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  • 1.
    Agebratt, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ström, Edvin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A Randomized Study of the Effects of Additional Fruit and Nuts Consumption on Hepatic Fat Content, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Basal Metabolic Rate2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, p. e0147149-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Fruit has since long been advocated as a healthy source of many nutrients, however, the high content of sugars in fruit might be a concern.

    Objectives

    To study effects of an increased fruit intake compared with similar amount of extra calories from nuts in humans.

    Methods

    Thirty healthy non-obese participants were randomized to either supplement the diet with fruits or nuts, each at +7 kcal/kg bodyweight/day for two months. Major endpoints were change of hepatic fat content (HFC, by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), basal metabolic rate (BMR, with indirect calorimetry) and cardiovascular risk markers.

    Results

    Weight gain was numerically similar in both groups although only statistically significant in the group randomized to nuts (fruit: from 22.15±1.61 kg/m2 to 22.30±1.7 kg/m2, p = 0.24 nuts: from 22.54±2.26 kg/m2 to 22.73±2.28 kg/m2, p = 0.045). On the other hand BMR increased in the nut group only (p = 0.028). Only the nut group reported a net increase of calories (from 2519±721 kcal/day to 2763±595 kcal/day, p = 0.035) according to 3-day food registrations. Despite an almost three-fold reported increased fructose-intake in the fruit group (from 9.1±6.0 gram/day to 25.6±9.6 gram/day, p<0.0001, nuts: from 12.4±5.7 gram/day to 6.5±5.3 gram/day, p = 0.007) there was no change of HFC. The numerical increase in fasting insulin was statistical significant only in the fruit group (from 7.73±3.1 pmol/l to 8.81±2.9 pmol/l, p = 0.018, nuts: from 7.29±2.9 pmol/l to 8.62±3.0 pmol/l, p = 0.14). Levels of vitamin C increased in both groups while α-tocopherol/cholesterol-ratio increased only in the fruit group.

    Conclusions

    Although BMR increased in the nut-group only this was not linked with differences in weight gain between groups which potentially could be explained by the lack of reported net caloric increase in the fruit group. In healthy non-obese individuals an increased fruit intake seems safe from cardiovascular risk perspective, including measurement of HFC by MRI.

  • 2.
    Ali, Neserin
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Wierzbicka, Aneta
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Pagels, Joakim
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Isaxon, Christina
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Anders
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Rissler, Jenny
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Jorn
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lindh, Christian H.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Karedal, Monica
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Comprehensive proteome analysis of nasal lavage samples after controlled exposure to welding nanoparticles shows an induced acute phase and a nuclear receptor, LXR/RXR, activation that influence the status of the extracellular matrix2018In: Clinical Proteomics, ISSN 1542-6416, E-ISSN 1559-0275, Vol. 15, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidemiological studies have shown that many welders experience respiratory symptoms. During the welding process a large number of airborne nanosized particles are generated, which might be inhaled and deposited in the respiratory tract. Knowledge of the underlying mechanisms behind observed symptoms is still partly lacking, although inflammation is suggested to play a central role. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of welding fume particle exposure on the proteome expression level in welders suffering from respiratory symptoms, and changes in protein mediators in nasal lavage samples were analyzed. Such mediators will be helpful to clarify the pathomechanisms behind welding fume particle-induced effects. Methods: In an exposure chamber, 11 welders with work-related symptoms in the lower airways during the last month were exposed to mild-steel welding fume particles (1 mg/m(3)) and to filtered air, respectively, in a double-blind manner. Nasal lavage samples were collected before, immediately after, and the day after exposure. The proteins in the nasal lavage were analyzed with two different mass spectrometry approaches, label-free discovery shotgun LC-MS/MS and a targeted selected reaction monitoring LC-MS/MS analyzing 130 proteins and four in vivo peptide degradation products. Results: The analysis revealed 30 significantly changed proteins that were associated with two main pathways; activation of acute phase response signaling and activation of LXR/RXR, which is a nuclear receptor family involved in lipid signaling. Connective tissue proteins and proteins controlling the degradation of such tissues, including two different matrix metalloprotease proteins, MMP8 and MMP9, were among the significantly changed enzymes and were identified as important key players in the pathways. Conclusion: Exposure to mild-steel welding fume particles causes measurable changes on the proteome level in nasal lavage matrix in exposed welders, although no clinical symptoms were manifested. The results suggested that the exposure causes an immediate effect on the proteome level involving acute phase proteins and mediators regulating lipid signaling Proteases involved in maintaining the balance between the formation and degradation of extracellular matrix proteins are important key proteins in the induced effects.

  • 3.
    Ali, Neserin
    et al.
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Karin
    Center for Molecular Protein Science, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rissler, Jenny
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen Marg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Svensson, Christian R
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Anders
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindh, Christian H
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Bo A G
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Cedervall, Tommy
    Center for Molecular Protein Science, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kåredal, Monica
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Analysis of nanoparticle-protein coronas formed in vitro between nanosized welding particles and nasal lavage proteins.2016In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 226-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welding fumes include agglomerated particles built up of primary nanoparticles. Particles inhaled through the nose will to some extent be deposited in the protein-rich nasal mucosa, and a protein corona will be formed around the particles. The aim was to identify the protein corona formed between nasal lavage proteins and four types of particles with different parameters. Two of the particles were formed and collected during welding and two were manufactured iron oxides. When nasal lavage proteins were added to the particles, differences were observed in the sizes of the aggregates that were formed. Measurements showed that the amount of protein bound to particles correlated with the relative size increase of the aggregates, suggesting that the surface area was associated with the binding capacity. However, differences in aggregate sizes were detected when nasal proteins were added to UFWF and Fe2O3 particles (having similar agglomerated size) suggesting that yet parameters other than size determine the binding. Relative quantitative mass spectrometric and gel-based analyses showed differences in the protein content of the coronas. High-affinity proteins were further assessed for network interactions. Additional experiments showed that the inhibitory function of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor, a highly abundant nasal protein, was influenced by particle binding suggesting that an understanding of protein function following particle binding is necessary to properly evaluate pathophysiological events. Our results underscore the importance of including particles collected from real working environments when studying the toxic effects of particles because these effects might be mediated by the protein corona.

  • 4.
    Arapovic-Johansson, B.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kwak, L.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Björklund, C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jensen, I.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Work-related stress assessed by a text message single-item stress question2017In: Occupational Medicine, ISSN 0962-7480, E-ISSN 1471-8405, Vol. 67, no 8, p. 601-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Given the prevalence of work stress-related ill-health in the Western world, it is important to find cost-effective, easy-to-use and valid measures which can be used both in research and in practice. Aims To examine the validity and reliability of the single-item stress question (SISQ), distributed weekly by short message service (SMS) and used for measurement of work-related stress. Methods The convergent validity was assessed through associations between the SISQ and subscales of the Job Demand-Control-Support model, the Effort-Reward Imbalance model and scales measuring depression, exhaustion and sleep. The predictive validity was assessed using SISQ data collected through SMS. The reliability was analysed by the test-retest procedure. Results Correlations between the SISQ and all the subscales except for job strain and esteem reward were significant, ranging from -0.186 to 0.627. The SISQ could also predict sick leave, depression and exhaustion at 12-month follow-up. The analysis on reliability revealed a satisfactory stability with a weighted kappa between 0.804 and 0.868. Conclusions The SISQ, administered through SMS, can be used for the screening of stress levels in a working population.

  • 5.
    Arapovic-Johansson, Bozana
    et al.
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wåhlin-Norgren, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Jan
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Christina
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jensen, Irene
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Participatory work place intervention for stress prevention in primary health care. A randomized controlled trial2018In: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 1359-432X, E-ISSN 1464-0643, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 219-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore whether a participatory, organizational intervention can reduce work-related risk factors, and thereby prevent stress-related ill health. We build on the job demand-control and effort-reward imbalance models of stress. It is a two-armed randomized trial, with one primary health care unit receiving the intervention and a two-unit control group. Validated questionnaires for the assessment of psychosocial work environment and health were administered, at the baseline and at 6 and 12-month follow up. The primary outcome was job strain. Secondary outcomes were effort-reward imbalance, exhaustion, sleep, and recovery. Group-level objective data on workload and data about relevant processes during the study were continuously collected. The changes in the intervention group with regard to job strain, effort-reward imbalance, exhaustion, sleep and recovery were not statistically different from changes in the control group. For the non-exhausted employees though, reward was significantly higher at follow up compared to baseline, but only in the intervention group. An important piece of information is that the objective workload was statistically significantly higher in the intervention group throughout the study. Not all the components of the intervention were implemented as intended. Context and process information, such as objective data and implementation fidelity are necessary for a valid interpretation of the results.

  • 6.
    Augustsson, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Uddh-Söderberg, Terese
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Filipsson, Monika
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Helmfrid, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Berglund, Marika
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Hogmalm, Johan
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Alriksson, Stina
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Challenges in assessing the health risks of consuming vegetables in metal-contaminated environments2018In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 113, p. 269-280, article id S0160-4120(17)31204-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A great deal of research has been devoted to the characterization of metal exposure due to the consumption of vegetables from urban or industrialized areas. It may seem comforting that concentrations in crops, as well as estimated exposure levels, are often found to be below permissible limits. However, we show that even a moderate increase in metal accumulation in crops may result in a significant increase in exposure. We also highlight the importance of assessing exposure levels in relation to a regional baseline. We have analyzed metal (Pb, Cd, As) concentrations in nearly 700 samples from 23 different vegetables, fruits, berries and mushrooms, collected near 21 highly contaminated industrial sites and from reference sites. Metal concentrations generally complied with permissible levels in commercial food and only Pb showed overall higher concentrations around the contaminated sites. Nevertheless, probabilistic exposure assessments revealed that the exposure to all three metals was significantly higher in the population residing around the contaminated sites, for both low-, median- and high consumers. The exposure was about twice as high for Pb and Cd, and four to six times as high for As. Since vegetable consumption alone did not result in exposure above tolerable intakes, it would have been easy to conclude that there is no risk associated with consuming vegetables grown near the contaminated sites. However, when the increase in exposure is quantified, its potential significance is harder to dismiss - especially when considering that exposure via other routes may be elevated in a similar way.

  • 7.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Carlsson, Anders K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Olausson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Multivariate proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain and healthy controls: a hypothesis-generating pilot study2015In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 8, p. 321-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain medicine lacks objective biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment. Combining two-dimensional gel proteomics with multivariate data analysis by projection, we exploratively analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid of eleven patients with severe peripheral neuropathic pain due to trauma and/or surgery refractory to conventional treatment and eleven healthy controls. Using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, we identified a panel of 36 proteins highly discriminating between the two groups. Due to a possible confounding effect of age, a new model with age as outcome variable was computed for patients (n=11), and four out of 36 protein spots were excluded due to a probable influence of age. Of the 32 remaining proteins, the following seven had the highest discriminatory power between the two groups: an isoform of angiotensinogen (upregulated in patients), two isoforms of alpha-1-antitrypsin (downregulated in patients), three isoforms of haptoglobin (upregulated in patients), and one isoform of pigment epithelium-derived factor (downregulated in patients). It has recently been hypothesized that the renin–angiotensin system may play a role in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, and a clinical trial of an angiotensin II receptor antagonist was recently published. It is noteworthy that when searching for neuropathic pain biomarkers with a purely explorative methodology, it was indeed a renin–angiotensin system protein that had the highest discriminatory power between patients and controls in the present study. The results from this hypothesis-generating pilot study have to be confirmed in larger, hypothesis-driven studies with age-matched controls, but the present study illustrates the fruitfulness of combining proteomics with multivariate data analysis in hypothesis-generating pain biomarker studies in humans.

  • 8.
    Christidis, Nikolaos
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Larsson, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Palstam, Annie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lofgren, Monika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bjersing, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm Spine Centre, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Comparison of the Levels of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Released in the Vastus Lateralis Muscle of Patients with Fibromyalgia and Healthy Controls during Contractions of the Quadriceps Muscle - A Microdialysis Study2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 12, p. e0143856-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Fibromyalgia is associated with central hyperexcitability, but it is suggested that peripheral input is important to maintain central hyperexcitability. The primary aim was to investigate the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines released in the vastus lateralis muscle during repetitive dynamic contractions of the quadriceps muscle in patients with fibromyalgia and healthy controls. Secondarily, to investigate if the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were correlated with pain or fatigue during these repetitive dynamic contractions. Material and Methods 32 women with fibromyalgia and 32 healthy women (controls) participated in a 4 hour microdialysis session, to sample IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF from the most painful point of the vastus lateralis muscle before, during and after 20 minutes of repeated dynamic contractions. Pain (visual analogue scale; 0-100) and fatigue Borgs Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale; 6-20) were assessed before and during the entire microdialysis session. Results The repetitive dynamic contractions increased pain in the patients with fibromyalgia (P &lt; .001) and induced fatigue in both groups (P &lt; .001). Perceived fatigue was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia than controls (P &lt; .001). The levels of IL-1 beta did not change during contractions in either group. The levels of TNF did not change during contractions in patients with fibromyalgia, but increased in controls (P &lt; .001) and were significantly higher compared to patients with fibromyalgia (P = .033). The levels of IL-6 and IL-8 increased in both groups alike during and after contractions (Ps &lt; .001). There were no correlations between pain or fatigue and cytokine levels after contractions. Conclusion There were no differences between patients with fibromyalgia and controls in release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and no correlations between levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and pain or fatigue. Thus, this study indicates that IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF do not seem to play an important role in maintenance of muscle pain in fibromyalgia.

  • 9.
    Chung, Rosanna W S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Lundberg, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lutein exerts anti-inflammatory effects in patients with coronary artery disease.2017In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 262, p. 87-93, article id S0021-9150(17)30197-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Many coronary artery disease (CAD) patients exhibit chronic low-grade inflammation. Carotenoids are anti-oxidants with potential anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we first assessed relationships between interleukin (IL)-6 and individual carotenoids in plasma from CAD patients. Based on the results, we proceeded to assess anti-inflammatory effects of one carotenoid, lutein, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from CAD patients.

    METHODS: Lutein + zeaxanthin (isomers with lutein being dominant), β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, α- and β-carotene and IL-6 were measured in plasma from 134 patients with stable angina (SA) and 59 patients with acute coronary syndrome. In 42 patients, plasma measurements were also performed 3 months after coronary intervention. PBMCs from SA patients were pre-treated with lutein (1, 5 and 25 μM) for 24 h followed by 24 h incubation ± lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cell pellets were collected for IL-6, IL-1β and TNF mRNA and intracellular lutein. Cytokine secretion was measured in cell media.

    RESULTS: Only lutein + zeaxanthin were inversely correlated with IL-6 in SA patients at baseline (r = -0.366, p < 0.001) and follow-up (r = -0.546, p < 0.001). Ex vivo, lutein was taken up by PBMCs from SA patients in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with lutein dose-dependently lowered LPS-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-1β (p < 0.01) and TNF (p < 0.05), and also reduced IL-6, IL-1β and TNF mRNA expression (p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Clinical findings highlighted the inverse association between lutein and IL-6 in CAD patients. Anti-inflammatory effects of lutein in PBMCs from CAD patients were consolidated in ex vivo experiments. Taken together, these results show that lutein has the potential to play a role in resolution of chronic inflammation in CAD patients.

  • 10.
    Dawson, Andreas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Svensson, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Effects of Experimental Tooth Clenching on Pain and Intramuscular Release of 5-HT and Glutamate in Patients With Myofascial TMD2015In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 740-749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: It has been suggested that tooth clenching may be associated with local metabolic changes, and is a risk factor for myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD). This study investigated the effects of experimental tooth clenching on the levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate, as well as on blood flow and pain intensity, in the masseter muscles of M-TMD patients. Methods: Fifteen patients with M-TMD and 15 pain-free controls participated. Intramuscular microdialysis was performed to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to assess blood flow. Two hours after the insertion of a microdialysis catheter, participants performed a 20-minute repetitive tooth clenching task (50% of maximal voluntary contraction). Pain intensity was measured throughout. Results: A significant effect of group (P less than 0.01), but not of time, was observed on 5-HT levels and blood flow. No significant effects of time or group occurred on glutamate, pyruvate, or lactate levels. Time and group had significant main effects on pain intensity (P less than 0.05 and less than 0.001). No significant correlations were identified between: (1) 5-HT, glutamate, and pain intensity; or between (2) pyruvate, lactate, and blood flow. Discussion: This experimental tooth clenching model increased jaw muscle pain levels in M-TMD patients and evoked low levels of jaw muscle pain in controls. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT than controls and significantly lower blood flow. These 2 factors may facilitate the release of other algesic substances that may cause pain.

  • 11.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Early and Late Return to Work After Sick Leave: Predictors in a Cohort of Sick-Listed Individuals with Common Mental Disorders2015In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 627-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The study aims to identify individual and workplace factors associated with early return to work (RTW)-defined as within 3 months-and factors associated with later RTW-between 3 and 12 months after being sick-listed-in a cohort of newly sick-listed individuals with common mental disorders. Methods In a prospective cohort study, a cross-sectional analysis was performed on baseline measures of patients granted sick leave due to common mental disorders. A total of 533 newly sick-listed individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate. A baseline questionnaire was sent by post within 3 weeks of their first day of certified medical sickness; 354 (66 %) responded. Those who were unemployed were excluded, resulting in a study population of 319 individuals. Sick leave was recorded for each individual from the Social Insurance Office during 1 year. Analyses were made with multiple Cox regression analyses. Results Early RTW was associated with lower education, better work ability at baseline, positive expectations of treatment and low perceived interactional justice with the supervisor. RTW after 3 months was associated with a need to reduce demands at work, and turnover intentions. Conclusions Early RTW among sick-listed individuals with common mental disorders seems to be associated with the individuals need to secure her/his employment situation, whereas later RTW is associated with variables reflecting dissatisfaction with work conditions. No health measures were associated with RTW. The study highlights the importance of considering not only health and functioning, but also workplace conditions and relations at the workplace in implementing RTW interventions.

  • 12.
    Flodin, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Paues, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Åkerlind, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Communicable Disease and Infection Control.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Sjögren, Bengt
    Karolinska Institutet, Arbetsmiljötoxikologi, Institutet för miljömedicin Stockholm, Sweden Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet - Arbetsmiljötoxikologi Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svetsare – en riskgrupp för septisk pneumoni [Welders - a risk group for septic pneumonia]: Vaccination mot pneumokocker kan vara motiverat för yrkesgruppen2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Flodin, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Rolander, B.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Futurum, Sweden.
    Lofgren, H.
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Krapi, Blerim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Nyqvist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Wåhlin-Norgren, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Risk factors for neck pain among forklift truck operators: a retrospective cohort study2018In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    No previous research has been performed into neck pain among forklift operators. This is a common complaint among these workers, who number around 150,000 in Sweden and six million in Europe. The aim of the study was to examine long-term exposure to unnatural neck positions among forklift operators as a risk factor for neck pain.

    Methods

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all eligible employees at a high-level warehouse. Forklift operators and office workers answered an 18-page questionnaire comprising questions about joint pain, work tasks, work postures and year of start for all items. By using person years in the exposed and less-exposed groups before start of neck pain we were able to calculate Incident Rate ratios for various exposures.

    Results

    Forty nine percent of the forklift operators reported having experienced neck pain compared to 30 % of office workers. Being a forklift operator was associated with an increased risk of neck pain (OR = 5.1, 95% CI 1.4–18.2). Holding the head in an unnatural position resulted in significantly increased risks for neck pain, irrespective of type of position. The risks for neck pain remained after taking other ergonomic exposures and psychosocial aspects into consideration.

    Conclusions

    This is the first published study showing that forklift operators have an increased risk of neck pain. The results are therefore of significance for improving work schedules, the adjustment of work tasks for these workers and the design of the vehicles.

  • 14.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Carlsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Holmberg, Sara
    Department Research and Dev, Sweden.
    Thelin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Biomarkers of lsystemic inflammation in farmers with musculoskeletal disorders; a plasma proteomic study2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, no 206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Farmers have an increased risk for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) such as osteoarthritis of the hip, low back pain, and neck and upper limb complaints. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Workrelated exposures and inflammatory responses might be involved. Our objective was to identify plasma proteins that differentiated farmers with MSD from rural referents. Methods: Plasma samples from 13 farmers with MSD and rural referents were included in the investigation. Gel based proteomics was used for protein analysis and proteins that differed significantly between the groups were identified by mass spectrometry. Results: In total, 15 proteins differed significantly between the groups. The levels of leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein, haptoglobin, complement factor B, serotransferrin, one isoform of kininogen, one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin, and two isoforms of hemopexin were higher in farmers with MSD than in referents. On the other hand, the levels of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, vitamin D-binding protein, apolipoprotein A1, antithrombin, one isoform of kininogen, and one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin were lower in farmers than in referents. Many of the identified proteins are known to be involved in inflammation. Conclusions: Farmers with MSD had altered plasma levels of protein biomarkers compared to the referents, indicating that farmers with MSD may be subject to a more systemic inflammation. It is possible that the identified differences of proteins may give clues to the biochemical changes occurring during the development and progression of MSD in farmers, and that one or several of these protein biomarkers might eventually be used to identify and prevent work-related MSD.

  • 15.
    Graff, Pål
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro , Sweden.
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordenberg, Eva
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspång, Sweden.
    Graichen, Andreas
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspång, Sweden.
    Johansson, Pontus
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspång, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evaluating Measuring Techniques for Occupational Exposure during Additive Manufacturing of Metals: A Pilot Study2017In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 21, p. 120-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing that creates three-dimensional objects by adding layer uponlayer of material is a new technique that has proven to be an excellent tool for themanufacturing of complex structures for a variety of industrial sectors. Today, knowl-edge regarding particle emissions and potential exposure-related health hazards forthe operators is limited. The current study has focused on particle numbers, masses,sizes, and identities present in the air during additive manufacturing of metals. Mea-surements were performed during manufacturing with metal powder consisting es-sentially of chromium, nickel, and cobalt. Instruments used were Nanotracer (10 to300 nanometers [nm]), Lighthouse (300 nm to 10 micrometers), and traditional filter-basedparticle mass estimation followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Resultsshowed that there is a risk of particle exposure at certain operations and that particle sizestended to be smaller in recycled metal powder compared to new. In summary, nanosizedparticles were present in the additive manufacturing environment and the operators wereexposed specifically while handling the metal powder. For the workers’ safety, improvedpowder handling systems and measurement techniques for nanosized particles will possiblyhave to be developed and then translated into work environment regulations. Until then,relevant protective equipment and regular metal analyses of urine is recommended

  • 16.
    Helmfrid, Ingela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Salihovic, Samira
    Örebro University.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro University.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berglund, Marika
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Exposure and body burden of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and metals in a historically contaminated community.2015In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 76, p. 41-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many small villages where environmental contamination is substantial due to historical industrial activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate if long-term or current consumption of local foods, as reported in food frequency questionnaires, co-vary with measured concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) in blood, urine and hair from a population living in a historically contaminated village. Blood, urine and hair were provided by men (n=38) and women (n=57), who had participated in a previous case-control study in the contaminated area, and were analyzed for PCB, OCPs, Pb, Cd and Hg. A detailed food frequency questionnaire, used in the previous epidemiological study, was repeated, and up-dated information of life-style, exposure factors and other covariates was collected. Associations between reported consumption of local foods and exposure biomarkers were explored in relation to age, gender, life-style factors and other covariates. A large part of the population in the area reported consumption of local food, and thus, was potentially exposed to the contaminants. Despite the limited number of participants and other weaknesses described, it was possible to link reported consumption of different foods to biomarker concentrations. Reported consumption of local vegetables, forest berries and mushrooms co-varied with urinary Cd, indicating an influence from the contaminated area on the Cd exposure. We found no associations between PCB plasma concentrations with reported consumption of local fish, but with consumption of herring (non-local sea fish) which is typically high in PCB. Pesticide (HCB, p,p'-DDE, trans-nonachlor) exposure was mainly associated with agricultural work and having a private well the first five years of life, but we found no associations between pesticide concentrations in plasma and consumption of local vegetables or fish. Exposure to Hg was associated with consumption of fish, both local and non-local, and Pb exposure was associated with the consumption of game. Overall, the contaminant concentrations measured in blood, urine and hair varied substantially among study participants, but on average, the concentrations were similar to concentrations measured in other groups of the general Swedish population in the same age range. Larger studies are needed to evaluate health risks (and causality) associated with historical environmental contamination.

  • 17.
    Karlsson, Helen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Kontush, Anatol
    University of Pierre and Marie Curie, Paris, France .
    James, Richard W
    University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland .
    Functionality of HDL: Antioxidation and Detoxifying Effects.2015In: Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology, ISSN 0171-2004, E-ISSN 1865-0325, Vol. 224, p. 207-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are complexes of multiple talents, some of which have only recently been recognised but all of which are under active investigation. Clinical interest initially arose from their amply demonstrated role in atherosclerotic disease with their consequent designation as a major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor. However, interest is no longer confined to vascular tissues, with the reports of impacts of the lipoprotein on pancreatic, renal and nervous tissues, amongst other possible targets. The ever-widening scope of HDL talents also encompasses environmental hazards, including infectious agents and environmental toxins. In almost all cases, HDL would appear to have a beneficial impact on health. It raises the intriguing question of whether these various talents emanate from a basic ancestral function to protect the cell.The following chapter will illustrate and review our current understanding of some of the functions attributed to HDL. The first section will look at the antioxidative functions of HDL and possible mechanisms that are involved. The second section will focus specifically on paraoxonase-1 (PON1), which appears to bridge the divide between the two HDL functions discussed herein. This will lead into the final section dealing with HDL as a detoxifying agent protecting against exposure to environmental pathogens and other toxins.

  • 18.
    Karlsson, Linn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Olausson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Intramuscular pain modulatory substances before and after exercise in women with chronic neck pain2015In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 1075-1085Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIn peripheral tissue, several substances influence pain and pain modulation. Exercise has been found to decrease pain and improve function for chronic pain conditions, but how and why exercise produces beneficial effects remains unclear. This study investigates whether aspects of pain and concentrations of substances with algesic, analgesic and metabolic functions differ between women with chronic neck shoulder pain (CNSP) and healthy women (CON) and whether changes are found after an exercise intervention for CNSP. MethodsForty-one women with CNSP and 24 CON subjects were included. The participants attended two microdialysis sessions with 4-6 months between the experiments. During this period, the CNSP subjects underwent an exercise intervention. Expression levels of substance P, beta-endorphin, cortisol, glutamate, lactate and pyruvate as well as pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds were analysed. ResultsAt baseline, higher concentrations of glutamate and beta-endorphin and lower concentrations of cortisol in CNSP than CON were found. After exercise, decreased levels of substance P and possibly of glutamate, increased levels of beta-endorphin and cortisol as well as decreased pain intensity and increased pain pressure thresholds were found for CNSP. ConclusionsThe findings at baseline indicated algesic and analgesic alterations in the painful trapezius muscles. The findings for CNSP after the exercise intervention, with changes in peripheral substances and decreased pain intensity and sensitivity, could reflect a long-term physiological effect of the exercise.

  • 19.
    Kentson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Jacobson, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Persson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    The influence of disease severity and lifestyle factors on the peak annual 25(OH)D value of COPD patients2018In: The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1176-9106, E-ISSN 1178-2005, Vol. 13, p. 1389-1398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of individuals deficient in vitamin D (defined as a serum level of the stable metabolite 25(OH)D amp;lt; 50 nmol/L) is increasing in countries with low annual ultraviolet (UV) radiation and among individuals unable to perform outdoor activities, for example, COPD patients. Objective: To assess the role of vitamin D deficiency, independently of seasonal variation, the peak annual value of 25(OH)D was measured in subjects with advanced COPD +/- long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) and lung healthy control subjects. A method to grade the individual annual UV light exposure was designed and tested. Subjects and methods: Sixty-six Caucasians with advanced COPD (28 with LTOT) and 47 control subjects were included, and the levels of 25(OH)D were determined in late summer/ early fall when the annual peak was assumed. Questionnaires about COPD symptoms, general health, lifestyle, dietary habits and QoL were used to collect data. Lung function tests and blood sampling were performed. Results: The peak annual 25(OH)D of COPD subjects was significantly lower than in the control subjects, but there was no significant difference between COPD patients with and without LTOT. Ongoing vitamin D supplementation was the single most important intervention to maintain 25(OH)D levels amp;gt;= 50 nmol/L. Among vitamin D-deficient COPD subjects, 25(OH)D correlated positively with forced expiratory volume in 1 second as % predicted, Modified British Medical Research Council score, blood oxygenation, food portion size, Mediterranean Diet Score and Ultraviolet Score. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency was common among healthy individuals and COPD subjects. Peak annual 25(OH)D levels of COPD subjects correlated with clinically important outcomes. The present study emphasizes the need to routinely monitor vitamin D status among patients with advanced COPD and to consider to medicate those with vitamin D deficiency with vitamin D supplementation.

  • 20.
    Kjellmo, Christian Abendstein
    et al.
    Nordland Hosp, Norway; Univ Tromso, Norway.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Nestvold, Torunn K.
    Nordland Hosp, Norway.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    Swedish Toxicol Sci Res Ctr, Sweden.
    Marcusson-Stahl, Maritha
    Swedish Toxicol Sci Res Ctr, Sweden.
    Mathisen, Monica
    Nordland Hosp, Norway.
    Lappegard, Knut Tore
    Nordland Hosp, Norway; Univ Tromso, Norway.
    Hovland, Anders
    Nordland Hosp, Norway; Univ Tromso, Norway.
    Bariatric surgery improves lipoprotein profile in morbidly obese patients by reducing LDL cholesterol, apoB, and SAA/PON1 ratio, increasing HDL cholesterol, but has no effect on cholesterol efflux capacity2018In: Journal of Clinical Lipidology, ISSN 1933-2874, E-ISSN 1876-4789, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 193-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Bariatric surgery has been shown to reduce cardiovascular events and cause specific mortality for coronary artery disease in obese patients. Lipoprotein biomarkers relating to low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), their subfractions, and macrophage cholesterol efflux have all been hypothesized to be of value in cardiovascular risk assessment. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of a lifestyle intervention followed by bariatric surgery on the lipid profile of morbidly obese patients. METHODS: Thirty-four morbidly obese patients were evaluated before and after lifestyle changes and then 1 year after bariatric surgery. They were compared with 17 lean subjects. Several lipoprotein metrics, serum amyloid A (SAA), serum paraoxonase-1 (PON1), and macrophage cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) were assessed. RESULTS: Average weight loss after the lifestyle intervention was 10.5% and 1 year after bariatric surgery was 33.9%. The lifestyle intervention significantly decreased triglycerides (TGs; 28.7 mg/dL, P amp;lt; .05), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C; 32.3 mg/dL, P amp;lt; .0001), and apolipoprotein B (apoB; 62.9 mu g/mL, P amp;lt; .001). Bariatric surgery further reduced TGs (-36.7 mg/dL, P amp;lt; .05), increased HDL cholesterol (+12 mg/dL, P amp;lt; .0001), and reductions in LDL-C and apoB were sustained. Bariatric surgery reduced large, buoyant LDL (P amp;lt; .0001), but had no effect on the small, dense LDL.The large HDL subfractions increased (P amp;lt; .0001), but there was no effect on the smaller HDL sub fractions. The ratio for SAA/PON1 was reduced after the lifestyle intervention (P amp;lt; .01) and further reduced after bariatric surgery (P amp;lt; .0001). Neither the lifestyle intervention nor bariatric surgery had any effect on CEC. CONCLUSIONS: Lifestyle intervention followed by bariatric surgery in 34 morbidly obese patients showed favorable effects on TGs, LDL-C, and apoB. HDL cholesterol and apoA1 was increased, apoB/apoA1 ratio as well as SAA/PON1 ratio reduced, but bariatric surgery did not influence CEC. (C) 2017 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  • 21.
    Kwak, Lydia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stigmar, Kjerstin
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Developing a practice guideline for the occupational health services by using a community of practice approach: a process evaluation of the development process2017In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One way to facilitate the translation of research into the occupational health service practice is through clinical practice guidelines. To increase the implementability of guidelines it is important to include the end-users in the development, for example by a community of practice approach. This paper describes the development of an occupational health practice guideline aimed at the management of non-specific low back pain (LBP) by using a community of practice approach. The paper also includes a process evaluation of the development providing insight into the feasibility of the process. Methods: A multidisciplinary community of practice group (n = 16) consisting of occupational nurses, occupational physicians, ergonomists/physical therapists, health and safety engineers, health educators, psychologists and researchers from different types of occupational health services and geographical regions within Sweden met eleven times (June 2012-December 2013) to develop the practice guideline following recommendations of guideline development handbooks. Process-outcomes recruitment, reach, context, satisfaction, feasibility and fidelity were assessed by questionnaire, observations and administrative data. Results: Group members attended on average 7.5 out of 11 meetings. Half experienced support from their workplace for their involvement. Feasibility was rated as good, except for time-scheduling. Most group members were satisfied with the structure of the process (e.g. presentations, multidisciplinary group). Fidelity was rated as fairly high. Conclusions: The described development process is a feasible process for guideline development. For future guideline development expectations of the work involved should be more clearly communicated, as well as the purpose and tasks of the CoP-group. Moreover, possibilities to improve support from managers and colleagues should be explored. This paper has important implications for future guideline development; it provides valuable information on how practitioners can be included in the development process, with the aim of increasing the implementability of the developed guidelines.

  • 22.
    Lappegård, Knut Tore
    et al.
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    Kjellmo, Christian Abendstein
    Division of Internal Medicine, Nordland Hospital, Bodø, Norway.
    Ljunggren, Stefan A
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    Swedish Toxicology Sciences Research Center, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Marcusson-Ståhl, Maritha
    Swedish Toxicology Sciences Research Center, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Mathisen, Monica
    Research Laboratory, Nordland Hospital, Bodø, Norway.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Hovland, Anders
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    Lipoprotein apheresis affects lipoprotein particle subclasses more efficiently compared to the PCSK9 inhibitor evolocumab, a pilot study.2018In: Transfusion and apheresis science, ISSN 1473-0502, E-ISSN 1878-1683, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 91-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipoprotein apheresis and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors are last therapeutic resorts in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). We explored changes in lipoprotein subclasses and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function when changing treatment from lipoprotein apheresis to PCSK9 inhibition. We measured the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and HDL particle subclasses, serum amyloid A1 (SAA1), paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity and cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) in three heterozygous FH patients. Concentrations of all LDL particle subclasses were reduced during apheresis (large 68.0 ± 17.5 to 16.3 ± 2.1 mg/dL, (p = 0.03), intermediate 38.3 ± 0.6 to 5.0 ± 3.5 mg/dL (p = 0.004) and small 5.0 ± 2.6 to 0.2 ± 0.1 mg/dL (p = 0.08)). There were non-significant reductions in the LDL subclasses during evolocumab treatment. There were non-significant reductions in subclasses of HDL particles during apheresis, and no changes during evolocumab treatment. CEC was unchanged throughout the study, while the SAA1/PON1 ratio was unchanged during apheresis but decreased during evolocumab treatment. In conclusion, there were significant reductions in large and intermediate size LDL particles during apheresis, and a non-significant reduction in small LDL particles. There were only non-significant reductions in the LDL subclasses during evolocumab treatment.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-01-04 10:57
  • 23.
    Li, Wei
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Sultana, Nargis
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Siraj, Nabeel
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Department of internal medicine, University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
    Ward, Liam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Pawlik, Monika
    Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, USA.
    Levy, Efrat
    Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Departments of Psychiatry and Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University Langone School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
    Jovinge, Stefan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Eva
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Yuan, Ximing
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Autophagy dysfunction and regulatory cystatin C in macrophage death of atherosclerosis2016In: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine (Print), ISSN 1582-1838, E-ISSN 1582-4934, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1664-1672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autophagy dysfunction in mouse atherosclerosis models has been associated with increased lipid accumulation, apoptosis and inflammation. Expression of cystatin C (CysC) is decreased in human atheroma, and CysC deficiency enhances atherosclerosis in mice. Here, we first investigated the association of autophagy and CysC expression levels with atheroma plaque severity in human atherosclerotic lesions. We found that autophagy proteins Atg5 and LC3β in advanced human carotid atherosclerotic lesions are decreased, while markers of dysfunctional autophagy p62/SQSTM1 and ubiquitin are increased together with elevated levels of lipid accumulation and apoptosis. The expressions of LC3β and Atg5 were positively associated with CysC expression. Second, we investigated whether CysC expression is involved in autophagy in atherosclerotic apoE-deficient mice, demonstrating that CysC deficiency (CysC−/−) in these mice results in reduction of Atg5 and LC3β levels and induction of apoptosis. Third, macrophages isolated from CysC−/− mice displayed increased levels of p62/SQSTM1 and higher sensitivity to 7-oxysterol-mediated lysosomal membrane destabilization and apoptosis. Finally, CysC treatment minimized oxysterol-mediated cellular lipid accumulation. We conclude that autophagy dysfunction is a characteristic of advanced human atherosclerotic lesions and is associated with reduced levels of CysC. The deficiency of CysC causes autophagy dysfunction and apoptosis in macrophages and apoE-deficient mice. The results indicate that CysC plays an important regulatory role in combating cell death via the autophagic pathway in atherosclerosis.

  • 24.
    Liang, Wenzhao
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Jilin University, Peoples R China.
    Ward, Liam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Li, Wei
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Yuan, Ximing
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Distinctive proteomic profiles among different regions of human carotid plaques in men and women2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 26231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The heterogeneity of atherosclerotic tissue has limited comprehension in proteomic and metabolomic analyses. To elucidate the functional implications, and differences between genders, of atherosclerotic lesion formation we investigated protein profiles from different regions of human carotid atherosclerotic arteries; internal control, fatty streak, plaque shoulder, plaque centre, and fibrous cap. Proteomic analysis was performed using 2-DE with MALDI-TOF, with validation using nLC-MS/MS. Protein mapping of 2-DE identified 52 unique proteins, including 15 previously unmapped proteins, of which 41 proteins were confirmed by nLC-MS/MS analysis. Expression levels of 18 proteins were significantly altered in plaque regions compared to the internal control region. Nine proteins showed site-specific alterations, irrespective of gender, with clear associations to extracellular matrix remodelling. Five proteins display gender-specific alterations with 2-DE, with two alterations validated by nLC-MS/MS. Gender differences in ferritin light chain and transthyretin were validated using both techniques. Validation of immunohistochemistry confirmed significantly higher levels of ferritin in plaques from male patients. Proteomic analysis of different plaque regions has reduced the effects of plaque heterogeneity, and significant differences in protein expression are determined in specific regions and between genders. These proteomes have functional implications in plaque progression and are of importance in understanding gender differences in atherosclerosis.

  • 25.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Intervention and Implementation Research Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Workplace health in dental care: a salutogenic approach2018In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 103-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to explore self-reported psychosocial health and work environments among different dental occupations and workplaces from a salutogenic perspective. A further purpose was to analyse possible associations between three salutogenic measurements: The Sense of Coherence questionnaire (SOC), the Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS) and the Work Experience Measurement Scale (WEMS).

    METHODS: Employees in the Public Dental Service in a Swedish county council (n = 486) were invited to respond to a self-reported web survey including demographics, work-related factors, the SOC, the SHIS and the WEMS.

    RESULTS: This study showed positive associations between employee characteristics and self-reported overall psychosocial health as well as experienced work environment. Autonomy was reported more among men than women (P < 0.000) and to a higher degree by dentists and dental hygienists than dental nurses (P < 0.000). Meaningfulness, happiness, job satisfaction, autonomy and positive to reorganization were reported by personnels aged less than 40 years (P ≤ 0.047). Clinical coordinators reported significant better health (SOC, SHIS) and experienced more autonomy, better management and more positive to reorganization than other dental professions. Dental hygienists and nurses experienced less time pressure than dentists (P ≤ 0.007). Better health and positive work experiences were also seen in smaller clinics (P ≤ 0.29).

    CONCLUSION: Dental professionals reported a high degree of overall psychosocial health as well as a positive work experience. Some variations could be seen between employee characteristics such as gender, years in dental care, professionals, managing position and workplace size. Identify resources and processes at each workplace are important and should be included in the employee's/employers dialogue.

  • 26.
    Ljunggren, Stefan A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Iggland, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rönn, Monika
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lind, P M
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Altered heart proteome in fructose-fed Fisher 344 rats exposed to bisphenol A.2016In: Toxicology, ISSN 0300-483X, E-ISSN 1879-3185, Vol. 347-349, p. 6-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is an artificial estrogen initially produced for medical purposes but is today widely used in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Exposure-related reproductive disorders have been found, but recently it has also been suggested that BPA may be involved in obesity, diabetes, myocardial hypertrophy and myocardial infarction in humans. To mimic a modern lifestyle, female rats were fed with fructose or fructose plus BPA (0.25mg/L drinking water). The myocardial left ventricle proteome of water controls, fructose-fed and fructose-fed plus BPA supplemented rats was explored. The proteome was investigated using nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry identification. In total, 41 proteins were significantly altered by BPA exposure compared to water or fructose controls. Principal component analysis and cellular process enrichment analysis of altered proteins suggested increased fatty acid transport and oxidation, increased ROS generation and altered structural integrity of the myocardial left ventricle in the fructose-fed BPA-exposed rats, indicating unfavorable effects on the myocardium. In conclusion, BPA exposure in the rats induces major alterations in the myocardial proteome.

  • 27.
    Ljunggren, Stefan A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levels, Johannes H M
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Hovingh, Kees
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Holleboom, Adriaan G
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Vergeer, Menno
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Argyri, Letta
    National Center for Scientific Research "Demokritos", Athens, Greece.
    Gkolfinopoulou, Christina
    National Center for Scientific Research "Demokritos", Athens, Greece.
    Chroni, Angeliki
    National Center for Scientific Research "Demokritos", Athens, Greece.
    Sierts, Jeroen A
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Kastelein, John J
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert
    University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Lipoprotein profiles in human heterozygote carriers of a functional mutation P297S in scavenger receptor class B1.2015In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, ISSN 1388-1981, E-ISSN 1879-2618, Vol. 1851, no 12, p. 1587-1595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is an important HDL receptor involved in cholesterol uptake and efflux, but its physiological role in human lipoprotein metabolism is not fully understood. Heterozygous carriers of the SR-B1P297S mutation are characterized by increased HDL cholesterol levels, impaired cholesterol efflux from macrophages and attenuated adrenal function. Here, the composition and function of lipoproteins were studied in SR-B1P297S heterozygotes.

    Lipoproteins from six SR-B1P297S carriers and six family controls were investigated. HDL and LDL/VLDL were isolated by ultracentrifugation and proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. HDL antioxidant properties, paraoxonase 1 activities, apoA-I methionine oxidations and HDL cholesterol efflux capacity were assessed.

    Multivariate modeling separated carriers from controls based on lipoprotein composition. Protein analyses showed a significant enrichment of apoE in LDL/VLDL and of apoL-1 in HDL from heterozygotes compared to controls. The relative distribution of plasma apoE was increased in LDL and in lipid-free form. There were no significant differences in paraoxonase 1 activities, HDL antioxidant properties or HDL cholesterol efflux capacity but heterozygotes showed a significant increase of oxidized methionines in apoA-I.

    The SR-B1P297S mutation affects both HDL and LDL/VLDL protein compositions. The increase of apoE in carriers suggests a compensatory mechanism for attenuated SR-B1 mediated cholesterol uptake by HDL. Increased methionine oxidation may affect HDL function by reducing apoA-I binding to its targets. The results illustrate the complexity of lipoprotein metabolism that has to be taken into account in future therapeutic strategies aiming at targeting SR-B1.

  • 28.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Helmfrid, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Norinder, Ulf
    Swedish Toxicol Science Research Centre, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alterations in high-density lipoprotein proteome and function associated with persistent organic pollutants2017In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 98, p. 204-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing body of evidence that persistent organic pollutants (POPs) may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the mechanisms remain unclear. High- density lipoprotein (HDL) acts protective against CVD by different processes, andwe have earlier found that HDL from subjects with CVD contains higher levels of POPs than healthy controls. In the present study, we have expanded analyses on the same individuals living in a contaminated community and investigated the relationship between the HDL POP levels and protein composition/ function. HDL from17 subjectswas isolated by ultracentrifugation. HDL protein composition, using nanoliquid chromatography tandemmass spectrometry, and antioxidant activity were analyzed. The associations of 16 POPs, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides, with HDL proteins/functionswere investigated by partial least square and multiple linear regression analysis. Proteomic analyses identified 118 HDL proteins, of which ten were significantly (p b 0.05) and positively associated with the combined level of POPs or with highly chlorinated PCB congeners. Among these, cholesteryl ester transfer protein and phospholipid transfer protein, as well as the inflammatory marker serum amyloid A, were found. The serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 activity was inversely associated with POPs. Pathway analysis demonstrated that up- regulated proteinswere associatedwith biological processes involving lipoproteinmetabolism, while down- regulated proteinswere associatedwith processes such as negative regulation of proteinases, acute phase response, platelet degranulation, and complement activation. These results indicate an association between POP levels, especially highly chlorinated PCBs, and HDL protein alterations that may result in a less functional particle. Further studies are needed to determine causality and the importance of other environmental factors. Nevertheless, this study provides a first insight into a possible link between exposure to POPs and risk of CVD. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 29.
    Lönn, J.
    et al.
    Malmo Univ, Sweden; PEAS Inst AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Klarstrom-Engstrom, K.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Demirel, I.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, T.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Lipoprotein modifications by gingipains of Porphyromonas gingivalis2018In: Journal of Periodontal Research, ISSN 0022-3484, E-ISSN 1600-0765, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 403-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objective: Several studies have shown an association between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Atherosclerosis is the major cause of CVD, and a key event in the development of atherosclerosis is accumulation of lipoproteins within the arterial wall. Bacteria are the primary etiologic agents in periodontitis and Porphyromonas gingivalis is the major pathogen in the disease. Several studies support a role of modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in atherogenesis; however, the pathogenic stimuli that induce the changes and the mechanisms by which this occur are unknown. This study aims to identify alterations in plasma lipoproteins induced by the periodontopathic species of bacterium, P.gingivalis, in vitro. Material and Methods: Plasma lipoproteins were isolated from whole blood treated with wild-type and gingipain-mutant (lacking either the Rgp- or Kgp gingipains) P.gingivalis by density/gradient-ultracentrifugation and were studied using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Porphyromonasgingivalis-induced lipid peroxidation and antioxidant levels were measured by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and antioxidant assay kits, respectively, and lumiaggregometry was used for measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and aggregation. Results: Porphyromonas gingivalis exerted substantial proteolytic effects on the lipoproteins. The Rgp gingipains were responsible for producing 2 apoE fragments, as well as 2 apoB-100 fragments, in LDL, and the Kgp gingipain produced an unidentified fragment in high-density lipoproteins. Porphyromonasgingivalis and its different gingipain variants induced ROS and consumed antioxidants. Both the Rgp and Kgp gingipains were involved in inducing lipid peroxidation. Conclusion: Porphyromonas gingivalis has the potential to change the expression of lipoproteins in blood, which may represent a crucial link between periodontitis and CVD.

  • 30.
    Nyqvist, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Helmfrid, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Augustsson, Anna
    Linneaus University, Sweden.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Increased Cancer Incidence in the Local Population Around Metal-Contaminated Glassworks Sites2017In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 59, no 5, p. E84-E90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine mortality causes and cancer incidence in a population cohort that have resided in close proximity to highly metal-contaminated sources, characterized by contamination of, in particular, arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb). Methods: Data from Swedish registers were used to calculate standardized mortality and cancer incidence ratios. An attempt to relate cancer incidence to metal contamination levels was made. Results: Significantly elevated cancer incidences were observed for overall malignant cancers in both genders, cancer in the digestive system, including colon, rectum, and pancreas, and cancers in prostate among men. Dose-response relationships between Cd and Pb levels in soil and cancer risks were found. Conclusions: Cancer observations made, together with previous studies of metal uptake in local vegetables, may imply that exposure to local residents have occurred primarily via oral intake of locally produced foodstuffs.

  • 31.
    Olausson, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Sjöström, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Blixt, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Protein alterations in women with chronic widespread pain: An explorative proteomic study of the trapezius muscle2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, no 11894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic widespread pain (CWP) has a high prevalence in the population and is associated with prominent negative individual and societal consequences. There is no clear consensus concerning the etiology behind CWP although alterations in the central processing of nociception maintained by peripheral nociceptive input has been suggested. Here, we use proteomics to study protein changes in trapezius muscle from 18 female patients diagnosed with CWP compared to 19 healthy female subjects. The 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in combination with multivariate statistical analyses revealed 17 proteins to be differently expressed between the two groups. Proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Many of the proteins are important enzymes in metabolic pathways like the glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Other proteins are associated with muscle damage, muscle recovery, stress and inflammation. The altered expressed levels of these proteins suggest abnormalities and metabolic changes in the myalgic trapezius muscle in CWP. Taken together, this study gives further support that peripheral factors may be of importance in maintaining CWP.

  • 32.
    Persson, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Costs of production loss and primary health care interventions for return-to-work of sick-listed workers in Sweden2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 771-776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate, from the perspective of society, the costs of sick leave and rehabilitation of recently sick-listed workers with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) or mental disorders (MD). Methods: In a prospective cohort study, 812 sick-listed workers with MSD (518) or MD (294) were included. Data on consumption of health care and production loss were collected over six months from an administrative casebook system of the health care provider. Production loss was estimated based on the number of sick-leave days. Societal costs were based on the human capital approach. Results: The mean costs of production loss per person were EUR 5978 (MSD) and EUR 6381 (MD). Health care interventions accounted for 9.3% (MSD) and 8.2% (MD) of the costs of production loss. Corresponding figures for rehabilitation activities were 3.7% (MSD) and 3.1% (MD). Health care interventions were received by about 95% in both diagnostic groups. For nearly half of the cohort, no rehabilitation intervention at all was provided. Conclusions: Costs associated with sick leave were dominated by production loss. Resources invested in rehabilitation were small. By increasing investment in early rehabilitation, costs to society and the individual might be reduced. Implications for Rehabilitation Resources invested in rehabilitation for sick-listed with musculoskeletal and mental disorders in Sweden are very small in comparison with the costs of production loss. For policy makers, there may be much to gain through investments into improved rehabilitation processes for return to work. Health care professionals need to develop rehabilitative activities aiming for return to work, rather than symptoms treatment only.

  • 33.
    Rolander, Bo
    et al.
    Jonköping County Council, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Johnston, Venerina
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Changes in division of labour and tasks within public dentistry: relationship to employees work demands, health and work ability2016In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 471-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: By 2023, fewer dentists are expected in Sweden, at the same time as the demand for dental care is expected to increase. Older people, in particular, are expected to require more dental health than previous generations. To meet this demand, the public sector dentistry in Sweden is moving towards changes in division of labour among dental professionals, including dentists, dental hygienists and dental nurses. However, the impact of this reallocation on the physical and psychosocial wellbeing of employees is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare workplaces with an equal or larger proportion of dental hygienists than dentists (HDH) with workplaces with a larger proportion of dentists than dental hygienists (HD) on the physical and psychosocial work load, musculoskeletal and psychosomatic disorders and sickness presence.Material: A total of 298 persons employed in the Public Dental Service in a Swedish County Council participated in this study.Conclusion: The medium large clinics HDH reported 85% of employees with considerably more high psychosocial demands compared to employees in medium HD (53%) and large HD (57%). Employees in medium large clinics HDH also reported sleep problems due to work (25%) compared with employees in medium large clinics HD (6%), large clinics HD (11%) and small clinics HDH (3%). Clinic size does not seem to influence the outcome of the HD and HD clinics to any great extent. Of all employees, about 94-100% reported high precision demands and 78-91% poor work postures.

  • 34.
    Rosander, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Blomberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    The WHOLE picture: Measurement of Psychosocial Work Environment2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is the first official description of PSYWEQ (Psychosocial Work Environment Questionnaire). PSYWEQ is a measurement instrument focussing on both individual work experience and organisational factors. It was developed by Blomberg and Rosander beginning in 2012.

    The main focus of the report was to clarify the factor structure behind PSYWEQ as well as describing the additional instruments included in PSYWEQ – NAQ-22R (Einarsen, Hoel & Notelaers, 2009), SHIS (Bringsén, Andersson & Ejlertsson, 2009) and HAD (Zigmond & Snaith, 1983). The report also includes descriptive statistics based on the first wave of data from a governmental organization, two municipalities and a private organisation.

  • 35.
    Shimada, Akiko
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark; SCON, Denmark.
    Baad-Hansen, Lene
    Aarhus University, Denmark; SCON, Denmark.
    Castrillon, Eduardo
    Aarhus University, Denmark; SCON, Denmark.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Stensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Cairns, Brian
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Svensson Odont, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark; SCON, Denmark.
    Differential effects of repetitive oral administration of monosodium glutamate on interstitial glutamate concentration and muscle pain sensitivity2015In: Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), ISSN 0899-9007, E-ISSN 1873-1244, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 315-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship of high daily monosodium glutamate (MSG) consumption with glutamate concentrations in jaw muscle, saliva, and serum, and muscle pain sensitivity in healthy participants. Methods: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study was conducted to investigate the effect of repetitive consumption of high-dose MSG on glutamate concentration in the masseter muscles measured by microdialysis and muscle pain sensitivity. In five contiguous experimental daily sessions, 32 healthy participants drank MSG (150 mg/kg) or NaCl (24 mg/kg) diluted with a 400 mL soda. The concentrations of glutamate before and after the ingestion were assessed in dialysate and plasma samples on the first and last days. Saliva glutamate concentration was assessed every day. Pressure pain threshold, pressure pain tolerance, autonomic parameters (heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures) and reported side effects also were assessed. Results: No significant change was noted in the baseline concentration of glutamate in the masseter muscle, blood, or saliva, but the peak concentration in the masseter muscle increased significantly between day 1 and 5. A statistically significant increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressures after MSG administration was observed, as well as a significantly higher frequency of reports of nausea and headache in the MSG group. No robust effect of MSG on muscle sensitivity was found. Conclusion: Interstitial glutamate concentration in the masseter muscle is not highly disturbed by excessive repetitive intake of MSG in healthy man. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 36.
    Shimada, Akiko
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark; SCON, Denmark.
    Castrillon, Eduardo
    Aarhus University, Denmark; SCON, Denmark.
    Baad-Hansen, Lene
    Aarhus University, Denmark; SCON, Denmark.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ernberg, Malin
    SCON, Denmark; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Cairns, Brian
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Svensson, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark; SCON, Denmark.
    Muscle pain sensitivity after glutamate injection is not modified by systemic administration of monosodium glutamate2015In: Journal of Headache and Pain, ISSN 1129-2369, E-ISSN 1129-2377, Vol. 16, no 68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is often thought to be associated with headache and craniofacial pains like temporomandibular disorders. This randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study was performed to investigate how ingestion of MSG affects muscle pain sensitivity before and after experimentally induced muscle pain. Methods: Sixteen healthy adult subjects participated in 2 sessions with at least 1-week interval between sessions. In each session, two injections of glutamate (Glu, 0.5 M, 0.2 ml) and two injections of saline (0.9 %, 0.2 ml) into the masseter and temporalis muscles, respectively, were undertaken, with a 15 min interval between each injection. Injections of saline were made contralateral to Glu injections and done in a randomized order. Participants drank 400 mL of soda mixed with either MSG (150 mg/kg) or NaCl (24 mg/kg, placebo) 30 min before the intramuscular injections. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT), autonomic parameters and pain intensity were assessed prior to (baseline) and 30 min after ingestion of soda, as well as 5 min and 10 min after the intramuscular injections and at the end of the session. Whole saliva samples were collected prior to and 30, 45, 60, and 75 min after the ingestion of soda. Results: MSG administration resulted in a significantly higher Glu level in saliva than administration of NaCl and was associated with a significant increase in systolic blood pressure. Injections of Glu were significantly more painful than injections of NaCl. However, ingestion of MSG did not change the intensity of Glu-evoked pain. Glu injections also significantly increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but without an additional effect of MSG ingestion. Glu injections into the masseter muscle significantly reduced the PPT. However, pre-injection MSG ingestion did not significantly alter this effect. Interestingly, PPT was significantly increased in the trapezius after MSG ingestion and intramuscular injection of Glu in the jaw muscles. Conclusion: The main finding in this study was that systemic intake of a substantial amount of MSG does not influence either pain intensity or pressure pain sensitivity in the masseter and temporalis muscles into which Glu injections were made.

  • 37.
    Sulaiman, Wan N Wan
    et al.
    University of Glasgow, U.K..
    Caslake, Muriel J
    University of Glasgow, U.K..
    Delles, Christian
    University of Glasgow, U.K..
    Karlsson, Helen
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Mulder, Monique T
    University of Glasgow, U.K, Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Graham, Delyth
    University of Glasgow, Glasgow, U.K..
    Freeman, Dilys J
    University of Glasgow, Glasgow, U.K..
    Does high-density lipoprotein protect vascular function in healthy pregnancy?2016In: Clinical Science, ISSN 0143-5221, E-ISSN 1470-8736, Vol. 130, no 7, p. 491-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The maternal adaptation to pregnancy includes hyperlipidaemia, oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. In non-pregnant individuals, these processes are usually associated with poor vascular function. However, maternal vascular function is enhanced in pregnancy. It is not understood how this is achieved in the face of the adverse metabolic and inflammatory environment. Research into cardiovascular disease demonstrates that plasma HDL (high-density lipoprotein), by merit of its functionality rather than its plasma concentration, exerts protective effects on the vascular endothelium. HDL has vasodilatory, antioxidant, anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects, and can protect against endothelial cell damage. In pregnancy, the plasma HDL concentration starts to rise at 10 weeks of gestation, peaking at 20 weeks. The initial rise in plasma HDL occurs around the time of the establishment of the feto-placental circulation, a time when the trophoblast plugs in the maternal spiral arteries are released, generating oxidative stress. Thus there is the intriguing possibility that new HDL of improved function is synthesized around the time of the establishment of the feto-placental circulation. In obese pregnancy and, to a greater extent, in pre-eclampsia, plasma HDL levels are significantly decreased and maternal vascular function is reduced. Wire myography studies have shown an association between the plasma content of apolipoprotein AI, the major protein constituent of HDL, and blood vessel relaxation. These observations lead us to hypothesize that HDL concentration, and function, increases in pregnancy in order to protect the maternal vascular endothelium and that in pre-eclampsia this fails to occur.

  • 38.
    Wagman, Petra
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare , Jönköping University , Jönköping , Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Futurum, Academy for Health and Care , Jönköping County Council , Jönköping , Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    School of Health and Welfare , Jönköping University , Jönköping , Futurum, Academy for Health and Care , Jönköping County Council , Jönköping , Sweden.
    Wåhlin-Norgren, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine , Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
    Occupational balance in health professionals in Sweden.2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Health care employees are often women, a group that has high degrees of sick leave and perhaps problems attaining occupational balance. However, people think differently about their everyday activities and it is therefore important to take their perceptions into account but occupational balance has not yet been measured in health professionals. The aim was to describe occupational balance in three different samples of health professionals in Sweden. A further aim was to investigate whether occupational therapists (OTs) rate their occupational balance differently from other health professionals.

    MATERIAL AND METHOD: Four hundred and eighty-two health professionals, employees in public dentistry, mental health care and OTs, aged 21-70 years participated. The participants' occupational balance was measured using the occupational balance questionnaire (OBQ).

    RESULTS: The ratings of occupational balance were similar to earlier studies and did not differ significantly between the samples. The OTs' occupational balance was also similar to that of the other health professionals.

    CONCLUSION: The similarities in occupational balance indicate the same difficulties in attaining it.

    SIGNIFICANCE: The result highlights the possibility that working people face similar difficulties in achieving occupational balance. Further research is warranted about how to attain it.

  • 39.
    Ward, Liam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Li, Wei
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Yuan, Ximing
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Exposure to atheroma-relevant 7-oxysterols causes proteomic alterations in cell death, cellular longevity, and lipid metabolism in THP-1 macrophages2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 7-oxysterols are recognised as strong enhancers of inflammatory processes in foamy macrophages. Atheroma-relevant 7-oxysterol mixtures induce a mixed type of cell death in macrophages, and trigger cellular oxidative stress responses, which mimic oxidative exposures observed in atherosclerotic lesions. However, the macrophage proteome has not previously been determined in the 7-oxysterol treated cell model. The aim of the present study was to determine the specific effects of an atheroma-relevant 7-oxysterol mixture on human macrophage proteome. Human THP-1 macrophages were exposed to an atheroma-relevant mixture of 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry techniques were used to analyse the alterations in macrophage proteome, which resulted in the identification of 19 proteins with significant differential expression upon oxysterol loading; 8 increased and 11 decreased. The expression patterns of 11 out of 19 identified significant proteins were further confirmed by tandemmass spectrometry, including further validation of increased histone deacetylase 2 and macrophage scavenger receptor types I and II expressions by western blot analysis. Identified proteins with differential expression in the cell model have been associated with i) signalling imbalance in cell death and cellular longevity; ii) lipid uptake and metabolism in foam cells; and iii) inflammatory proteins. The presented findings highlight a new proteomic platform for further studies into the functional roles of macrophages in atherosclerosis, and present a cell model for future studies to modulate the macrophage proteome by potential anti-atherosclerotic agents.

  • 40.
    Westberg, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Elihn, Karine
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Eva
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Persson, Bodil
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Andersson, Lennart
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Cathe
    Billerud AB, Sweden.
    Sjogren, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Inflammatory markers and exposure to airborne particles among workers in a Swedish pulp and paper mill2016In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 89, no 5, p. 813-822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To study the relationship between exposure to airborne particles in a pulp and paper mill and markers of inflammation and coagulation in blood. Personal sampling of inhalable dust was performed for 72 subjects working in a Swedish pulp and paper mill. Stationary measurements were used to study concentrations of total dust, respirable dust, PM10 and PM2.5, the particle surface area and the particle number concentrations. Markers of inflammation, interleukins (IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10), C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), and fibrinogen and markers of coagulation factor VIII, von Willebrand, plasminogen activator inhibitor, and D-dimer were measured in plasma or serum. Sampling was performed on the last day of the work free period of 5 days, before and after the shift the first day of work and after the shifts the second and third day. In a mixed model analysis, the relationship between particulate exposures and inflammatory markers was determined. Sex, age, smoking, and BMI were included as covariates. The average 8-h time-weighted average (TWA) air concentration levels of inhalable dust were 0.30 mg/m(3), range 0.005-3.3 mg/m(3). The proxies for average 8-h TWAs of respirable dust were 0.045 mg/m(3). Significant and consistent positive relations were found between several exposure metrics (PM 10, total and inhalable dust) and CRP, SAA and fibrinogen taken post-shift, suggesting a dose-effect relationship. This study supports a relationship between occupational particle exposure and established inflammatory markers, which may indicate an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

  • 41.
    Wåhlén, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Fornander, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olausson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ydreborg, Kjell
    Clinic of Otorhinolaryngology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Graff, Pål
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Protein profiles of nasal lavage fluid from individuals with work-related upper airway symptoms associated to moldy and damp buildings2016In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 743-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Upper airway irritation is common among individuals working in moldy and damp buildings. The aim was to investigate effects on the protein composition of the nasal lining fluid. The prevalence of symptoms in relation to work was examined in 37 individuals working in two damp buildings. Microbial growth was confirmed in one of the buildings. Nasal lavage fluid was collected from 29 exposed subjects and 13 controls. Protein profiles were investigated with a proteomic approach and evaluated by multivariate statistical models. Subjects from both workplaces reported upper airway and ocular symptoms. Based on protein profiles, symptomatic subjects in the two workplaces were discriminated from each other and separated from healthy controls. The groups differed in proteins involved in inflammation and host defense. Measurements of innate immunity proteins showed a significant increa e of protein S100-A8 and decrease of SPLUNC1 in subjects from one workplace while alpha-1-antitrypsin was elevated in subjects from the other workplace, compared to healthy controls. The results show that protein profiles in nasal lavage fluid can be used to monitor airway mucosal effects in personnel working in damp buildings and indicate that the profile may be separate when the dampness is associated with the presence of molds.

  • 42.
    Yuan, Xi-Ming
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Sultana, Nargis
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Siraj, Nabeel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ward, Liam J
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Li, Wei
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Autophagy Induction Protects Against 7-Oxysterol-induced Cell Death via Lysosomal Pathway and Oxidative Stress2016In: Journal of cell death, ISSN 1179-0660, no 9, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    7-Oxysterols are major toxic components in oxidized low-density lipoprotein and human atheroma lesions, which cause lysosomal mem-brane permeabilization (LMP) and cell death. Autophagy may function as a survival mechanism in this process. Here, we investigated whether 7-oxysterols mixed in an atheroma-relevant proportion induce autophagy, whether autophagy induction influences 7-oxysterol-mediated cell death, and the underlying mechanisms, by focusing on cellular lipid levels, oxidative stress, and LMP in 7-oxysterol-treated macrophages. We found that 7-oxysterols induced cellular lipid accumulation, autophagy dysfunction, and cell death in the form of both apoptosis and necrosis. Exposure to 7-oxysterols induced autophagic vacu-ole synthesis in the form of increased autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3) and LC3-phosphatidylethanolamine conjugate (LC3-II) and autophagic vacuole formation. This led to an accumulation of p62, indicating a reduction in autophagic vacuole degradation. Importantly, autophagy induction significantly reduced 7-oxysterol-mediated cell death by diminishing LMP and oxidative stress. Moreover, autophagy induction minimized cellular lipid accumulation induced by 7-oxysterols. These findings highlight the importance of autophagy in combating cellular stress, LMP, and cell death in atherosclerosis. Therefore, activation of the autophagy pathway may be a potential therapeutic strategy for prevention of necrotic core formation in atherosclerotic lesions.

  • 43.
    Yuan, Ximing
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ward, Liam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Forssell, Claes
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Siraj, Nabeel
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Univ Alberta, Dept Internal Med, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
    Li, Wei
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carotid Atheroma From Men Has Significantly Higher Levels of Inflammation and Iron Metabolism Enabled by Macrophages2018In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 419-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose-Men differ from women in the manifestation of atherosclerosis and iron metabolism. Intraplaque hemorrhage and hemoglobin (Hb) catabolism by macrophages are associated with atherosclerotic lesion instability. The study aims were to investigate sex differences in (1) lesion severity in relation to blood Hb, (2) iron homeostasis in human carotid plaques, and (3) macrophage polarization within atheroma. Methods-The carotid artery samples from 39 men and 23 women were immunostained with cell markers for macrophages, smooth muscle cells, ferritin, and TfR1 (transferrin receptor 1), which were further analyzed according to sex in relation to iron, Hb, and lipids in circulation. Additionally, samples of predefined regions from human carotid atherosclerotic lesions, including internal controls, were used for proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry. Results-Male patients, compared with women, had larger necrotic cores and more plaque rupture, which were associated with higher levels of Hb. Atheroma of male patients had significantly higher levels of Hb in circulation and CD68 macrophages, ferritin, and TfR1 in lesions. CD68 macrophages were significantly correlated with ferritin and TfR1. Plaques from male patients comparatively possessed higher levels of inflammatory macrophage subsets, CD86 (M1) and CD163 (M2), but lower levels of STF (serotransferrin) and HPX (hemopexin). Conclusions-Male patients with carotid atheroma had more advanced and ruptured lesions associated with significantly higher levels of inflammatory macrophage infiltration and high iron stores in the blood and in their plaques. These findings help to understand sex differences and iron metabolism in atherosclerosis and factors related to atheroma progression.

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