Bai, C.
    Chinese Medical Assoc, Peoples R China; Chinese Alliance Lung Canc, Peoples R China.
    Baiardini, I.
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Bachert, C.
    Ghent University Hospital, Belgium.
    Baigenzhin, A. K.
    EuroAsian Resp Soc, Kazakhstan.
    Barbara, C.
    Fac Medical Lisbon, Portugal.
    Bateman, E. D.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Beghe, B.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Ben Kheder, A.
    Hop Abderrahman Mami, Tunisia.
    Bennoor, K. S.
    National Institute Disease Chest and Hospital, Bangladesh.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Bergmann, K. C.
    Charite, Germany; GA2LEN, Germany.
    Bieber, T.
    Rheinische Friedrich Wilhelms University of Bonn, Germany.
    Bindslev-Jensen, C.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark; Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Bjermer, L.
    University Hospital, Sweden.
    Blain, H.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France; University of Montpellier, France.
    Blasi, F.
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Boner, A. L.
    University of Verona Hospital, Italy.
    Bonini, M.
    Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.
    Bonini, S.
    University of Naples 2, Italy; Italian National Research Council, Italy.
    Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.
    University of Sydney, Australia; Sydney Local Health Dist, Australia.
    Boulet, L. P.
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Bourret, R.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Bousquet, P. J.
    INSERM, France.
    Braido, F.
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Briggs, A. H.
    University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Brightling, C. E.
    University Hospital Leicester NHS Trust, England; University of Leicester, England.
    Brozek, J.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Buhl, R.
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Burney, P. G.
    Imperial Coll, England; Imperial Coll, England; Imperial Coll, England.
    Bush, A.
    Imperial Coll, England; Royal Brompton Hospital, England.
    Caballero-Fonseca, F.
    Centre Medical Docente Trinidad, Venezuela.
    Caimmi, D.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Calderon, M. A.
    Royal Brompton Hospital NHS, England.
    Calverley, P. M.
    University of Liverpool, England; Aintree University Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Camargos, P. A. M.
    University of Federal Minas Gerais, Brazil.
    Canonica, G. W.
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Camuzat, T.
    Regional Languedoc Roussillon, France.
    Carlsen, K. H.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Carr, W.
    Allergy and Asthma Associates Southern Calif, CA USA.
    Carriazo, A.
    Regional Minist Equal Health and Social Policies Andalusia, Spain.
    Casale, T.
    University of S Florida, FL USA.
    Cepeda Sarabia, A. M.
    University of Simon Bolivar, Colombia; Soc Latinoamer Allergia, Colombia.
    Chatzi, L.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Chen, Y. Z.
    Peking and Centre Asthma Research and Educ, Peoples R China; Peking and Centre Asthma Research and Educ, Peoples R China.
    Chiron, R.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Chkhartishvili, E.
    Grigol Robakidze University, Rep of Georgia.
    Chuchalin, A. G.
    GARD Execut Comm, Brazil; FMBA, Russia.
    Chung, K. F.
    Imperial Coll, England.
    Ciprandi, G.
    IRCCS Azienda Osped University of San Martino, Italy.
    Cirule, I.
    Latvian Allergy Assoc, Latvia.
    Cox, L.
    Nova Southeastern University, FL USA.
    Costa, D. J.
    MACVIA LR, France; Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Custovic, A.
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Dahl, R.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark; Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Dahlen, S. E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Darsow, U.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany; Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    De Carlo, G.
    EFA European Federat Allergy and Airways Disease Patien, Belgium.
    De Blay, F.
    University Hospital Strasbourg, France.
    Dedeu, T.
    European Regional and Local Health Assoc, Belgium; University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Deleanu, D.
    Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medical and Pharm, Romania.
    De Manuel Keenoy, E.
    Kronikgune, Spain.
    Demoly, P.
    INSERM, France; Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Denburg, J. A.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Devillier, P.
    Suresnes University of Versailles St Quentin, France.
    Didier, A.
    Rangueil Larrey Hospital, France.
    Dinh-Xuan, A. T.
    University of Paris 05, France.
    Djukanovic, R.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Dokic, D.
    University of Clin Pulmol and Allergy, Macedonia.
    Douagui, H.
    Centre Hospital University of Beni Messous, Algeria.
    Dray, G.
    Ecole Mines, France.
    Dubakiene, R.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Durham, S. R.
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Dykewicz, M. S.
    St Louis University, MO USA.
    El-Gamal, Y.
    Ain Shams University, Egypt.
    Emuzyte, R.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Fabbri, L. M.
    University of Modena, Italy.
    Fletcher, M.
    Educ Heatlh, England.
    Fiocchi, A.
    Bambino Gesu Childrens Research Hospital Holy See, Italy.
    Fink Wagner, A.
    GAAPP, Austria.
    Fonseca, J.
    University of Porto, Portugal; CUF Porto Institute and Hospital, Portugal.
    Fokkens, W. J.
    Academic Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Forastiere, F.
    Regional Health Serv Lazio Reg, Italy.
    Frith, P.
    Repatriat Gen Hospital, Australia.
    Gaga, M.
    Athens Chest Hospital, Greece.
    Gamkrelidze, A.
    National Centre Disease Control and Public Health Georgia, Rep of Georgia.
    Garces, J.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Garcia-Aymerich, J.
    Centre Research Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Spain; Hospital del Mar, Spain; CIBERESP, Spain; UPF, Spain.
    Gemicioglu, B.
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Gereda, J. E.
    Clin Ricardo Palma, Peru.
    Gonzalez Diaz, S.
    University of Autonoma Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
    Gotua, M.
    Georgian Assoc Allergol and Clin Immunol, Rep of Georgia.
    Grisle, I.
    Latvian Assoc Allergists, Latvia.
    Grouse, L.
    Washington University, MO 63110 USA.
    Gutter, Z.
    University Hospital Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Guzman, M. A.
    University of Chile, Chile.
    Heaney, L. G.
    Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland.
    Hellquist-Dahl, B.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Henderson, D.
    Scottish Centre Telehealth and Telecare, Scotland.
    Hendry, A.
    NHS Scotland, Scotland.
    Heinrich, J.
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Germany.
    Heve, D.
    MACVIA LR, France; Agence Regional Sante, France.
    Horak, F.
    Vienna Challenge Chamber, Austria.
    Hourihane, J. O. B.
    University of Coll Cork, Ireland.
    Howarth, P.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Humbert, M.
    University of Paris Sud, France.
    Hyland, M. E.
    University of Plymouth, England.
    Illario, M.
    Federico II University Hospital Campania RS, Italy.
    Ivancevich, J. C.
    Clin Santa Isabel, Argentina.
    Jardim, J. R.
    University of Federal Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Jares, E. J.
    Libra Fdn, Argentina.
    Jeandel, C.
    MACVIA LR, France; Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Jenkins, C.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Johnston, S. L.
    Imperial Coll, England; MRC and Asthma UK Centre Allerg Mech Asthma, England.
    Jonquet, O.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Julge, K.
    Tartu University Hospital, Estonia.
    Jung, K. S.
    Hallym University, South Korea.
    Just, J.
    Hop Enfants Armand Trousseau, France; Sorbonne University, France.
    Kaidashev, I.
    Ukrainian Medical Stomatol Acad, Ukraine.
    Kaitov, M. R.
    Federal Medicobiol Agency, Russia.
    Kalayci, O.
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Kalyoncu, A. F.
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Keil, T.
    Charite, Germany; University of Wurzburg, Germany.
    Keith, P. K.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Klimek, L.
    Centre Rhinol and Allergol, Germany.
    Koffi NGoran, B.
    Soc Pneumol Langue Francaise, France.
    Kolek, V.
    University Hospital Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Koppelman, G. H.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Kowalski, M. L.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland; HARC, Poland.
    Kull, I.
    Sachs Childrens Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kuna, P.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Kvedariene, V.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Lambrecht, B.
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Lau, S.
    Charite, Germany.
    Larenas-Linnemann, D.
    Hospital Medical Sur, Mexico.
    Laune, D.
    Digi Heatlh, France.
    Le, L. T. T.
    University of Medical and Pharm, Vietnam.
    Lieberman, P.
    University of Tennessee, TN USA; University of Tennessee, TN USA; University of Tennessee, TN USA; University of Tennessee, TN USA.
    Lipworth, B.
    University of Dundee, Scotland.
    Li, J.
    Guangzhou Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Lodrup Carlsen, K.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Louis, R.
    CHU Sart Tilman, Belgium.
    MacNee, W.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Magard, Y.
    Hop St Joseph, France.
    Magnan, A.
    University of Nantes, France; University of Nantes, France.
    Mahboub, B.
    Rashid Hospital, U Arab Emirates.
    Mair, A.
    Scottish Govt Health Department, Scotland.
    Majer, I.
    University of Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Makela, M. J.
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Manning, P.
    Bon Secours Hospital, Ireland.
    Mara, S.
    AOU Citta Salute and Science Torino, Italy.
    Marshall, G. D.
    University of Mississippi, MS 39216 USA.
    Masjedi, M. R.
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Matignon, P.
    VingCard Elsafe, Norway.
    Maurer, M.
    Charite, Germany.
    Mavale-Manuel, S.
    Maputo Central Hospital, Mozambique.
    Melen, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Melo-Gomes, E.
    PNDR Portuguese National Programme Resp Disease, Portugal.
    Meltzer, E. O.
    Allergy and Asthma Medical Grp and Research Centre, CA USA.
    Menzies-Gow, A.
    Royal Brompton Hospital, England.
    Merk, H.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    Michel, J. P.
    EUGMS, Norway.
    Miculinic, N.
    Croatian Pulm Soc, Croatia.
    Mihaltan, F.
    National Institute Pneumol M Nasta, Romania.
    Milenkovic, B.
    University of Belgrade, Serbia; Serbian Assoc Asthma, Serbia; COPD, Serbia.
    Mohammad, G. M. Y.
    Tishreen University, Syria.
    Molimard, M.
    University of Bordeaux, France.
    Momas, I.
    Paris Descartes University, France; Paris Municipal Department Social Act Childhood and Heatlh, France.
    Montilla-Santana, A.
    Aura Andalucia, Spain.
    Morais-Almeida, M.
    Hospital CUF Descobertas, Portugal.
    Morgan, M.
    NHS England, England.
    Mosges, R.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Mullol, J.
    Sachs Childrens Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Nafti, S.
    Mustapha Hospital, Algeria.
    Namazova-Baranova, L.
    Russian Academic Medical Science, Russia.
    Naclerio, R.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA; University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Neou, A.
    Charite, Germany; GA2LEN, Germany.
    Neffen, H.
    Hospital Ninos Orlando Alassia, Argentina.
    Nekam, K.
    Hospital Hospitaller Bros Buda, Hungary.
    Niggemann, B.
    Charite, Germany.
    Ninot, G.
    University of Montpellier I, France.
    Nyembue, T. D.
    University Hospital Kinshasa, DEM REP CONGO.
    OHehir, R. E.
    Monash University, Australia; Monash University, Australia; Monash University, Australia.
    Ohta, K.
    Tokyo National Hospital, Japan.
    Okamoto, Y.
    Chiba University Hospital, Japan.
    Okubo, K.
    Nippon Medical Sch, Japan.
    Ouedraogo, S.
    Centre Hospital University of Pediat Charles de Gaulle, Burkina Faso.
    Paggiaro, P.
    University Hospital Pisa, Italy.
    Pali-Scholl, I.
    University of Vet Med, Austria; Medical University, Austria.
    Panzner, P.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Papadopoulos, N.
    University of Manchester, England; University of Athens, Greece.
    Papi, A.
    University of Ferrara, Italy.
    Park, H. S.
    Ajou University, South Korea.
    Passalacqua, G.
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Pavord, I.
    University of Oxford, England.
    Pawankar, R.
    Nippon Medical Sch, Japan.
    Pengelly, R.
    Department Health Social Serv and Public Safety, North Ireland.
    Pfaar, O.
    Centre Rhinol and Allergol, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Picard, R.
    Minist Econ Ind and Numer, France.
    Pigearias, B.
    Soc Pneumol Langue Francaise, France.
    Pin, I.
    CHU Grenoble, France.
    Plavec, D.
    University of JJ Strossmayer, Croatia.
    Poethig, D.
    Europe Europa Vereinigung Vitalitat and Aktives Alt, Germany.
    Pohl, W.
    Hietzing Hospital, Austria.
    Popov, T. A.
    Medical University of Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Portejoie, F.
    MACVIA LR, France.
    Potter, P.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Postma, D.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Price, D.
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland; Research Real Life, England.
    Rabe, K. F.
    German Centre Lung Research DZL, Germany; University of Kiel, Germany; German Centre Lung Research DZL, Germany.
    Raciborski, F.
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Radier Pontal, F.
    Maison Profess Liberales, France.
    Repka-Ramirez, S.
    SLAAI, Colombia.
    Reitamo, S.
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Rennard, S.
    University of Nebraska Medical Centre, NE USA.
    Rodenas, F.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Roberts, J.
    Salford Royal NHS Fdn Trust and NHS England North, England.
    Roca, J.
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Rodriguez Manas, L.
    Hospital University of Getafe Serv Madrileno Salud, Spain.
    Rolland, C.
    Assoc Asthme and Allergie, France.
    Roman Rodriguez, M.
    Institute Invest Sanitaria Palma IdisPa, Spain.
    Romano, A.
    Complesso Integrato Columbus, Italy.
    Rosado-Pinto, J.
    Hospital Luz, Portugal.
    Rosario, N.
    University of Parana, Brazil.
    Rosenwasser, L.
    Medical University of Misouri Kansas City, MO USA; Medical University of Misouri Kansas City, MO USA.
    Rottem, M.
    Emek Medical Centre, Israel.
    Ryan, D.
    Woodbrook Medical Centre, England; University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Sanchez-Borges, M.
    Centre Medicodocente Trinidad and Clin El Avila, Venezuela.
    Scadding, G. K.
    UCL, England.
    Schunemann, H. J.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Serrano, E.
    CHU Rangueil Larrey, France.
    Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Schulz, H.
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Germany.
    Sheikh, A.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Shields, M.
    Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland; Royal Belfast Hospital Sick Children, North Ireland.
    Siafakas, N.
    University Hospital Heraklion, Greece.
    Sibille, Y.
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Similowski, T.
    Sorbonne University, France; INSERM, France; Groupe, France.
    Simons, F. E. R.
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Sisul, J. C.
    Soc Paraguaya Alergia Asma and Inmunol, Paraguay.
    Skrindo, I.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Smit, H. A.
    University of Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Sole, D.
    University of Federal Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Sooronbaev, T.
    Euro Asian Resp Soc, Kyrgyzstan.
    Spranger, O.
    GAAPP, Austria.
    Stelmach, R.
    University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Sterk, P. J.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sunyer, J.
    Centre Research Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Spain; CIBERESP, Spain; UPF, Spain.
    Thijs, C.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    To, T.
    Sidkkids Hospital and Institute Health Policy Management and Eva, Canada.
    Todo-Bom, A.
    University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Triggiani, M.
    University of Salerno, Italy.
    Valenta, R.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Valero, A. L.
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Valia, E.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Valovirta, E.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Van Ganse, E.
    University of Claude Bernard, France.
    van Hage, M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University Hospital, Sweden.
    Vandenplas, O.
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Vasankari, T.
    Finnish Lung Assoc, Finland.
    Vellas, B.
    CHU Toulouse, France.
    Vestbo, J.
    University of Manchester, England; Manchester NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Vezzani, G.
    Arcispedale S Maria Nuova, Italy; Regional Agency Health and Social Care, Italy.
    Vichyanond, P.
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Viegi, G.
    CNR, Italy; CNR, Italy.
    Vogelmeier, C.
    Philipps University of Marburg, Germany.
    Vontetsianos, T.
    Sotiria Hospital, Greece.
    Wagenmann, M.
    University of Klinikum Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Wallaert, B.
    CHRU, France.
    Walker, S.
    Asthma UK, England.
    Wang, D. Y.
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Wahn, U.
    Charite, Germany.
    Wickman, M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Williams, D. M.
    University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    Williams, S.
    Int Primary Care Resp Grp, Scotland.
    Wright, J.
    Bradford Royal Infirm, England.
    Yawn, B. P.
    Olmsted Medical Centre, MN USA.
    Yiallouros, P. K.
    Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus; Hospital Archbishop Makarios III, Cyprus.
    Yusuf, O. M.
    Allergy and Asthma Institute, Pakistan.
    Zaidi, A.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Zar, H. J.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa; University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Zernotti, M. E.
    University of Catolica Cordoba, Argentina.
    Zhang, L.
    Capital Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Zhong, N.
    Guangzhou Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Zidarn, M.
    University of Clin Resp and Allerg Disease, Slovenia.
    Mercier, J.
    CHRU, France; University of Montpellier, France.
    Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5)2016In: Clinical and Translational Allergy, ISSN 2045-7022, E-ISSN 2045-7022, Vol. 6, article id 29Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un Vleillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing and the AIRWAYS ICPs network. It is deployed in collaboration with the World Health Organization Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing has proposed a 5-step framework for developing an individual scaling up strategy: (1) what to scale up: (1-a) databases of good practices, (1-b) assessment of viability of the scaling up of good practices, (1-c) classification of good practices for local replication and (2) how to scale up: (2-a) facilitating partnerships for scaling up, (2-b) implementation of key success factors and lessons learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing.

  • 10.
    Bousquet, J.
    et al.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France; European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; INSERM, France; CHRU Arnaud Villeneuve, France.
    Hellings, P. W.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Agache, I.
    Transylvania University of Brasov, Romania.
    Bedbrook, A.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France.
    Bachert, C.
    Ghent University Hospital, Belgium.
    Bergmann, K. C.
    Charite, Germany; Global Allergy and Asthma European Network, Germany.
    Bewick, M.
    iQ4U Consultants Ltd, England.
    Bindslev-Jensen, C.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Bucca, C.
    University of Sydney and Sydney Local Health Dist, Australia.
    Caimmi, D. P.
    Hospital City Health and Science Torino, Italy.
    Camargos, P. A. M.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Canonica, G. W.
    University of Federal Minas Gerais, Brazil.
    Casale, T.
    Humanitas University, Italy.
    Chavannes, N. H.
    University of S Florida, FL USA.
    Cruz, A. A.
    Leiden University, Netherlands; University of Federal Bahia, Brazil.
    De Carlo, G.
    GARD Execut Comm, Brazil.
    Dahl, R.
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Demoly, P.
    Hospital City Health and Science Torino, Italy; EFA European Federat Allergy and Airways Disease Patien, Belgium; INSERM, France.
    Devillier, P.
    University of Paris 06, France.
    Fonseca, J.
    Suresnes University of Versailles, France; Institute CUF Porto, Portugal.
    Fokkens, W. J.
    Hospital CUF Porto, Portugal.
    Guldemond, N. A.
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Haahtela, T.
    Academic Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Illario, M.
    Erasmus University, Netherlands.
    Just, J.
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Keil, T.
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy; University of Paris 06, France.
    Klimek, L.
    Charite, Germany.
    Kuna, P.
    University of Wurzburg, Germany.
    Larenas-Linnemann, D.
    Centre Rhinol and Allergol, Germany.
    Morais-Almeida, M.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Mullol, J.
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Murray, R.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Naclerio, R.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    OHehir, R. E.
    Monash University, Australia; Monash University, Australia.
    Papadopoulos, N. G.
    Monash University, Australia; University of Manchester, England.
    Pawankar, R.
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Potter, P.
    Nippon Medical Sch, Japan.
    Ryan, D.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa; Woodbrook Medical Centre, England.
    Samolinski, B.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Schunemann, H. J.
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Sheikh, A.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Simons, F. E. R.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Stellato, C.
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Todo-Bom, A.
    University of Salerno, Italy.
    Tomazic, P. V.
    University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Valiulis, A.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria; Vilnius University, Lithuania; Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Valovirta, E.
    European Academic Paediat EAP UEMS SP, Belgium; University of Turku, Finland.
    Ventura, M. T.
    Terveystalo, Finland.
    Wickman, M.
    University of Bari, Italy; Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Young, I.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yorgancioglu, A.
    Queens University, North Ireland.
    Zuberbier, T.
    Charite, Germany; Global Allergy and Asthma European Network, Germany.
    Aberer, W.
    Celal Bayar University, Turkey.
    Akdis, C. A.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Akdis, M.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Annesi-Maesano, I.
    EFA European Federat Allergy and Airways Disease Patien, Belgium; INSERM, France.
    Ankri, J.
    INSERM, France.
    Ansotegui, I. J.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Anto, J. M.
    Hospital Quiron Bizkaia, Spain; Barcelona Institute Global Health ISGlobal, Spain; IMIM Hospital Mar Research Institute, Spain; CIBER Epidemiol and Salud Public CIBERESP, Spain.
    Arnavielhe, S.
    University of Pompeu Fabra, Spain.
    Asarnoj, A.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland; Kyomed, France; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Arshad, H.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Avolio, F.
    David Hide Asthma and Allergy Research Centre, England.
    Baiardini, I.
    University of Federal Minas Gerais, Brazil.
    Barbara, C.
    Regional Puglia, Italy.
    Barbagallo, M.
    Portuguese National Programme Resp Disease PNDR, Portugal.
    Bateman, E. D.
    University of Palermo, Italy.
    Beghe, B.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Bel, E. H.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Bennoor, K. S.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Benson, Mikael
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bialoszewski, A. Z.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Bieber, T.
    Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-University Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Bjermer, L.
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Blain, H.
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden; Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Blasi, F.
    University of Montpellier, France.
    Boner, A. L.
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Bonini, M.
    Sapienza University, Rome, Italy.
    Bonini, S.
    University of Verona Hospital, Italy; University of Roma La Sapienza, Italy.
    Bosse, I.
    University of Naples 2, Italy.
    Bouchard, J.
    Italian National Research Council, Italy.
    Boulet, L. P.
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Bourret, R.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Bousquet, P. J.
    EFA European Federat Allergy and Airways Disease Patien, Belgium.
    Braido, F.
    University of Federal Minas Gerais, Brazil.
    Briggs, A. H.
    University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Brightling, C. E.
    University Hospital Leicester NHS Trust, England; University of Leicester, England.
    Brozek, J.
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Buhl, R.
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Bunu, C.
    University of Medical and Farm Timisoara, Romania.
    Burte, E.
    INSERM, France.
    Bush, A.
    University of Medical and Farm Timisoara, Romania; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Caballero-Fonseca, F.
    Centre Medical Docente Trinidad, Venezuela.
    Calderon, M. A.
    University of Medical and Farm Timisoara, Romania; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Camuzat, T.
    Regional Languedoc Roussillon, France.
    Cardona, V.
    Hospital Valle De Hebron, Spain.
    Carreiro-Martins, P.
    CEDOC, Portugal; Centre Hospital Lisboa Cent, Portugal.
    Carriazo, A. M.
    Regional Minist Health Andalusia, Spain.
    Carlsen, K. H.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Carr, W.
    Allergy and Asthma Associates Southern Calif, CA USA.
    Cepeda Sarabia, A. M.
    Metropolitan University, Colombia; SLaai Sociedad Latinoamer Allergia Asma and Immunol, Colombia.
    Cesari, M.
    Gerontopole Toulouse, France.
    Chatzi, L.
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Chiron, R.
    Hospital City Health and Science Torino, Italy.
    Chivato, T.
    University of CEU San Pablo, Spain.
    Chkhartishvili, E.
    Grigol Robakidze University, Rep of Georgia.
    Chuchalin, A. G.
    Pulmonolory Research Institute FMBA, Russia; GARD Execut Comm, Russia.
    Chung, K. F.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Ciprandi, G.
    IRCCS Azienda Osped University of San Martino, Italy.
    Correia de Sousa, J.
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Cox, L.
    Nova Southeastern University, FL USA.
    Crooks, G.
    Scottish Centre Telehealth and Telecare, Scotland.
    Custovic, A.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Dahlen, S. E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Darsow, U.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany; Helmholtz Centre Munich, Germany.
    Dedeu, T.
    AQuAS, Spain; European Regional and Local Health Assoc, Belgium.
    Deleanu, D.
    Luliu Hatieganu University of Medical and Pharm, Romania.
    Denburg, J. A.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    De Vries, G.
    Peercode DV, Netherlands.
    Didier, A.
    Rangueil Larrey Hospital, France.
    Dinh-Xuan, A. T.
    University of Paris 05, France.
    Dokic, D.
    Ss Cyril and Methodius University, Macedonia.
    Douagui, H.
    Centre Hospital University of Beni Messous, Algeria.
    Dray, G.
    Ecole Mines, France.
    Dubakiene, R.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Durham, S. R.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Du Toit, G.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Dykewicz, M. S.
    St Louis University, MO USA.
    Eklund, P.
    Umeå University, Sweden; Four Comp Oy, Finland.
    El-Gamal, Y.
    Ain Shams University, Egypt.
    Ellers, E.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Emuzyte, R.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria; Vilnius University, Lithuania; Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Farrell, J.
    Social Serv and Public Safety, North Ireland.
    Fink Wagner, A.
    Global Allergy and Asthma Platform, Austria.
    Fiocchi, A.
    Bambino Gesu Childrens Research Hospital Holy See, Italy.
    Fletcher, M.
    Educ Heatlh, England.
    Forastiere, F.
    Regional Health Serv Lazio Reg, Italy.
    Gaga, M.
    Athens Chest Hospital, Greece.
    Gamkrelidze, A.
    National Centre Disease Control and Public Health Georgia, Rep of Georgia.
    Gemicioglu, B.
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Gereda, J. E.
    Clin Ricardo Palma, Peru.
    Gerth van Wick, R.
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Gonzalez Diaz, S.
    University of Autonoma Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
    Grisle, I.
    Latvian Assoc Allergists, Latvia.
    Grouse, L.
    University of Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Gutter, Z.
    University Hospital Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Guzman, M. A.
    University of Chile, Chile.
    Hellquist-Dahl, B.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Heinrich, J.
    German Research Centre Environm Heatlh, Germany.
    Horak, F.
    Vienna Challenge Chamber, Austria.
    Hourihane, J. O. B.
    University of Coll Cork, Ireland.
    Humbert, M.
    University of Paris 11, France; Hop Bicetre, France; INSERM, France.
    Hyland, M.
    University of Plymouth, England.
    Iaccarino, G.
    University of Salerno, Italy.
    Jares, E. J.
    Libra Fdn, Argentina.
    Jeandel, C.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; University Hospital, Sweden.
    Johnston, S. L.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; MRC and Asthma UK Centre Allerg Mech Asthma, England.
    Joos, G.
    Ghent University Hospital, Belgium.
    Jonquet, O.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Jung, K. S.
    Hallym University, South Korea.
    Jutel, M.
    Wroclaw Medical University, Poland.
    Kaidashev, I.
    Ukrainian Medical Stomatol Acad, Ukraine.
    Khaitov, M.
    Federal Medicobiol Agency, Russia.
    Kalayci, O.
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Kalyoncu, A. F.
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Kardas, P.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Keith, P. K.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Kerkhof, M.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Kerstjens, H. A. M.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Khaltaev, N.
    GARD, Switzerland.
    Kogevinas, M.
    Hospital Quiron Bizkaia, Spain; Barcelona Institute Global Health ISGlobal, Spain; IMIM Hospital Mar Research Institute, Spain; CIBER Epidemiol and Salud Public CIBERESP, Spain.
    Kolek, V.
    University Hospital Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Koppelman, G. H.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Kowalski, M. L.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Kuitunen, M.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kull, I.
    University of Bari, Italy; Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Kvedariene, V.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Lambrecht, B.
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Lau, S.
    Charite, Germany.
    Laune, D.
    University of Pompeu Fabra, Spain.
    Le, L. T. T.
    University of Medical and Pharm, Vietnam.
    Lieberman, P.
    University of Tennessee, TN USA.
    Lipworth, B.
    University of Dundee, Scotland.
    Li, J.
    Guangzhou Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Lodrup Carlsen, K. C.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Louis, R.
    CHU Sart Tilman, Belgium.
    Lupinek, C.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    MacNee, W.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Magar, Y.
    Hop St Joseph, France.
    Magnan, A.
    University of Nantes, France; University of Nantes, France.
    Mahboub, B.
    Rashid Hospital, U Arab Emirates.
    Maier, D.
    Biomax Informat AG, Germany.
    Majer, I.
    University of Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Malva, J.
    University of Coimbra, Portugal; Ageing@Coimbra EIP AHA Reference Site, Portugal.
    Manning, P.
    Bon Secours Hospital, Ireland.
    De Manuel Keenoy, E.
    Kronikgune, Spain.
    Marshall, G. D.
    University of Mississippi, MS USA.
    Masjedi, M. R.
    Iranian Anti Tobacco Assoc, Iran.
    Mathieu-Dupas, E.
    University of Pompeu Fabra, Spain.
    Maurer, M.
    Charite, Germany.
    Mavale-Manuel, S.
    Maputo Central Hospital, Mozambique.
    Melen, E.
    University of Bari, Italy; Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Melo-Gomes, E.
    Regional Puglia, Italy.
    Meltzer, E. O.
    Allergy and Asthma Medical Grp and Research Centre, CA USA.
    Mercier, J.
    University of Montpellier, France.
    Merk, H.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    Miculinic, N.
    Croatian Pulm Soc, Croatia.
    Mihaltan, F.
    National Institute Pneumol M Nasta, Romania.
    Milenkovic, B.
    University of Belgrade, Serbia; Serbian Assoc Asthma and COPD, Serbia.
    Millot-Keurinck, J.
    Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    Mohammad, Y.
    Tishreen University, Syria.
    Momas, I.
    Paris Descartes University, France; Paris Municipal Department Social Act Childhood and Heatlh, France.
    Mosges, R.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Muraro, A.
    Padua Gen University Hospital, Italy.
    Namazova-Baranova, L.
    Russian Academic Medical Science, Russia.
    Nadif, R.
    INSERM, France.
    Neffen, H.
    Hospital Ninos Orlando Alassia, Argentina.
    Nekam, K.
    Hospital Hospital Bros Buda, Hungary.
    Nieto, A.
    Hospital La Fe, Spain.
    Niggemann, B.
    Charite, Germany.
    Nogueira-Silva, L.
    Suresnes University of Versailles, France; University of Porto, Portugal; Institute CUF Porto, Portugal; Centre Hospital Sao Joao, Portugal.
    Nogues, M.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    Nyembue, T. D.
    University Hospital Kinshasa, DEM REP CONGO.
    Ohta, K.
    Tokyo National Hospital, Japan.
    Okamoto, Y.
    Chiba University Hospital, Japan.
    Okubo, K.
    Nippon Medical Sch, Japan.
    Olive-Elias, M.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France; University of Porto, Portugal; Academic Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Ouedraogo, S.
    Centre Hospital University of Pediatr Charles Gaulle, Burkina Faso.
    Paggiaro, P.
    University Hospital Pisa, Italy.
    Pali-Schoell, I.
    Medical University, Austria.
    Palkonen, S.
    GARD Execut Comm, Brazil.
    Panzner, P.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Papi, A.
    University of Ferrara, Italy.
    Park, H. S.
    Ajou University, South Korea.
    Passalacqua, G.
    University of Federal Minas Gerais, Brazil.
    Pedersen, S.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Pereira, A. M.
    Suresnes University of Versailles, France; University of Porto, Portugal; Institute CUF Porto, Portugal; CUF Porto Hospital and Institute, Portugal.
    Pfaar, O.
    Charite, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Picard, R.
    Minist Econ Ind and Numer, France.
    Pigearias, B.
    Espace Francophone Pneumol, France.
    Pin, I.
    CHU Grenoble, France.
    Plavec, D.
    Childrens Hospital Srebrnjak, Croatia; University of JJ Strossmayer, Croatia.
    Pohl, W.
    Hietzing Hospital, Austria.
    Popov, T. A.
    Medical University of Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Portejoie, F.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France.
    Postma, D.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Poulsen, L. K.
    Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Denmark.
    Price, D.
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland; Research Real Life, England.
    Rabe, K. F.
    German Centre Lung Research DZL, Germany; University of Kiel, Germany.
    Raciborski, F.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Roberts, G.
    Southampton University Hospital, England.
    Robalo-Cordeiro, C.
    Coimbra University Hospital, Portugal.
    Rodenas, F.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Manas, L.
    Getafe University Hospital, Spain.
    Rolland, C.
    Assoc Asthme and Allergie, France.
    Roman Rodriguez, M.
    Institute Invest Sanitaria Palma IdisPa, Spain.
    Romano, A.
    Complesso Integrato Columbus, Italy.
    Rosado-Pinto, J.
    Hospital Luz, Portugal.
    Rosario, N.
    University of Parana, Brazil.
    Rottem, M.
    Emek Medical Centre, Israel.
    Sanchez-Borges, M.
    Centre Medical Docente Trinidad and Clin El Avila, Venezuela.
    Sastre-Dominguez, J.
    Autononous University of Madrid, Spain.
    Scadding, G. K.
    UCL, England.
    Scichilone, N.
    University of Palermo, Italy.
    Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Serrano, E.
    CHU Rangueil Larrey, France.
    Shields, M.
    Queens University, North Ireland; Royal Belfast Hospital Sick Children, North Ireland.
    Siroux, V.
    University of Joseph Fourier, France.
    Sisul, J. C.
    Soc Paraguaya Alergia Asma and Inmunol, Paraguay.
    Skrindo, I.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Smit, H. A.
    University of Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Sole, D.
    University of Federal Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Sooronbaev, T.
    Euro Asian Resp Soc, Kyrgyzstan.
    Spranger, O.
    Global Allergy and Asthma Platform, Austria.
    Stelmach, R.
    University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Sterk, P. J.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Strandberg, T.
    European Union Geriatr Medical Soc EUGMS, Finland.
    Sunyer, J.
    Hospital Quiron Bizkaia, Spain; Barcelona Institute Global Health ISGlobal, Spain; IMIM Hospital Mar Research Institute, Spain; CIBER Epidemiol and Salud Public CIBERESP, Spain.
    Thijs, C.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Triggiani, M.
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Valenta, R.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Valero, A.
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    van Eerd, M.
    Peercode DV, Netherlands.
    van Ganse, E.
    PELyon, France; University of Claude Bernard Lyon, France.
    van Hague, M.
    Kyomed, France; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University Hospital, Sweden.
    Vandenplas, O.
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Varona, L. L.
    Philippines Soc Allergy Asthma and Immunol, Philippines.
    Vellas, B.
    Gerontopole Toulouse, France.
    Vezzani, G.
    Research Hospital, Italy; Regional Agency Health and Social Care, Italy.
    Vazankari, T.
    Finnish Lung Assoc FILHA, Finland.
    Viegi, G.
    CNR Institute Clin Physiol, Italy; CNR, Italy.
    Vontetsianos, T.
    Sotiria Hospital, Greece.
    Wagenmann, M.
    University of Klinikum Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Walker, S.
    Asthma UK, England.
    Wang, D. Y.
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Wahn, U.
    Charite, Germany.
    Werfel, T.
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Whalley, B.
    University of Plymouth, England.
    Williams, D. M.
    University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    Williams, S.
    IPCRG, Scotland.
    Wilson, N.
    Northern Health Alliance, England.
    Wright, J.
    Bradford Royal Infirm, England.
    Yawn, B. P.
    Olmsted Medical Centre, MN USA.
    Yiallouros, P. K.
    University of Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Yusuf, O. M.
    Allergy and Asthma Institute, Pakistan.
    Zaidi, A.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Zar, H. J.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa; University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Zernotti, M. E.
    University of Catolica Cordoba, Argentina.
    Zhang, L.
    Beijing TongRen Hospital, Peoples R China; Beijing Institute Otolaryngol, Peoples R China.
    Zhong, N.
    Guangzhou Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Zidarn, M.
    University of Clin Resp and Allerg Disease, Slovenia.
    ARIA 2016: Care pathways implementing emerging technologies for predictive medicine in rhinitis and asthma across the life cycle2016In: Clinical and Translational Allergy, ISSN 2045-7022, E-ISSN 2045-7022, Vol. 6, article id 47Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative commenced during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999. The initial goals were (1) to propose a new allergic rhinitis classification, (2) to promote the concept of multi-morbidity in asthma and rhinitis and (3) to develop guidelines with all stakeholders that could be used globally for all countries and populations. ARIA-disseminated and implemented in over 70 countries globally-is now focusing on the implementation of emerging technologies for individualized and predictive medicine. MASK [MACVIA (Contre les Maladies Chroniques pour un Vieillissement Actif)-ARIA Sentinel NetworK] uses mobile technology to develop care pathways for the management of rhinitis and asthma by a multi-disciplinary group and by patients themselves. An app (Android and iOS) is available in 20 countries and 15 languages. It uses a visual analogue scale to assess symptom control and work productivity as well as a clinical decision support system. It is associated with an inter-operable tablet for physicians and other health care professionals. The scaling up strategy uses the recommendations of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. The aim of the novel ARIA approach is to provide an active and healthy life to rhinitis sufferers, whatever their age, sex or socio-economic status, in order to reduce health and social inequalities incurred by the disease.

  • 11.
    Bousquet, J.
    et al.
    University Hospital, France; European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; INSERM, France; University of Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines UVSQ, France.
    Schunemann, H. J.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Fonseca, J.
    University of Porto, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal.
    Samolinski, B.
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Bachert, C.
    Ghent University Hospital, Belgium.
    Canonica, G. W.
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Casale, T.
    University of S Florida, FL USA.
    Cruz, A. A.
    University of Federal Bahia, Brazil; GARD Execut Comm, Brazil.
    Demoly, P.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France; INSERM, France; UPMC, France.
    Hellings, P.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Valiulis, A.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Wickman, M.
    Sachs Childrens Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Zuberbier, T.
    Charite, Germany.
    Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.
    University of Sydney, Australia; Sydney Local Health Dist, Australia.
    Bedbrook, A.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France.
    Bergmann, K. C.
    Charite, Germany.
    Caimmi, D.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Dahl, R.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark; Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Fokkens, W. J.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Grisle, I.
    Latvian Assoc Allergists, Latvia.
    Lodrup Carlsen, K.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; .
    Mullol, J.
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    Muraro, A.
    Padua Gen University Hospital, Italy.
    Palkonen, S.
    EFA European Federat Allergy and Airways Disease Patien, Belgium.
    Papadopoulos, N.
    University of Manchester, England; University of Athens, Greece.
    Passalacqua, G.
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Ryan, D.
    Woodbrook Medical Centre, England; University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Valovirta, E.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Yorgancioglu, A.
    Celal Bayar University, Turkey.
    Aberer, W.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Agache, I.
    Transylvania University of Brasov, Romania.
    Adachi, M.
    Int University of Health and Welfare, Japan.
    Akdis, C. A.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Akdis, M.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Annesi-Maesano, I.
    INSERM, France; UPMC, France.
    Ansotegui, I. J.
    Hospital Quiron Bizkaia, Spain.
    Anto, J. M.
    Centre Research Environm Epidemiol, Spain; Hospital del Mar, Spain; CIBER Epidemiol and Salud Publ, Spain; University of Pompeu Fabra, Spain.
    Arnavielhe, S.
    Digi Heatlh, France.
    Arshad, H.
    David Hide Asthma and Allergy Research Centre, England.
    Baiardini, I.
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Baigenzhin, A. K.
    EuroAsian Resp Soc, Kazakhstan.
    Barbara, C.
    Fac Medical Lisbon, Portugal.
    Bateman, E. D.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Beghe, B.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Bel, E. H.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Ben Kheder, A.
    Hop Abderrahman Mami, Tunisia.
    Bennoor, K. S.
    National Institute Disease Chest and Hospital, Bangladesh.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Bewick, M.
    Bieber, T.
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Bindslev-Jensen, C.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark;.
    Bjermer, L.
    University of Lund Hospital, Sweden.
    Blain, H.
    University of Montpellier, France; .
    Boner, A. L.
    University of Verona Hospital, Italy.
    Boulet, L. P.
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Bonini, M.
    University of Roma La Sapienza, Italy.
    Bonini, S.
    University of Naples 2, Italy; Italian National Research Council, Italy.
    Bosse, I.
    Bourret, R.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Bousquet, P. J.
    INSERM, France; UPMC, France.
    Braido, F.
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Briggs, A. H.
    University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Brightling, C. E.
    University Hospital Leicester NHS Trust, England; University of Leicester, England.
    Brozek, J.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Buhl, R.
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Burney, P. G.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Bush, A.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; Royal Brompton Hospital, England.
    Caballero-Fonseca, F.
    Centre Medical Docente La Trinidad, Venezuela.
    Calderon, M. A.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Camargos, P. A. M.
    University of Federal Minas Gerais, Brazil.
    Camuzat, T.
    Regional Languedoc Roussillon, France.
    Carlsen, K. H.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; .
    Carr, W.
    Allergy and Asthma Associates Southern Calif, CA USA.
    Cepeda Sarabia, A. M.
    University of Simon Bolivar, Colombia; SLaai, Colombia.
    Chavannes, N. H.
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Chiron, R.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Chkhartishvili, E.
    Grigol Robakidze University, Rep of Georgia.
    Chuchalin, A. G.
    Pulmonolory Research Institute FMBA, Russia; GARD Execut Comm, Russia.
    Ciprandi, G.
    Azienda Osped University of San Martino, Italy.
    Cirule, I.
    University of Children Hospital Latvia, Latvia.
    Correia de Sousa, J.
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Cox, L.
    Nova SE University, FL USA.
    Crooks, G.
    NHS Scotland, Scotland.
    Costa, D. J.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Custovic, A.
    University of Manchester, England.
    Dahlen, S. E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Darsow, U.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    De Carlo, G.
    EFA European Federat Allergy and Airways Disease Patien, Belgium.
    De Blay, F.
    University Hospital Strasbourg, France.
    Deleanu, D.
    European Regional and Local Health Assoc, Belgium; Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medical and Pharm, Romania.
    Denburg, J. A.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Devillier, P.
    Suresnes University of Versailles St Quentin, France.
    Didier, A.
    Rangueil Larrey Hospital, France.
    Dinh-Xuan, A. T.
    University of Paris 05, France.
    Dokic, D.
    University of Skopje, Macedonia.
    Douagui, H.
    Centre Hospital University of Beni Messous, Algeria.
    Dray, G.
    Ecole Mines, France.
    Dubakiene, R.
    Vilnius State University, Lithuania.
    Durham, S. R.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Dykewicz, M. S.
    St Louis University, MI USA.
    El-Gamal, Y.
    Ain Shams University, Egypt.
    Emuzyte, R.
    Vilnius State University, Lithuania.
    Fink Wagner, A.
    Global Allergy and Asthma Platform GAAPP, Austria.
    Fletcher, M.
    Educ Heatlh, England.
    Fiocchi, A.
    Bambino Gesu Childrens Research Hospital Holy See, Italy.
    Forastiere, F.
    Regional Health Serv Lazio Reg, Italy.
    Gamkrelidze, A.
    National Centre Disease Control and Public Health Georgia, Rep of Georgia.
    Gemicioglu, B.
    Turkish Thorac Soc, Turkey.
    Gereda, J. E.
    Clin Ricardo Palma, Peru.
    Gonzalez Diaz, S.
    Sociedad Latinoamer Allergia Asma and Immunol, Mexico.
    Gotua, M.
    Georgian Assoc Allergol and Clin Immunol, Rep of Georgia.
    Grouse, L.
    University of Washington, WA USA.
    Guzman, M. A.
    University of Chile, Chile.
    Haahtela, T.
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Hellquist-Dahl, B.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Heinrich, J.
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Germany.
    Horak, F.
    Vienna Challenge Chamber, Austria.
    Hourihane, J. O. B.
    National University of Ireland University of Coll Cork, Ireland.
    Howarth, P.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Humbert, M.
    University of Paris 11, France; Hop Bicetre, France.
    Ivancevich, J. C.
    Clin Santa Isabel, Argentina.
    Jares, E. J.
    Libra Fdn, Argentina.
    Johnston, S. L.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; MRC, England; Asthma UK Centre Allerg Mech Asthma, England.
    Joos, G.
    Ghent University Hospital, Belgium.
    Jonquet, O.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Jung, K. S.
    Hallym University, South Korea.
    Just, J.
    Hop Enfants Armand Trousseau, France; University of Paris 06, France.
    Kaidashev, I.
    Ukrainian Medical Stomatol Acad, Ukraine.
    Kalayci, O.
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Kalyoncu, A. F.
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Keil, T.
    Charite, Germany; University of Wurzburg, Germany.
    Keith, P. K.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Khaltaev, N.
    GARD, Switzerland.
    Klimek, L.
    Centre Rhinol and Allergol, Germany.
    Koffi NGoran, B.
    Soc Pneumol Langue Francaise, France; Espace Francophone Pneumol, France.
    Kolek, V.
    University Hospital Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Koppelman, G. H.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Kowalski, M. L.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Kull, I.
    Sachs Childrens Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kuna, P.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Kvedariene, V.
    Vilnius State University, Lithuania.
    Lambrecht, B.
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Lau, S.
    Charite, Germany.
    Larenas-Linnemann, D.
    Hospital Medical Sur, Mexico.
    Laune, D.
    Digi Heatlh, France.
    Le, L. T. T.
    University of Medical and Pharm, Vietnam.
    Lieberman, P.
    University of Tennessee, TN USA; University of Tennessee, TN USA; University of Tennessee, TN USA.
    Lipworth, B.
    University of Dundee, Scotland.
    Li, J.
    Guangzhou Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Louis, R.
    CHU Sart Tilman, Belgium.
    Magard, Y.
    Hop St Joseph, France.
    Magnan, A.
    University of Nantes, France.
    Mahboub, B.
    Rashid Hospital, U Arab Emirates.
    Makela, M. J.
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    De Manuel Keenoy, E.
    Kronikgune, Spain.
    Marshall, G. D.
    University of Mississippi, MS 39216 USA.
    Masjedi, M. R.
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Maurer, M.
    Charite, Germany; Charite, Germany.
    Mavale-Manuel, S.
    Maputo Central Hospital, Mozambique.
    Melen, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Melo-Gomes, E.
    Fac Medical Lisbon, Portugal.
    Meltzer, E. O.
    Allergy and Asthma Medical Grp and Research Centre, CA USA.
    Merk, H.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    Miculinic, N.
    Croatian Pulm Soc, Croatia.
    Mihaltan, F.
    National Institute Pneumol M Nasta, Romania.
    Milenkovic, B.
    University of Belgrade, Serbia; Serbian Assoc Asthma and COPD, Serbia.
    Mohammad, Y.
    Tishreen University, Syria.
    Molimard, M.
    University of Bordeaux, France.
    Momas, I.
    Paris Descartes University, France; Paris Municipal Department Social Act Childhood and Heatlh, France.
    Montilla-Santana, A.
    Aura Andalucia, Spain.
    Morais-Almeida, M.
    Hospital CUF Descobertas, Portugal.
    Moesges, R.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Namazova-Baranova, L.
    Russian Academic Medical Science, Russia.
    Naclerio, R.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA; University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Neou, A.
    Charite, Germany.
    Neffen, H.
    Hospital Ninos Orlando Alassia, Argentina.
    Nekam, K.
    Hospital Hospitaller Bros Buda, Hungary.
    Niggemann, B.
    Charite, Germany.
    Nyembue, T. D.
    University Hospital Kinshasa, Zaire.
    OHehir, R. E.
    Monash University, Australia; Monash University, Australia.
    Ohta, K.
    Tokyo National Hospital, Japan.
    Okamoto, Y.
    Chiba University Hospital, Japan.
    Okubo, K.
    Nippon Medical Sch, Japan.
    Ouedraogo, S.
    Centre Hospital University of Pediat Charles Gaulle, Burkina Faso.
    Pali-Schoell, I.
    University of Vienna, Austria; University of Vet Medical Vienna, Austria; University of Vet Medical Vienna, Austria; University of Vienna, Austria.
    Palmer, S.
    University of York, England.
    Panzner, P.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; .
    Papi, A.
    University of Ferrara, Italy.
    Park, H. S.
    Ajou University, South Korea.
    Pavord, I.
    University of Oxford, England.
    Pawankar, R.
    Nippon Medical Sch, Japan.
    Pfaar, O.
    Centre Rhinol and Allergol, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Picard, R.
    Conseil Gen Econ, France.
    Pigearias, B.
    Soc Pneumol Langue Francaise, France; Espace Francophone Pneumol, France.
    Pin, I.
    CHU Grenoble, France.
    Plavec, D.
    University Hospital Pisa, Italy; University of JJ Strossmayer, Croatia.
    Pohl, W.
    Hietzing Hospital, Austria.
    Popov, T. A.
    Medical University of Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Portejoie, F.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France.
    Postma, D.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Potter, P.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Price, D.
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland; Research Real Life, England.
    Rabe, K. F.
    LungenClin Grosshansdorf, Germany; University of Kiel, Germany.
    Raciborski, F.
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Radier Pontal, F.
    Maison Profess Liberales, France.
    Repka-Ramirez, S.
    SLAAI, Mexico.
    Robalo-Cordeiro, C.
    Hospital University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Rolland, C.
    Assoc Asthme and Allergie, France.
    Reitamo, S.
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Roman Rodriguez, M.
    Institute Invest Sanitaria Palma IdisPa, Spain.
    Romano, A.
    Complesso Integrato Columbus, Italy.
    Rosario, N.
    University of Federal Parana, Brazil.
    Rosenwasser, L.
    University of Misouri, MI USA.
    Rottem, M.
    Emek Medical Centre, Israel.
    Sanchez-Borges, M.
    Centre Meddocente La, Venezuela; Clin El Avila, Venezuela.
    Scadding, G. K.
    UCL, England.
    Serrano, E.
    CHU Rangueil Larrey, France.
    Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Sheikh, A.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Simons, F. E. R.
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Sisul, J. C.
    Soc Paraguaya Alergia Asma and Inmunol, Paraguay.
    Skrindo, I.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Smit, H. A.
    University of Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Sole, D.
    University of Federal Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Sooronbaev, T.
    Euroasian Resp Soc, Kyrgyzstan.
    Spranger, O.
    Global Allergy and Asthma Platform GAAPP, Austria.
    Stelmach, R.
    University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Strandberg, T.
    European Union Geriatr Medical Soc, Austria.
    Sunyer, J.
    Centre Research Environm Epidemiol, Spain; Hospital del Mar, Spain; CIBER Epidemiol and Salud Publ, Spain; University of Pompeu Fabra, Spain.
    Thijs, C.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Todo-Bom, A.
    University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Triggiani, M.
    University of Salerno, Italy.
    Valenta, R.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Valero, A. L.
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    van Hage, M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Vandenplas, O.
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Vezzani, G.
    Research Hospital, Italy; Regional Agency Health and Social Care, Italy.
    Vichyanond, P.
    Mahidol University, Thailand.
    Viegi, G.
    CNR, Italy.
    Wagenmann, M.
    University of Klinikum Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Walker, S.
    Asthma UK, England.
    Wang, D. Y.
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Wahn, U.
    Aura Andalucia, Jaen, Spain.
    Williams, D. M.
    University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    Wright, J.
    Bradford Royal Infirm, England.
    Yawn, B. P.
    Olmsted Medical Centre, MN USA.
    Yiallouros, P. K.
    Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus; Hospital Archbishop Makarios III, Cyprus.
    Yusuf, O. M.
    Allergy and Asthma Institute, Pakistan.
    Zar, H. J.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Zernotti, M. E.
    University of Catolica Cordoba, Argentina.
    Zhang, L.
    Capital Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Zhong, N.
    Guangzhou Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Zidarn, M.
    University of Clin Resp and Allerg Disease, Slovenia.
    Chatzi, L,
    Mercier, J.
    University of Montpellier, France.
    Dedeu, T,
    Hyland, ME,
    Majer, I,
    Manning, P,
    Paggiaro, P,
    Rosado-Pinto, J,
    Rodenas, F,
    MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis (MASK-rhinitis): the new generation guideline implementation2015In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 70, no 11, p. 1372-1392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several unmet needs have been identified in allergic rhinitis: identification of the time of onset of the pollen season, optimal control of rhinitis and comorbidities, patient stratification, multidisciplinary team for integrated care pathways, innovation in clinical trials and, above all, patient empowerment. MASK-rhinitis (MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis) is a simple system centred around the patient which was devised to fill many of these gaps using Information and Communications Technology (ICT) tools and a clinical decision support system (CDSS) based on the most widely used guideline in allergic rhinitis and its asthma comorbidity (ARIA 2015 revision). It is one of the implementation systems of Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA). Three tools are used for the electronic monitoring of allergic diseases: a cell phone-based daily visual analogue scale (VAS) assessment of disease control, CARAT (Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test) and e-Allergy screening (premedical system of early diagnosis of allergy and asthma based on online tools). These tools are combined with a clinical decision support system (CDSS) and are available in many languages. An e-CRF and an e-learning tool complete MASK. MASK is flexible and other tools can be added. It appears to be an advanced, global and integrated ICT answer for many unmet needs in allergic diseases which will improve policies and standards.

  • 12.
    Carlsson, R. M.
    et al.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, L.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Hallander, H. O.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Ljungman, M.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Olin, P.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Gothefors, L.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Netterlid, E.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Two consecutive randomized controlled pertussis booster trials in children initially vaccinated in infancy with an acellular vaccine: The first with a five-component Tdap vaccine to 5-year olds and the second with five- or monocomponent Tdap vaccines at age 14-15 years2015In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 33, no 31, p. 3717-3725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior study children from a DTaP efficacy trial were recruited at ages 5 and 15 years to randomized booster trials addressing immunogenicity and reactogenicity; 475 preschool children received mixed or separate injections of a reduced antigen vaccine (Tdap5, Sanofi Pasteur MSD) and an inactivated polio vaccine, and 230 adolescents received the same or another booster vaccine (Tdap1, SSI, Denmark). Pre-vaccination antibody concentrations against pertussis antigens were significantly higher at 15 than 5 years of age, probably due to natural boosting between the studies. Tdap5 induced comparable anti-PT concentrations at both ages, but antibody responses were significantly higher to filamentous haemagglutinin, pertactin and fimbriae 2/3 in adolescents. As expected, a higher amount of PT (Tdap1, 20 mu g) induced a stronger anti-PT response than a lower amount (Tdap5, 2.5 mu g). The frequency of adverse events was low and there were no serious adverse reactions. All local reactions had an early onset and a short duration. A large swelling or redness of more than half of the upper arm circumference was reported in 8/475 5-year-olds and in 6/230 15-year-olds. Children vaccinated with Tdap5 reported more moderate pain in adolescence than at preschool age, whereas itching was only reported in preschool children. Sweden introduced DTaP vaccines in 1996 after a 17-year hiatus with no general pertussis vaccination and pertussis was still endemic at the time of the studies. The frequency of adverse events was nevertheless low in both preschool children and adolescents and antibody responses were adequate. These studies document immunogenicity and reactogenicity in a trial cohort consecutively vaccinated with acellular pertussis vaccines from infancy to adolescence. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Carlsson, R. M.
    et al.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    von Segebaden, K.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Bergstrom, J.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Kling, A. M.
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Surveillance of infant pertussis in Sweden 1998-2012; severity of disease in relation to the national vaccination programme2015In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 20, no 6, article id 21032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, pertussis was excluded from the national vaccination programme in 1979 until acellular vaccination was introduced in a highly endemic setting in 1996. The general incidence dropped 10-fold within a decade, less in infants. Infant pertussis reached 40–45 cases per 100,000 in 2008 to 2012; few of these cases were older than five months. We present an observational 15-year study on the severity of infant pertussis based on 1,443 laboratory-confirmed cases prospectively identified from 1998 to 2012 in the national mandatory reporting system and followed up by telephone contact. Analyses were made in relation to age at onset of symptoms and vaccination history. Pertussis decreased in non-vaccinated infants (2003 to 2012, p < 0.001), indicating herd immunity, both in those too young to be vaccinated and those older than three months. The hospitalisation rates also decreased (last five-year period vs the previous five-year periods, p <0.001), but 70% of all cases in under three month-old infants and 99% of cases with apnoea due to pertussis were admitted to hospital in 1998 to 2012. Median duration of hospitalisation was seven days for unvaccinated vs four days for vaccinated infants aged 3–5 months. Nine unvaccinated infants died during the study period.

  • 14.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Prevalence of different pain categories based on pain spreading on the bodies of older adults in Sweden: a descriptive-level and multilevel association with demographics, comorbidities, medications, and certain lifestyle factors (PainS65+)2016In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 9, p. 1131-1141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objective: There is limited knowledge about the prevalence of pain and its relation to comorbidities, medication, and certain lifestyle factors in older adults. To address this limitation, this cross-sectional study examined the spreading of pain on the body in a sample of 6611 subjects amp;gt;= 65 years old (mean age = 75.0 years; standard deviation [SD] = 7.7) living in southeastern Sweden. Methods: Sex, age, comorbidities, medication, nicotine, alcohol intake, and physical activity were analyzed in relation to the following pain categories: local pain (LP) (24.1%), regional pain medium (RP-Medium) (20.3%), regional pain heavy (RP-Heavy) (5.2%), and widespread pain (WSP) (1.7%). Results: RP-Medium, RP-Heavy, and WSP were associated more strongly with women than with men (all pamp;lt;0.01). RP-Heavy was less likely in the 80-84 and amp;gt;85 age groups compared to the 65-69 age group (both pamp;lt;0.01). Traumatic injuries, rheumatoid arthritis/osteoarthritis, and analgesics were associated with all pain categories (all pamp;lt;0.001). An association with gastrointestinal disorders was found in LP, RP-Medium, and RP-Heavy (all pamp;lt;0.01). Depressive disorders were associated with all pain categories, except for LP (all pamp;lt;0.05). Disorders of the central nervous system were associated with both RP-Heavy and WSP (all pamp;lt;0.05). Medication for peripheral vascular disorders was associated with RP-Medium (pamp;lt;0.05), and hypnotics were associated with RP-Heavy (pamp;lt;0.01). Conclusion: More than 50% of older adults suffered from different pain spread categories. Women were more likely to experience greater spreading of pain than men. A noteworthy number of common comorbidities and medications were associated with increased likelihood of pain spread from LP to RP-Medium, RP-Heavy, and WSP. Effective management plans should consider these observed associations to improve functional deficiency and decrease spreading of pain-related disability in older adults.

  • 15.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Early and Late Return to Work After Sick Leave: Predictors in a Cohort of Sick-Listed Individuals with Common Mental Disorders2015In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 627-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The study aims to identify individual and workplace factors associated with early return to work (RTW)-defined as within 3 months-and factors associated with later RTW-between 3 and 12 months after being sick-listed-in a cohort of newly sick-listed individuals with common mental disorders. Methods In a prospective cohort study, a cross-sectional analysis was performed on baseline measures of patients granted sick leave due to common mental disorders. A total of 533 newly sick-listed individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate. A baseline questionnaire was sent by post within 3 weeks of their first day of certified medical sickness; 354 (66 %) responded. Those who were unemployed were excluded, resulting in a study population of 319 individuals. Sick leave was recorded for each individual from the Social Insurance Office during 1 year. Analyses were made with multiple Cox regression analyses. Results Early RTW was associated with lower education, better work ability at baseline, positive expectations of treatment and low perceived interactional justice with the supervisor. RTW after 3 months was associated with a need to reduce demands at work, and turnover intentions. Conclusions Early RTW among sick-listed individuals with common mental disorders seems to be associated with the individuals need to secure her/his employment situation, whereas later RTW is associated with variables reflecting dissatisfaction with work conditions. No health measures were associated with RTW. The study highlights the importance of considering not only health and functioning, but also workplace conditions and relations at the workplace in implementing RTW interventions.

  • 16.
    Gulyas, Miklos
    et al.
    Genetics and Pathology , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
    Mattsson, Johanna Sofia Margareta
    Genetics and Pathology , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
    Lindgren, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Ek, Lars
    Skane University Hospital , Lund , Sweden.
    Lamberg Lundström, Kristina
    Akademiska Hospital , Uppsala , Sweden.
    Behndig, Annelie
    Norrland University Hospital , Umeå , Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Micke, Patrick
    Genetics and Pathology , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
    Bergman, Bengt
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg , Sweden..
    COX-2 expression and effects of celecoxib in addition to standard chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer2018In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 244-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is proposed as a treatment option in several cancer types. However, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), phase III trials have failed to demonstrate a benefit of adding COX-2 inhibitors to standard chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to analyze COX-2 expression in tumor and stromal cells as predictive biomarker for COX-2 inhibition.

    METHODS: In a multicenter phase III trial, 316 patients with advanced NSCLC were randomized to receive celecoxib (400 mg b.i.d.) or placebo up to one year in addition to a two-drug platinum-based chemotherapy combination. In a subset of 122 patients, archived tumor tissue was available for immunohistochemical analysis of COX-2 expression in tumor and stromal cells. For each compartment, COX-2 expression was graded as high or low, based on a product score of extension and intensity of positively stained cells.

    RESULTS: An updated analysis of all 316 patients included in the original trial, and of the 122 patients with available tumor tissue, showed no survival differences between the celecoxib and placebo arms (HR 1.01; 95% CI 0.81-1.27 and HR 1.12; 95% CI 0.78-1.61, respectively). High COX-2 scores in tumor (n = 71) or stromal cells (n = 55) was not associated with a superior survival outcome with celecoxib vs. placebo (HR =0.96, 95% CI 0.60-1.54; and HR =1.51; 95% CI 0.86-2.66), and no significant interaction effect between COX-2 score in tumor or stromal cells and celecoxib effect on survival was detected (p = .48 and .25, respectively).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this subgroup analysis of patients with advanced NSCLC treated within the context of a randomized trial, we could not detect any interaction effect of COX-2 expression in tumor or stromal cells and the outcome of celecoxib treatment in addition to standard chemotherapy.

  • 17.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gawel, Danuta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Baranzini, Sergio
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA, USA.
    Bjorkander, Janne
    County Council Jonköping, Sweden.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellberg, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Centre Molecular Med, Sweden.
    Konstantinell, Aelita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Lahesmaa, Riita
    University of Turku, Finland; Abo Akad University, Finland.
    Lentini, Antonio
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Liljenström, H. Robert I.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mattson, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Matussek, Andreas
    County Council Jonköping, Sweden.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Mendez, Melissa
    University of Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Peru.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Centre Molecular Med, Sweden.
    Pujana, Miguel A.
    Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Rasool, Omid
    University of Turku, Finland; Abo Akad University, Finland.
    Serra-Musach, Jordi
    Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    County Council Jonköping, Sweden.
    Tripathi, Subhash
    University of Turku, Finland; Abo Akad University, Finland.
    Viitala, Miro
    University of Turku, Finland; Abo Akad University, Finland.
    Wang, Hui
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nestor, Colm
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    A validated gene regulatory network and GWAS identifies early regulators of T cell-associated diseases2015In: Science Translational Medicine, ISSN 1946-6234, E-ISSN 1946-6242, Vol. 7, no 313, article id 313ra178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early regulators of disease may increase understanding of disease mechanisms and serve as markers for presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment. However, early regulators are difficult to identify because patients generally present after they are symptomatic. We hypothesized that early regulators of T cell-associated diseases could be found by identifying upstream transcription factors (TFs) in T cell differentiation and by prioritizing hub TFs that were enriched for disease-associated polymorphisms. A gene regulatory network (GRN) was constructed by time series profiling of the transcriptomes and methylomes of human CD4(+) T cells during in vitro differentiation into four helper T cell lineages, in combination with sequence-based TF binding predictions. The TFs GATA3, MAF, and MYB were identified as early regulators and validated by ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) and small interfering RNA knockdowns. Differential mRNA expression of the TFs and their targets in T cell-associated diseases supports their clinical relevance. To directly test if the TFs were altered early in disease, T cells from patients with two T cell-mediated diseases, multiple sclerosis and seasonal allergic rhinitis, were analyzed. Strikingly, the TFs were differentially expressed during asymptomatic stages of both diseases, whereas their targets showed altered expression during symptomatic stages. This analytical strategy to identify early regulators of disease by combining GRNs with genome-wide association studies may be generally applicable for functional and clinical studies of early disease development.

  • 18.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kalkan, Almina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Rheumatoid arthritis is still expensive in the new decade: a comparison between two early RA cohorts, diagnosed 1996-98 and 2006-092016In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 371-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To calculate total costs during the first year after diagnosis in 463 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) included during 2006-09 (T2) and compare the results with a similar cohort included in 1996-98 (T1).

    METHOD:

    Clinical and laboratory data were collected regularly in both cohorts, and patients completed biannual questionnaires reporting health care utilization and number of days lost from work.

    RESULTS:

    Disease activity was similar in both cohorts T1 and T2 at inclusion. Significant improvements were seen during the first year in both cohorts but were more pronounced in T2. Outpatient care increased and hospitalization decreased in T2 compared with T1. Almost 3% of patients had surgery in both cohorts, but in T2, only women had surgery. Drug costs were higher in T2 than in T1 (EUR 689 vs. EUR 435). In T2, 12% of drug costs were direct costs and 4% were total costs. The corresponding values for T1 were 9% and 3%. In T1, 50% were prescribed disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) at inclusion, compared to T2, where prescription was > 90%. Direct costs were EUR 5716 in T2 and EUR 4674 in T1. Costs for sick leave were lower in T2 than in T1 (EUR 5490 vs. EUR 9055) but disability pensions were higher (EUR 4152 vs. EUR 2139), resulting in unchanged total costs. In T1, direct costs comprised 29% and indirect costs 71% of the total costs. The corresponding values for T2 were 37% and 63%.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The earlier and more aggressive treatment of RA with traditional DMARDs in T2 resulted in better outcomes compared to T1. Direct costs were higher in T2, partly offset by decreased sick leave, but total costs remained unchanged.

  • 19.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalkan, Almina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rahmqvist, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Changes in sociodemographic characteristics at baseline in two Swedish cohorts of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed 1996-98 and 2006-092015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 100-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To compare baseline sociodemographic characteristics in two rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cohorts enrolled 10 years apart, and to examine differences with respect to the general population. Method: Clinical and sociodemographic data were collected in 320 early RA patients during 1996-98 (TIRA-1) and 467 patients in 2006-09 (TIRA-2). Multivariate logistic regression tests were performed and intercohort comparisons were related to general population data, obtained from official databases. Results: TIRA-2 patients were older than TIRA-1 (58 vs. 56 years). Women (both cohorts, 67%) were younger than men in TIRA-1 (55 vs. 59 years) and in TIRA-2 (57 vs. 61 years). Disease activity was similar but TIRA-2 women scored worse pain and worse on the HAQ. Approximately 73% were cohabiting, in both cohorts and in the general population. Education was higher in TIRA-2 than in TIRA-2 but still lower than in the general population. Women had consistently higher education than men. Education was associated with age, younger patients having higher education. In both cohorts, lower education was associated with increased disability pension and increased sick leave. Sick leave was lower in TIRA-2 than in TIRA-1 (37% vs. 50%) but disability pension was higher (16% vs. 10%). In TIRA-1, 9% of women had disability pension compared with 17% in TIRA-2. A similar decrease in sick leave and an increase in disability pension were also seen in the general population. Older age and a higher HAQ score were associated with increased sick leave and being in the TIRA-2 cohort was associated with decreased sick leave. Conclusions: TIRA-2 patients were slightly older, better educated, had lower sick leave and higher disability pension than those in TIRA-1. Similar changes were seen simultaneously in the general population. Belonging to the TIRA-2 cohort was associated with decreased sick leave, indicating that societal changes are of importance.

  • 20.
    Hellberg, Sandra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gawel, Danuta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Köpsén, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nestor, Colm
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Karolinska Institute, Department Clin Neurosci, Neuroimmunol Unit, S-17177 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Institute, Department Clin Neurosci, Neuroimmunol Unit, S-17177 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Kastbom, Alf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Håkansson, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dynamic Response Genes in CD4+T Cells Reveal a Network of Interactive Proteins that Classifies Disease Activity in Multiple Sclerosis2016In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 2928-2939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS and has a varying disease course as well as variable response to treatment. Biomarkers may therefore aid personalized treatment. We tested whether in vitro activation of MS patient-derived CD4+ T cells could reveal potential biomarkers. The dynamic gene expression response to activation was dysregulated in patient-derived CD4+ T cells. By integrating our findings with genome-wide association studies, we constructed a highly connected MS gene module, disclosing cell activation and chemotaxis as central components. Changes in several module genes were associated with differences in protein levels, which were measurable in cerebrospinal fluid and were used to classify patients from control individuals. In addition, these measurements could predict disease activity after 2 years and distinguish low and high responders to treatment in two additional, independent cohorts. While further validation is needed in larger cohorts prior to clinical implementation, we have uncovered a set of potentially promising biomarkers.

  • 21.
    Lentini, Antonio
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lagerwall, Cathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vikingsson, Svante
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Mjoseng, Heidi K.
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Douvlataniotis, Dimitrios Karolos
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vogt, Hartmut
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Meehan, Richard R.
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Nestor, Colm
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    A reassessment of DNA-immunoprecipitation-based genomic profiling2018In: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 499-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNA immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (DIP-seq) is a common enrichment method for profiling DNA modifications in mammalian genomes. However, the results of independent DIP-seq studies often show considerable variation between profiles of the same genome and between profiles obtained by alternative methods. Here we show that these differences are primarily due to the intrinsic affinity of IgG for short unmodified DNA repeats. This pervasive experimental error accounts for 50-99% of regions identified as enriched for DNA modifications in DIP-seq data. Correction of this error profoundly altered DNA-modification profiles for numerous cell types, including mouse embryonic stem cells, and subsequently revealed novel associations among DNA modifications, chromatin modifications and biological processes. We conclude that both matched input and IgG controls are essential in order for the results of DIP-based assays to be interpreted correctly, and that complementary, non-antibody-based techniques should be used to validate DIP-based findings to avoid further misinterpretation of genome-wide profiling data.

  • 22.
    Løkke, Anders
    et al.
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, Aarhus County Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Ahlbeck, Lars
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Respiratory System Drug Committee at Region Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bjermer, Leif
    Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Institute of Clinical Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Mortensen, Jann
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Denmark;Department of Medicine, National Hospital, Torshavn, Faroe Islands.
    Østrem, Anders
    Gransdalen Health Care Centre, Oslo, Norway.
    Pasternack, Iris
    Summaryx Ltd, HTA Research, Helsinki, Finland.
    Safioti, Guilherme
    TEVA Pharmaceuticals, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Torvinen, Saku
    TEVA Pharmaceuticals BV, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Expert Nordic perspectives on the potential of novel inhalers to overcome unmet needs in the management of obstructive lung disease2015In: European clinical respiratory journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 2, p. 1-8, article id 29445Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effective self-management of obstructive lung disease is dependent upon the patient achieving good inhaler technique. However, many current inhalers are complicated to use, which may lead to handling difficulties. These difficulties can cause clinically relevant errors, whereby pharmacotherapy fails to achieve adequate lung deposition and therapeutic effect. In this report, the potential of novel inhaler devices to overcome unmet needs in the management of obstructive lung disease is considered by a panel of Nordic experts. The panel concludes that innovative inhalers can contribute to good disease management and better use of healthcare resources.

  • 23.
    Magnusson, Rasmus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mariotti, Guido
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Köpsén, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lövfors, William
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gawel, Danuta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jornsten, Rebecka
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Linde, Joerg
    Hans Knoell Institute, Germany; Hans Knoell Institute, Germany.
    Nordling, Torbjorn
    National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan; Science Life Lab, Sweden.
    Nyman, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schulze, Sylvie
    Hans Knoell Institute, Germany.
    Nestor, Colm
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hanmin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Tjärnberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    LASSIM-A network inference toolbox for genome-wide mechanistic modeling2017In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, Vol. 13, no 6, article id e1005608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent technological advancements have made time-resolved, quantitative, multi-omics data available for many model systems, which could be integrated for systems pharmacokinetic use. Here, we present large-scale simulation modeling (LASSIM), which is a novel mathematical tool for performing large-scale inference using mechanistically defined ordinary differential equations (ODE) for gene regulatory networks (GRNs). LASSIM integrates structural knowledge about regulatory interactions and non-linear equations with multiple steady state and dynamic response expression datasets. The rationale behind LASSIM is that biological GRNs can be simplified using a limited subset of core genes that are assumed to regulate all other gene transcription events in the network. The LASSIM method is implemented as a general-purpose toolbox using the PyGMO Python package to make the most of multicore computers and high performance clusters, and is available at https://gitlab.com/Gustafsson-lab/lassim. As a method, LASSIM works in two steps, where it first infers a non-linear ODE system of the pre-specified core gene expression. Second, LASSIM in parallel optimizes the parameters that model the regulation of peripheral genes by core system genes. We showed the usefulness of this method by applying LASSIM to infer a large-scale non-linear model of naive Th2 cell differentiation, made possible by integrating Th2 specific bindings, time-series together with six public and six novel siRNA-mediated knock-down experiments. ChIP-seq showed significant overlap for all tested transcription factors. Next, we performed novel time-series measurements of total T-cells during differentiation towards Th2 and verified that our LASSIM model could monitor those data significantly better than comparable models that used the same Th2 bindings. In summary, the LASSIM toolbox opens the door to a new type of model-based data analysis that combines the strengths of reliable mechanistic models with truly systems-level data. We demonstrate the power of this approach by inferring a mechanistically motivated, genome-wide model of the Th2 transcription regulatory system, which plays an important role in several immune related diseases.

  • 24.
    Mattson, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lentini, Antonio
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gawel, Danuta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Badam, Tejaswi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Nestor, Colm
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Serra I Musach, Jordi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björkander, Janne
    County Council Jonköping, Sweden.
    Xiang, Zou
    Hong Kong Polytech University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Potential Involvement of Type I Interferon Signaling in Immunotherapy in Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis2016In: Journal of Immunology Research, ISSN 2314-8861, E-ISSN 2314-7156, article id 5153184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) reverses the symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) in most patients. Recent studies report type I interferons shifting the balance between type I T helper cell (Th1) and type II T helper cells (Th2) towards Th2 dominance by inhibiting the differentiation of naive Tcells into Th1 cells. As SIT is thought to cause a shift towardsTh1 dominance, we hypothesized that SIT would alter interferon type I signaling. To test this, allergen and diluent challenged CD4(+) T cells from healthy controls and patients from different time points were analyzed. The initial experiments focused on signature genes of the pathway and found complex changes following immunotherapy, which were consistent with our hypothesis. As interferon signaling involves multiple genes, expression profiling studies were performed, showing altered expression of the pathway. These findings require validation in a larger group of patients in further studies.

  • 25.
    Nestor, Colm E
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. MRC Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK.
    Ottaviano, Raffaele
    MRC Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK.
    Reinhardt, Diana
    MRC Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK.
    Cruickshanks, Hazel A
    MRC Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK.
    Mjoseng, Heidi K
    MRC Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK.
    McPherson, Rhoanne C
    MRC Centre for Inflammation Research, Centre for Multiple Sclerosis Research and Centre for Immunity Infection and Evolution, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ, UK.
    Lentini, Antonio
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thomson, John P
    MRC Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK .
    Dunican, Donncha S
    MRC Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK .
    Pennings, Sari
    Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Queen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ, UK.
    Anderton, Stephen M
    MRC Centre for Inflammation Research, Centre for Multiple Sclerosis Research and Centre for Immunity Infection and Evolution, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ, UK.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Meehan, Richard R
    MRC Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK .
    Rapid reprogramming of epigenetic and transcriptional profiles in mammalian culture systems.2015In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 16, p. 11-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe DNA methylation profile of mammalian cell lines differs from the primary tissue from which they were derived, exhibiting increasing divergence from the in vivo methylation profile with extended time in culture. Few studies have directly examined the initial epigenetic and transcriptional consequences of adaptation of primary mammalian cells to culture, and the potential mechanisms through which this epigenetic dysregulation occurs is unknown.ResultsWe demonstrate that adaptation of mouse embryonic fibroblast, MEFS, to cell culture results in a rapid reprogramming of epigenetic and transcriptional states. We observed global 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) erasure within three days of culture initiation. Loss of genic 5hmC was independent of global 5-methylcytosine (5mC) levels and could be partially rescued by addition of Vitamin C. Significantly, 5hmC loss was not linked to concomitant changes in transcription. Discrete promoter-specific gains of 5mC were also observed within seven days of culture initiation. Against this background of global 5hmC loss we identified a handful of developmentally important genes that maintained their 5hmC profile in culture, including the imprinted loci Gnas and H19. Similar outcomes were identified in the adaption of CD4+ T-cells to culture.ConclusionsWe report a dramatic and novel consequence of adaptation of mammalian cells to culture in which global loss of 5hmC occurs; suggesting rapid concomitant loss of methylcytosine dioxygenase activity. The observed epigenetic and transcriptional re-programming occurs much earlier than previously assumed, and has significant implications for the use of cell lines as faithful mimics of in vivo epigenetic and physiological processes.

  • 26.
    Nestor, Colm
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lentini, Antonio
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hägg Nilsson, Cathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gawel, Danuta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mattson, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wang, Hui
    MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Rundquist, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Meehan, Richard R.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Klocke, Bernward
    Genomatix Software GmbH, Germany.
    Seifert, Martin
    Genomatix Software GmbH, Germany.
    Hauck, Stefanie M.
    German Research Centre Environm Health GmbH, Germany.
    Laumen, Helmut
    Technical University of Munich, Germany; Technical University of Munich, Germany; Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Germany; Technical University of Munich, Germany; Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine Remodeling Precedes Lineage Specification during Differentiation of Human CD4(+) T Cells2016In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 559-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    5-methylcytosine (5mC) is converted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) by the TET family of enzymes as part of a recently discovered active DNA de-methylation pathway. 5hmC plays important roles in regulation of gene expression and differentiation and has been implicated in T cell malignancies and autoimmunity. Here, we report early and widespread 5mC/5hmC remodeling during human CD4(+) T cell differentiation ex vivo at genes and cell-specific enhancers with known T cell function. We observe similar DNA de-methylation in CD4(+) memory T cells in vivo, indicating that early remodeling events persist long term in differentiated cells. Underscoring their important function, 5hmC loci were highly enriched for genetic variants associated with T cell diseases and T-cell-specific chromosomal interactions. Extensive functional validation of 22 risk variants revealed potentially pathogenic mechanisms in diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Our results support 5hmC-mediated DNA de-methylation as a key component of CD4(+) T cell biology in humans, with important implications for gene regulation and lineage commitment.

  • 27.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Blennow, Margareta
    Sachsska barn- och ungdomssjukhuset, Södersjukhuset (KI SÖS), Stockholm.
    Storsaeter, Jann
    Biverkningsgruppen, Avdelning för Vacciner, Nasjonalt Folkehelseinstitutt i Norge, .
    Lepp, Tiia
    Folkhälsomyndigheten, Östersund.
    Att förebygga kikhosta hos spädbarn: Systematisk litteraturöversikt2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Allmän barnvaccination mot kikhosta återinfördes i Sverige 1996 och sedan dess har antalet rapporterade fall av kikhosta minskat dramatiskt. Sjukdomen förekommer dock fortfarande bland ovaccinerade spädbarn och bland ungdomar och vuxna. Den högsta sjukdomsincidensen i Sverige ses bland spädbarn under sex månaders ålder. Kikhosta är en allvarlig och livshotande sjukdom för spädbarn och hårdast drabbas de allra yngsta som inte har fått sin första vaccindos vid tre månaders ålder. Drygt 70 procent av dem som insjuknar behöver sjukhusvård.

    Flera länder har under de senaste åren rapporterat en ökning av kikhostefall i befolkningen och dödsfall på grund av kikhosta hos spädbarn. För att minska sjukdomsbördan hos spädbarnen har rekommendationer i dessa länder innefattat vaccination av vuxna runt det nyfödda barnet (kokongvaccination), vaccination av modern under sista trimestern av graviditeten och vaccination av hälso- och sjukvårdspersonal. Dessutom har man i vissa länder rekommenderat vaccination av vuxna vart tionde år.

    Folkhälsomyndigheten har gjort en systematisk litteraturöversikt med syfte att finna evidens enligt GRADE-metodiken för preventiva strategier som minskar förekomsten av kikhosta hos barn yngre än sex månader. De preventiva strategier som har utvärderats är a) striktare följsamhet till tidpunkten för eller tidigareläggning av första vaccindosen, b) neonatal vaccination, c) kokongvaccination, d) vaccination av gravida, e) vaccination vid 4–7 års ålder, f) vaccination vid 13–19 års ålder, och g) postexpositionsprofylax med antibiotika.

    Litteraturöversikten visar någon grad av evidens för att alla de utvärderade strategierna bidrar till att skydda spädbarn mot kikhosta, förutom tonårsvaccination. Det finns två vårdinsatser som redan stöds av befintliga föreskrifter och rekommendationer men som bör följas mer strikt.

    • Tidpunkten för första vaccindosen har betydelse för skydd mot kikhosta hos spädbarn. Uträkningar från bland annat det svenska uppföljningsprogrammet talar för en väsentlig minskning av kikhosta hos barn under sex månaders ålder om första vaccindosen ges strikt vid angiven tid enligt vaccinationsschemat eller inom två veckor före den tidpunkten.
    • Det är viktigt att vara uppmärksam på hosta i närfamiljen under barnets första levnadsmånader. Frikostig provtagning, snabb diagnostik och behandling kan förhindra dödsfall i kikhosta hos spädbarn. Tidigt insatt postexpositionsprofylax med antibiotika till spädbarn ger ett gott skydd mot klinisk kikhosta.

    Dessutom finns två strategier som ytterligare kan minska förekomsten av kikhosta hos spädbarn under 6 månader:

    • Kokongvaccination
    • Vaccination av gravida.

    Kokongvaccination har i några länder visat effekt vid hög anslutning och kostnadsfri vaccination. Vaccination mot kikhosta under graviditet rekommenderas i flera länder. I England har vaccination av gravida erbjudits i cirka tre års tid i vaccinationsprogram och visat god effekt bland spädbarn till vaccinerade mödrar. Uppföljning av programmet och utvärdering av långtidseffekterna pågår och resultaten publiceras allteftersom.

  • 28.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Brockow, Knut
    Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany.
    Alm, Johan
    Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cardona, Victoria
    Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain.
    Caubet, Jean-Christoph
    University of Geneva, Genève, Switzerland.
    Gomes, Eva
    CHP, Porto, Portugal.
    Jenmalm, Maria Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lau, Susanne
    Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.
    Netterlid, Eva
    Lund University, Malmö, The Public Health Agency of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden.The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Schwarze, Jürgen
    The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Sheikh, Aziz
    The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK..
    Storsaeter, Jann
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Skevaki, Chrysanthi
    Philipps University Marburg, University Hospital Giessen and Marburg GmbH, Marburg, Germany.
    Terreehorst, Ingrid
    Department of ENT, AMC, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Zanoni, Giovanna
    Immunology Unit, University Hospital, Verona, Italy.
    Vaccination and allergy: EAACI position paper, practical aspects2017In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immunization is highly effective in preventing infectious diseases and therefore an indispensable public health measure. Allergic patients deserve access to the same publicly recommended immunizations as nonallergic patients unless risks associated with vaccination outweigh the gains. Whereas the number of reported possible allergic reactions to vaccines is high, confirmed vaccine-triggered allergic reactions are rare. Anaphylaxis following vaccination is rare, affecting less than 1/100,000, but can occur in any patient. Some patient groups, notably those with a previous allergic reaction to a vaccine or its components, are at heightened risk of allergic reaction and require special precautions. Allergic reactions, however, may occur in patients without known risk factors and cannot be predicted by currently available tools. Unwarranted fear and uncertainty can result in incomplete vaccination coverage for children and adults with or without allergy. In addition to concerns about an allergic reaction to the vaccine itself, there is fear that routine childhood immunization may promote the development of allergic sensitization and disease. Thus, although there is no evidence that routine childhood immunization increases the risk of allergy development, such risks need to be discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 29.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    The Effect on Overall Cost and Health-Related Quality of Life by Inpatient Trajectories 3 Years Before and After Critical Illness2016In: Journal of Anesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 2474-7653, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 55553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pre-existing disease is the most important factor in the prediction of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after intensive care. We hypothesised that the “inpatient care trajectories” in the years before admission to the ICU is a stronger predictor of HRQoL and mortality after intensive care than pre-existing disease, and that it has significant effects on overall costs.

    Method:A retrospective investigation in two combined medical and surgical ICUs in Sweden. Inpatient care was assessed from the County administrative registry. HRQoL (SF-36) was measured at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after discharge.

    Results:Of 1092 patients, 459 (73%) had pre-existing diseases, and among them 360 (57%) had at least one inpatient episode less than 3 years before the ICU period, during which the group used significantly more hospital resources than the combined cost for all ICU care during the same time. The addition of episodes of inpatient care to the regression model strongly reduced the effect of pre-existing disease on HRQoL and was also a strong predictor for early mortality after ICU.

  • 30.
    Persson, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Costs of production loss and primary health care interventions for return-to-work of sick-listed workers in Sweden2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 771-776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate, from the perspective of society, the costs of sick leave and rehabilitation of recently sick-listed workers with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) or mental disorders (MD). Methods: In a prospective cohort study, 812 sick-listed workers with MSD (518) or MD (294) were included. Data on consumption of health care and production loss were collected over six months from an administrative casebook system of the health care provider. Production loss was estimated based on the number of sick-leave days. Societal costs were based on the human capital approach. Results: The mean costs of production loss per person were EUR 5978 (MSD) and EUR 6381 (MD). Health care interventions accounted for 9.3% (MSD) and 8.2% (MD) of the costs of production loss. Corresponding figures for rehabilitation activities were 3.7% (MSD) and 3.1% (MD). Health care interventions were received by about 95% in both diagnostic groups. For nearly half of the cohort, no rehabilitation intervention at all was provided. Conclusions: Costs associated with sick leave were dominated by production loss. Resources invested in rehabilitation were small. By increasing investment in early rehabilitation, costs to society and the individual might be reduced. Implications for Rehabilitation Resources invested in rehabilitation for sick-listed with musculoskeletal and mental disorders in Sweden are very small in comparison with the costs of production loss. For policy makers, there may be much to gain through investments into improved rehabilitation processes for return to work. Health care professionals need to develop rehabilitative activities aiming for return to work, rather than symptoms treatment only.

  • 31.
    Roback, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Lundqvist, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ordnad utmönstring av hälso- och sjukvårdsmetoder2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It is a great challenge to provide a sustainable health care that maintain high quality and is available on equal terms for all citizens.

    Disinvestment in health care implies that existing health care services/interventions are removed from the publicly funded supply of health care or that they will be restricted in use. Quality improvements are continuously performed and unnecessary, harmful or ineffective services are replaced with new and better ones. This is generally not perceived as disinvestment. With time, however, a situation arises where it will be difficult to find "unnecessary, harmful or ineffective" care. This implies that clear priorities must be set for the provision of care and that evidence based disinvestment will be a necessary component to ensure the quality of care within limited budgets.

    The aim of this report on evidence based disinvestment is to describe how this is perceived and performed in Sweden's county councils and regions. We also give a brief overview of international disinvestment initiatives. The concept of disinvestment is illustrated by a number of ongoing or completed disinvestment initiatives and through a tentative framework for disinvestment in a Swedish context. The work has four parts:

    • An interview study for mapping disinvestment activities in Sweden
    • Case studies of active disinvestment
    • An overview of disinvestment initiatives internationally
    • A description of disinvestment processes and different types of disinvestment in a schematic framework

    Methods

    An initial literature search was performed in 2012 as a basis for a minor pilot study and to provide an introduction to the subject. The literature search was supplemented with new search terms in 2013 and 2015. The interviews were conducted by telephone with experts at Sweden's county councils and regions. A questionnaire was constructed to be used as an interview template and to serve as an e-mail survey in case any of our informants preferred this.

    Results

    In Sweden, open discussions on disinvestment of health care practices began in the early 2000s, which led to several counties starting to sketch on disinvestment policies. Few policies were, however, realized in practice. Organized disinvestment occurs in some counties/regions in the context of more general improvement or prioritization efforts and the term disinvestment is not always used. The majority of our respondents still thought that disinvestment was a significant issue requiring special attention.

    An evidence based disinvestment is always active, that is, it includes a conscious decision to stop using, restrict the use of, or withdraw resources from existing healthcare practices. The disinvestment work, however, was in most cases not clearly organized. The most active disinvestment work occurs where there is a priority setting committee or a group for evidence based adoption and disinvestment.

    This report describes disinvestment components and sub-processes in a schematic framework. The character of these processes was in large mapped by the interviews. Interview results were then synthesized with information from the literature into a tentative description of evidence based disinvestment. Whatever the causes and goals with disinvestment, the same problems arise and the work follows in large the same steps or sub-processes. Broadly, these sub-processes are:

    • identification of disinvestment objects
    • choice and preparation/assessment of disinvestment proposals
    • decision making
    • implementation of decisions and
    • follow-up and possible revision of decided disinvestments

    One of the sub-processes, that so far received little attention in Sweden, is how disinvestment decisions are implemented in operational health care. We have chosen to develop this in the framework as it seems to be an area on the rise internationally. There is a range of strategies and practical measures to facilitate and accelerate a desired change. This has been thoroughly investigated regarding implementation of new methods. Such strategies are based on different mechanisms to eliminate barriers and utilize facilitators.

    To illustrate the results presented in the report we present four cases of disinvestment in a little more detail. These are examples of how practices are identified as disinvestment objects, the preparation of cases, implementation of decisions, and of controversies that might arise. The cases have been selected to show the variation in types of disinvestment objects and the outcomes of disinvestment initiatives.

    Disinvestment has gained increased interest internationally in recent years. The problem of rising health care costs is present everywhere in the world and disinvestment is discussed in many countries. Early on, the focus was on disinvestment for greater efficiency. Then the trend turned to re-assessment of old services to be able to make evidence-based disinvestments. This resulted in so-called "low-value-lists" and "do-notdo" recommendations. Today, the focus is on measurable outputs of different disinvestment initiatives and studies have shown that compliance with "low-value-lists" is modest.

    Conclusions

    There are many indications that the future will call for efficient disinvestment processes to obtain a sustainable health care financing. Our study shows that disinvestment is used both for efficiency reasons and for cost control.

    • Most counties/regions are using or have used disinvestment; defined as decisions to withdraw or restrict the use of services/interventions in publicly funded health care.
    • The main reasons for disinvestment is the need for: quality improvements, reallocation of resources to new practices, cost control and/or better efficiency.
    • We identified two main types of organized disinvestment in Sweden: -  evidence based adoption including disinvestment as an integral part, and - proactive identification of disinvestment objects with a subsequent assessment and prioritization of the objects.
    • Services that are withdrawn or restricted in use is a mixture of pharmaceuticals, non-pharmaceutical methods and organizational arrangements.
    • Many withdrawn services remains available as privately funded options.
    • Prioritization principles are often indicative of disinvestment work and evidence-based medicine and health technology assessment are considered as obvious components.
    • Important criteria for classification as disinvestment candidates are: - the service/intervention has adverse effects or very little clinical benefit - the service/intervention is not cost effective - the service/intervention is perceived to have negative effects on the organization and/or work environment
    • There are also services that have been removed due to ethical considerations on what publicly funded healthcare should cover.
    • Today, disinvestment takes place without sufficient openness and citizen involvement in the processes. Documentation of the work, to the extent there is any, is usually not readily accessible.

    In order to improve health care quality, and at the same time control rising costs, it will be required that disinvestment is placed on the national agenda. Ethically difficult considerations associated with disinvestment have made it a question hard to tackle for decision makers at the regional political and administrative levels. Conflicting interests may arise between the patient and the caregiver's budgetary commitment. It is not always easy to determine which interventions are medically and socially justified in the individual patient case, which induces ethical dilemmas.

    Regardless of the ethical dilemmas and difficulties that arise – and at which organizational level decisions are made – a useful working model will be required for active withdrawal of services from the supply of publicly funded health care. In our study, we have outlined a framework that describes the processes, including medical and economic as well as social and ethical aspects.

  • 32.
    Serra-Musach, Jordi
    et al.
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Mateo, Francesca
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Capdevila-Busquets, Eva
    Barcelona Institute Science and Technology, Spain.
    Ruiz de Garibay, Gorka
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Zhang, Xiaohu
    NIH, MD 20850 USA.
    Guha, Raj
    NIH, MD 20850 USA.
    Thomas, Craig J.
    NIH, MD 20850 USA.
    Grueso, Judit
    VHIO, Spain.
    Villanueva, Alberto
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Jaeger, Samira
    Barcelona Institute Science and Technology, Spain.
    Heyn, Holger
    IDIBELL, Spain.
    Vizoso, Miguel
    IDIBELL, Spain.
    Perez, Hector
    IDIBELL, Spain.
    Cordero, Alex
    IDIBELL, Spain.
    Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva
    IDIBELL, Spain.
    Esteller, Manel
    IDIBELL, Spain; University of Barcelona, Spain; University of Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Spain.
    Moreno-Bueno, Gema
    Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain; MD Anderson Int Fdn, Spain.
    Tjärnberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lazaro, Conxi
    IDIBELL, Spain.
    Serra, Violeta
    VHIO, Spain.
    Arribas, Joaquin
    ICREA, Spain; VHIO, Spain; Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ferrer, Marc
    NIH, MD 20850 USA.
    Aloy, Patrick
    Barcelona Institute Science and Technology, Spain; ICREA, Spain.
    Angel Pujana, Miquel
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Cancer network activity associated with therapeutic response and synergism2016In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 8, no 88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cancer patients often show no or only modest benefit from a given therapy. This major problem in oncology is generally attributed to the lack of specific predictive biomarkers, yet a global measure of cancer cell activity may support a comprehensive mechanistic understanding of therapy efficacy. We reasoned that network analysis of omic data could help to achieve this goal. Methods: A measure of "cancer network activity" (CNA) was implemented based on a previously defined network feature of communicability. The network nodes and edges corresponded to human proteins and experimentally identified interactions, respectively. The edges were weighted proportionally to the expression of the genes encoding for the corresponding proteins and relative to the number of direct interactors. The gene expression data corresponded to the basal conditions of 595 human cancer cell lines. Therapeutic responses corresponded to the impairment of cell viability measured by the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 130 drugs approved or under clinical development. Gene ontology, signaling pathway, and transcription factor-binding annotations were taken from public repositories. Predicted synergies were assessed by determining the viability of four breast cancer cell lines and by applying two different analytical methods. Results: The effects of drug classes were associated with CNAs formed by different cell lines. CNAs also differentiate target families and effector pathways. Proteins that occupy a central position in the network largely contribute to CNA. Known key cancer-associated biological processes, signaling pathways, and master regulators also contribute to CNA. Moreover, the major cancer drivers frequently mediate CNA and therapeutic differences. Cell-based assays centered on these differences and using uncorrelated drug effects reveals novel synergistic combinations for the treatment of breast cancer dependent on PI3K-mTOR signaling. Conclusions: Cancer therapeutic responses can be predicted on the basis of a systems-level analysis of molecular interactions and gene expression. Fundamental cancer processes, pathways, and drivers contribute to this feature, which can also be exploited to predict precise synergistic drug combinations.

  • 33.
    Shalek, Alex K.
    et al.
    MIT, MA USA; Broad Institute MIT and Harvard, MA 02142 USA; Ragon Institute Massachusetts Gen Hospital MIT and Harvard, MA 02139 USA.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Single-cell analyses to tailor treatments2017In: Science Translational Medicine, ISSN 1946-6234, E-ISSN 1946-6242, Vol. 9, no 408, article id eaan4730Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Single-cell RNA-seq could play a key role in personalized medicine by facilitating characterization of cells, pathways, and genes associated with human diseases such as cancer.

  • 34.
    Wang, Hui
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Nestor, Colm
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    GAB2 regulates type 2 T helper cell differentiation in humans2017In: Cytokine, ISSN 1043-4666, E-ISSN 1096-0023, Vol. 96, p. 234-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Th2 cell differentiation involves complex changes in expression of multiple genes, many of which have poorly characterized roles. In a gene expression microarray analysis of human primary CD4(+) effector T subsets, we identified that an adaptor protein, GAB2, was preferentially expressed in human Th2 cells. The role of GAB2 in human Th2 cells is unknown. Through analysis of primary and in vitro differentiated human T effector subsets, we confirmed that human Th2 cells preferentially expressed GAB2. Further analysis of public gene expression microarray data of STAT6-knockdowned Th2 cells indicated that GAB2 expression was regulated by IL-4 and STAT6. Both siRNA knockdown and ectopic expression of GAB2 in activated T cells showed that GAB2 positively regulated IL-4 and IL-13 expression in human Th2 cells. We hence identified the adaptor protein, GAB2, as an important novel regulator of the human Th2 immune response.

  • 35.
    Zhang, Ling
    et al.
    Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Hui
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Han, Xiaodong
    Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Li, Dongmei
    Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Roles of piRNAs in microcystin-leucine-arginine (MC-LR) induced reproductive toxicity in testis on male offspring2017In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 105, p. 177-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we evaluated the toxic effects on the testis of the male offspring of MC-LR exposure during fetal and lactational periods. Pregnant females were distributed into two experimental groups: control group and MC-LR group which were exposed to 0 and 10 mu g/L of MC-LR, respectively, through drinking water separately during fetal and lactational periods. At the age of 30 days after birth, the male offspring were euthanized. The body weight, testis index, and histomorphology change were observed and the global changes of piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) expression were evaluated. The results revealed that MC-LR was found in the testis of male offspring, body weight and testis index decreased significantly, and testicular tissue structure was damaged in the MC-LR group. In addition, the exposure to MCLR resulted in an altered piRNA expression profile and an increase of the cell apoptosis and a decrease of the cell proliferation in the testis of the male offspring. It was reasonable to speculate that the toxic effects on reproductive system of the male offspring in MC-LR group might be mediated by piRNAs through the regulation of the target genes. As far as we are aware, this is the first report showing that MC-LR could play a role in disorder of proliferative and cell apoptosis in the testis of the male offspring by the maternal transmission effect of toxicity. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 36.
    Zhou, Yuan
    et al.
    Nanjing University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Hui
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wang, Cong
    Nanjing University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Qiu, Xuefeng
    Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Yin, Xiaoqin
    Nanjing University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Xiang, Zou
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Li, Dongmei
    Nanjing University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Han, Xiaodong
    Nanjing University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China; Nanjing University, Peoples R China.
    Roles of miRNAs in microcystin-LR-induced Sertoli cell toxicity2015In: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, ISSN 0041-008X, E-ISSN 1096-0333, Vol. 287, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microcystin (MC)-LR, a cyclic heptapeptide, is a potent reproductive system toxin. To understand the molecular mechanisms of MC-induced reproductive system cytotoxicity, we evaluated global changes of miRNA and mRNA expression in mouse Sertoli cells following MC-LR treatment. Our results revealed that the exposure to MC-LR resulted in an altered miRNA expression profile that might be responsible for the modulation of mRNA expression. Bio-functional analysis indicated that the altered genes were involved in specific cellular processes, including cell death and proliferation. Target gene analysis suggested that junction injury in Sertoli cells exposed to MC-LR might be mediated by miRNAs through the regulation of the Sertoli cell-Sertoli cell pathway. Collectively, these findings may enhance our understanding on the modes of action of MC-LR on mouse Sertoli cells as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying the toxicity of MC-LR on the male reproductive system.

1 - 36 of 36
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf