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  • 1.
    Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction in water–fat MRI2015In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 468-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the water-signal performance of the consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction (CIIC) method to correct for intensity inhomogeneities METHODS: Water-fat volumes were acquired using 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T symmetrically sampled 2-point Dixon three-dimensional MRI. Two datasets: (i) 10 muscle tissue regions of interest (ROIs) from 10 subjects acquired with both 1.5T and 3.0T whole-body MRI. (ii) Seven liver tissue ROIs from 36 patients imaged using 1.5T MRI at six time points after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. The performance of CIIC was evaluated quantitatively by analyzing its impact on the dispersion and bias of the water image ROI intensities, and qualitatively using side-by-side image comparisons.

    RESULTS:

    CIIC significantly ( P1.5T≤2.3×10-4,P3.0T≤1.0×10-6) decreased the nonphysiological intensity variance while preserving the average intensity levels. The side-by-side comparisons showed improved intensity consistency ( Pint⁡≤10-6) while not introducing artifacts ( Part=0.024) nor changed appearances ( Papp≤10-6).

    CONCLUSION:

    CIIC improves the spatiotemporal intensity consistency in regions of a homogenous tissue type. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2014.

  • 2.
    Angelison, L.
    et al.
    Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Almer, S.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Eriksson, A.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital Östra, Sweden.
    Karling, P.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Fagerberg, U.
    Västmanlands Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, J.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Thorn, M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Björk, J.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hindorf, U.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Löfberg, R.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bajor, A.
    Södera Älvsborgs sjukhus, Borås, Sweden.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hammarlund, P.
    Ängelholm Hospital, Sweden.
    Grip, O.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Torp, J.
    Kristianstad Central Hospital, Sweden.
    Marsal, J.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hertervig, E.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Long-term outcome of infliximab treatment in chronic active ulcerative colitis: a Swedish multicentre study of 250 patients2017In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 519-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Real-life long-term data on infliximab treatment in ulcerative colitis are limited. Aim To study the long-term efficacy and safety of infliximab in chronic active ulcerative colitis and possible predictors of colectomy and response were also examined. Methods A retrospective multi-centre study of infliximab treatment in 250 patients with chronic active ulcerative colitis with inclusion criteria: age 18 years, ambulatory treated, steroid-dependent or intolerant and/or immunomodulator refractory or intolerant. Results Steroid-free clinical remission was achieved by 123/250 patients (49.2%) at 12 months and in 126/250 patients at a median follow-up of 2.9 years (50.4%). Primary response at 3 months was achieved by 190/250 (76.0%) patients and associated with a high probability of response 168/190 (88.4%) at 12 months and 143/190 (75.3%) at follow-up. Long-term rate of colectomy in primary responders was 6/190 (3.2%) at 12 months and 27/190 (14.2%) at last follow-up. Failure to achieve response at 3 months was associated with a high risk of subsequent colectomy, 29/60 (48.3%) at 12 months and 41/60 (68.3%) at follow-up. Response at 12 months was associated with a low risk of subsequent colectomy, 14/181 (7.7%) compared with non-response 19/34 (55.9%) (P amp;lt; 0.0001). Non-response at 3 months was an independent predictor of subsequent colectomy (HR = 9.40, 95% CI = 5.10-17.35, P amp;lt; 0.001). Concomitant azathioprine therapy did not influence outcome in terms of colectomy. Conclusions Long-term efficacy of infliximab treatment in chronic active ulcerative colitis is excellent especially in patients who respond to induction treatment. Conversely, non-response at 3 months predicts a poor outcome, with a high risk of subsequent colectomy.

  • 3.
    Bednarska, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tapper, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lowén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Neurotransmittor Concentration in Pregenual ACC in Stool Consistency Patient Subgroups With IBS2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC) is a key region of the central autonomic brain network. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is characterized abdominal pain and bowel habit disturbances. Autonomic dysregulation has been reported in IBS as well as altered ACC activation in pregenual ACC during visceral stimulation 1 2. Glutamate is the major excitatory and Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain.

    Aim & Methods

    We aimed to measure neurotransmitter concentration in the pregenual ACC, in stool consistency subgroups with IBS by using quantitative neurotransmitter Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (qMRS)Seven patients with IBS-mixed (6 women) and five patients with IBS -diarrhea (4 women) according to Rome 3 were included. Mean age was 34.2 years (SD 5.3) with no significant difference between subgroups.  Patients completed symptom severity score (IBS-SSS). Quantitative MRS was measured in a 3T MRI scanner. A water-suppressed MEGA-PRESS sequence (TR 2.0 s, TE 68 ms) was used with the editing pulses placed at 1.90 ppm (‘ON-dynamics’) and at 7.46 ppm (‘OFF-dynamics’) with a voxel (3x3x3 cm3) placed in the pACC. Each MEGA-PRESS measurement resulted in a sequence of 40 OFF- and ON-dynamics, where each was computed by 8 phase cycles. Directly after each water-suppressed MEGA-PRESS measurement, a shorter 2-dynamic unsuppressed water MEGA-PRESS measurement was performed within the same voxel, which was used to obtain the concentrations in physically well-defined units of [mM]. The GABA concentrations were computed by averaging the difference spectra obtained by subtracting each OFF-dynamic from subsequent ON-dynamic and using LCModel (Version 6.3) for the final quantification. The Glutamate concentrations were obtained by only averaging the OFF-dynamics, which were not affected by the editing pulses. Additionally, all dynamics were phase and frequency corrected prior to the averaging. For group comparison unpaired T-tests were used.

    Results

    Patients had moderate to severe symptoms with IBS-SSS of 367 (SD 79.7). There was no significant difference between IBS subgroups in terms of IBS-SSS. Mean pACC GABA concentration was 1.66 (SD 0.17) mM in IBS-M and 1.65 (SD 0.27) mM in IBS-D. There was no significant difference between groups (p=0.9). Mean pACC Glutamate concentration was 4.54 (0.35) mM in IBS-M and 5.13 (SD 0.64) mM in IBS-D. There was no significant difference between groups, although a trend with p=0.06 was observed.

    Conclusion

    Further qMRS data have to be collected in IBS patients as well as healthy controls to evaluate if IBS subgroups demonstrate alterations in pACC glutamate and GABA concentrations

  • 4.
    Bednarska, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Casado-Bedmar, Maite
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Salvo-Romero, Eloisa
    University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Vicario, Maria
    University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide and Mast Cells Regulate Increased Passage of Colonic Bacteria in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome2017In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 153, no 4, p. 948-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND amp; AIMS: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with intestinal dysbiosis and symptoms of IBS develop following gastroenteritis. We aimed to study the passage of live bacteria through the colonic epithelium, and determine the role of mast cells (MCs) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in barrier regulation in IBS and healthy individuals. METHODS: Colon biopsies from 32 women with IBS and 15 age-matched healthy women (controls) were mounted in Ussing chambers; we measured numbers of fluorescently labeled Escherichia coli HS and Salmonella typhimurium that passed through from the mucosal side to the serosal side of the tissue. Some biopsies were exposed to agents that block the VIP receptors (VPAC1 and VPAC2) or MCs. Levels of VIP and tryptase were measured in plasma and biopsy lysates. Number of MCs and MCs that express VIP or VIP receptors were quantified by immunofluorescence. Biopsies from an additional 5 patients with IBS and 4 controls were mounted in chambers and Salmonella were added; we studied passage routes through the epithelium by transmission electron microscopy and expression of tight junctions by confocal microscopy. RESULTS: In colon biopsies from patients with IBS, larger numbers of E coli HS and S typhimurium passed through the epithelium than in biopsies from controls (P amp;lt;.0005). In transmission electron microscopy analyses, bacteria were found to cross the epithelium via only the transcellular route. Bacterial passage was reduced in biopsies from patients with IBS and controls after addition of antibodies against VPACs or ketotifen, which inhibits MCs. Plasma samples from patients with IBS had higher levels of VIP than plasma samples from controls. Biopsies from patients with IBS had higher levels of tryptase, larger numbers of MCs, and a higher percentage of MCs that express VPAC1 than biopsies from controls. In biopsies from patients with IBS, addition of Salmonella significantly reduced levels of occludin; subsequent addition of ketotifen significantly reversed this effect. CONCLUSIONS: We found that colonic epithelium tissues from patients with IBS have increased translocation of commensal and pathogenic live bacteria compared with controls. The mechanisms of increased translocation include MCs and VIP.

  • 5.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    et al.
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bujanda, Luis
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Univ Basque Country, Spain.
    Bresso, Francesca
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Simren, Magnus
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Nardone, Gerardo
    Univ Federico II, Italy.
    Cuomo, Rosario
    Federico II Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Usai-Satta, Paolo
    Azienda Osped G Brotzu, Italy.
    Galeazzi, Francesca
    Padova Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Neri, Matteo
    G DAnnunzio Univ and Fdn, Italy; G DAnnunzio Univ and Fdn, Italy.
    Portincasa, Piero
    Univ Bari, Italy.
    Bellini, Massimo
    Univ Pisa, Italy.
    Barbara, Giovanni
    Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Latiano, Anna
    Casa Sollievo Sofferenza Hosp, Italy.
    Huebenthal, Matthias
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    Thijs, Vincent
    Florey Inst Neurosci and Mental Hlth, Australia.
    Netea, Mihai G.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Univ Bonn, Germany.
    Jonkers, Daisy
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Chang, Lin
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Wouters, Mira M.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Boeckxstaens, Guy
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Camilleri, Michael
    Mayo Clin, MN USA; Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Franke, Andre
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    Zhernakova, Alexandra
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Netherlands.
    DAmato, Mauro
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ikerbasque, Spain.
    Female-Specific Association Between Variants on Chromosome 9 and Self-Reported Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome2018In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 155, no 1, p. 168-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND amp; AIMS: Genetic factors are believed to affect risk for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but there have been no sufficiently powered and adequately sized studies. To identify DNA variants associated with IBS risk, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the large UK Biobank population-based cohort, which includes genotype and health data from 500,000 participants. METHODS: We studied 7,287,191 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms in individuals who self-reported a doctors diagnosis of IBS (cases; n = 9576) compared to the remainder of the cohort (controls; n = 336,499) (mean age of study subjects, 40-69 years). Genome-wide significant findings were further investigated in 2045 patients with IBS from tertiary centers and 7955 population controls from Europe and the United States, and a small general population sample from Sweden (n = 249). Functional annotation of GWAS results was carried out by integrating data from multiple biorepositories to obtain biological insights from the observed associations. RESULTS: We identified a genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9q31.2 (single nucleotide polymorphism rs10512344; P = 3.57 x 10(-8)) in a region previously linked to age at menarche, and 13 additional loci of suggestive significance (P amp;lt; 5.0 x 10(-6)). Sex-stratified analyses revealed that the variants at 9q31.2 affect risk of IBS in women only (P = 4.29 x 10(-10) in UK Biobank) and also [GRAPHICS] associate with constipation-predominant IBS in women (P = .015 in the tertiary cohort) and harder stools in women (P = .0012 in the population-based sample). Functional annotation of the 9q31.2 locus identified 8 candidate genes, including the elongator complex protein 1 gene (ELP1 or IKB-KAP), which is mutated in patients with familial dysautonomia. CONCLUSIONS: In a sufficiently powered GWAS of IBS, we associated variants at the locus 9q31.2 with risk of IBS in women. This observation may provide additional rationale for investigating the role of sex hormones and autonomic dysfunction in IBS.

  • 6.
    Borssen, Åsa D.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Annika
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Weiland, Ola
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Verbaan, Hans
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Werner, Marten
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Histological improvement of liver fibrosis in well-treated patients with autoimmune hepatitis A cohort study2017In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 34, article id e7708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic autoimmune liver disease that if left untreated may lead to the development of cirrhosis. Previous studies on AIH patients have suggested that fibrosis and even cirrhosis can be reversed by medical treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of medical treatment for protection of developing fibrosis and cirrhosis. A total of 258 liver biopsies from 101 patients (72 women, 29 men) were analyzed by a single pathologist and classified according to the Ishak grading (inflammation) and staging (fibrosis) system. Liver histology was stratified according to the temporal changes of fibrosis stage (increased, decreased, or stable), and groups were compared. Complete or partial response to medical treatment was 94.9%. Reduction of fibrosis stage from the first to the last biopsy was seen in 63 patients (62.4%). We found an association between a reduction in the fibrosis stage and continuous glucocorticoid medication, as well as lowered scores of inflammation at last biopsy. Twenty-one patients had cirrhosis (Ishak stage 6) at least in one of the previous biopsies, but only 5 patients at the last biopsy. Histological improvement is common in AIH patients that respond to medical treatment, and a reduction or stabilization of fibrosis stage occurs in about 2/3 of such patients.

  • 7.
    Bouma, Gerd
    et al.
    Vrije University, Netherlands.
    Münch, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Microscopic Colitis2015In: Digestive Diseases, ISSN 0257-2753, E-ISSN 1421-9875, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 208-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is the common denominator for lymphocytic and collagenous colitis (CC). It is now recognized as a relatively frequent cause of diarrhea that equals the prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease. Patients are typically middle-aged women, but disease may occur at every age. Patients with MC report watery, non-bloody diarrhea in the absence of endoscopic and radiologic abnormalities. Lymphocytic colitis is characterized by an increased number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, and CC by a thickened subepithelial collagen band, whereas in both an increased mononuclear infiltration of the lamina propria is found. The pathogenesis of MC is largely unknown, but may relate to autoimmunity, adverse reactions to drugs or (bacterial) toxins, and abnormal collagen metabolism in the case of CC. Budesonide is so far the only drug that has proven efficacy in randomized controlled trials both for the induction and maintenance of remission. Patients who are nonresponsive, dependent or who experience side effects on budesonide may benefit from thiopurine or anti-TNF treatment, but these options are still experimental. The long-term prognosis of MC is good; it does not appear to predispose to malignancies and can in some cases be self-limiting. Further research and randomized clinical trials are required to expand our understanding of the natural course and the pathogenesis of MC.

  • 8.
    Buzzetti, Elena
    et al.
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Hall, Andrew
    Royal Free Hosp, England; Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Manuguerra, Roberta
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Misas, Marta Guerrero
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Covelli, Claudia
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Leandro, Gioacchino
    S de Bellis Res Hosp, Italy.
    Luong, TuVinh
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Manesis, Emanuel K.
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Pinzani, Massimo
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Dhillon, Amar P.
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A.
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Collagen proportionate area is an independent predictor of long-term outcome in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2019In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 1214-1222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Collagen proportionate area (CPA) measurement is a technique that quantifies fibrous tissue in liver biopsies by measuring the amount of collagen deposition as a proportion of the total biopsy area. CPA predicts clinical outcomes in patients with HCV and can sub-classify cirrhosis. Aim To test the ability of CPA to quantify fibrosis and predict clinical outcomes in patients with NAFLD. Methods We assessed consecutive patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD from three European centres. Clinical and laboratory data were collected at baseline and at the time of the last clinical follow-up or death. CPA was performed at two different objective magnifications, whole biopsy macro and x4 objective magnification, named standard (SM) and high (HM) magnification respectively. The correlation between CPA and liver stiffness was assessed in a sub-group of patients. Results Of 437 patients, 32 (7.3%) decompensated and/or died from liver-related causes during a median follow-up of 103 months. CPA correlated with liver stiffness and liver fibrosis stage across the whole spectrum of fibrosis. HM CPA was significantly higher than SM CPA in stages F0-F3 but similar in cirrhosis, reflecting a higher ability to capture pericellular/perisinusoidal fibrosis at early stages. Age at baseline (HR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01-1.08), HM CPA (HR: 1.04 per 1% increase, 95% CI: 1.01-1.08) and presence of advanced fibrosis (HR: 15.4, 95% CI: 5.02-47.84) were independent predictors of liver-related clinical outcomes at standard and competing risk multivariate Cox-regression analysis. Conclusions CPA accurately measures fibrosis and is an independent predictor of clinical outcomes in NAFLD; hence it merits further evaluation as a surrogate endpoint in clinical trials.

  • 9. Bäckman, C
    et al.
    Ahlberg, M
    Jones, C
    Walther, S
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Group conversations after a long stay in the intensive care2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Daferera, Niki
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kumar Kumawat, Ashok
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Hultgren-Hornquist, Elisabeth
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Münch, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Fecal stream diversion and mucosal cytokine levels in collagenous colitis: A case report2015In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 21, no 19, p. 6065-6071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this case report, we examined the levels of cytokines expressed before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored in a patient with collagenous colitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with chronic, active collagenous colitis who either failed to achieve clinical remission or experienced adverse effects with the following drugs: loperamide, cholestyramine, budesonide, methotrexate and adalimumab. Due to the intractable nature of the disease and because the patient was having up to 15 watery bowel movements per day, she underwent a temporary ileostomy. Colonic biopsies were analyzed for mucosal cytokine protein levels before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored. Mucosal protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1 beta, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17 A, IL-23, TNF, IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 were all higher during active disease and decreased to non-detectable or considerably lower levels during fecal stream diversion. One month after the restoration of bowel continuity, when the patient experienced a relapse of symptoms, IL-2, IL-23 and IL-21 levels were again increased. Our results indicate that fecal stream diversion in this patient suppressed the levels of all cytokines analyzed in colonic biopsies. With the recurrence of clinical symptoms and histological changes after bowel reconstruction, the levels of primarily proinflammatory cytokines increased. Our findings support the hypothesis that a luminal factor triggers the inflammation observed in collagenous colitis.

  • 11.
    Danielsson Borssen, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Annika
    Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Weiland, Ola
    Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Verbaan, Hans
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Werner, Marten
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Epidemiology and causes of death in a Swedish cohort of patients with autoimmune hepatitis2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 1022-1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidemiological studies of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) show varying figures on prevalence and incidence, and data on the long-term prognosis are scarce.Objective To investigate the epidemiology, long-term prognosis and causes of death in a Swedish AIH cohort.Material and methods: Data collected from 634 AIH patients were matched to the Cause of Death Registry, and survival analyses were made. Prevalence and incidence were calculated for university hospitals with full coverage of cases and compared to the County of Vasterbotten in Northern Sweden.Results: AIH point prevalence was 17.3/100,000 inhabitants in 2009, and the yearly incidence 1990-2009 was 1.2/100,000 inhabitants and year. The time between diagnosis and end of follow-up, liver transplantation or death was in median 11.3 years (range 0-51.5 years). Men were diagnosed earlier (pamp;lt;.001) and died younger than women (p=.002). No gender differences were found concerning transplant-free, overall survival and liver-related death. Cirrhosis at diagnosis was linked to an inferior survival (pamp;lt;.001). Liver-related death was the most common cause of death (32.7%). The relative survival started to diverge from the general population 4 years after diagnosis but a distinct decline was not observed until after more than 10 years.Conclusions: Long-term survival was reduced in patients with AIH. No gender difference regarding prognosis was seen but men died younger, probably as a result of earlier onset of disease. Cirrhosis at diagnosis was a risk factor for poor prognosis and the overall risk of liver-related death was increased.

  • 12.
    Dulai, Parambir S
    et al.
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA..
    Singh, Siddharth
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
    Patel, Janki
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
    Soni, Meera
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
    Prokop, Larry J
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
    Younossi, Zobair
    Department of Medicine, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA.
    Sebastiani, Giada
    McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wong, Vincent Wai-Sun
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Loomba, Rohit
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
    Increased risk of mortality by fibrosis stage in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.2017In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 65, no 5, p. 1557-1565Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Liver fibrosis is the most important predictor of mortality in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Quantitative risk of mortality by fibrosis stage has not been systematically evaluated. We aimed to quantify the fibrosis stage-specific risk of all-cause and liver-related mortality in NAFLD.

    METHODS: Through a systematic review and meta-analysis, we identified 5 adult NAFLD cohort studies reporting fibrosis stage specific mortality (0-4). Using fibrosis stage 0 as a reference population, fibrosis stage-specific mortality rate ratios (MRR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), for all-cause and liver-related mortality, were estimated. The study is reported according to the PRISMA statement.

    RESULTS: 1,495 NAFLD patients with 17,452 patient years of follow-up were included. Compared to NAFLD patients with no fibrosis (stage 0), NAFLD patients with fibrosis were at an increased risk for all-cause mortality and this risk increased with increase in the stage of fibrosis: stage 1, MRR, 1.58 (95% CI 1.19-2.11); stage 2, MRR, 2.52 (95% CI 1.85-3.42); stage 3, MRR, 3.48 (95% CI 2.51-4.83), and stage 4, MRR, 6.40 (95% CI 4.11-9.95). The results were more pronounced as the risk of liver-related mortality increased exponentially with increase in the stage of fibrosis: stage 1, MRR, 1.41 (95% CI 0.17-11.95); stage 2, MRR, 9.57 (95% CI 1.67-54.93); stage 3, MRR, 16.69 (95% CI 2.92-95.36); and stage 4, MRR, 42.30 (95% CI 3.51-510.34).

    LIMITATIONS: Inability to adjust for co-morbid conditions or demographics known to impact fibrosis progression in NAFLD, and the inclusion of patients with simple steatosis and NASH without fibrosis in the reference comparison group.

    CONCLUSION: The risk of liver-related mortality increases exponentially with increase in fibrosis stage. These data have important implications in assessing utility of each stage and benefits of regression of fibrosis from one stage to another. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Ek, Weronica E
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Reznichenko, Anna
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Ripke, Stephan
    Massachusetts General Hospital Boston, Cambridge Massachussetts, USA .
    Niesler, Beate
    University of Heidelberg, Germany .
    Zucchelli, Marco
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Rivera, Natalia V
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Schmidt, Peter T
    University Hospital, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm .
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Magnusson, Patrik
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Talley, Nicholas J
    University of Newcastle, Australia .
    Holliday, Elizabeth G
    University of Newcastle, Australia .
    Houghton, Lesley
    University of Manchester UK and Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville USA.
    Gazouli, Maria
    University of Athens, Greece .
    Karamanolis, George
    University of Athens, Greece .
    Rappold, Gudrun
    University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    University Women's Clinic, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Surowy, Harald
    University Women's Clinic, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Rafter, Joseph
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Assadi, Ghazaleh
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Li, Ling
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Papadaki, Evangelia
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Gambaccini, Dario
    University of Pisa, Pisa Italy .
    Marchi, Santino
    University of Pisa, Pisa Italy .
    Colucci, Rocchina
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine University of Pisa, Italy .
    Blandizzi, Corrado
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine University of Pisa, Italy .
    Barbaro, Raffaella
    University of Bologna, Italy .
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University .
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Skånes University Hospital, Malmö .
    Tornblom, Hans
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg.
    Bresso, Francesca
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm .
    Andreasson, Anna
    Sweden Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Karolinska Instituet, Stockholm .
    Simren, Magnus
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet Stockholm .
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Boeckxstaens, Guy
    Leuven University, Leuven, Belgium .
    Bellini, Massimo
    University of Pisa, Italy .
    Stanghellini, Vincenzo
    University of Bologna, Italy .
    Barbara, Giovanni
    University of Bologna, Italy .
    Daly, Mark J
    Massachusetts General Hospital Boston, Cambridge Massachussetts, USA .
    Camilleri, Michael
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA .
    Wouters, Mira M
    Leuven University, Belgium .
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Exploring the genetics of irritable bowel syndrome: a GWA study in the general population and replication in multinational case-control cohorts.2015In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 64, p. 1774-1782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: IBS shows genetic predisposition, but adequately powered gene-hunting efforts have been scarce so far. We sought to identify true IBS genetic risk factors by means of genome-wide association (GWA) and independent replication studies.

    DESIGN: We conducted a GWA study (GWAS) of IBS in a general population sample of 11 326 Swedish twins. IBS cases (N=534) and asymptomatic controls (N=4932) were identified based on questionnaire data. Suggestive association signals were followed-up in 3511 individuals from six case-control cohorts. We sought genotype-gene expression correlations through single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-expression quantitative trait loci interactions testing, and performed in silico prediction of gene function. We compared candidate gene expression by real-time qPCR in rectal mucosal biopsies of patients with IBS and controls.

    RESULTS: One locus at 7p22.1, which includes the genes KDELR2 (KDEL endoplasmic reticulum protein retention receptor 2) and GRID2IP (glutamate receptor, ionotropic, delta 2 (Grid2) interacting protein), showed consistent IBS risk effects in the index GWAS and all replication cohorts and reached p=9.31×10(-6) in a meta-analysis of all datasets. Several SNPs in this region are associated with cis effects on KDELR2 expression, and a trend for increased mucosal KDLER2 mRNA expression was observed in IBS cases compared with controls.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that general population-based studies combined with analyses of patient cohorts provide good opportunities for gene discovery in IBS. The 7p22.1 and other risk signals detected in this study constitute a good starting platform for hypothesis testing in future functional investigations.

  • 14.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hagström, Hannes
    Unit of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stal, Per
    Unit of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Unit of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score and Mortality: Imperfect But Not Insignificant REPLY2016In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 310-311Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hagström, Hannes
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stål, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fibrosis stage is the strongest predictor for disease-specific mortality in NAFLD after up to 33 years of follow-up2015In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 1547-1554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and rationale for the study: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, strongly associated with insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, i.e. fatty liver accompanied by necroinflammatory changes, is mostly defined by the NAFLD activity score (NAS). The aim of the current study was to determine disease-specific mortality in NAFLD, and evaluate the NAS and fibrosis stage as prognostic markers for overall and disease-specific mortality. Methods: In a cohort study, data from 229 well-characterized patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD were collected. Mean follow-up was 26.4 (± 5.6, range 6-33) years. A reference population was obtained from the National Registry of Population, and information on time and cause of death were obtained from the Registry of Causes of Death. Main results: NAFLD patients had an increased mortality compared with the reference population (HR 1.29, CI 1.04-1.59, p=0.020), with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (HR 1.55, CI 1.11-2.15, p=0.01), hepatocellular carcinoma (HR 6.55, CI 2.14-20.03, p=0.001), infectious disease (HR 2.71, CI 1.02-7.26, p=0.046), and cirrhosis (HR 3.2, CI 1.05-9.81, p=0.041). Overall mortality was not increased in patients with NAS 5-8 and fibrosis stage 0-2 (HR 1.41, CI 0.97-2.06, p=0.07), whereas patients with fibrosis stage 3-4, irrespective of NAS, had increased mortality (HR 3.3, CI 2.27-4.76, p<0.001). Conclusions: NAFLD patients have increased risk of death, with a high risk of death from cardiovascular disease and liver-related disease. The NAS was not able to predict overall mortality, whereas fibrosis stage predicted both overall and disease-specific mortality.

  • 16.
    Fagerström, Carola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Living With Liver Cirrhosis A Vulnerable Life2017In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 38-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liver cirrhosis is a chronic liver disease. Patients with liver cirrhosis need to manage the symptoms of the disease and possible complications. Symptoms due to ascites, encephalopathy, and/ or varices are hard to manage and live with. Self-care is necessary for coping with the symptoms and for improving the patients life situation. The aim of this study was to explore the areas of life situation and self-care among patients suffering from liver cirrhosis with complications. Interviews with patients with liver cirrhosis (n = 13), seven women and six men (46-70 years), were performed. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The experience of the patients life situation was described from two aspects: vulnerability and reflection on life. Vulnerability was expressed as symptom experience, feelings of loneliness, preconceptions, and limits in daily life. In reflection on life, the patients expressed acceptance and sadness. Self-care dealt with (a) being responsible by observing symptoms and signs; (b) adhering to treatment, prescription, and advice; and (c) the need for more understanding of and information about the disease. When caring for patients with liver cirrhosis, it is important to identify symptoms and feelings and help patients individually to maintain health through self-care.

  • 17.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort2019In: PLOS COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY, Vol. 15, no 6, article id e1007157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimation of liver function is important to monitor progression of chronic liver disease (CLD). A promising method is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with gadoxetate, a liver-specific contrast agent. For this method, we have previously developed a model for an average healthy human. Herein, we extended this model, by combining it with a patient-specific non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with CLD of varying severity and etiologies. The model explained all MRI data and adequately predicted both timepoints saved for validation and gadoxetate concentrations in both plasma and biopsies. The validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function vary across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate. These mechanisms are shared across many liver functions and can now be estimated from standard clinical images. Author summary Being able to accurately and reliably estimate liver function is important when monitoring the progression of patients with liver disease, as well as when identifying drug-induced liver injury during drug development. A promising method for quantifying liver function is to use magnetic resonance imaging combined with gadoxetate. Gadoxetate is a liver-specific contrast agent, which is taken up by the hepatocytes and excreted into the bile. We have previously developed a mechanistic model for gadoxetate dynamics using averaged data from healthy volunteers. In this work, we extended our model with a non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework to give patient-specific estimates of the gadoxetate transport-rates. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with liver disease, covering a range of severity and etiologies. All patients underwent an MRI-examination and provided both blood and liver biopsies. Our validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function varies across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate.

  • 18.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Wolfram MathCore AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Comparing hepatic 2D and 3D magnetic resonance elastography methods in a clinical setting – Initial experiences2015In: European Journal of Radiology Open, E-ISSN 2352-0477, Vol. 2, p. 66-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Continuous monitoring of liver fibrosis progression in patients is not feasible with the current diagnostic golden standard (needle biopsy). Recently, magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a promising method for such continuous monitoring. Since there are different MRE methods that could be used in a clinical setting there is a need to investigate whether measurements produced by these MRE methods are comparable. Hence, the purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the measurements of the viscoelastic properties produced by 2D (stiffness) and 3D (elasticity and ‘Gabs,Elastic’) MRE are comparable.

    Materials and methods

    Seven patients with diffuse or suspect diffuse liver disease were examined in the same day with the two MRE methods. 2D MRE was performed using an acoustic passive transducer, with a 1.5 T GE 450 W MR system. 3D MRE was performed using an electromagnetic active transducer, with a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MR system. Finally, mean viscoelastic values were extracted from the same anatomical region for both methods by an experienced radiologist.

    Results

    Stiffness correlated well with the elasticity, R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 1.08, intercept = 0.61 kPa), as well as with ‘Gabs,ElasticR2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 0.95, intercept = 0.28 kPa).

    Conclusion

    This pilot study shows that different MRE methods can produce comparable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of the liver. The existence of such comparable measurements is important, both from a clinical as well as a research perspective, since it allows for equipment-independent monitoring of disease progression.

  • 19.
    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo
    et al.
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bujanda, Luis
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Univ Basque Country, Spain.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Univ Basque Country, Spain.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Simren, Magnus
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Nardone, Gerardo
    University Federico II, Naples, Italy.
    Cuomo, Rosario
    Federico II Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Usai-Satta, Paolo
    Azienda Osped G Brotzu, Italy.
    Galeazzi, Francesca
    Padova Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Neri, Matteo
    G DAnnunzio Univ and Fdn, Italy.
    Portincasa, Piero
    G DAnnunzio Univ and Fdn, Italy.
    Bellini, Massimo
    Univ Bari, Italy.
    Barbara, Giovanni
    Univ Pisa, Italy.
    Jonkers, Daisy
    Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Eswaran, Shanti
    Univ Michigan, MI USA.
    Chey, William D.
    Univ Michigan, MI USA.
    Kashyap, Purna
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Chang, Lin
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Wouters, Mira M.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Boeckxstaens, Guy
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Camilleri, Michael
    Mayo Clin, MN USA; Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Franke, Andre
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands; Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    DAmato, Mauro
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Basque Sci Fdn, Spain.
    Increased Prevalence of Rare Sucrase-isomaltase Pathogenic Variants in Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients2018In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 16, no 10, p. 1673-1676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 20.
    Gawel, Danuta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Serra-Musach, Jordi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lilja, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aagesen, Jesper
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Arenas, Alex
    Univ Rovira and Virgili, Spain.
    Asking, Bengt
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Bengner, Malin
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Bjorkander, Janne
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Biggs, Sophie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Köpsén, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jung Lee, Eun Jung
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lentini, Antonio
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Li, Xinxiu
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Martinez, David
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nestor, Colm
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schafer, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Sonmez, Ceylan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stjernman, Henrik
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Tjärnberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wu, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Shalek, Alex K.
    MIT, MA 02139 USA; Broad Inst MIT and Harvard, MA 02142 USA; Ragon Inst MGH MIT and Harvard, MA USA.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden; Inst Clin Sci, Sweden.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    A validated single-cell-based strategy to identify diagnostic and therapeutic targets in complex diseases2019In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 11, article id 47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Genomic medicine has paved the way for identifying biomarkers and therapeutically actionable targets for complex diseases, but is complicated by the involvement of thousands of variably expressed genes across multiple cell types. Single-cell RNA-sequencing study (scRNA-seq) allows the characterization of such complex changes in whole organs.

    Methods

    The study is based on applying network tools to organize and analyze scRNA-seq data from a mouse model of arthritis and human rheumatoid arthritis, in order to find diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Diagnostic validation studies were performed using expression profiling data and potential protein biomarkers from prospective clinical studies of 13 diseases. A candidate drug was examined by a treatment study of a mouse model of arthritis, using phenotypic, immunohistochemical, and cellular analyses as read-outs.

    Results

    We performed the first systematic analysis of pathways, potential biomarkers, and drug targets in scRNA-seq data from a complex disease, starting with inflamed joints and lymph nodes from a mouse model of arthritis. We found the involvement of hundreds of pathways, biomarkers, and drug targets that differed greatly between cell types. Analyses of scRNA-seq and GWAS data from human rheumatoid arthritis (RA) supported a similar dispersion of pathogenic mechanisms in different cell types. Thus, systems-level approaches to prioritize biomarkers and drugs are needed. Here, we present a prioritization strategy that is based on constructing network models of disease-associated cell types and interactions using scRNA-seq data from our mouse model of arthritis, as well as human RA, which we term multicellular disease models (MCDMs). We find that the network centrality of MCDM cell types correlates with the enrichment of genes harboring genetic variants associated with RA and thus could potentially be used to prioritize cell types and genes for diagnostics and therapeutics. We validated this hypothesis in a large-scale study of patients with 13 different autoimmune, allergic, infectious, malignant, endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular diseases, as well as a therapeutic study of the mouse arthritis model.

    Conclusions

    Overall, our results support that our strategy has the potential to help prioritize diagnostic and therapeutic targets in human disease.

  • 21.
    Gerdin, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Department of Surgery, Höglandssjukhuset, Eksjö, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Anders S.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Northern Hospital Zeeland, Denmark.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Swedish Crohn Trial: A Prematurely Terminated Randomized Controlled Trial of Thiopurines or Open Surgery for Primary Treatment of Ileocaecal Crohns Disease2016In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 50-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: The importance of efficient and safe treatment of Crohns disease is highlighted by its chronicity. Both medical and surgical treatments have shown good results in the symptomatic control of limited ileocaecal Crohns disease. The aim of this study was to compare medical treatment with surgical treatment of ileocaecal Crohns disease. Methods: Thirty-six patients from seven hospitals with primary ileocaecal Crohns disease were randomized to either medical or surgical treatment. The medical treatment was induction of remission with budesonide and thereafter maintenance treatment with azathioprine. The surgical treatment was open ileocaecal resection. Crohns disease activity index over time, expressed as area under the curve at 1, 3 and 5 years, was the primary endpoint. Subjective health measured with the 36-item Short Form Survey Instrument (SF36) and a visual analogue scale (VAS) were secondary endpoints. Results: There were no differences between the treatment groups in Crohns disease activity index over time. General health, measured as SF36 score, was higher in patients receiving surgical treatment than in those receiving medical treatment at 1 year, but there was no corresponding difference in VAS. Due to the slow inclusion rate and changes in clinical practice, the study was t = erminated prematurely. Conclusion: The study ended up being underpowered and should be interpreted with caution, but there was no clinically significant difference between the two treatment arms. Further studies are needed to address this important clinical question.

  • 22.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Viktorsson, Lisa
    Carlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Jones, Michael P.
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Olsen Faresjö, Ashild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    More negative self-esteem and inferior coping strategies among patients diagnosed with IBS compared with patients without IBS - a case-control study in primary care2015In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 16, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, relapsing gastrointestinal disorder,that affects approximately 10% of the general population and the majority are diagnosed  in primary care. IBS has been reported to be associated with altered psychological and cognitive functioning such as mood disturbances, somatization, catastrophizing or altered visceral interoception by negative emotions and stress. The aim was to  investigate the psychosocial constructs of self-esteem and sense of coherence among IBS patients compared to non-IBS patients in primary care.     

    Methods

    A case–control study in primary care setting among IBS patients meeting the ROME III         criteria (n = 140) compared to controls i.e. non-IBS patients (n = 213) without any         present or previous gastrointestinal complaints. The data were collected through self-reportedquestionnaires of psychosocial factors.     

    Results

    IBS-patients reported significantly more negative self-esteem (p < 0.001), lower scores         for positive self-esteem (p < 0.001), and lower sense of coherence (p < 0.001) than the controls. The IBS-cases were also less likely to report ‘good’ health status (p < 0.001) and less likely to report a positive belief in the future (p < 0.001). After controlling for relevant confounding factors in multiple regressions, the elevation  in negative self-esteem among IBS patients remained statistically significant (p =0.02), as did the lower scores for sense of coherence among IBS cases (p = 0.04).     

    Conclusions

    The more frequently reported negative self-esteem and inferior coping strategies among         IBS patients found in this study suggest the possibility that psychological therapies         might be helpful for these patients. However these data do not indicate the causal         direction of the observed associations. More research is therefore warranted to determine whether these psychosocial constructs are more frequent in IBS patients.

  • 23.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Isfahan Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; BioDonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain.
    Belheouane, Meriem
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany; Max Planck Inst Evolutionary Biol, Germany.
    Vallier, Marie
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany; Max Planck Inst Evolutionary Biol, Germany.
    Sauer, Sascha
    Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med BIMSB BIH, Germany.
    Bang, Corinna
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    Bujanda, Luis
    BioDonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Univ Pais Vasco UPV EHU, Spain.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sci Life Lab, Sweden.
    Talley, Nicholas J.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Newcastle, Australia; Mayo Clin, MN USA; AGIRA, Australia.
    Rafter, Joseph
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Baines, John F.
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany; Max Planck Inst Evolutionary Biol, Germany.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Franke, Andre
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    DAmato, Mauro
    BioDonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Basque Sci Fdn, Spain.
    Faecal microbiota composition associates with abdominal pain in the general population2018In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 778-+Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 24.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Nutrition, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Belheouane, Meriem
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön, Germany; Institute for Experimental Medicine, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heinsen, Femke-Anouska
    Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Division for Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Agreus, Lars
    Division for Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Genomics Facility, Science for Life Laboratory, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Baines, John F
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön, Germany; Institute for Experimental Medicine, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Rafter, Joseph
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franke, Andre
    Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    DAmato, Mauro
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; BioCruces Health Research Institute and IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain.
    Stool frequency is associated with gut microbiota composition2017In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 559-560Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Cardiovascular risk factors in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2019In: Liver international (Print), ISSN 1478-3223, E-ISSN 1478-3231, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 197-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background amp; Aims Patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is unclear whether histological variables may help predict CVD risk. We evaluated histology and traditional CV risk factors as predictors of CVD outcomes in a large NAFLD cohort. Methods We included 603 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients free of baseline CVD and matched these (1:10, by age, sex and municipality) to 6269 population controls. All individuals were cross-linked to national registries to ascertain incident CVD events, defined as acute ischaemic heart disease or stroke. The presence of CV risk factors and liver histology were available in NAFLD patients only. Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) for incident CVD. Results During a mean follow-up of 18.6 years, 168 (28%) of NAFLD patients and 1325 (21%) of controls experienced a CVD event (HR 1.54, 95%CI 1.30-1.83). Within the NAFLD cohort, age, male sex, type 2 diabetes, smoking and triglycerides were associated with risk of CVD. Taking these CV risk factors into account, no histological parameter, including presence of NASH and fibrosis stage, were associated with incident CVD. Conclusions Patients with NAFLD are at an increased risk for CVD compared to matched controls, but histological parameters do not seem to independently predict this risk.

  • 26.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    et al.
    Department of Upper GI, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Stål, Per
    Department of Upper GI, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Department of Upper GI, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Accuracy of Noninvasive Scoring Systems in Assessing Risk of Death and Liver-Related Endpoints in Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease2019In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 1148-1156.e4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims

    Several non-invasive scoring systems have been developed to determine risk of advanced fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We examined the association between 4 scoring systems and incident severe liver disease and overall mortality in a large cohort of patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD.

    Methods

    We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 646 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD, recruited from 2 hospitals in Sweden, from 1971 through 2009. The NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS), FIB-4, APRI, and BARD scores were calculated at the time of the liver biopsy. Based on each score, patients were assigned to categories of low, intermediate, or high risk for advanced fibrosis. Overall mortality and severe liver disease (cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease, liver failure, or hepatocellular carcinoma) were ascertained through linkage with national registers until the end of 2014. Cox regression, area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve, and C-statistic analyses were used to study the predictive capacity of each scoring system.

    Results

    During a mean follow-up time of 19.9±8.7 years, there were 214 deaths and 76 cases of severe liver disease. For overall mortality, AUROC curve values were: NFS, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.68–0.76); FIB-4, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.68–0.76); BARD, 0.62 (95% CI, 0.58–0.66); and APRI, 0.52 (95% CI, 0.47–0.57). For severe liver disease, AUROC curve values were: NFS, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.66–0.78); FIB-4, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.66–0.79); BARD, 0.62 (95% CI, 0.55–0.69); APRI, 0.69 (95% CI, 0.63–0.76). C-statistics for all scores were of moderate capacity to predict outcomes.

    Conclusions

    In a retrospective analysis of data from 646 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD, we found the NFS and the FIB-4 scores to most accurately determine risk of overall death or severe liver disease. However, the AUROC values for these scoring systems are not high enough for use in the clinic; new systems are needed to determine prognoses of patients with NAFLD.

  • 27.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Center for Digestive Diseases, Unit of Hepatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Bottai, Matteo
    Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Center for Digestive Diseases, Unit of Hepatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Per
    Center for Digestive Diseases, Unit of Hepatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elevated serum ferritin is associated with increased mortality in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease after 16 years of follow-up2016In: Liver international (Print), ISSN 1478-3223, E-ISSN 1478-3231, Vol. 36, no 11, p. 1688-1695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: High levels of ferritin in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are associated with significant fibrosis and higher NAFLD activity score (NAS). It is unclear if this association has an impact on mortality. We investigated if high levels of ferritin, with or without iron overload, were associated with an increased mortality in NAFLD.

    METHODS: We included 222 patients between 1979 and 2009 with biopsy-proven NAFLD and available serum ferritin concentrations. The cohort was divided into "high" (n = 89) and "normal" (n = 133) ferritin values, using a cut-point of 350 μg/L in males, and 150 μg/L in females, and stratified upon iron overload status. Data on mortality was obtained from a national, population based register. Poisson regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for mortality. The estimates were adjusted for age at biopsy, sex, smoking, BMI, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and fibrosis stage at the time of biopsy.

    RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 15.6 years (range: 0.5-34.2). Patients with high ferritin had more advanced fibrosis and higher NAS than patients with normal ferritin (p < 0.05). Fifteen years after diagnosis, and after adjusting for confounders, the high-ferritin group showed an increasingly higher mortality that was statistically significant (Hazard ratio = 1.10 per year, 95% Confidence interval 1.01-1.21, p < 0.05). There was no difference in mortality between patients with different iron overload patterns.

    CONCLUSIONS: High levels of ferritin are associated with a long-term increased risk of death. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 28.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Fibrosis stage but not NASH predicts mortality and time to development of severe liver disease in biopsy-proven NAFLD2017In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 1265-1273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background amp; Aims: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is very common in the general population, but identifying patients with increased risk of mortality and liver-specific morbidity remains a challenge. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is thought to enhance this risk; therefore, resolution of NASH is a major endpoint in current pharmacologic studies. Herein, we aim to investigate the long-term prognosis of a large cohort of NAFLD patients, and to study the specific effect of NASH and fibrosis stage on prognosis. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 646 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients. Each case was matched for age, sex and municipality to ten controls. Outcomes on mortality and severe liver disease, defined as cirrhosis, liver decompensation/failure or hepatocellular carcinoma, were evaluated using population-based registers. Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex and type 2 diabetes were used to examine the long-term risk according to fibrosis stage. Likelihood ratio tests were used to assess whether adding NASH to these models increased the predictive capacity. Laplace regression was used to estimate the time to severe liver disease according to stage of fibrosis. Results: During a follow-up of mean 20 years (range 0-40) equivalent to 139,163 person-years, 12% of NAFLD patients and 2.2% of controls developed severe liver disease (p amp;lt; 0.001). Compared to controls, the risk of severe liver disease increased per stage of fibrosis (hazard ratio ranging from 1.9 in F0 to 104.9 in F4). Accounting for the presence of NASH did not change these estimates significantly (likelihood ratio test amp;gt; 0.05 for all stages of fibrosis). Similar results were seen for overall mortality. The lower end of the 95% confidence interval for the 10th percentile of time to development of severe liver disease was 22-26 years in F0-1, 9.3 years in F2, 2.3 years in F3, and 0.9 years to liver decompensation in F4. Conclusions: In this, the largest ever study of biopsy-proven NAFLD, the presence of NASH did not increase the risk of liver-specific morbidity or overall mortality. Knowledge of time to development of severe liver disease according to fibrosis stage can be used in individual patient counselling and for public health decisions. (C) 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 29.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Center for Digestive Diseases, Division of Hepatology Karolinska University HospitalStockholm Sweden. Department of Medicine, Huddinge Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden.
    Stål, Per
    Center for Digestive Diseases, Division of Hepatology Karolinska University Hospital Stockholm Sweden. Department of Medicine and Huddinge Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden..
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Center for Digestive Diseases, Division of Hepatology Karolinska University Hospital Stockholm Sweden. Department of Medicine and Huddinge Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden..
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Risk for development of severe liver disease in lean patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A long-term follow-up study.2018In: Hepatology communications, ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 48-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are overweight or obese. However, a significant proportion of patients have a normal body mass index (BMI), denoted as lean NAFLD. The long-term prognosis of lean NAFLD is unclear. We conducted a cohort study of 646 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Patients were defined as lean (BMI < 25.0), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9), or obese (BMI ≥ 30.0) at the time of biopsy. Each case was matched for age, sex, and municipality to 10 controls. Overall mortality and development of severe liver disease were evaluated using population-based registers. Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex, type 2 diabetes, and fibrosis stage were used to examine the long-term risk of mortality and liver-related events in lean and nonlean NAFLD. Lean NAFLD was seen in 19% of patients, while 52% were overweight and 29% were obese. Patients with lean NAFLD were older, had lower transaminases, lower stages of fibrosis, and lower prevalence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis at baseline compared to patients with a higher BMI. During a mean follow-up of 19.9 years (range 0.4-40 years) representing 12,631 person years and compared to patients who were overweight, patients with lean NAFLD had no increased risk for overall mortality (hazard ratio 1.06; P =  0.73) while an increased risk for development of severe liver disease was found (hazard ratio 2.69; P =  0.007). Conclusion: Although patients with lean NAFLD have lower stages of fibrosis, they are at higher risk for development of severe liver disease compared to patients with NAFLD and a higher BMI, independent of available confounders. (Hepatology Communications 2018;2:48-57).

  • 30.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Onnerhag, Kristina
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Sheikhi, Reza
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Low to moderate lifetime alcohol consumption is associated with less advanced stages of fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 159-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: Moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with a lower risk of disease severity in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). It is unclear if this reflects current or lifetime drinking, or can be attributed to confounders such as diet and exercise. We evaluated the impact of lifetime alcohol consumption on fibrosis severity in NAFLD. Methods: We prospectively enrolled 120 subjects with biopsy-proven NAFLD and through detailed questionnaires examined lifetime alcohol consumption, diet and physical activity. Main outcome measures were odds ratios (OR) for fibrosis stage, calculated through ordinal regression after adjustment for body mass index, diabetes mellitus type 2, smoking and age at biopsy. A biomarker for recent alcohol consumption, phosphatidyl ethanol (PEth) was sampled. Results: An increase in median weekly alcohol consumption to a maximum of 13 drinks per week was associated with lower fibrosis stage (adjusted OR for each incremental unit, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76-0.97; p = .017). The lowest risk for fibrosis was found with the lowest odds seen in the top quartile of alcohol consumption (aOR 0.23; 95% CI 0.08-0.66; p = .006). Adding soft drink and coffee consumptions, and physical activity to the model did not change the estimates. Subjects with PEth amp;gt;= 0.3 mu mol/L had higher ORs for a higher fibrosis stage (aOR 2.77; 95% CI 1.01-7.59; p = .047). Conclusion: Lifetime alcohol consumption with up to 13 units per week is associated with lower fibrosis stage in NAFLD. Elevated PEth is associated with higher stages of fibrosis.

  • 31.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bedossa, Pierre
    University of Paris Diderot, France.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    SAF score and mortality in NAFLD after up to 41 years of follow-up2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 87-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: A new score for the histological severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), called SAF (Steatosis, Activity and Fibrosis) has been developed. We aimed to evaluate the impact of this score on overall mortality. Methods: We used data from 139 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. All biopsies were graded according to the SAF scoring system and disease severity was classified as mild, moderate or severe. Causes of death were extracted from a national, population-based register. A Cox regression model, adjusted for sex, body mass index (BMI) and diabetes mellitus type 2, was applied. Results: At baseline 35 patients presented with mild or moderate disease respectively, and 69 patients with severe disease. During follow-up (median 25.3 years, range 1.7-40.8) 74 patients died, 11 in the mild group (31%), 18 in the moderate group (51%) and 45 in the severe group (65%), p=.002. Compared to patients with mild disease, patients with moderate disease did not have a significant increase in overall mortality (HR 1.83, 95% CI 0.89-3.77, p=.10). Patients with severe disease had a significant increase in mortality (HR 2.65, 95% CI 1.19-5.93, p=.017). However, when adjusting for fibrosis stage, significance was lost (HR 1.85, 95% CI 0.76-4.54, p=.18). NASH, defined as per the FLIP algorithm, was not associated with mortality compared to not having NASH (HR 1.46, 95% CI 0.74-2.90, p=.28). Conclusions: After adjustment for fibrosis, the SAF score was not associated with increased mortality in NAFLD. This finding should be corroborated in larger cohorts with similar follow-up time.

  • 32.
    Henström, Maria
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Diekmann, Lena
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kuech, Eva-Maria
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    von Koeckritz-Blickwede, Maren
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    Thingholm, Louise B.
    Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Assadi, Ghazaleh
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dierks, Claudia
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    Heine, Martin
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    Philipp, Ute
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    Distl, Ottmar
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    Money, Mary E.
    University of Maryland, MD 21201 USA; Meritus Medical Centre, MD USA.
    Belheouane, Meriem
    Max Planck Institute Evolutionary Biol, Germany; Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Heinsen, Femke-Anouska
    Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Rafter, Joseph
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nardone, Gerardo
    Federico II University Hospital, Italy.
    Cuomo, Rosario
    Federico II University Hospital, Italy.
    Usai-Satta, Paolo
    Azienda Osped G Brotzu, Italy.
    Galeazzi, Francesca
    Padova University Hospital, Italy.
    Neri, Matteo
    GDAnnunzio University, Italy; University of GDAnnunzio, Italy.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Simren, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Mayer, Emeran
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Baines, John F.
    Max Planck Institute Evolutionary Biol, Germany; Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Portincasa, Piero
    University of Bari Aldo Moro, Italy.
    Bellini, Massimo
    University of Pisa, Italy.
    Stanghellini, Vincenzo
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Barbara, Giovanni
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Chang, Lin
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Camilleri, Michael
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Franke, Andre
    Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Naim, Hassan Y.
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    DAmato, Mauro
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; BioDonostia Health Research Institute, Spain; Basque Science Fdn, Spain; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Functional variants in the sucrase-isomaltase gene associate with increased risk of irritable bowel syndrome2018In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 263-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective IBS is a common gut disorder of uncertain pathogenesis. Among other factors, genetics and certain foods are proposed to contribute. Congenital sucraseisomaltase deficiency (CSID) is a rare genetic form of disaccharide malabsorption characterised by diarrhoea, abdominal pain and bloating, which are features common to IBS. We tested sucrase-isomaltase (SI) gene variants for their potential relevance in IBS. Design We sequenced SI exons in seven familial cases, and screened four CSID mutations (p.Val557Gly, p. Gly1073Asp, p.Arg1124Ter and p.Phe1745Cys) and a common SI coding polymorphism (p.Val15Phe) in a multicentre cohort of 1887 cases and controls. We studied the effect of the 15Val to 15Phe substitution on SI function in vitro. We analysed p.Val15Phe genotype in relation to IBS status, stool frequency and faecal microbiota composition in 250 individuals from the general population. Results CSID mutations were more common in patients than asymptomatic controls (p=0.074; OR=1.84) and Exome Aggregation Consortium reference sequenced individuals (p=0.020; OR=1.57). 15Phe was detected in 6/7 sequenced familial cases, and increased IBS risk in case-control and population-based cohorts, with best evidence for diarrhoea phenotypes (combined p=0.00012; OR=1.36). In the population-based sample, 15Phe allele dosage correlated with stool frequency (p=0.026) and Parabacteroides faecal microbiota abundance (p=0.0024). The SI protein with 15Phe exhibited 35% reduced enzymatic activity in vitro compared with 15Val (pamp;lt;0.05). Conclusions SI gene variants coding for disaccharidases with defective or reduced enzymatic activity predispose to IBS. This may help the identification of individuals at risk, and contribute to personalising treatment options in a subset of patients.

  • 33.
    Henström, Maria
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Isfahan University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Beyder, Arthur
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; BioDonostia Health Research Institute, Spain.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Assadi, Ghazaleh
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rafter, Joseph
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bujanda, Luis
    BioDonostia Health Research Institute, Spain.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Talley, Nicholas J.
    University of Newcastle, Australia.
    Simren, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Wouters, Mira
    Leuven University, Belgium.
    Farrugia, Gianrico
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    DAmato, Mauro
    BioDonostia Health Research Institute, Spain; BioCruces Health Research Institute, Spain; Basque Fdn Science, Spain; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    TRPM8 polymorphisms associated with increased risk of IBS-C and IBS-M2017In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 66, no 9, p. 1725-+Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 34.
    Holm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Zolfagharian, Shima
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bleeding complications after myocardial infarction in a real world population - An observational retrospective study with a sex perspective2018In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 167, p. 156-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aim of the current study was to assess bleeding events, including severity, localisation and prognostic impact, in a real world population of men and women with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and results: In total 850 consecutive patients were included during 2010 and followed for one year. Bleeding complications were identified by searching of each patients medical records and characterised according to the TIMI criteria. For this analysis, only the first event was calculated. The total incidence of bleeding events was 24.4% (81 women and 126 men, p=ns). The incidence of all inhospital bleeding events was 13.2%, with no sex difference. Women had significantly more minor non-surgery related bleeding events than men (5% vs 2.2%, p=0.02). During follow-up, 13.5% had a bleeding, with more non-surgery related bleeding events among women, 14.7% vs 9.7% (p=0.03). The most common bleeding localisation was the gastrointestinal tract, more in women than men (12.1% vs 7.6%, p=0.03). Women had also more access site bleeding complications (4% vs 1.7%, p=0.04), while men had more surgery related bleeding complications (6.4% vs 0.9%, p=0.001). Increased mortality was found only in men with non-surgery related bleeding events (p=0.008). Conclusions: Almost one in four patients experienced a bleeding complication through 12 months follow-up after a myocardial infarction. Women experienced more non-surgery related minor/minimal bleeding complications than men, predominantly GI bleeding events and access site bleeding events, with no apparent impact on outcome. In contrast men with non-surgery related bleeding complications had higher mortality. Improved bleeding prevention strategies are warranted for both men and women.

  • 35.
    Homeyer, Andre
    et al.
    Fraunhofer MEVIS, Germany.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Engel, Christiane
    Fraunhofer MEVIS, Germany.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kost, Henning
    Fraunhofer MEVIS, Germany.
    Weiss, Nick
    Fraunhofer MEVIS, Germany.
    Palmer, Tim
    University of Leeds, England.
    Karl Hahn, Horst
    Fraunhofer MEVIS, Germany.
    Treanor, Darren
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Leeds, England; Leeds Teaching Hospital NHS Trust, England.
    Lundström, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Automated quantification of steatosis: agreement with stereological point counting2017In: Diagnostic Pathology, ISSN 1746-1596, E-ISSN 1746-1596, Vol. 12, article id 80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Steatosis is routinely assessed histologically in clinical practice and research. Automated image analysis can reduce the effort of quantifying steatosis. Since reproducibility is essential for practical use, we have evaluated different analysis methods in terms of their agreement with stereological point counting (SPC) performed by a hepatologist. Methods: The evaluation was based on a large and representative data set of 970 histological images from human patients with different liver diseases. Three of the evaluated methods were built on previously published approaches. One method incorporated a new approach to improve the robustness to image variability. Results: The new method showed the strongest agreement with the expert. At 20x resolution, it reproduced steatosis area fractions with a mean absolute error of 0.011 for absent or mild steatosis and 0.036 for moderate or severe steatosis. At 10x resolution, it was more accurate than and twice as fast as all other methods at 20x resolution. When compared with SPC performed by two additional human observers, its error was substantially lower than one and only slightly above the other observer. Conclusions: The results suggest that the new method can be a suitable automated replacement for SPC. Before further improvements can be verified, it is necessary to thoroughly assess the variability of SPC between human observers.

  • 36.
    Icenhour, Adriane
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Witt, Suzanne
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Elsenbruch, Sigrid
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Lowén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Tillisch, Kirsten
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Brain functional connectivity is associated with visceral sensitivity in women with Irritable Bowel Syndrome2017In: NeuroImage: Clinical, ISSN 0353-8842, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 15, p. 449-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased perception of visceral stimuli is a key feature of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). While altered resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) has been also reported in IBS, the relationship between visceral hypersensitivity and aberrant rsFC is unknown. We therefore assessed rsFC within the salience, sensorimotor and default mode networks in patients with and without visceral hypersensitivity and in healthy controls (HCs). An exploratory resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study was performed in 41 women with IBS and 20 HCs. Group independent component analysis was used to derive intrinsic brain networks. Rectal thresholds were determined and patients were subdivided into groups with increased (hypersensitive IBS, N = 21) or normal (normosensitive IBS, N= 20) visceral sensitivity. Between-group comparisons of rsFC were carried-out using region-of-interest analyses and peak rsFC values were extracted for correlational analyses. Relative to normosensitive IBS, hypersensitive patients showed increased positive rsFC of pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and thalamus within the salience network and of posterior insula within the sensorimotor network. When compared to both hypersensitive IBS and HCs, normosensitive IBS showed decreased positive rsFC of amygdala and decreased negative rsFC in dorsal anterior insula within the DMN. DMN and sensorimotor network rsFC were associated with rectal perception thresholds, and rsFC in posterior insula was correlated with reported symptom severity in IBS. Our exploratory findings suggest that visceral sensitivity in IBS is related to changes in FC within resting-state networks associated with interoception, salience and sensory processing. These alterations may play an important role in hypervigilance and hyperalgesia in IBS.

  • 37.
    Jankipersadsing, Soesma A.
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands; University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Isfahan University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Jan Bonder, Marc
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Tigchelaar, Ettje F.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands; Top Institute Food and Nutr, Netherlands.
    Deelen, Patrick
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Fu, Jingyuan
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Wijmenga, Cisca
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Hysi, Pirro
    Kings Coll London, England.
    DAmato, Mauro
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; BioDonostia Health Research Institute San Sebastian, Spain; Basque Fdn Science, Spain.
    Zhernakova, Alexandra
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Letter: A GWAS meta-analysis suggests roles for xenobiotic metabolism and ion channel activity in the biology of stool frequency in GUT, vol 66, issue 4, pp 756-7582017In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 756-758Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 38.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Littoral cell angioma in a patient with Crohn's disease.2015In: Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine, ISSN 2090-6528, E-ISSN 2090-6536, Vol. 2015, p. 1-4, article id 474969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Littoral cell angioma is a rare vascular tumor of the spleen. The pathogenesis is unknown but the lesion is associated with several malignancies and immunological disorders. The diagnosis requires histopathological examination. The malignant potential of this lesion is unknown, which is why splenectomy is recommend for all cases. Symptomatic cases generally suffer from hypersplenism and pyrexia. A previously healthy 20-year-old female was diagnosed with colonic Crohn's disease; as part of the work-up a magnetic resonance enterography was performed which showed multiple signal changes of the spleen. The patient reported chronic abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant, malaise, and fever. The unknown splenic lesions prompted a laparoscopic splenectomy; pathology revealed a littoral cell angioma. The abdominal pain and malaise remitted but the fever persisted one year despite adequate treatment of the patient's Crohn's disease. Littoral cell angioma is associated with immune-dysregulation including Crohn's disease with several reported cases. Signs and symptoms of hypersplenism and splenic lesions on imaging should raise suspicion of littoral cell angioma in patients with Crohn's disease. Magnetic resonance enterography to assess disease severity in Crohn's disease may provide an opportunity to study the prevalence and natural history of this rare splenic tumor.

  • 39.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Sahin, Christofer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Pestoff, Rebecka
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Edsjö, Anders
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital Göteborg .
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    A Novel SMAD4 Mutation Causing Severe Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Protein Losing Enteropathy, Immunodeficiency, and Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia.2015In: Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine, ISSN 2090-6528, E-ISSN 2090-6536, Vol. 2015, p. 1-5, article id 140616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by juvenile polyps of the gastrointestinal tract. We present a new pathogenic mutation of the SMAD4 gene and illustrate the need for a multidisciplinary health care approach to facilitate the correct diagnosis. The patient, a 47-year-old Caucasian woman, was diagnosed with anaemia at the age of 12. During the following 30 years, she developed numerous gastrointestinal polyps. The patient underwent several operations, and suffered chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and multiple infections. Screening of the SMAD4 gene revealed a novel, disease-causing mutation. In 2012, the patient suffered hypoalbuminemia and a large polyp in the small bowel was found. Gamma globulin was given but the patient responded with fever and influenza-like symptoms and refused more treatment. The patient underwent surgery in 2014 and made an uneventful recovery. At follow-up two months later albumin was 38 g/L and IgG was 6.9 g/L. Accurate diagnosis is essential for medical care. For patients with complex symptomatology, often with rare diseases, this is best provided by multidisciplinary teams including representatives from clinical genetics. Patients with a SMAD4 mutation should be followed up both for JPS and haemorrhagic hereditary telangiectasia and may develop protein loosing enteropathy and immunodeficiency.

  • 40.
    Jones, Michael P.
    et al.
    Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Kjellstrom, Lars
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Sweden.
    Viktorsson, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Talley, Nicholas J.
    Univ Newcastle, Australia.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Gastrointestinal recall questionnaires compare poorly with prospective patient diaries for gastrointestinal symptoms: data from population and primary health centre samples2019In: European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepathology, ISSN 0954-691X, E-ISSN 1473-5687, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 163-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Clinical understanding of gastrointestinal symptoms is commonly based on patient reports of symptom experience. For diagnosis and treatment choices to be appropriate, symptom reports need to be accurate. We examined the agreement between questionnaire recall and prospective diary enumeration of symptoms relevant to the irritable bowel syndrome.

    Patients and methods Data are reported from a randomly selected general population sample (n=238) and also a primary healthcare centre (PHC) sample (n=503, 10 PHCs). All the patients completed the questionnaires, which included Rome III-qualifying irritable bowel syndrome items and a stool and symptom diary over either 7 or 14 days. Agreement between retrospective questionnaire reports and prospective diaries was evaluated.

    Results Concordance between questionnaires and diaries was highest for the simple construct of the occurrence of abdominal pain, although after adjusting for possible chance, agreement was only moderate in the general population sample. More complex constructs, such as pain relieved by defecation, yielded poorer concordance. In general, concordance was stronger among PHC respondents than in the general population sample.

    Conclusion Concordance between questionnaires and diaries was generally poor and related to the complexity of the symptom construct and the type of respondent. The information used to classify individuals based on patient self-report may be unreliable, and therefore, more effort is needed to develop data collection instruments.

  • 41.
    Karlsson, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Liver R2*is affected by both iron and fat: A dual biopsy-validated study of chronic liver disease2019In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 325-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Liver iron content (LIC) in chronic liver disease (CLD) is currently determined by performing an invasive liver biopsy. MRI using R2* relaxometry is a noninvasive alternative for estimating LIC. Fat accumulation in the liver, or proton density fat fraction (PDFF), may be a possible confounder of R2* measurements. Previous studies of the effect of PDFF on R2* have not used quantitative LIC measurement. Purpose To assess the associations between R2*, LIC, PDFF, and liver histology in patients with suspected CLD. Study Type Prospective. Population Eighty-one patients with suspected CLD. Field Strength/Sequence 1.5 T. Multiecho turbo field echo to quantify R2*. PRESS MRS to quantify PDFF. Assessment Each patient underwent an MR examination, followed by two needle biopsies immediately following the MR examination. The first biopsy was used for conventional histological assessment of LIC, whereas the second biopsy was used to quantitatively measure LIC using mass spectrometry. R2* was correlated with both LIC and PDFF. A correction for the influence of fat on R2* was calculated. Statistical Tests Pearson correlation, linear regression, and area under the receiver operating curve. Results There was a positive linear correlation between R2* and PDFF (R = 0.69), after removing data from patients with elevated iron levels, as defined by LIC. R2*, corrected for PDFF, was the best method for identifying patients with elevated iron levels, with a correlation of R = 0.87 and a sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 98.6%, respectively. Data Conclusion PDFF increases R2*. Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2019;50:325-333.

  • 42.
    Karlsson, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Leinhard Dahlqvist, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Diffuse Liver Disease: Measurements of Liver Trace Metal Concentrations and R2* Relaxation Rates2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Over the past decade, several methods for measuring of liver iron content (LIC) non-invasively with MRI have been developed and verified. The most promising methods uses relaxometry, measuring either R2- or R2* relaxation rate in the liver1,2. For instance, several studies have shown that there seems to be a linear relationship between R2* and LIC1. However, few of these studies have measured the liver content of other metals, which could also affect the relaxation rates. The goal of this study was to investigate if any trace metals, other than iron could affect the R2* relaxation rate in liver tissue in a patients with diffuse liver disease.

    Subjects and methods

    75 patients with suspected diffuse liver disease underwent an MRI examination followed by a liver biopsy the same day. The R2* relaxation rate of the water protons in the liver was measured using an axial 3D multi-slice fat-saturated multi-echo turbo field echo sequence (TE=4.60/9.20/13.80/18.40/23.00ms). Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn and R2* was estimated by fitting the mean signal intensity from the ROIs to a mono-exponential decay model. The biopsies were freeze dried and the concentrations of iron, manganese, copper, cobalt and gadolinium were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP-SFMS). A multiple linear regression analysis was applied to determine which of the measured metals significantly affected the relaxation rate.

    Results

    A linear regression with the LIC and R2* showed a reasonable fit (Figure 1). The multiple linear regression analysis (Table 1) showed that iron as well as manganese had a significant affect on R2*. Unlike iron however, the regression coefficient of manganese was negative, meaning that an increasing manganese concentration gave a shorter R2* relaxation rate. The same trend can be seen when plotting the manganese concentration against R2* (Figure 2).

  • 43.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Blomdahl, Julia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Alcohol consumption in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease-harmful or beneficial?2019In: Hepatobiliary surgery and nutrition, ISSN 2304-3881, E-ISSN 2304-389X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 311-313Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 44.
    Krarup, Anne L.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Peterson, Emma
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ringstroem, Gisela
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Toernblom, Hans
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Simren, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Short Health Scale A Simple, Valid, Reliable, and Responsive Way of Measuring Subjective Health in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome2015In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, ISSN 0192-0790, E-ISSN 1539-2031, Vol. 49, no 7, p. 565-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Goals:To evaluate validity, reliability, and responsiveness of the Short Health Scale (SHS) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients.Background:Subjective health assessment is central when treating patients with IBS. The Short Health Scale is a quick 4-item questionnaire covering most aspects of subjective health that has been validated for inflammatory bowel disease.Study:To test validity, 451 patients with IBS (mean age, 38 y; 81% females) completed the SHS and questionnaires assessing IBS symptom severity (IBS-SSS), gastrointestinal (GI)-specific anxiety (VSI), and quality of life (IBSQOL). To evaluate reliability and responsiveness to changes, the questionnaires were repeated after 2 weeks in 18 patients, and after 12 weeks in 212 patients who had completed a patient-education program.Results:Validity was documented with (1) gradually increasing mean scores for all 4 SHS items with increasing IBS-SSS (Pless than0.0001), and (2) correlations between the 4 SHS items and the corresponding items from the other subjective health assessment tools [item 1 (symptom burden): =0.67, item 2 (daily function): =-0.44 to -0.46, item 3 (disease-related worry): =-0.51 to 0.57, item 4 (general well-being): =-0.34 to -0.46, Pless than0.0001]. Reliability was confirmed (Spearman greater than0.7 and intraclass correlations greater than0.7). Responsiveness was good with responders to the patient-education program (IBS-SSS reduction 50 points) having significant reductions in 3 of the SHS items (Pless than0.05), and borderline change for the fourth SHS item (P=0.06).Conclusions:SHS is a health measure that shows promising evidence of validity, reliability, and responsiveness in IBS patients. It is quickly completed and evaluated, which supports its usefulness in the busy clinical practice.

  • 45.
    Lindh Falk, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Heslyk, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Whiss, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Creating spaces for interprofessional learning: Strategic revision of a common IPL curriculum in undergraduate programs2015In: Interprofessional Education in Europe: Policy and Practice / [ed] Andre Vyt, Majda Pahor, Tiina Tervaskanto-Maentausta, Antwerpen: Garant Publishers Limited , 2015, p. 49-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Riegel, Barbara
    University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, USA.
    Yngman Uhlin, Pia
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Self-care of inflammatory bowel disease may be associated with better well-being2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Council of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Yngman Uhlin, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Riegel, Barbara
    University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, USA.
    Stjernman, Henrik
    County Hospital Ryhov, County Council of Jonkoping, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Self-care among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An interview study2016In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 121-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25-66 years of age, were interviewed. Data were analyzed by performing a qualitative content analysis. Four categories with 10 subcategories emerged from the analysis of the interviews. The self-care patients perform consists of symptom recognition (subcategories: physiological sensations and psychological sensations), handling of symptoms (subcategories: adapting the diet, using medical treatment, stress management, and using complementary alternative medicine), planning life (subcategories: planning for when to do activities and when to refrain from activities), and seeking new options (subcategories: seeking knowledge and personal contacts). Self-care consists of symptom recognition, handling life through planning, and accommodating the existing situation with the ultimate goal of maintaining well-being. Being one step ahead facilitates living with IBD. A decision to actively participate in care of a chronic illness is a prerequisite for self-care. Healthcare professionals must consider patients' potential for and desire for self-care when giving advice on self-care activities. Doing so may help people better cope with IBD.

  • 48.
    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Primary Health Care in County Council of Kalmar, Sweden.
    Yngman Uhlin, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Wenemark, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stjernman, Henrik
    Department of Medicine, County Hospital Ryhov, Region Jönköping, Sweden.
    Riegel, Barbara
    School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, United States.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Development of a self-care questionnaire for clinical assessment of self-care in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: A psychometric evaluation2019In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have lifelong needs to learn how to manage their symptoms and life situation. The range of actions that patients take in order to manage daily life and maintain health is referred to as self-care. Assessment of self-care in patients with inflammatory bowel disease could allow targeted support and education by health careprofessionals. There are no existing measures assessing self-care in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Objectives

    The aim was to develop and evaluate the self-care questionnaire for assessment of self-care among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Methods

    Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to develop the inflammatory bowel disease self-care questionnaire. The development and evaluation process was performed in three phases: (1) item generation based on interviews with patients with inflammatory bowel disease (n = 20), (2) content validation in a panel of experts (n = 6) and patients (n = 100) assessed with the content validity index, cognitive interviews and quantifying and ranking the items to determine the usability of the questionnaire, and (3) final evaluation through a pilot study (n = 93) with test-retest evaluation (n = 50). An expert review group of three nurses and one physician continuously discussed the result during the development process.

    Results

    A total of 91 patients with Crohn's disease and 102 with ulcerative colitis participated. The final self-care questionnaire consists of 22 items. Assessment of content validity indicated that the items were adequate and easy to understand. Test-retest reliability was confirmed with intraclass correlations above 0.6 after a three week interval, for all items except one.

    Conclusion

    An inflammatory bowel disease-specific self-care questionnaire was developed using structured methods. The evaluation indicated good validity and reliability. The questionnaire may be a useful tool to assess the ability of patients with inflammatory bowel disease to perform routine self-care.

  • 49.
    Lowén, Mats B. O.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mayer, E.
    Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Tillisch, K.
    Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Labus, J.
    Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Naliboff, B.
    Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Emotra AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Deficient habituation to repeated rectal distensions in irritable bowel syndrome patients with visceral hypersensitivity2015In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 646-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients show evidence of altered central processing of visceral signals. One of the proposed alterations in sensory processing is an altered engagement of endogenous pain modulation mechanisms. The aim was to test the hypothesis that IBS patients with (IBS-S) and without visceral hypersensitivity (IBS-N) differ in their ability to engage endogenous pain modulation mechanism during habituation to repeated visceral stimuli.

    Methods Brain blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response was measured during repeated rectal distension and its anticipation in 33 IBS patients with and without visceral hypersensitivity and 18 healthy controls (HCs). BOLD response to early and late phase of the distension series was compared within and between groups.

    Key Results While BOLD response was similar during the early phase of the experiment, IBS-S showed greater BOLD response than IBS-N and HCs during the late phase of the distension series. IBS-S showed increasing BOLD response both to the anticipation and delivery of low intensity rectal distensions in brain regions including insula, anterior and mid cingulate cortex. IBS-N showed decreasing BOLD response to repeated rectal distensions in brain regions including insula, prefrontal cortex and amygdala.

    Conclusions & Inferences These findings are consistent with compromised ability of IBS-S to respond to repeated delivery of rectal stimuli, both in terms of sensitization of sensory pathways and habituation of emotional arousal. The fact that both IBS subgroups met Rome criteria, and did not differ in terms of reported symptom severity demonstrates that similar symptom patterns can result from different underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  • 50.
    Lundberg, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leinhard Dahlqvist, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kvantifiering av leversteatos: diagnostisk utvärdering av protonmagnetresonansspektroskopi jämfört med histologiska metoder2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund

    Leversteatos är den vanligaste manifestationen av leversjukdom i västvärlden. Leverbiopsi med semikvantitativ histologisk gradering är referensmetod vid gradering av leversteatos. Med protonmagnetsresonansspektroskopi (1H-MRS), en metod som föreslagits ersätta leverbiopsi för värdering av steatos, kan leverns innehåll av triglycerider mätas icke-invasivt. Triglyceridinnehåll >5,00 % används ofta som ett diagnostiskt kriterium för leversteatos vid undersökning med 1H-MRS. Syftet med studien var att jämföra 1H-MRS med semikvantitativ histologisk steatosgradering och kvantitativ histologisk steatosmätning.

    Metod

    Patienter remitterade för utredning av förhöjda leverenzymer in-kluderades i studien. Samtliga patienter genomgick klinisk undersökning, laboratorieprovtagning samt 1H-MRS direkt följd av leverbiopsi. För konventionell histologisk semikvantitativ gradering av steatos användes kriterierna utarbetade av Brunt och medarbetare. Kvantitativ mätning av fett i biopsierna utfördes genom att med hjälp av stereologisk punkträkning (SPC) mäta andelen av ytan som innehöll fettvakuoler.

    Resultat

    I studien inkluderades 94 patienter, varav 37 hade icke-alkoholor-sakad fettleversjukdom (NAFLD), 49 hade andra leversjukdomar och 8 hade normal leverbiopsi. En stark korrelation noterades mel-lan 1H-MRS och SPC (r=0,92, p<0,0001; к=0.82). Korrelationen mellan 1H-MRS och Brunts kriterier (к=0.26) samt mellan SPC och Brunts kriterier (к=0.38) var betydligt sämre. När patologens gradering (Brunts kriterier) användes som referensmetod för diag-nos av leversteatos så hade alla patienter med triglyceridinnehåll >5,00 % mätt med 1H-MRS steatos (specificitet 100 %). Emellertid hade 22 av 69 patienter med triglyceridinnehåll ≤5,00 % också le-versteatos enligt Brunts kriterier (sensitivitet 53 %). Motsvarande siffror när man använde gränsvärdet 3,02 % var sensitivitet 79 % och specificitet 100 %. Vid ytterligare reduktion av gränsvärdet för triglyceridinnehåll till 2,00 % ökade sensitiviteten till 87 % med upprätthållande av hög specificitet (94 %).

    Slutsats

    1H-MRS och SPC uppvisade en mycket hög korrelation vid kvantifiering av leversteatos. SPC borde därför föredras framför Brunts kriterier när noggrann histologisk kvantifiering av leversteatos är önskvärd. Många patienter kan ha histologisk leversteatos trots triglyceridinnehåll ≤5,00 % mätt med 1H-MRS. Gränsvärdet för diagnostisering av leversteatos med 1H-MRS bör därför reduceras.

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