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  • 1.
    Alimadadi, Majid
    et al.
    Department of Natural Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Lindström, Stefan B
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kulachenko, Artem
    Department of Solid Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Role of microstructures in the compression response of three-dimensional foam-formed wood fiber networks2018In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 14, p. 8945-8955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-porosity, three-dimensional wood fiber networks made by foam forming present experimentally accessible instances of hierarchically structured, athermal fiber networks. We investigate the large deformation compression behavior of these networks using fiber-resolved finite element analyses to elucidate the role of microstructures in the mechanical response to compression. Three-dimensional network structures are acquired using micro-computed tomography and subsequent skeletonization into a Euclidean graph representation. By using a fitting procedure to the geometrical graph data, weare able to identify nine independent statistical parameters needed for the regeneration of artificial networks with the observed statistics. The compression response of these artificially generated networks and the physical network is then investigated using implicit finite element analysis. A direct comparison of the simulation results from the reconstructed and artificial network reveals remarkable differences already in the elastic region. These can neither be fully explained by density scaling, the size effect nor the boundary conditions. The only factor which provides the consistent explanation of the observed difference is the density and fiber orientation nonuniformities; these contribute to strain-localization so that the network becomes more compliant than expected for statistically uniform microstructures. We also demonstrate that the experimentally manifested strain-stiffening of such networks is due to development of new inter-fiber contacts during compression.

  • 2.
    Alm Grundström, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Developments in Topology Optimization in the ADDMAN Project2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This document gives an account of some of the work done so far on topology optimization (TO) in the ADDMAN project. As well as the mathematical formulations and implementations details, short discussions are presented on some of the nuances of the different formulations and how they should be used efficiently

  • 3.
    Alm Grundström, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics.
    Topology Optimization for Additive Manufacturing Considering Stress and Anisotropy2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is a particularly useful manufacturing method for components designed using topology optimization (TO) since it allows for a greater part complexity than any traditional manufacturing method. However, the AM process potentially leads to anisotropic material properties due to the layer-by-layer buildup of parts and the fast and directional cooling. For Ti6Al4V tensile specimens built using electron beam melting (EBM), it has been observed that flat built specimens show superior strength and elastic moduli compared to top built specimens. Designs with the loading direction parallel to the build layers are therefore expected to show greater reliability.

    In this thesis a procedure is developed to optimize the AM build orientation considering anisotropic elastic material properties. A transversely isotropic material model is used to represent the in-plane and out-of-plane characteristics of AM produced parts. Two additional design variables are added to the TO formulation in order to control the orientation of the material using a coordinate transformation. Sensitivity analysis for the material direction variables is conducted for compliance as well as maximum von-Mises stress using a -norm stress aggregation function.

    The procedures for the AM build orientation optimization and stress constraints are implemented in the finite element software TRINITAS and evaluated using a number of examples in 2D and 3D. It is found that the procedure works well for compliance as well as stress but that a combination of these may lead to convergence issues due to contradicting optimal material orientations. An evaluation of the -norm stress aggregation function showed that a single global stress measure in combination with a stress correction procedure works well for most problems given that the mesh is refined enough to resolve the stresses accurately.  

  • 4.
    Alm Grundström, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Trinitas Topology Optimization Tutorial Document2018Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A Co-Simulation Approach for Hydraulic Percussion Units2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This Licentiate of Engineering thesis concerns modelling and simulation of hydraulic percussion units. These units are often found in equipment for breaking or drilling in rock and concrete, and are also often driven by oil hydraulics, in which complex fluid-structure couplings are essential for their operation.

    Current methodologies used today when developing hydraulic percussion units are based on decoupled analyses, which are not correctly capturing the important coupled mechanisms. Hence, an efficient method for coupled simulations is of high importance, since these mechanisms are critical for the function of these units. Therefore, a co-simulation approach between a 1D system simulation model representing the fluid system and a structural 3D FE-model is proposed.

    This approach is presented in detail, implemented for two well-known simulation tools and evaluated for a simple but relevant model. The Hopsan simulation tool was used for the fluid system and the FE-simulation software LS-DYNA was used for the structural mechanics simulation. The co-simulation interface was implemented using the Functional Mock-up Interface-standard.

    The approach was further developed to also incorporate multiple components for coupled simulations. This was considered necessary when models for the real application are to be developed. The use of two components for co-simulation was successfully evaluated for two models, one using the simple rigid body representation, and a second where linear elastic representations of the structural material were implemented.

    An experimental validation of the co-simulation approach applied to an existing hydraulic hammer was performed. Experiments on the hydraulic hammer were performed using an in-house test rig, and responses were registered at four different running conditions. The co-simulation model was developed using the same approach as before. The corresponding running conditions were simulated and the responses were successfully validated against the experiments. A parameter study was also performed involving two design parameters with the objective to evaluate the effects of a parameter change.

    This thesis consists of two parts, where Part I gives an introduction to the application, the simulation method and the implementation, while Part II consists of three papers from this project.

    List of papers
    1. A co-simulation method for system-level simulation of fluid-structure couplings in hydraulic percussion units
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A co-simulation method for system-level simulation of fluid-structure couplings in hydraulic percussion units
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Engineering with Computers, ISSN 0177-0667, E-ISSN 1435-5663, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 317-333Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses a co-simulation method for fluid power driven machinery equipment, i.e. oil hydraulic machinery. In these types of machinery, the fluid-structure interaction affects the end-product performance to a large extent, hence an efficient co-simulation method is of high importance. The proposed method is based on a 1D system model representing the fluid components of the hydraulic machinery, within which structural 3D Finite Element (FE) models can be incorporated for detailed simulation of specific sub-models or complete structural assemblies. This means that the fluid system simulation will get a more accurate structural response, and that the structural simulation will get more correct fluid loads at every time step, compared to decoupled analysis. Global system parameters such as fluid flow, performance and efficiency can be evaluated from the 1D system model simulation results. From the 3D FE-models, it is possible to evaluate displacements, stresses and strains to be used in stress analysis, fatigue evaluation, acoustic analysis, etc. The method has been implemented using two well-known simulation tools for fluid power system simulations and FE-simulations, respectively, where the interface between the tools is realised by use of the Functional Mock-up Interface standard. A simple but relevant model is used to validate the method.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SPRINGER, 2017
    Keywords
    Co-simulation; Fluid-structure coupling; System simulation; Functional mock-up interface; Fluid power machinery; Transmission line modelling
    National Category
    Computer Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136875 (URN)10.1007/s00366-016-0476-8 (DOI)000398468100012 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Atlas Copco Construction Tools

    Available from: 2017-04-30 Created: 2017-04-30 Last updated: 2018-09-11
    2. System level co-simulation of a control valve and hydraulic cylinder circuit in a hydraulic percussion unit
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>System level co-simulation of a control valve and hydraulic cylinder circuit in a hydraulic percussion unit
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Proceedings of 15:th Scandinavian International Conference on Fluid Power, June 7-9, 2017, Linköping, Sweden / [ed] Petter Krus, Liselott Ericson and Magnus Sethson, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017, Vol. 144, p. 225-235Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study a previously developed co-simulation method that is based on a 1D system model representing the fluid components of a hydraulic machinery, within which structural 3D Finite Element (FE) models can be incorporated for detailed simulation of specific sub-models or complete structural assemblies, is further developed. The fluid system model consists of ordinary differential equation sub-models that are computationally very inexpensive, but still represents the fluid dynamics very well. The co-simulation method has been shown to work very well for a simple model representing a hydraulic driven machinery. A more complex model was set up in this work, in which two cylinders in the hydraulic circuit were evaluated. Such type of models, including both the main piston and control valves, are necessary as they represent the real application to a further extent than the simple model, of only one cylinder. Two models have been developed and evaluated, from the simple rigid body representation of the structural mechanics model, to the more complex model using linear elastic representation. The 3D FE-model facilitates evaluation of displacements, stresses, and strains on a local level of the model. The results can be utilised for fatigue assessment, wear analysis and for predictions of noise radiation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017
    Series
    Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings, ISSN 1650-3686, E-ISSN 1650-3740 ; 144
    Keywords
    Co-simulation, Fluid-structure coupling, System simulation, Functional mockup interface, Fluid power machinery, Transmission line modelling
    National Category
    Applied Mechanics Vehicle Engineering Control Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151015 (URN)10.3384/ecp17144225 (DOI)9789176853696 (ISBN)
    Conference
    15th Scandinavian International Conference on Fluid Power, June 7-9, 2017, Linköping, Sweden
    Available from: 2018-09-11 Created: 2018-09-11 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
  • 6.
    Andersson, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Construct Tools PC AB, Sweden.
    Nordin, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Borrvall, Thomas
    DYNAmore Nordic AB, Brigadgatan 5, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hilding, Daniel
    DYNAmore Nordic AB, Brigadgatan 5, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Schill, Mikael
    DYNAmore Nordic AB, Brigadgatan 5, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Krus, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Fluid and Mechatronic Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leidermark, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A co-simulation method for system-level simulation of fluid-structure couplings in hydraulic percussion units2017In: Engineering with Computers, ISSN 0177-0667, E-ISSN 1435-5663, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 317-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses a co-simulation method for fluid power driven machinery equipment, i.e. oil hydraulic machinery. In these types of machinery, the fluid-structure interaction affects the end-product performance to a large extent, hence an efficient co-simulation method is of high importance. The proposed method is based on a 1D system model representing the fluid components of the hydraulic machinery, within which structural 3D Finite Element (FE) models can be incorporated for detailed simulation of specific sub-models or complete structural assemblies. This means that the fluid system simulation will get a more accurate structural response, and that the structural simulation will get more correct fluid loads at every time step, compared to decoupled analysis. Global system parameters such as fluid flow, performance and efficiency can be evaluated from the 1D system model simulation results. From the 3D FE-models, it is possible to evaluate displacements, stresses and strains to be used in stress analysis, fatigue evaluation, acoustic analysis, etc. The method has been implemented using two well-known simulation tools for fluid power system simulations and FE-simulations, respectively, where the interface between the tools is realised by use of the Functional Mock-up Interface standard. A simple but relevant model is used to validate the method.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hilding, Daniel
    DYNAmore Nordic AB, Brigadgatan 5, 587 58 Linköping, Sweden.
    Schill, Mikael
    DYNAmore Nordic AB, Brigadgatan 5, 587 58 Linköping, Sweden.
    Leidermark, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    System level co-simulation of a control valve and hydraulic cylinder circuit in a hydraulic percussion unit2017In: Proceedings of 15:th Scandinavian International Conference on Fluid Power, June 7-9, 2017, Linköping, Sweden / [ed] Petter Krus, Liselott Ericson and Magnus Sethson, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017, Vol. 144, p. 225-235Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study a previously developed co-simulation method that is based on a 1D system model representing the fluid components of a hydraulic machinery, within which structural 3D Finite Element (FE) models can be incorporated for detailed simulation of specific sub-models or complete structural assemblies, is further developed. The fluid system model consists of ordinary differential equation sub-models that are computationally very inexpensive, but still represents the fluid dynamics very well. The co-simulation method has been shown to work very well for a simple model representing a hydraulic driven machinery. A more complex model was set up in this work, in which two cylinders in the hydraulic circuit were evaluated. Such type of models, including both the main piston and control valves, are necessary as they represent the real application to a further extent than the simple model, of only one cylinder. Two models have been developed and evaluated, from the simple rigid body representation of the structural mechanics model, to the more complex model using linear elastic representation. The 3D FE-model facilitates evaluation of displacements, stresses, and strains on a local level of the model. The results can be utilised for fatigue assessment, wear analysis and for predictions of noise radiation.

  • 8.
    Andric, J.
    et al.
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Lindström, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sasic, S.
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Nilsson, H.
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Ballistic deflection of fibres in decelerating flow2016In: International Journal of Multiphase Flow, ISSN 0301-9322, E-ISSN 1879-3533, Vol. 85, p. 57-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the motion of inertial, rod-like fibres in the decelerating flow of a wedge-shaped channel with non-creeping fibre-flow interactions. We consider the trajectories of isolated fibres to identify the conditions for which these trajectories deflect from the streamlines of the flow as well as a rectilinear path. We carry out analytical and numerical studies under the assumption of an infinite fibre hydrodynamic resistance to transverse flow, and we expand the numerical study by taking into account a finite transverse hydrodynamic resistance. The analytical analysis identifies a longitudinal ballistic number Be and a transverse ballistic number B-t as two dimensionless parameters that govern the fibre dynamics. It is found that Be is the product of the Stokes number Ste(l) in the longitudinal direction of the fibre and the channel opening angle beta. As anticipated, a fibre moves along the streamlines in the viscosity-dominated regime (B-l amp;lt;amp;lt; 1, B-t amp;lt;amp;lt; 1), while it moves in a straight line without being rotated in the inertia-dominated regime (Bt amp;gt;amp;gt; 1). The focus of the present study is on the intermediate regime (B-l amp;gt;amp;gt; 1, B-t amp;lt; 1), in which we identify and analyse a fibre trajectory that significantly deviates from the streamlines of the flow. This behaviour is observed for both infinite and finite resistances to transverse flow, and it is referred to as ballistic deflection. We argue that ballistic deflection may increase the rate of collisions between suspended fibres, and thus potentially affects the rate of fibre aggregation in flowing suspensions. An order of magnitude estimate of the ballistic numbers identifies dry-forming of pulp mats, which includes an air-wood fibre flowing suspension, to operate in the regime of ballistic deflection. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Andric, Jelena
    et al.
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Lindström, Stefan B
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics.
    Sasic, Srdjan
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Hakan
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Numerical investigation of fiber flocculation in the air flow of an asymmetrical diffuser2014In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Nanochannels, Microchannels and Minichannels (ICNMM), AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2014, no V001T12A013, p. V001T12A013-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A particle-level rigid fiber model is used to study flocculation in an asymmetric planar diffuser with a turbulent Newtonian fluid flow, resembling one stage in dry-forming process of pulp mats. The fibers are modeled as chains of rigid cylindrical segments. The equations of motion incorporate hydrodynamic forces and torques from the interaction with the fluid, and the fiber inertia is taken into account. The flow is governed by the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the standard k - omega turbulence model. A one-way coupling between the fibers and the flow is considered. A stochastic model is employed for the flow fluctuations to capture the fiber dispersion. The fibers are assumed to interact through short-range attractive forces, causing them to interlock as the fiber-fiber contacts occur during the flow. It is found that the formation of fiber flocs is driven by both the turbulence-induced dispersion and the gradient of the averaged flow field.

  • 10.
    Andric, Jelena S.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lindström, Stefan B
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sasic, Srdjan M.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    PARTICLE-LEVEL SIMULATIONS OF FLOCCULATION IN A FIBER SUSPENSION FLOWING THROUGH A DIFFUSER2017In: Thermal Science, ISSN 0354-9836, E-ISSN 2334-7163, Vol. 21, p. S573-S583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate flocculation in dilute suspensions of rigid, straight fibers in a decelerating flow field of a diffuser. We carry out numerical studies using a particle-level simulation technique that takes into account the fiber inertia and the non-creeping fiber-flow interactions. The fluid flow is governed by the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the standard k-omega eddy-viscosity turbulence model. A one-way coupling between the fibers and the flow is considered with a stochastic model for the fiber dispersion due to turbulence. The fibers interact through short-range attractive forces that cause them to aggregate into flocs when fiber-fiber collisions occur. We show that ballistic deflection of fibers greatly increases the flocculation in the diffilser. The inlet fiber kinematics and the fiber inertia are the main parameters that affect fiber flocculation in the predffuser region.

  • 11.
    Azeez, Ahmed
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics.
    Effect of dwell time on stress intensity factor of ferritic steel for steam turbine applications2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the transition from conventional to green energy production resources, steam turbines are used to satisfy the lack of energy during peaks in the demand times and the limited access of renewable resources. This type of usage for steam turbines makes them operate on a flexible schedule, which leads to unpredictable issues related to shorter component life and faster crack propagation. Thus, the steam turbine components must be examined to determine their specific life period. This will help set proper maintenance intervals and prevent unexpected failures. For that, thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) testing is used, where a specimen made of the same material as the turbine component is subjected to both temperature and load variation. The specimen is pre-cracked to investigate the crack propagation behavior, which is the focus of this study.

    This thesis work concentrates on simulating the TMF cycle for the steam turbine casing component. The material is 9%-10%Cr ferritic steel. The aim is to understand the material behavior during crack propagation and to predict a useful testing parameter. The method provided in this work discusses two cases, both are out-of-phase (OP) TMF tests with strain control. The maximum and minimum temperatures for the cycle are 600 ˚C and 400 ˚C respectively, while the maximum and minimum strain levels are 0 and  respectively. The study will investigate different , which is the maximum compressive strain level. Case 1 has a dwell time at the maximum temperature only, while case 2 has dwell times at both maximum and minimum temperatures. The method utilizes the stress intensity factor (SIF) to characterize the crack tip conditions. Also, it uses Paris' law to estimate the duration of the tests. For simplification, only the elastic behavior of the material is considered.

    The results obtained show no effect of using different pre-crack lengths due to the strain control condition. Minor effects can be observed by using different dwell times, however very short dwell times must be avoided to produce reliable results. A recommended dwell time of 5 minutes could be used, since longer dwell times will make the test prohibitively time-consuming. The compressive strain levels used in the work shows large effects on the results. Using low compressive strain values will produce a very long time for the tests, while very high compressive strains produce large plasticity. Thus, high compressive strains must be avoided since the SIF describes cracks for only elastic or near elastic cases. Also, small compressive strain levels in case 2 should not be used since it will lead to results like case 1. This is due to the small creep effect at the minimum temperature. Finally, compressive strain levels of 0.6 %, 0.5 % and 0.4 % are recommended for case 1, while only 0.6 % compressive strain level is recommended for case 2.

    This thesis contributes to the fields of solid mechanics, fracture mechanics and the use of TMF testing, where a recommended set of testing parameters are provided.

  • 12.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hedbrant, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pavlasevic, Vanja
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stålhand, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Understanding the user beyond ‘common sense’ – teaching Product Ergonomics to design engineering students2015In: Proceedings 19th Triennial Congress of the IEA, International Ergonomics Association , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multidisciplinary frameworks are needed to develop products that fit the human. Ergonomics is a multifaceted field that encompasses physical, cognitive and organizational aspects, and it is therefore a suitable subject to be taught to design engineering students.

    The objective of this paper was to describe and reflect upon how a systems perspective on Ergonomics is developed and conveyed in a course in Product Ergonomics to engineering students at the Design and Product Development (DPD) programme at Linköping University, Sweden. The paper is based on the authors’ experiences from teaching the course in Product Ergonomicsas well ason 52 students’ written reflections about their view on Ergonomics before and after taking the course.

    Means and ideas for teaching Ergonomics with a systems perspective included organizing a theoretical introduction into weekly themes and thereafter integrating and applying these themes in a product concept project under supervision of a multidisciplinary teacher team.

    The paper also reflects on how the systems perspective of Ergonomics is planned for and realized in the intended, implemented and attained curriculum.

  • 13.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pavlasevic, Vanja
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hedbrant, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stålhand, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Theme-based assessment of education in design and product development2014In: Proceedings of the 10th International CDIO Conference, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One fundamental challenge in choosing an examination form to assess student achievements is to find an examination which, both encourages students to continuously elaborate the course content and constitutes a learning process itself. The objective of this paper is to share and reflect on the development and implementation of a new theme-based examination in a six credit course in Product Ergonomics given in the engineering programme Design and Product Development at Linköping University, Sweden. The course runs during four months and has two parts: one theoretical and one applied. The former focuses on theoretical ergonomic topics, models and methods while the latter is a project aiming at consolidating the students’ understanding of the theory by implementing the knowledge in a product development case. To encourage the students to adapt a deep learning approach, the traditional written mid-term exam for the theoretical part was abandoned and another concept developed. In the new concept, the theoretical part was split onto six weekly themes. Each theme was introduced at the beginning of the week by high-lighting main theories and models followed by a group-work assignment to be elaborated on by the students during the week. The theme was examined at the end of the week through a short written exam and a seminar to discuss and reflect upon the theme. From a student perspective, the positive outcome of the theme-based examination was peer learning and a more active learning style. The students appreciated the theme-based structure of the course. Occasionally, some students commented that weekly examinations could be perceived as stressful. The teachers perceived the students to be more acquainted with ergonomics theory and methods which increased the quality of the course project. The reported theme-based assessment is one example of implementing among others the CDIO syllabus parts 2.2 and 3.1and CDIO standards 8 and 11.

  • 14.
    Busse, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aspects of Crack Growth in Single-Crystal Nickel-Base Superalloys2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This Licentiate of Engineering thesis is a product of the results generated in the research project KME-702, which comprises modelling, microstructure investigations and material testing of cast nickel-base superalloys.

    The main objective of this work is to model the fatigue crack propagation behaviour in single-crystal nickel-base superalloys. To achieve this, the influence of the crystal orientations on the cracking behaviour is assessed. The results show that the crystal orientation is strongly affecting the material response and must be accounted for. Furthermore, a linear elastic crack driving force parameter suitable for describing crystallographic cracking has been developed. This parameter is based on resolved anisotropic stress intensity factors and is able to predict the correct crystallographic cracking plane after a transition from a Mode I crack. Finally, a method to account for inelastic deformations in a linear elastic fracture mechanics context was investigated. A residual stress field is extracted from an uncracked finite-element model with a perfectly plastic material model and superimposed on the stress field from the cracked model with a linear elastic material model to account for the inelastic deformations during the determination of the crack driving force. The modelling work is validated by material testing on two different specimen geometries at different temperatures.

    This Licentiate of Engineering thesis consists of two parts, where Part I gives an introduction and background to the research area, while Part II consists of three papers.

    List of papers
    1. A FINITE ELEMENT STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CRYSTAL ORIENTATION AND MISALIGNMENT ON THE CRACK DRIVING FORCE IN A SINGLE-CRYSTAL SUPERALLOY
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A FINITE ELEMENT STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CRYSTAL ORIENTATION AND MISALIGNMENT ON THE CRACK DRIVING FORCE IN A SINGLE-CRYSTAL SUPERALLOY
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME TURBO EXPO: TURBINE TECHNICAL CONFERENCE AND EXPOSITION, 2016, VOL 7A, AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2016, no UNSP V07AT28A002Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The elastic and plastic anisotropy of the single-crystal materials bring many difficulties in terms of modeling, evaluation and prediction of fatigue crack growth. In this paper a single-crystal material model has been adopted to a finite element-environment, which is paired with a crack growth tool. All simulations are performed in a three-dimensional context. This methodology makes it possible to analyze complex finite element-models, which are more application-near than traditional two-dimensional models. The influence of the crystal orientation, as well as the influence of misalignments of the crystal orientation due to the casting process are investigated. It is shown that both the crystal orientation and the misalignment from the ideal crystal orientation are important for the crack driving force. The realistic maximum limit of 10 degrees misalignment is considered. It can be seen that crack growth behavior is highly influenced by the misalignment. This knowledge is of great interest for the industry in order to evaluate the crack growth in single-crystal components more accurately.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS, 2016
    National Category
    Applied Mechanics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132570 (URN)10.1115/GT2016-56305 (DOI)000385461600011 ()978-0-7918-4983-5 (ISBN)
    Conference
    ASME Turbo Expo: Turbine Technical Conference and Exposition
    Available from: 2016-11-14 Created: 2016-11-14 Last updated: 2017-11-20
    2. Three-Dimensional LEFM Prediction of Fatigue Crack Propagation in a Gas Turbine Disk Material at Component Near Conditions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three-Dimensional LEFM Prediction of Fatigue Crack Propagation in a Gas Turbine Disk Material at Component Near Conditions
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 138, no 4, article id 042506Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the possibility to use linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), with and without a superimposed residual stress field, to predict fatigue crack propagation in the gas turbine disk material Inconel 718 has been studied. A temperature of 400 degrees C and applied strain ranges corresponding to component near conditions have been considered. A three-dimensional crack propagation software was used for determining the stress intensity factors (SIFs) along the crack path. In the first approach, a linear elastic material behavior was used when analyzing the material response. The second approach extracts the residual stresses from an uncracked model with perfectly plastic material behavior after one loading cycle. As a benchmark, the investigated methods are compared to experimental tests, where the cyclic lifetimes were calculated by an integration of Paris law. When comparing the results, it can be concluded that the investigated approaches give good results, at least for longer cracks, even though plastic flow was taking place in the specimen. The pure linear elastic simulation overestimates the crack growth for all crack lengths and gives conservative results over all considered crack lengths. Noteworthy with this work is that the 3D-crack propagation could be predicted with the two considered methods in an LEFM context, although plastic flow was present in the specimens during the experiments.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ASME, 2016
    National Category
    Mechanical Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126240 (URN)10.1115/1.4031526 (DOI)000371125800020 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB through Research Consortium of Materials Technology for Thermal Energy Processes [KME-702]; Swedish Energy Agency

    Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2017-11-30
  • 15.
    Busse, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gustafsson, David
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Rasmusson, Patrik
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Sjodin, Bjorn
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Moverare, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leidermark, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Three-Dimensional LEFM Prediction of Fatigue Crack Propagation in a Gas Turbine Disk Material at Component Near Conditions2016In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 138, no 4, article id 042506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the possibility to use linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), with and without a superimposed residual stress field, to predict fatigue crack propagation in the gas turbine disk material Inconel 718 has been studied. A temperature of 400 degrees C and applied strain ranges corresponding to component near conditions have been considered. A three-dimensional crack propagation software was used for determining the stress intensity factors (SIFs) along the crack path. In the first approach, a linear elastic material behavior was used when analyzing the material response. The second approach extracts the residual stresses from an uncracked model with perfectly plastic material behavior after one loading cycle. As a benchmark, the investigated methods are compared to experimental tests, where the cyclic lifetimes were calculated by an integration of Paris law. When comparing the results, it can be concluded that the investigated approaches give good results, at least for longer cracks, even though plastic flow was taking place in the specimen. The pure linear elastic simulation overestimates the crack growth for all crack lengths and gives conservative results over all considered crack lengths. Noteworthy with this work is that the 3D-crack propagation could be predicted with the two considered methods in an LEFM context, although plastic flow was present in the specimens during the experiments.

  • 16.
    Busse, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Loureiro Homs, Jordi
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, David
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Palmert, Frans
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Sjodin, Bjorn
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Moverare, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leidermark, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A FINITE ELEMENT STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CRYSTAL ORIENTATION AND MISALIGNMENT ON THE CRACK DRIVING FORCE IN A SINGLE-CRYSTAL SUPERALLOY2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME TURBO EXPO: TURBINE TECHNICAL CONFERENCE AND EXPOSITION, 2016, VOL 7A, AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2016, no UNSP V07AT28A002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The elastic and plastic anisotropy of the single-crystal materials bring many difficulties in terms of modeling, evaluation and prediction of fatigue crack growth. In this paper a single-crystal material model has been adopted to a finite element-environment, which is paired with a crack growth tool. All simulations are performed in a three-dimensional context. This methodology makes it possible to analyze complex finite element-models, which are more application-near than traditional two-dimensional models. The influence of the crystal orientation, as well as the influence of misalignments of the crystal orientation due to the casting process are investigated. It is shown that both the crystal orientation and the misalignment from the ideal crystal orientation are important for the crack driving force. The realistic maximum limit of 10 degrees misalignment is considered. It can be seen that crack growth behavior is highly influenced by the misalignment. This knowledge is of great interest for the industry in order to evaluate the crack growth in single-crystal components more accurately.

  • 17.
    Busse, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palmert, Frans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sjodin, B.
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Almroth, P.
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, D.
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leidermark, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Prediction of crystallographic cracking planes in single-crystal nickel-base superalloys2018In: Engineering Fracture Mechanics, ISSN 0013-7944, E-ISSN 1873-7315, Vol. 196, p. 206-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inherent anisotropy of single-crystal nickel-base superalloys brings many difficulties in terms of modelling, evaluation and prediction of fatigue crack growth. Two models to predict on which crystallographic plane cracking will occur is presented. The models are based on anisotropic stress intensity factors resolved on crystallographic slip planes calculated in a three-dimensional finite-element context. The developed models have been compared to experiments on two different test specimen geometries. The results show that a correct prediction of the crystallographic cracking plane can be achieved. This knowledge is of great interest for the industry and academia to better understand and predict crack growth in single-crystal materials.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-05-05 15:21
  • 18.
    Calmunger, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chai, Guocai
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Sandvik Materials Technology, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Moverare, Johan J.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Characterization of austenitic stainless steels deformed at elevated temperature2017In: Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. A, ISSN 1073-5623, E-ISSN 1543-1940, Vol. 48A, no 10, p. 4525-4538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels are promising candidates to replace more expansive nickel-based alloys within the energy-producing industry. The present study investigates the deformation mechanisms by microstructural characterisation, mechanical properties and stress-strain response of three commercial austenitic stainless steels and two commercial nickel-based alloys using uniaxial tensile tests at elevated temperatures from 400 C up to 700 C. The materials showed different influence of temperature on ductility, where the ductility at elevated temperatures increased with increasing nickel and solid solution hardening element content. The investigated materials showed planar dislocation driven deformation at elevated temperature. Scanning electron microscopy showed that deformation twins were an active deformation mechanism in austenitic stainless steels during tensile deformation at elevated temperatures up to 700 C.

  • 19.
    Calmunger, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chai, Guocai
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Moverare, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Influence of Cyclic Oxidation in Moist Air on Surface Oxidation-Affected Zones2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Domeij Bäckryd, Rebecka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics.
    Ryberg, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Combitech AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Larsgunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics.
    Multidisciplinary design optimisation methods for automotive structures2017In: International Journal of Automotive and Mechanical Engineering, ISSN 2229-8649, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 4050-4067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multidisciplinary design optimisation (MDO) can be used as an effective tool to improve the design of automotive structures. Large-scale MDO problems typically involve several groups who must work concurrently and autonomously in order to make the solution process efficient. In this article, the formulations of existing MDO methods are compared and their suitability is assessed in relation to the characteristics of automotive structural applications. Both multi-level and single-level optimisation methods are considered. Multi-level optimisation methods distribute the design process but are complex. When optimising automotive structures, metamodels are often required to relieve the computational burden of detailed simulation models. The metamodels can be created by individual groups prior to the optimisation process, and thus offer a way of distributing work. Therefore, it is concluded that a single-level method in combination with meta-models is the most straightforward way of implementing MDO into the development of automotive structures. If the benefits of multi-level optimisation methods, in a special case, are considered to compensate for their drawbacks, analytical target cascading has a number of advantages over collaborative optimisation, but both methods are possible choices.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Zhe
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonnalagadda, Krisha Praveen
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    BENDING FATIGUE OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME TURBO EXPO: TURBINE TECHNICAL CONFERENCE AND EXPOSITION, 2017, VOL 6, AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2017, article id V006T24A004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are ceramic coatings used in gas turbines to lower the base metal temperature. During operation, the TBC may fail through, for example, fatigue. In the present study, a TBC system deposited on a Ni-base alloy was tested in tensile bending fatigue. The TBC system was tested as-sprayed and oxidized and two load levels were used. After interrupting the tests, at 10000-50000 cycles, the TBC tested at the lower load had extensive delamination damage whereas the TBC tested at the higher load was relatively undamaged. At the higher load, the TBC formed vertical cracks which relieved the stresses in the TBC and retarded delamination damage. A finite element analysis was used to establish a likely vertical crack configuration (spacing and depth) and it could be confirmed that the corresponding stress drop in the TBC should prohibit delamination damage at the higher load.

  • 22.
    Eriksson, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Zhe
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonnalagadda, Krisha Praveen
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bending Fatigue of Thermal Barrier Coatings2017In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 139, no 12, p. 122101-1-122101-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are ceramic coatings used in gas turbines to lower the base metal temperature. During operation, the TBC may fail through, for example, fatigue. In this study, a TBC system deposited on a Ni-base alloy was tested in tensile bending fatigue. The TBC system was tested as-sprayed and oxidized, and two load levels were used. After interrupting the tests, at 10,000–50,000 cycles, the TBC tested at the lower load had extensive delamination damage, whereas the TBC tested at the higher load was relatively undamaged. At the higher load, the TBC formed vertical cracks which relieved the stresses in the TBC and retarded delamination damage. A finite element (FE) analysis was used to establish a likely vertical crack configuration (spacing and depth), and it could be confirmed that the corresponding stress drop in the TBC should prohibit delamination damage at the higher load.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonnalagadda, Krisha Praveen
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A STUDY ON CRACK CONFIGURATIONS IN THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME TURBO EXPO: TURBINE TECHNICAL CONFERENCE AND EXPOSITION, 2017, VOL 6, AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2017, article id V006T24A005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spallation of thermal barrier coatings subjected to thermal fatigue occurs through cracking in or close to the metal ceramic interface. To better match an experimentally observed damage progression curve with initially slow crack growth followed by rapid crack growth, a multitude of crack paths were modeled in a finite element analysis. Comparisons with experimental data enabled the most likely crack path to be identified. It was shown that the most likely failure type for the studied TBC system was crack initiation from pre-existing defects in the thermal barrier coating which propagated into the interface, leading to spallation. The results were used to fit a crack propagation model.

  • 24.
    Eriksson, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    OPTIMIZING THERMAL BARRIER COATING DESIGN USING STRUCTURAL OPTIMIZATION METHODS2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME TURBO EXPO: TURBINE TECHNICAL CONFERENCE AND EXPOSITION, 2017, VOL 6, AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2017, article id V006T24A003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used in gas turbines to reduce creep, thermo-mechanical fatigue, and oxidation, or to allow for reduced air cooling. TBCs may fail due to fatigue. Structural optimization methods were applied to optimize the. TBC thickness in such a way as to increase the life of the TBC. The TBC thickness was varied for three cases: 1) minimizing TBC volume, 2) minimizing TBC maximum effective stress, and 3) minimizing compliance (minimizing the strain energy). The results from the optimization were used to estimate the relative change in TBC life via a strain energy based failure criterion and a Coffin-Manson-like expression. Minimization of volume had limited use due to limitations in the current implementation. Minimization of effective stress did not give any significant increase in life. The minimization of compliance increased the estimated TBC life at highly stressed regions.

  • 25.
    Ewest, D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Almroth, P.
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Sjodin, B.
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leidermark, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Moverare, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A modified compliance method for fatigue crack propagation applied on a single edge notch specimen2016In: International Journal of Fatigue, ISSN 0142-1123, E-ISSN 1879-3452, Vol. 92, p. 61-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crack length measurements with high accuracy are often difficult to achieve during fatigue crack propagation testing under non-isothermal conditions. In this work a modified approach to the compliance method defined in e.g. ASTM E647 is described, which is better suited for high loads, varying temperatures and for taking the scatter in Youngs modulus into account. A numerical finite element study is performed for a single edge notch specimen, to investigate the influence of initiation locations on the accuracy of the method. The change in cracked area versus change in stiffness for three different cases are numerically shown to collapse to one curve, i.e. the result is not significantly affected by how the crack is initiated. The numerical study is compared to results from two experiments using different materials, with heat tinting during the tests for extracting snapshots of the crack fronts. A good agreement between the experiments and the numerical study is shown. A new compliance curve and a new geometry function for the stress intensity factor is proposed for the single edge notch specimen. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Ewest, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Modelling and experimental evaluation of non-linear fatigue crack propagation in a ductile superalloy2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fatigue life evaluation is an important part in the design process of an industrial gas turbine. The fatigue life can be divided into crack initiation and crack propagation, and not to address the crack propagation part usually yields a non-conservative and overcomplicated design. Historically a lot of attention has been directed towards the crack initiation, but the crack propagation part in an industrial gas turbine context has not been given the same attention due to limitations in theoretical modelling, lack of test possibilities and that the design requirements have been fulfilled within the initiation life. However, with the need to reduce service down time and to improve performance, the crack propagation life needs to be further accounted for. As an example, cracks that emerge from notches or other stress concentrations grow under non-elastic conditions, which cannot be modelled with linear theories.

    In this Licentiate of Engineering thesis a non-linear approach is put forward in which the plastic contribution in fatigue crack propagation is addressed and accounted for. The theoretical background is not new, but the finite element implementation done was, to the author knowledge, not available. This numerical post processing tool can calculate the non-linear ΔJ value for an arbitrary 2D-geometry. It was used to produce an expression for a non-linear geometry factor used in a simple expression for estimation of ΔJ in a test evaluation context. Room temperature tests were performed on a single notch specimen, under both displacement and force control. The latter were carried out in order to show the behaviour under small scale yielding conditions, while the displacement controlled testing was to show large scale yielding at the beginning of the tests. It was shown that all the test results could be collected in a Paris law type plot with ΔJ if the crack closure effect is taken into account. Furthermore, a study was performed where both a linear and a non-linear approach are applied on the displacement controlled tests. It was concluded that for the studied test series, the linear fatigue fracture parameter ΔK underestimates the crack growth behaviour if the elasto-plastic stresses from the tests are used, hence yielding non-conservative results.

    Since this project focuses on non-linear crack propagation at thermo-mechanical conditions a crack length description is put forward, which simplifies and increases the accuracy of crack length measurements in fatigue crack propagation tests. It has also been shown that irrespectively of the crack initiation location in a single edge notch specimen the data fall on one curve, meaning that no care has to be taken regarding this aspect when evaluating crack length with the modified compliance method put forward in Paper III.

    This Licentiate of Engineering thesis consists of two parts, where Part I gives an introduction to the subject, while Part II consists of three papers.

    List of papers
    1. Fatigue crack propagation in a ductile superalloy at room temperature and extensive cyclic plastic flow
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fatigue crack propagation in a ductile superalloy at room temperature and extensive cyclic plastic flow
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: International Journal of Fatigue, ISSN 0142-1123, E-ISSN 1879-3452, Vol. 80, p. 40-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Fatigue crack propagation experiments under both force and displacement control have been performed on the wrought superalloy Haynes 230 at room temperature, using a single edge notched specimen. The force controlled tests are nominally elastic, and the displacement controlled tests have nominally large plastic hysteresis at the beginning of the tests, but saturates towards linear elastic conditions as the crack grows. As some tests are in the large scale yielding regime, a non-linear fracture mechanics approach is used to correlate crack growth rates versus the fracture parameter Delta J. It is shown that crack closure must be accounted for, to correctly model the crack growth seen in all the tests in a unified manner. For the force controlled small scale yielding tests the Newman crack closure model was used. The Newman equation is however not valid for large nominal cyclic plasticity, instead the crack closure in the displacement controlled tests is extracted from the test data. A good agreement between all tests is shown, when closure is accounted for and effective values of Delta J are used.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2015
    Keywords
    Fatigue crack propagation; Haynes 230; Large scale yielding; Cyclic J-integral or Delta J; Crack closure
    National Category
    Applied Mechanics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122045 (URN)10.1016/j.ijfatigue.2015.04.006 (DOI)000360596500005 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspang, Sweden

    Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2017-12-01
    2. Comparison between linear and non-linear fracture mechanics analysis of experimental data for the ductile superalloy Haynes 230
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison between linear and non-linear fracture mechanics analysis of experimental data for the ductile superalloy Haynes 230
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 138, no 6, p. 062101-1-062101-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    With increasing use of renewable energy sources, an industrial gas turbine is often a competitive solution to balance the power grid. However, life robustness approaches for gas turbine components operating under increasingly cyclic conditions are a challenging task. Ductile superalloys, as Haynes 230, are often used in stationary gas turbine hot parts such as combustors. The main load for such components is due to nonhomogeneous thermal expansion within or between parts. As the material is ductile, there is considerable redistribution of stresses and strains due to inelastic deformations during the crack initiation phase. Therefore, the subsequent crack growth occurs through a material with significant residual stresses and strains. In this work, fatigue crack propagation experiments, including the initiation phase, have been performed on a single edge notched specimen under strain controlled conditions. The test results are compared to fracture mechanics analyses using the linear ΔK and the nonlinear ΔJ approaches, and an attempt to quantify the difference in terms of a life prediction is made. For the tested notched geometry, material, and strain ranges, the difference in the results using ΔKeff or ΔJeff is larger than the scatter seen when fitting the model to the experimental data. The largest differences can be found for short crack lengths, when the cyclic plastic work is the largest. The ΔJ approach clearly shows better agreement with the experimental results in this regime.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ASME Press, 2016
    National Category
    Applied Mechanics Other Materials Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126576 (URN)10.1115/1.4031712 (DOI)000374713500010 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies: Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspang, Sweden

    Available from: 2016-03-30 Created: 2016-03-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30
  • 27.
    Ewest, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB,Finspång, Sweden.
    Almroth, P.
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden.
    Leidermark, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sjodin, B.
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden.
    Fatigue crack propagation in a ductile superalloy at room temperature and extensive cyclic plastic flow2015In: International Journal of Fatigue, ISSN 0142-1123, E-ISSN 1879-3452, Vol. 80, p. 40-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fatigue crack propagation experiments under both force and displacement control have been performed on the wrought superalloy Haynes 230 at room temperature, using a single edge notched specimen. The force controlled tests are nominally elastic, and the displacement controlled tests have nominally large plastic hysteresis at the beginning of the tests, but saturates towards linear elastic conditions as the crack grows. As some tests are in the large scale yielding regime, a non-linear fracture mechanics approach is used to correlate crack growth rates versus the fracture parameter Delta J. It is shown that crack closure must be accounted for, to correctly model the crack growth seen in all the tests in a unified manner. For the force controlled small scale yielding tests the Newman crack closure model was used. The Newman equation is however not valid for large nominal cyclic plasticity, instead the crack closure in the displacement controlled tests is extracted from the test data. A good agreement between all tests is shown, when closure is accounted for and effective values of Delta J are used.

  • 28.
    Ewest, Daniel
    et al.
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Almroth, Per
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Sjodin, Bjorn
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Leidermark, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    COMPARISON BETWEEN LINEAR AND NON-LINEAR FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL DATA FOR THE DUCTILE SUPERALLOY HAYNES 2302015In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME TURBO EXPO: TURBINE TECHNICAL CONFERENCE AND EXPOSITION, 2015, VOL 7A, ASME Press, 2015, no V07AT28A014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vith increasing use of renewable energy sources, an industrial us turbine is often a competitive solution to balance the power rid. However, life robustness approaches for gas turbine corn9nents operating under increasingly cyclic conditions, is a chalmging task. Ductile superalloys, as Haynes 230, are often used n stationary gas turbine hot parts such as combustors. The main cad for such components is due to non -homogeneous thermal xpansion within or between parts. As the material is ductile Jere is considerable redistribution of stresses and strains due to nelastic deformations during the crack initiation phase. There ore, the subsequent crack growth occurs through a material with :gnificant residual stresses and strains. In this work, fatigue ack propagation experiments, including the initiation phase, ave been performed on a single edge notched specimen under train controlled conditions. The test results are compared to -acture mechanics analyses using the linear AK and the non near AJ approaches, and an attempt to quantify the difference 2 terms of a life prediction is made. For the tested notched gemetry, material and strain ranges, the difference in the results using AKeff or ATeff are larger than the scatter seen when fitting the model to the experimental data. The largest differences can be found for short crack lengths, when the cyclic plastic work is the largest. The AJ approach clearly shows better agreement with the experimental results in this regime.

  • 29.
    Ewest, Daniel
    et al.
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden .
    Almroth, Per
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden .
    Sjödin, Björn
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden .
    Leidermark, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Comparison between linear and non-linear fracture mechanics analysis of experimental data for the ductile superalloy Haynes 2302016In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 138, no 6, p. 062101-1-062101-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With increasing use of renewable energy sources, an industrial gas turbine is often a competitive solution to balance the power grid. However, life robustness approaches for gas turbine components operating under increasingly cyclic conditions are a challenging task. Ductile superalloys, as Haynes 230, are often used in stationary gas turbine hot parts such as combustors. The main load for such components is due to nonhomogeneous thermal expansion within or between parts. As the material is ductile, there is considerable redistribution of stresses and strains due to inelastic deformations during the crack initiation phase. Therefore, the subsequent crack growth occurs through a material with significant residual stresses and strains. In this work, fatigue crack propagation experiments, including the initiation phase, have been performed on a single edge notched specimen under strain controlled conditions. The test results are compared to fracture mechanics analyses using the linear ΔK and the nonlinear ΔJ approaches, and an attempt to quantify the difference in terms of a life prediction is made. For the tested notched geometry, material, and strain ranges, the difference in the results using ΔKeff or ΔJeff is larger than the scatter seen when fitting the model to the experimental data. The largest differences can be found for short crack lengths, when the cyclic plastic work is the largest. The ΔJ approach clearly shows better agreement with the experimental results in this regime.

  • 30.
    Ganghoffer, J.F.
    et al.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Denis, S.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Gautier, E.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Simon, A.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sjöström, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mechanical and thermodynamical study of a macroscopically coherent phase transition.Case of the martensitic transformation1991In: Journal de Physique IV, ISSN 1155-4339, Vol. 1, p. C4-89-C4-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the general framework of a macroscopically coherent phase transition, the mechanical and thermodynamical behaviour of a two-phase volume element under structural evolution will be investigated and discussed. The identification of internal entropy production will then allow to formulate a general evolution condition for such a system and the internal stress state will appear to influence strongly the transformation behaviour, via the interface. The case of a martensitic transformation is considered. From that rigourous mechanical approach, we obtain the thermodynamical balance equation used for martensitic transformation.

  • 31.
    Ganghoffer, J.F.
    et al.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Denis, S.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Gautier, E.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Simon, A.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sjöström, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Micromechanical simulation of a martensitic transformaation by Finite Elements1991In: Journal de Physique IV, ISSN 1155-4339, Vol. 1, p. C4-77-C4-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A micromechanical model describing the martensitic transformation on the grain scale has been developed, using Finite Elements. First results gained from the simulation illustrate how the morphological evolution within the grain is directly controlled by the internal stress state. The reversible and irreversible part of transformation "plasticity" strain and their evolution with the transformation can then be obtained from these calculations.

  • 32.
    Ganghoffer, J.F.
    et al.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Denis, S.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Gautier, E.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Simon, A.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sjöström, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Micromechanical simulation of martensitic transformation by Finite Elements1991In: Journal de Physique IV, ISSN 1155-4339, Vol. 1, p. C4-77-C4-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A micromechanical model describing the martensitic transformation on the grain scale has been developed, using Finite Elements. First results gained from the simulation illustrate how the morphological evolution within the grain is directly controlled by the internal stress state. The reversible and irreversible part of transformation "plasticity" strain and their evolution with the transformation can then be obtained from these calculations.

  • 33.
    Ganghoffer, J.F.
    et al.
    ICSI, 15, Rue Jean Starcky, BP 2478, 68057 Mulhouse Cedex, France.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A micromechanical model of the martensitic transformation1998In: Mechanics of Materials, ISSN 0167-6636, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 125-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A micromechanical model of the martensitic transformation at the grain scale has been established, considering the more specific case of ferrous alloys. The transformation proceeds through the formation of successive variants of the product phase within a unit cell representative of a grain; interactions between neighbouring grains are simulated by the choice of periodic boundary conditions. From a thermodynamical analysis, a selection rule for the order and orientation of the forming martensitic variants has been established, based on internal stresses anisotropy. These concepts have been implemented into a two-dimensional finite element simulation of the transformation, considering an elastoplastic behaviour of both parent and product phases. Morphological and crystallographical features of the transformation are considered: one variant consists of a thin layer of elements within the mesh that can form with four possible discrete orientations. Simulation results show the development of the plate pattern as a combination of the influence of both external load and internal stresses built during the progress of the transformation. These are related to global evolutions of transformation plasticity vs. transformation progress. Comparison with experiments show a similar form of the evolutions of the total strain; however, the model overestimates the strain levels. The possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

  • 34.
    Ganghoffer, J.F.
    et al.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, UA 159 du CNRS, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Denis, S.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, UA 159 du CNRS, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Gautier, E.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, UA 159 du CNRS, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Sjöström, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, A.
    Laboratoire de Science et Génie des Matériaux Métalliques, UA 159 du CNRS, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy cedex, France.
    Martensitic transformation plasticity simulations by Finite Elements1994In: Journal de Physique IV, ISSN 1155-4339, Vol. 4, p. C3-215-C3-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical behaviour associated to the martensitic transformation has been modelled using a 2D FE description. The martensite variants are constituted of different elements of the mesh and four different variants are allowed to transform in the grain. The transformation progress is prescribed using a thermodynamical criterion based on the maximal work associated to the variant formation. Transformation plasticity deformation and plates orientation patterns are obtained for three stress levels. These results are discussed in regard to the model used and the physical parameters introduced in the model.

  • 35.
    Gibaud, Thomas
    et al.
    Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Perge, Christophe
    Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Lindström, Stefan B
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Taberlet, Nicolas
    Université de Lyon, UFR de Physique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, Lyon, France .
    Manneville, Sebastien
    Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS/UMR 5672, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Université de Lyon, 46 allée d'Italie, 69007 Lyon, France.
    Multiple yielding processes in a colloidal gel under large amplitude oscillatory stress2016In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 1701-1712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fatigue refers to the changes in material properties caused by repeatedly applied loads. It has been widely studied for, e.g., construction materials, but much less has been done on soft materials. Here, we characterize the fatigue dynamics of a colloidal gel. Fatigue is induced by large amplitude oscillatory stress (LAOStress), and the local displacements of the gel are measured through high-frequency ultrasonic imaging. We show that fatigue eventually leads to rupture and fluidization. We evidence four successive steps associated with these dynamics: (i) the gel first remains solid, (ii) it then slides against the walls, (iii) the bulk of the sample becomes heterogeneous and displays solid-fluid coexistence, and (iv) it is finally fully fluidized. It is possible to homogeneously scale the duration of each step with respect to the stress oscillation amplitude sigma_0. The data are compatible with both exponential and power-law scalings with sigma_0, which hints at two possible interpretations of delayed yielding in terms of activated processes or of the Basquin law. Surprisingly, we find that the model parameters behave nonmonotonically as we change the oscillation frequency and/or the gel concentration.

  • 36.
    Grossmann, Oscar
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics.
    Lateral stability analysis of frames for civilianaircraft structures2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The fuselage of a civilian airplane is a quite complex structure build from slendermembers and panels. Slender members are essential to minimize the weight of theairplane. These slender structures are at risk of buckling due to high compressiveloads. The scope of this thesis is to evaluate the lateral stability of one of thesestructures, a curved beam later referred to as the frame. Three main factorsthat affect the lateral stability of the frame will be discussed: The effect of thesurrounding geometry, the load conditions and the initial curvature of the frame.A literature study was carried out to find current information and methodologiesregarding such structures. The most promising techniques were later implementedto evaluate the lateral stability of the frame.The results from the analysis indicate that the structures surrounding the frameare sufficiently stiff so they won’t deflect and rotate together with the frame whenit buckles laterally. The whole cross section of the frame was assumed to be a rigidbody in this thesis but the experience from the present work indicates that thismight be wrong. The stress distribution in the frame was seen as a combination oftwo different load cases, plane bending and pure compression. By analyzing theseload cases individually we found that for the pure compression case the criticalbuckling stress was lower than for the maximum stress level of the plane bendingcase. The effect of the initial curvature of the frame was evaluated for the planebending load case. The initial curvature increased the resistance to the lateralbuckling modes but had also local effects on the stability of the frame. The crosssection of the frame is of the type of an open channel and if one were to take theinitial curvature into consideration one would also have to make sure that the webdoesn’t buckle locally due to increased radial compressive stress in the web.It was found that the surrounding structures could be disregarded if one appliesfixed boundary conditions to the fastener line of the frame where it is connected tothe skin panel. Further evaluation of how the initial curvature affects the bucklingmode is needed but the results look promising.v

  • 37.
    Gunnarsson, Pontus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Methods to Predict Structural Response due to Random Sound Pressure Fields2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To predict structural responses due to random sound pressure fields are of great interest within many fields of aircraft development, particularly within acoustic fatigue problems and definition of vibration requirements.  Today there exist some methods to quantify sound pressure fields affecting the air-fighters. Some of them are considered to be expensive, time consuming or with high computational cost. Examples of this would be to measure a real flight, produce data from wind tunnels, use Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) or obtain data from an engineering database. Once the sound pressure levels are known they can be applied as loads to structural models and this is the area studied in this work. To study these problems a new working tool is made using MATLAB. The tool’s main purpose is to give an opportunity to study structural responses caused by random sound pressure fields with different correlation methods.  Because of the complexity of both the sound pressure and different structures of the aircraft a few limitations are considered. The plate is used since this makes is easy to produce different mode shape functions. The mode shape function is an important part in this work as it can be used to create all possible frequency response functions in a structure. Then, to determine a structure response, different methods to produce pressure fields are used. The methods are called correlation-models and five different models are considered: uncorrelated, fully correlated and moving correlated load (MCL) and two empirical models due to the similarity to real sound pressure fields called Turbulent Boundary Layer (TBL) and a diffuse excitation model. To prove the accuracy of the created working tool, an independent FE-solver is used called Abaqus. Abaqus  is  used  to  validate  the  mode  shape-  and  the  frequency  response-fucntions.  Another advantage  with  Abaqus  is  that  the  solver  already  includes  three  of  the  correlation  models  which therefore simplify the verification of the new tool. Finally,  a  simulation  study  is  carried  out  in  order  to  validate  the  MATLAB  functions  and  test  the sensitivity  to  different  correlation  models.  In  order  to  do  this,  the  sound  pressure  field  is  to  be reasonable  approximated  and  therefore  data  from  the  database  ESDU  (acronym  of  Engineering Sciences Data Unit) is used that predicts sound pressure fields for different flight envelopes. In the simulation study all correlation models are compared to TBL due to its sound pressure and here it can be seen that fully correlated loads fails to predict response due to certain modes. On the other hand, the MCL model increases this accuracy for low Mach numbers and even more for high Mach numbers  due  to  its  velocity  dependence.  The  diffuse  model,  which  is  supposed  to  imitate  a  real pressure chamber load, is often believed to be conservative but in this study it can be seen that this is not always the case.

  • 38.
    Hajian, Alireza
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Lindström, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Hamedi, Mahiar M.
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Wagberg, Lars
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Understanding the Dispersive Action of Nanocellulose for Carbon Nanomaterials2017In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 1439-1447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims at understanding the excellent ability of nanocelluloses to disperse carbon nanomaterials (CNs) in aqueous media to form long-term stable colloidal dispersions without the need for chemical functionalization of the CNs or the use of surfactant. These dispersions are useful for composites with high CN content when seeking water based, efficient, and green pathways for their preparation. To establish a comprehensive understanding of such dispersion mechanism, colloidal characterization of the dispersions has been combined with surface adhesion measurements using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) in aqueous media. AFM results based on model surfaces of graphene and nanocellulose further suggest that there is an association between the nanocellulose and the CN. This association is caused by fluctuations of the counterions on the surface of the nanocellulose inducing dipoles in the sp(2) carbon lattice surface of the CNs. Furthermore, the charges on the nanocellulose will induce an electrostatic stabilization of the nanocellulose-CN complexes that prevents aggregation. On the basis of this understanding, nanocelluloses with high surface charge density were used to disperse and stabilize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and reduced graphene oxide particles in water, so that further increases in the dispersion limit of CNTs could be obtained. The dispersion limit reached the value of 75 wt % CNTs and resulted in high electrical conductivity (515 S/cm) and high modulus (14 GPa) of the CNT composite nanopapers.

  • 39.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Topology optimization considering stress, fatigue and load uncertainties2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation concerns structural topology optimization in conceptual design stages. The objective of the project has been to identify and solve problems that prevent structural topology optimization from being used in a broader sense in the avionic industry; therefore the main focus has been on stress and fatigue constraints and robustness with respect to load uncertainties.

    The thesis consists of two parts. The first part gives an introduction to topology optimization, describes the new contributions developed within this project and motivates why these are important. The second part includes five papers.

    The first paper deals with stress constraints and a clustered approach is presented where stress constraints are applied to stress clusters, instead of being defined for each point of the structure. Different approaches for how to create and update the clusters, such that sufficiently accurate representations of the local stresses are obtained at a reasonable computational cost, are developed and evaluated.

    High-cycle fatigue constraints are developed in the second paper, where loads described by a variable-amplitude load spectrum and material data from fatigue tests are used to determine a limit stress, for which below fatigue failure is not expected. A clustered approach is then used to constrain the tensile principal stresses below this limit.

    The third paper introduces load uncertainties and stiffness optimization considering the worst possible loading is then formulated as a semi-definite programming problem, which is solved very efficiently. The load is due to acceleration of point masses attached to the structure and the mass of the structure itself, and the uncertainty concerns the direction of the acceleration. The fourth paper introduces an extension to the formulated semi-definite programming problem such that both fixed and uncertain loads can be optimized for simultaneously.

    Game theory is used in the fifth paper to formulate a general framework, allowing essentially any differentiable objective and constraint functions, for topology optimization under load uncertainty. Two players, one controlling the structure and one the loads, are in conflict such that a solution to the game, a Nash equilibrium, is a design optimized for the worst possible load.

    List of papers
    1. Stress constrained topology optimization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress constrained topology optimization
    2013 (English)In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 33-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops and evaluates a method for handling stress constraints in topology optimization. The stress constraints are used together with an objective function that minimizes mass or maximizes stiffness, and in addition, the traditional stiffness based formulation is discussed for comparison. We use a clustering technique, where stresses for several stress evaluation points are clustered into groups using a modified P-norm to decrease the number of stress constraints and thus the computational cost. We give a detailed description of the formulations and the sensitivity analysis. This is done in a general manner, so that different element types and 2D as well as 3D structures can be treated. However, we restrict the numerical examples to 2D structures with bilinear quadrilateral elements. The three formulations and different approaches to stress constraints are compared using two well known test examples in topology optimization: the L-shaped beam and the MBB-beam. In contrast to some other papers on stress constrained topology optimization, we find that our formulation gives topologies that are significantly different from traditionally optimized designs, in that it actually manage to avoid stress concentrations. It can therefore be used to generate conceptual designs for industrial applications.

    Keywords
    Topology optimization, Stress constraints, Clusters, SIMP, MMA
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88092 (URN)10.1007/s00158-012-0880-7 (DOI)000320865900003 ()
    Available from: 2013-01-30 Created: 2013-01-30 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Fatigue constrained topology optimization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fatigue constrained topology optimization
    2014 (English)In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 207-219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We present a contribution to a relatively unexplored application of topology optimization: structural topology optimization with fatigue constraints. A probability based high-cycle fatigue analysis is combined with principal stress calculations in order to find the topology with minimal mass that can withstand prescribed loading conditions for a specific life time. This allows us to generate optimal conceptual designs of structural components where fatigue life is the dimensioning factor.

    We describe the fatigue analysis and present ideas that makes it possible to separate the fatigue analysis from the topology optimization. The number of constraints is kept low as they are applied to stress clusters, which are created such that they give adequate representations of the local stresses. Optimized designs constrained by fatigue and static stresses are shown and a comparison is also made between stress constraints based on the von Mises criterion and the highest tensile principal stresses.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer-Verlag New York, 2014
    National Category
    Mechanical Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88093 (URN)10.1007/s00158-014-1054-6 (DOI)000339944100003 ()
    Available from: 2013-01-30 Created: 2013-01-30 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Worst-case topology optimization of self-weight loaded structures using semi-definite programming
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Worst-case topology optimization of self-weight loaded structures using semi-definite programming
    2015 (English)In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 915-928Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The paper concerns worst-case compliance optimization by finding the structural topology with minimum compliance for the loading due to the worst possible acceleration of the structure and attached non-structural masses. A main novelty of the paper is that it is shown how this min-max problem can be formulated as a non-linear semi-definite programming (SDP) problem involving a small-size constraint matrix and how this problem is solved numerically. Our SDP formulation is an extension of an eigenvalue problem seen previously in the literature; however, multiple eigenvalues naturally arise which makes the eigenvalue problem non-smooth, whereas the SDP problem presented in this paper provides a computationally tractable problem. Optimized designs, where the uncertain loading is due to acceleration of applied masses and the weight of the structure itself, are shown in two and three dimensions and we show that these designs satisfy optimality conditions that are also presented.

    Keywords
    Topology optimization; Semi-definite programming; Worst-case compliance; Self-weight; Robust optimization
    National Category
    Applied Mechanics Computational Mathematics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123002 (URN)10.1007/s00158-015-1285-1 (DOI)000366590800006 ()
    Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
    4. Large-scale robust topology optimization under load-uncertainty
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Large-scale robust topology optimization under load-uncertainty
    2015 (English)In: Advances in Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization - Proceedings of the 11th World Congress of Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization(WCSMO-11) / [ed] Qing Li, Grant P Steven and Zhongpu (Leo) Zhang, 2015, p. 255-260Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structures designed by topology optimization (TO) are frequently sensitive to loads different from the ones accounted for in the optimization. In extreme cases this means that loads differing ever so slightly from the ones it was designed to carry may cause a structure to collapse. It is therefore clear that handling uncertainty regarding the actual loadings is important. To address this issue in a systematic  manner is one of the main goals in the field of robust TO. In this work we present a deterministic robust formulation of TO for maximum stiffness design which accounts for uncertain variations around a set of nominal loads. The idea is to find a design which minimizes the maximum compliance obtained as the loads vary in infinite, so-called uncertainty sets. This naturally gives rise to a semi-infinite optimization problem, which we here reformulate into a non-linear, semi-definite program. With appropriate numerical algorithms this optimization problem can be solved at a cost similar to that of solving a standard multiple load-case TO problem with the number of loads equal to the number of spatial dimensions plus one, times the number of nominal loads. In contrast to most previously suggested methods, which can only be applied to small-scale problems, the presented method is – as illustrated by a numerical example – well-suited for large-scale TO problems.

    Keywords
    Robust optimization, Topology optimization, Large-scale optimization, Non-linear semi-definite programming
    National Category
    Applied Mechanics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123004 (URN)978-0-646-94394-7 (ISBN)
    Conference
    11th World Congress on Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization (WCSMO-11), Sydney Australia, 7–12 June
    Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2017-05-15Bibliographically approved
    5. Game theory approach to robust topology optimization with uncertain loading
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Game theory approach to robust topology optimization with uncertain loading
    2017 (English)In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 1383-1397Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The paper concerns robustness with respect to uncertain loading in topology optimization problems with essentially arbitrary objective functions and constraints. Using a game theoretic framework we formulate problems, or games, defining Nash equilibria. In each game a set of topology design variables aim to find an optimal topology, while a set of load variables aim to find the worst possible load. Several numerical examples with uncertain loading are solved in 2D and 3D. The games are formulated using global stress, mass and compliance as objective functions or constraints.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2017
    Keywords
    Topology optimization, Robust optimization, Game theory, Nash equilibrium, Stress constraints
    National Category
    Applied Mechanics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123006 (URN)10.1007/s00158-016-1548-5 (DOI)000398951100015 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies: NFFP [2013-01221]; Swedish Armed Forces; Swedish Defence Materiel Administration; Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems; Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research [AM13-0029]

    Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2017-05-18Bibliographically approved
  • 40.
    Holmberg, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thore, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Game theory approach to robust topology optimization with uncertain loading2017In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 1383-1397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper concerns robustness with respect to uncertain loading in topology optimization problems with essentially arbitrary objective functions and constraints. Using a game theoretic framework we formulate problems, or games, defining Nash equilibria. In each game a set of topology design variables aim to find an optimal topology, while a set of load variables aim to find the worst possible load. Several numerical examples with uncertain loading are solved in 2D and 3D. The games are formulated using global stress, mass and compliance as objective functions or constraints.

  • 41.
    Holmberg, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Saab AB, SE 581 88, Linköping, Sweden .
    Thore, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Worst-case topology optimization of self-weight loaded structures using semi-definite programming2015In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 915-928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper concerns worst-case compliance optimization by finding the structural topology with minimum compliance for the loading due to the worst possible acceleration of the structure and attached non-structural masses. A main novelty of the paper is that it is shown how this min-max problem can be formulated as a non-linear semi-definite programming (SDP) problem involving a small-size constraint matrix and how this problem is solved numerically. Our SDP formulation is an extension of an eigenvalue problem seen previously in the literature; however, multiple eigenvalues naturally arise which makes the eigenvalue problem non-smooth, whereas the SDP problem presented in this paper provides a computationally tractable problem. Optimized designs, where the uncertain loading is due to acceleration of applied masses and the weight of the structure itself, are shown in two and three dimensions and we show that these designs satisfy optimality conditions that are also presented.

  • 42.
    Holmberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Classification of Paralympic Athletes using Musculoskeletal Simulations2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Holmberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skiers’ summer training – to bike or not to bike?2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Joakim, Torstensson
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics.
    Topology Optimization as a Conceptual Tool for Designing New Airframes2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During the two last decades, topology optimization has grown to be an accepted and used method to produce conceptual designs. Topology optimization is traditionally carried out on a component level, but in this project, the possibility to apply it to airframe design on a full scale aeroplane model is evaluated.

    The project features a conceptual flying-wing design on which the study is to be carried out. Inertia Relief is used to constrain the aeroplane instead of traditional single point constraints with rigid body motion being suppressed by the application of accelerations instead of traditional forces and moments. The inertia relief method utilized the inertia of the aeroplane to achieve a state of quasi-equilibrium such that static finite element analysis can be carried out. Two load cases are used: a steep pitch-up manoeuvre and a landing scenario. Aerodynamic forces are calculated for the pitch-up load case via an in-house solver, with the pressure being mapped to the finite element mesh via a Matlab-script to account for different mesh sizes. Increased gravitational loads are used in the landing load case to simulate the dynamic loading caused in a real landing scenario, which is unable to be accounted for directly in the topology optimization.

    It can be concluded that the optimization is unable to account for one of the major design limitations: buckling of the outer skin. Approaches to account for the buckling of the outer skin are introduced and analysed, with a focus on local compression constraints throughout the wing. The compression constraints produce some promising results but are not without major drawbacks and complications.

    In general, a one-step topology optimization to produce a mature conceptual airframe design is not possible with optimization algorithms today. It may be possible to adopt a multiple-step optimization approach utilizing topology optimization with following size and shape optimization to achieve a design, which could be expanded on in a future project.

  • 45.
    Jonnalagadda, Krisha Praveen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Peng, Ru
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, X. -H.
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Johansson, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Factors Affecting the Performance of Thermal Barrier Coatings in the Presence of V2O5 and Na2SO42016In: JOURNAL OF CERAMIC SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, ISSN 2190-9385, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 409-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the influence of temperature, salt concentration and thickness on the corrosion resistance of seven YSZ thermal barrier coatings in the presence of V2O5 and Na2SO4. For this study, a thick, high-porosity APS coating (670 gm) using hollow spherical powder (HOSP) and a thin, low-porosity APS coating (300 pm) using agglomerated and sintered (Aamp;S) powder were fabricated. Corrosion tests were conducted at 750 degrees C and 900 degrees C with a mixture of Na2SO4 and V2O5 for four hours. At each temperature, salt concentrations of 4,10 and 20 mg/cm(2) were used. SEM and XRD investigations after the corrosion tests revealed that a combination of low temperature and high salt concentration resulted in higher corrosion-induced damage to the thin TBC coatings. With regard to the thick TBC coatings, all except one sample failed during the corrosion test. This suggests that thick TBC coatings with higher porosity may not be suitable in corrosive environments.

  • 46.
    Jonnalagadda, Krisha Praveen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yuan, Kang
    Beijing Gen Research Institute Min and Met, Peoples R China.
    Li, Xin-Hai
    Siemens Ind Turbomachineiy AB, Sweden.
    Ji, Xiaojuan
    Beijing Gen Research Institute Min and Met, Peoples R China.
    Yu, Yueguang
    Beijing Gen Research Institute Min and Met, Peoples R China.
    Peng, Ru
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A study of damage evolution in high purity nano TBCs during thermal cycling: A fracture mechanics based modelling approach2017In: Journal of the European Ceramic Society, ISSN 0955-2219, E-ISSN 1873-619X, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 2889-2899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work concerns the study of damage evolution in a newly developed high purity nano 8YSZ thermal barrier coating during thermal cyclic fatigue tests (TCF). TCF tests were conducted between 100 degrees C-1100 degrees C with a hold time of 1 hat 1100 degrees C, first till failure and later for interrupted tests. Cross section analysis along the diameter of the interrupted test samples revealed a mixed-type failure and that the most of the damage occurred towards the end of the coatings life. To understand the most likely crack growth mechanism leading to failure, different crack growth paths have been modelled using finite element analysis. Crack growing from an existing defect in the top coat towards the top coat/TGO interface has been identified as the most likely mechanism. Estimated damage by the model could predict the rapid increase in the damage towards the end of the coatings life. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 47.
    Jonnalagadda, Krisha Praveen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yuan, Kang
    Li, Xin-Hai
    Ji, Xiaojuan
    Yu, Yueguang
    Peng, Ru Lin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A Study of Damage Evolution in High Purity Nano TBCs During Thermal Cycling: A Fracture Mechanics Based modeling approach.2017In: ASME Turbine Expo, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 37, p. 2889-2899, article id 8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work concerns the study of damage evolution in a newly developed high purity nano 8YSZ thermal barrier coating during thermal cyclic fatigue tests (TCF). TCF tests were conducted between 100 °C–1100 °C with a hold time of 1 h at 1100 °C, first till failure and later for interrupted tests. Cross section analysis along the diameter of the interrupted test samples revealed a mixed-type failure and that the most of the damage occurred towards the end of the coating’s life. To understand the most likely crack growth mechanism leading to failure, different crack growth paths have been modelled using finite element analysis. Crack growing from an existing defect in the top coat towards the top coat/TGO interface has been identified as the most likely mechanism. Estimated damage by the model could predict the rapid increase in the damage towards the end of the coating’s life.

  • 48.
    Jonnalagadda, Krisha Praveen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yuan, Kang
    Beijing General Reseach Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Beijing, China.
    Li, Xin-Hai
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden.
    Ji, Xiaojuan
    Beijing General Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Beijing, China.
    Yu, Yueguang
    Beijing General Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Beijing, China.
    Peng, Ru Lin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Comparison of Damage Evolution During Thermal Cycling in a High Purity Nano and Conventional Thermal Barrier Coating2017In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 332, p. 47-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), consisting of a ceramic top coat and a metallic bond coat, offer resistance against high temperature degradation of turbine components. Cyclic oxidation of the bond coat, thermal stresses due to their thermal mismatches during cyclic operations, and sintering of the top coat are considered to be the common ways by which thermal barrier coatings fail. To reduce sintering, a nano structured high purity yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was developed. The focus of this work is to compare the damage development of such high purity nano YSZ TBC during thermal cycling with a conventional YSZ TBC. Thermal cyclic fatigue (TCF) tests were conducted on both the TBC systems between 100 °C and 1100 °C with a 1 h hold time at 1100 °C. TCF test results showed that conventional YSZ TBC exhibited much higher life compared to the high purity nano YSZ TBC. The difference in the lifetime is explained by the use of microstructural investigations, crack length measurements along the cross-section and the difference in the elastic modulus. Furthermore, stress intensity factors were calculated in order to understand the difference(s) in the damage development between the two TBC systems.

  • 49.
    Kahlin, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Saab AB, Aeronaut, SE-58188 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ansell, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Saab AB, Aeronaut, SE-58188 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Moverare, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fatigue behaviour of additive manufactured Ti6Al4V, with as-built surfaces, exposed to variable amplitude loading2017In: International Journal of Fatigue, ISSN 0142-1123, E-ISSN 1879-3452, Vol. 103, p. 353-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) allows for great design freedom compared to conventional manufacturing. This is very attractive for the aerospace industry in which AM could contribute to lightweight designs and thereby reduce fuel consumption, increase payload and extend flight range. The fatigue behaviour for rough as-built AM surfaces has previously been characterized with constant amplitude testing but in aerospace applications, most parts are exposed to variable amplitude loading. The fatigue behaviour for variable amplitude is not always consistent with the behaviour for constant amplitude due to effects of overloads and local plastic deformations. Therefore, variable amplitude loading behaviour of laser sintered and electron beam melted Ti6Al4V, with rough as-built surfaces have been investigated in this study using the Short-FALSTAFF (Fighter Aircraft Loading STAndard For Fatigue) load sequence. The predicted and the experimental fatigue life was overall consistent even though most experimental results exceeded the predicted life, especially for the laser sintered material. These findings show that conventional cumulative damage fatigue life predictions give reliable predictions for AM materials with rough as-built surfaces for the type of tension dominated load sequence used. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-06-19 15:02
  • 50.
    Kahlin, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ansell, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Moverare, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fatigue Behaviour of Notched Additive Manufactured Ti6Al4V with As-built Surfaces2017In: International Journal of Fatigue, ISSN 0142-1123, E-ISSN 1879-3452, no 101, p. 51-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing (AM) allows the manufacturer to produce parts with complex geometries that are difficult to produce with conventional production methods. Generally, AM is considered to have great potential for the aerospace industry by contributing to reduced weight and lower costs. There are a number of challenges to be solved before AM can be fully utilized in the aerospace industry, and the understanding of fatigue behaviour is one of the major challenges. Although the fatigue properties of flat additive manufactured specimens with rough as-built surfaces already have been widely studied, in practice, few aerospace components have a simple flat geometry with no corners or radii that would act as stress concentrations. Therefore, the combined effect on fatigue life of a rough as-built surface and a geometrical notch needs to be established. In this study, the fatigue properties of both laser sintered and electron beam melted Ti6Al4V have been investigated and a combined effect of a rough as-built surface and a geometrical notch has been determined. In addition, hot isostatic pressing was found to have no impact on fatigue life for rough as-built surfaces. These findings can be directly applied to predict fatigue behaviour of an AM industrial component.

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