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  • 1.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Fallman, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Relations between Concurrent Longitudinal Changes in Cognition, Depressive Symptoms, Self-Rated Health and Everyday Function in Normally Aging Octogenarians2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 8, p. e0160742-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ability to predict and prevent incipient functional decline in older adults may help prolong independence. Cognition is related to everyday function and easily administered, sensitive cognitive tests may help identify at-risk individuals. Factors like depressive symptoms and self-rated health are also associated with functional ability and may be as important as cognition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between concurrent longitudinal changes in cognition, depression, self-rated health and everyday function in a well-defined cohort of healthy 85 year olds that were followed-up at the age of 90 in the Elderly in Linkoping Screening Assessment 85 study. Regression analyses were used to determine if cognitive decline as assessed by global (the Mini-Mental State Examination) and domain specific (the Cognitive Assessment Battery, CAB) cognitive tests predicted functional decline in the context of changes in depressive symptoms and self-rated health. Results showed deterioration in most variables and as many as 83% of these community-dwelling elders experienced functional difficulties at the age of 90. Slowing-down of processing speed as assessed by the Symbol Digits Modality Test (included in the CAB) accounted for 14% of the variance in functional decline. Worsening self-rated health accounted for an additional 6%, but no other variables reached significance. These results are discussed with an eye to possible preventive interventions that may prolong independence for the steadily growing number of normally aging old-old citizens.

  • 2.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Törnvall, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Education to Increase Skills in Research Methods among Clinicians in Health Care2017In: Journal of Health & Medical Informatics, ISSN 2157-7420, Vol. 8, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The aim of this study was to evaluate participants’ and managers’ experience of the design and content of an education programme. The Knowledge to Action (KTA) framework was applied to identify the steps of knowledge creation and action in the education programme.

    Methods

    Data were collected from 18 participants representing two groups: participants in the intervention and supervisors and managers. Two focus groups took place: two with participants in the intervention (4 and 3 in each) and one with eleven managers.

    Results

    All steps in the KTA framework were identified and discussed from several aspects. The importance of selecting projects that were relevant and added value in their clinics was mentioned by all participants. The participants also mentioned that after the education, they had further understanding and increased skills in how to be active and perform continuous improvement projects. The step in the KTA process regarding how to adapt knowledge to local context was not discussed explicitly by the participants or managers.

    Discussion

    Education in research methods and performing improvement projects to develop the clinic creates a more positive attitude to working with continuous improvement. The participant’s self-esteem and knowledge increased regarding how to work with improvements. It is important to have the manager’s support to perform a project. Emphasis was on knowledge inquiry and synthesis and presenting the results with or without possible solutions. The participants and managers talked about barriers and knowledge use more generally and at an organizational level. This means that the participants did not gain the last bit of nowledge needed to put the action into practice. This implies that the problem regarding lack of implementation skills in health care might remain.

  • 3.
    Edvardsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Health care Center Finspång.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Division of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Sweden.
    Differences in levels of albumin, ALT, AST, gamma-GT and creatinine in frail, moderately healthy and healthy elderly individuals2018In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 471-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reference intervals are widely used as decision tools, providing the physician with information about whether the analyte values indicate ongoing disease process. Reference intervals are generally based on individuals without diagnosed diseases or use of medication, which often excludes elderly. The aim of the study was to assess levels of albumin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatinine and gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT) in frail, moderately healthy and healthy elderly indivuduals. Methods: Blood samples were collected from individuals amp;gt; 80 years old, nursing home residents, in the Elderly in Linkoping Screening Assessment and Nordic Reference Interval Project, a total of 569 individuals. They were divided into three cohorts: frail, moderately healthy and healthy, depending on cognitive and physical function. Albumin, ALT, AST, creatinine and gamma-GT were analyzed using routine methods. Results: Linear regression predicted factors for 34% of the variance in albumin were activities of daily living (ADL), gender, stroke and cancer. ADLs, gender and weight explained 15% of changes in ALT. For AST levels, ADLs, cancer and analgesics explained 5% of changes. Kidney disease, gender, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease explained 25% of the variation in creatinine levels and MMSE explained three per cent of gamma-GT variation. Conclusions: Because a group of people are at the same age, they should not be assessed the same way. To interpret results of laboratory tests in elderly is a complex task, where reference intervals are one part, but far from the only one, to take into consideration.

  • 4.
    Gustafsson Asting, Annika
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Iresjö, Britt-Marie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsberth, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Smedh, Ulrika
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundholm, Kent
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Host knockout of E-prostanoid 2 receptors reduces tumor growth and causes major alterations of gene expression in prostaglandin E2-producing tumors2017In: Oncology Letters, ISSN 1792-1074, E-ISSN 1792-1082, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 476-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostaglandin E-2 (PGE(2)) is elevated in a variety of malignant tumors and has been shown to affect several hallmarks of cancer. Accordingly, the PGE, receptor, E-prostanoid 2 (EP2), has been reported to be associated with patient survival and reduced tumor growth in EP2-knockout mice. Thus, the aim of the present study was to screen for major gene expression alterations in tumor tissue growing in EP2-knockout mice. EP2-knockout mice were bred and implanted with EP2 receptor-expressing and PGE(2)-producing epithelial-like tumors. Tumor tissue and plasma were collected and used for analyses with gene expression microarrays and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Tumor growth, acute phase reactions/systemic inflammation and the expression of interleukin-6 were reduced in EP2-knockout tumor-bearing mice. Several hundreds of genes displayed major changes of expression in the tumor tissue when grown in EP2-knockout mice. Such gene alterations involved several different cellular functions, including sternness, migration and cell signaling. Besides gene expression, several long non-coding RNAs were downregulated in the tumors from the EP2-knockout mice. Overall, PGE(2) signaling via host EP2 receptors affected a large number of different genes involved in tumor progression based on signaling between host stroma and tumor cells, which caused reduced tumor growth.

  • 5.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Development of an instrument for measuring activities of daily living in persons with suspected cognitive impairment2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 230-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: According to the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, structured assessment of function and activity has high priority when investigating for dementia.

    Aim/objectives: The aim was to develop and psychometrically test an instrument to measure self-reported and/or informant-reported ability to perform activities of daily living in persons with suspected cognitive impairment.

    Material and methods: The Cognitive Impairment in Daily Life (CID) instrument has been developed in several phases. Content validity was achieved through five expert panels using a Content Validity Index (CVI). The content was tested further in a pilot study of 51 patients and 49 relatives from primary care or a specialist memory clinic.

    Results: Content validity was good with a CVI index of 0.83. All patients considered that relevant activities were included. Most relatives considered that the activities included in the instrument were adequate and captured the patients’ difficulties in daily life. Some adjustments to the items and scale were suggested and these were done after each phase. In general, relatives indicated more difficulties than patients.

    Conclusion: The CID instrument seems promising in terms of content validity. Further testing of reliability and construct validity is ongoing.

  • 6.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Arbring, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wallstedt, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rånby, Mats
    Zafena AB, Borensberg, Sweden.
    A novel prothrombin time method to measure all non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants (NOACs)2017In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 122, no 3, p. 171-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a clinical need for point-of-care (POC) methods for non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants (NOACs). We modified a routine POC procedure: Zafena’s Simple Simon™ PT-INR, a room-temperature, wet-chemistry prothrombin time method of the Owren-type.

    Methods: To either increase or decrease NOAC interference, two assay variants were devised by replacing the standard 10 µL end-to-end capillary used to add the citrated plasma sample to 200 µL of prothrombin time (PT) reagent by either a 20 µL or a 5 µL capillary. All assay variants were calibrated to show correct PT results in plasma samples from healthy and warfarin-treated persons.

    Results: For plasmas spiked with dabigatran, apixaban, or rivaroxaban, the 20 µL variant showed markedly higher PT results than the 5 µL. The effects were even more pronounced at room temperature than at +37 °C. In plasmas from patients treated with NOACs (n = 30 for each) there was a strong correlation between the PT results and the concentration of NOACs as determined by the central hospital laboratory. For the 20 µL variant the PT response of linear correlation coefficient averaged 0.90. The PT range was INR 1.1–2.1 for dabigatran and apixaban, and INR 1.1–5.0 for rivaroxaban. Using an INR ratio between the 20 µL and 5 µL variants (PTr20/5) made the NOAC assay more robust and independent of the patient sample INR value in the absence of NOAC. Detection limits were 80 µg/L for apixaban, 60 µg/L for dabigatran, and 20 µg/L for rivaroxaban.

    Conclusions: A wet-chemistry POC PT procedure was modified to measure the concentrations of three NOACs using a single reagent.

  • 7.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Subsyndromal depression hos äldre äldre personer2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Subsyndromal depression (SSD) eller subklinisk depression är ett vanligt affektivt tillstånd som kan beskrivas som depressivitet under gränsen för vad som kallas syndromal eller egentlig depressiv episod. Förekomsten av SSD har rapporterats vara ungefär 10 % i populationen, eller ungefär 2-3 gånger högre än förekomsten av syndromal depression. SSD jämfört med icke-depression (ND) är associerat med en lägre aktivitetsförmåga (ADL, Activities of Daily Living), lägre kognitiv funktion, lägre subjektiv hälsa, sämre psykiska utfall och en högre dödlighet. Emellertid har flertalet studier om SSD hos äldre gjorts i åldersgruppen yngre äldre (60-80 års ålder), medan få studier har undersökt SSD hos äldre äldre personer (80+ års ålder). Eftersom många aspekter (t ex multisjukdom, skörhet, funktionsförmågor och socialt beroende) generellt förändras mellan yngre äldre och äldre äldre åldrar, så finns det ett behov av ökad kunskap om SSD hos äldre äldre. Syftet med denna avhandling var att beskriva SSD, eller det komplexa området mellan syndromal depression och normalt åldrande, hos äldre äldre personer.

    Metod: studie 1 baserades på kvalitativa intervjuer (n=27), medan studier 2-4 till stor del baserades på data från en prospektiv observationsstudie av en kohort, ”Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment” (ELSA85). ELSA85 hade en populationsbaserad design där man följde personer från 85 års ålder i tre uppföljande mätvågor. Depressivitet mättes med 15- frågeversionen av Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), som också användes för att definiera SSD i studierna.

    Resultat: Analysen av de kvalitativa intervjuerna (studie 1) resulterade i fyra teman (livet går ned och kroppen sviktar, att klara sig själv, att hänga med, och att ta en dag i taget), vilka tillsammans gav en helhetsbild av SSD i de högsta åldrarna. I en jämförelse mellan SSD, ND och syndromal depression, så skiljde sig SSD kvalitativt från syndromal depression, men däremot inte tydligt från ND. En tvärsnittsanalys av data från baslinjen av studien (studie 2) identifierade associerade faktorer till SSD bland äldre äldre personer, och enligt analysen med multipel logistisk respektive linjär regression så var det fyra domäner (sociodemografiska faktorer, sviktande fysisk funktion, neuropsykiatriska faktorer och existentiella faktorer) som var signifikant associerade med SSD.

    I en fem års longitudinell uppföljning (studie 3) visades att direkta hälso- och sjukvårdskostnader per överlevnadsmånad och person var förhöjd hos personer med SSD jämfört med ND med ett storleksförhållande 1.45 (€634 vs €436), vilket var en signifikant skillnad även när man kontrollerade för somatisk multisjukdom. I en åtta års longitudinell uppföljning visades att dödligheten var förhöjd (dödsintensitet eller Hazard ratio (HR))=1.33) för personer med SSD jämfört med ND, liksom sjuklighet avseende personlig ADL (P-ADL), instrumentell ADL (IADL), ensamhet, subjektiv hälsa, och depressivitet. Däremot var inte kognitiv snabbhet, exekutiva funktioner eller global kognitiv funktion signifikant försämrade när man hade kontrollerat för relevanta variabler.

    Slutsatser: SSD hos äldre äldre personer ser olika ut hos olika personer, och personal i hälso- och sjukvården bör vara uppmärksamma på även andra depressiva tecken förutom de klassiska symtomen i diagnosregistren. SSD hos äldre äldre är associerat med förhöjda sjukvårdskostnader, förhöjd sjuklighet och dödlighet. Med tanke på den höga förekomsten av SSD och den demografiska utvecklingen med ökande antal äldre äldre personer i samhället, så indikerar fynden behovet av att utveckla kliniska och samhälleliga strategier för att förebygga SSD och associerade negativa utfall.

    List of papers
    1. Normal Aging or Depression? A Qualitative Study on the Differences Between Subsyndromal Depression and Depression in Very Old People.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Normal Aging or Depression? A Qualitative Study on the Differences Between Subsyndromal Depression and Depression in Very Old People.
    2015 (English)In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 760-769Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the Study: The aim of this study was to make a qualitative comparison of experiences of being in very old people with subsyndromal depression (SSD), in relation to the experiences of very old people with syndromal depression or nondepression. Through investigation and deeper understanding of the interface between depressive disease and normal aging, clinicians might give more accurate prevention or treatment to those very old persons who need such help.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted for 27 individuals of 87-88 years of age, who were categorized in the 3 strata of nondepressive, SSD, and syndromal depression. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis within each stratum and later with a comparison between the strata.

    RESULTS: The content analysis resulted in 4 themes in people with SSD, as defined by a self-report depression screening instrument, giving a comprehensive picture of SSD in very old people, and also showed qualitative differences between the SSD, syndromal depression, and nondepressive groups. A main finding was that SSD differs qualitatively from syndromal depression but not clearly from nondepression.

    IMPLICATIONS: The results might indicate that SSD in very old people is not related to pathology but to normal aging, even though the condition correlates with negative health parameters. Overlooking certain psychosocial aspects of living in the very old may pose a risk of both underdiagnosis and overdiagnosis in the spectrum of depressive disorders.

    Keywords
    Coping, Frailty, Healthy aging, Subthreshold depression, Successful aging
    National Category
    Psychiatry Geriatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120848 (URN)10.1093/geront/gnt162 (DOI)000362984500006 ()24398652 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Östergötland County Council
    Available from: 2015-08-27 Created: 2015-08-27 Last updated: 2018-07-26Bibliographically approved
    2. Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.
    2016 (English)In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 619-628Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate factors associated with subsyndromal depression (SSD) in very old persons, and to develop a model for prediction of SSD among very old persons.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden. Data were collected from a postal questionnaire, assessments in the participants' homes and at reception visits. Depressiveness was screened with GDS-15 (Geriatric Depression Scale), and the results were classified into three outcome categories: non-depression (ND), SSD and syndromal depression. Data were analysed with binary logistic, ordinal logistic and linear regression.

    RESULTS: With univariate logistic regression 20 factors associated with SSD were identified in very old persons, and the four hypothesized domains-sociodemographic factors, declining physical functioning, neuropsychiatric factors and existential factors-significantly related to SSD. The multivariate logistic model included seven independent factors that increase the likelihood of SSD instead of ND (lower self-perceived health, life not meaningful, problems with self-care, use of tranquilizing medication, no contact with neighbours, history of affective disorder and history of stroke). The ordinal logistic and the linear regression models resulted in seven partly different factors for predicting SSD and depressiveness, in the very old.

    CONCLUSIONS: The identified markers may help clinicians with the detection, prevention and treatment of SSD in very old persons. The findings indicate the importance of a comprehensive functional approach to diagnosing and treating depressiveness in this population, and the findings might be interpreted as offering support for the coexistence of a dimensional and a categorical view on depressive disorders.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
    National Category
    Geriatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127480 (URN)10.1002/gps.4369 (DOI)000374700000009 ()26489528 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-27 Last updated: 2018-07-26
    3. Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, ISSN 1064-7481, E-ISSN 1545-7214, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 741-751Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    This study aimed to compare, over a 5-year period, the prospective direct healthcare costs and service utilization of persons with subsyndromal depression (SSD) and non-depressive persons (ND), in a population of very old persons. A second aim was to develop a model that predicts direct healthcare costs in very old persons with SSD.

    Design and Setting

    A prospective population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden.

    Measurements

    Depressiveness was screened with the Geriatric Depression Scale at baseline and at 1-year follow-up, and the results were classified into ND, SSD, and syndromal depression. Data on individual healthcare costs and service use from a 5-year period were derived from national database registers. Direct costs were compared between categories using Mann-Whitney U tests, and a prediction model was identified with linear regression.

    Results

    For persons with SSD, the direct healthcare costs per month of survival exceeded those of persons with ND by a ratio 1.45 (€634 versus €436), a difference that was significant even after controlling for somatic multimorbidity. The final regression model consisted of five independent variables predicting direct healthcare costs: male sex, activities of daily living functions, loneliness, presence of SSD, and somatic multimorbidity.

    Conclusions

    SSD among very old persons is associated with increased direct healthcare costs independently of somatic multimorbidity. The associations between SSD, somatic multimorbidity, and healthcare costs in the very old need to be analyzed further in order to better guide allocation of resources in health policy.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2018
    Keywords
    Subthreshold depression; multimorbidity; oldest old; elderly; cost-of-illness; late-life depression
    National Category
    Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149695 (URN)10.1016/j.jagp.2018.03.007 (DOI)000436629200003 ()29673895 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045544057 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
  • 8.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Subsyndromal Depression in Very Old Persons2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Subsyndromal depression (SSD) or subthreshold depression is a common affective condition that can be described as depressiveness below the threshold of what is called a syndromal or a major depressive episode. The point prevalence for SSD has been reported to be about 10% in the community, or about two or three times higher than the prevalence for syndromal depression. In elderly persons, SSD compared to non-depression (ND) is associated with impaired activities of daily living, lower cognitive function, lower self-perceived health, worse psychiatric outcomes and higher mortality. However, most studies on SSD in elderly persons have been done in the young old age group (age 60-80 years), while few studies have investigated SSD in very old persons (age 80+). As many aspects (e.g. multimorbidity, frailty, functional decline and social dependence) change between the young old and the very old ages, there is a need for more knowledge about SSD in the very old. The overall aim of this doctoral thesis was to describe SSD, or the complex area between syndromal depression and normal aging, in very old persons.

    Method: Paper 1 was based on qualitative interviews (n=27), while papers 2-4 were based largely on data from a prospective observational cohort study “Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment” (ELSA85), with a population-based design following the participants from the age of 85 in three waves of follow-up. The 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) was used for measuring depressiveness and to define SSD in the studies.

    Results: The analysis of the qualitative interviews (paper 1) resulted in four themes (life curve and the body go down, to manage on one’s own, to keep up with life, and taking one day at a time), giving a comprehensive picture of SSD in very old age. In a comparison among SSD, ND and syndromal depression, SSD differed qualitatively from syndromal depression, but not clearly from ND. A cross-sectional analysis of data from baseline (paper 2) identified factors associated with SSD in very old persons, and according to analyses with multiple logistic and linear regressions, four domains (sociodemographic factors, declining physical functioning, neuropsychiatric factors, and existential factors) were significantly associated with SSD.

    A five-year longitudinal follow-up (paper 3) showed that direct healthcare costs per month of survival for persons with SSD exceeded those of persons with ND by a ratio of 1.45 (€634 vs €436), a difference that was significant even after controlling for somatic multimorbidity.

    An eight-year longitudinal follow-up (paper 4) showed that mortality was elevated (hazard ratio=1.33) for persons with SSD compared to ND, as were morbidity regarding basic ADL, IADL, loneliness, self-perceived health and depressiveness, whereas cognitive speed, executive functions and global cognitive function were not significantly impaired when adjusting for covariates.

    Conclusion: SSD in very old persons has a different presentation in different persons, and healthcare personnel should be attentive to other depressive signs beside the classical ones in the diagnostic classification registries. SSD in the very old is associated with elevated direct healthcare costs, morbidity and mortality. Considering the high prevalence of SSD and the demographic development of increasing numbers of very old people, the findings highlight the need to develop clinical and societal strategies to prevent SSD and associated negative outcomes.

    List of papers
    1. Normal Aging or Depression? A Qualitative Study on the Differences Between Subsyndromal Depression and Depression in Very Old People.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Normal Aging or Depression? A Qualitative Study on the Differences Between Subsyndromal Depression and Depression in Very Old People.
    2015 (English)In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 760-769Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the Study: The aim of this study was to make a qualitative comparison of experiences of being in very old people with subsyndromal depression (SSD), in relation to the experiences of very old people with syndromal depression or nondepression. Through investigation and deeper understanding of the interface between depressive disease and normal aging, clinicians might give more accurate prevention or treatment to those very old persons who need such help.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted for 27 individuals of 87-88 years of age, who were categorized in the 3 strata of nondepressive, SSD, and syndromal depression. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis within each stratum and later with a comparison between the strata.

    RESULTS: The content analysis resulted in 4 themes in people with SSD, as defined by a self-report depression screening instrument, giving a comprehensive picture of SSD in very old people, and also showed qualitative differences between the SSD, syndromal depression, and nondepressive groups. A main finding was that SSD differs qualitatively from syndromal depression but not clearly from nondepression.

    IMPLICATIONS: The results might indicate that SSD in very old people is not related to pathology but to normal aging, even though the condition correlates with negative health parameters. Overlooking certain psychosocial aspects of living in the very old may pose a risk of both underdiagnosis and overdiagnosis in the spectrum of depressive disorders.

    Keywords
    Coping, Frailty, Healthy aging, Subthreshold depression, Successful aging
    National Category
    Psychiatry Geriatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120848 (URN)10.1093/geront/gnt162 (DOI)000362984500006 ()24398652 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Östergötland County Council
    Available from: 2015-08-27 Created: 2015-08-27 Last updated: 2018-07-26Bibliographically approved
    2. Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.
    2016 (English)In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 619-628Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate factors associated with subsyndromal depression (SSD) in very old persons, and to develop a model for prediction of SSD among very old persons.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden. Data were collected from a postal questionnaire, assessments in the participants' homes and at reception visits. Depressiveness was screened with GDS-15 (Geriatric Depression Scale), and the results were classified into three outcome categories: non-depression (ND), SSD and syndromal depression. Data were analysed with binary logistic, ordinal logistic and linear regression.

    RESULTS: With univariate logistic regression 20 factors associated with SSD were identified in very old persons, and the four hypothesized domains-sociodemographic factors, declining physical functioning, neuropsychiatric factors and existential factors-significantly related to SSD. The multivariate logistic model included seven independent factors that increase the likelihood of SSD instead of ND (lower self-perceived health, life not meaningful, problems with self-care, use of tranquilizing medication, no contact with neighbours, history of affective disorder and history of stroke). The ordinal logistic and the linear regression models resulted in seven partly different factors for predicting SSD and depressiveness, in the very old.

    CONCLUSIONS: The identified markers may help clinicians with the detection, prevention and treatment of SSD in very old persons. The findings indicate the importance of a comprehensive functional approach to diagnosing and treating depressiveness in this population, and the findings might be interpreted as offering support for the coexistence of a dimensional and a categorical view on depressive disorders.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
    National Category
    Geriatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127480 (URN)10.1002/gps.4369 (DOI)000374700000009 ()26489528 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-27 Last updated: 2018-07-26
    3. Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, ISSN 1064-7481, E-ISSN 1545-7214, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 741-751Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    This study aimed to compare, over a 5-year period, the prospective direct healthcare costs and service utilization of persons with subsyndromal depression (SSD) and non-depressive persons (ND), in a population of very old persons. A second aim was to develop a model that predicts direct healthcare costs in very old persons with SSD.

    Design and Setting

    A prospective population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden.

    Measurements

    Depressiveness was screened with the Geriatric Depression Scale at baseline and at 1-year follow-up, and the results were classified into ND, SSD, and syndromal depression. Data on individual healthcare costs and service use from a 5-year period were derived from national database registers. Direct costs were compared between categories using Mann-Whitney U tests, and a prediction model was identified with linear regression.

    Results

    For persons with SSD, the direct healthcare costs per month of survival exceeded those of persons with ND by a ratio 1.45 (€634 versus €436), a difference that was significant even after controlling for somatic multimorbidity. The final regression model consisted of five independent variables predicting direct healthcare costs: male sex, activities of daily living functions, loneliness, presence of SSD, and somatic multimorbidity.

    Conclusions

    SSD among very old persons is associated with increased direct healthcare costs independently of somatic multimorbidity. The associations between SSD, somatic multimorbidity, and healthcare costs in the very old need to be analyzed further in order to better guide allocation of resources in health policy.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2018
    Keywords
    Subthreshold depression; multimorbidity; oldest old; elderly; cost-of-illness; late-life depression
    National Category
    Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149695 (URN)10.1016/j.jagp.2018.03.007 (DOI)000436629200003 ()29673895 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045544057 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
  • 9.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study2018In: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, ISSN 1064-7481, E-ISSN 1545-7214, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 741-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    This study aimed to compare, over a 5-year period, the prospective direct healthcare costs and service utilization of persons with subsyndromal depression (SSD) and non-depressive persons (ND), in a population of very old persons. A second aim was to develop a model that predicts direct healthcare costs in very old persons with SSD.

    Design and Setting

    A prospective population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden.

    Measurements

    Depressiveness was screened with the Geriatric Depression Scale at baseline and at 1-year follow-up, and the results were classified into ND, SSD, and syndromal depression. Data on individual healthcare costs and service use from a 5-year period were derived from national database registers. Direct costs were compared between categories using Mann-Whitney U tests, and a prediction model was identified with linear regression.

    Results

    For persons with SSD, the direct healthcare costs per month of survival exceeded those of persons with ND by a ratio 1.45 (€634 versus €436), a difference that was significant even after controlling for somatic multimorbidity. The final regression model consisted of five independent variables predicting direct healthcare costs: male sex, activities of daily living functions, loneliness, presence of SSD, and somatic multimorbidity.

    Conclusions

    SSD among very old persons is associated with increased direct healthcare costs independently of somatic multimorbidity. The associations between SSD, somatic multimorbidity, and healthcare costs in the very old need to be analyzed further in order to better guide allocation of resources in health policy.

  • 10.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.2016In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 619-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate factors associated with subsyndromal depression (SSD) in very old persons, and to develop a model for prediction of SSD among very old persons.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden. Data were collected from a postal questionnaire, assessments in the participants' homes and at reception visits. Depressiveness was screened with GDS-15 (Geriatric Depression Scale), and the results were classified into three outcome categories: non-depression (ND), SSD and syndromal depression. Data were analysed with binary logistic, ordinal logistic and linear regression.

    RESULTS: With univariate logistic regression 20 factors associated with SSD were identified in very old persons, and the four hypothesized domains-sociodemographic factors, declining physical functioning, neuropsychiatric factors and existential factors-significantly related to SSD. The multivariate logistic model included seven independent factors that increase the likelihood of SSD instead of ND (lower self-perceived health, life not meaningful, problems with self-care, use of tranquilizing medication, no contact with neighbours, history of affective disorder and history of stroke). The ordinal logistic and the linear regression models resulted in seven partly different factors for predicting SSD and depressiveness, in the very old.

    CONCLUSIONS: The identified markers may help clinicians with the detection, prevention and treatment of SSD in very old persons. The findings indicate the importance of a comprehensive functional approach to diagnosing and treating depressiveness in this population, and the findings might be interpreted as offering support for the coexistence of a dimensional and a categorical view on depressive disorders.

  • 11.
    Mattsson, Niklas
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Groot, Colin
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Jansen, Willemijn J.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Landau, Susan M.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Villemagne, Victor L.
    Austin Hlth, Australia; Austin Hlth, Australia.
    Engelborghs, Sebastiaan
    Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mintun, Mark M.
    Avid Radiopharmaceut, PA USA.
    Lleo, Alberto
    Hosp Santa Creu and Sant Pau, Spain.
    Molinuevo, Jose Luis
    Clin Univ Hosp, Spain.
    Jagust, William J.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Frisoni, Giovanni B.
    Univ Hosp, Switzerland; Univ Hosp, Switzerland; Univ Geneva, Switzerland; IRCCS, Italy.
    Ivanoiu, Adrian
    Clin Univ Hosp, Spain; Catholic Univ Louvain, Belgium; Catholic Univ Louvain, Belgium.
    Chetelat, Gael
    Univ Caen Normandie, France.
    de Oliveira, Catarina Resende
    CHU Coimbra, Portugal.
    Rodrigue, Karen M.
    Univ Texas Dallas, TX USA.
    Kornhuber, Johannes
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Germany.
    Wallin, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Aleksandra
    Jagiellonian Univ, Poland.
    Kandimalla, Ramesh
    Postgrad Inst Med Educ and Res PGIMER, India.
    Popp, Julius
    Univ Hosp Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Aalten, Pauline P.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Aarsland, Dag
    Stavanger Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Alcolea, Daniel
    Hosp Santa Creu and Sant Pau, Spain.
    Almdahl, Ina S.
    Akershus Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Baldeiras, Ines
    CHU Coimbra, Portugal.
    van Buchem, Mark A.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Cavedo, Enrica
    IRCCS, Italy; Univ Pierre and Marie Curie UPMC Paris 06, France.
    Chen, Kewei
    Banner Alzheimers Inst, AZ USA.
    Cohen, Ann D.
    Univ Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Foerster, Stefan
    Tech Univ Munich, Germany.
    Fortea, Juan
    Hosp Santa Creu and Sant Pau, Spain.
    Frederiksen, Kristian S.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Freund-Levi, Yvonne
    Karolinska Univ, Sweden.
    Gill, Kiran Dip
    Postgrad Inst Med Educ and Res PGIMER, India.
    Gkatzima, Olymbia
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Grimmer, Timo
    Techn Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Hampel, Harald
    Univ Pierre and Marie Curie UPMC Paris 06, France; Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany; Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa
    Univ Eastern Finland, Finland; Kuopio Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Johannsen, Peter
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    van Laere, Koen
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    de Leon, Mony J.
    NYU, NY USA.
    Maier, Wolfgang
    Univ Bonn, Germany.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Meulenbroek, Olga
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Mollergard, Hanne M.
    Akershus Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Morris, John C.
    Washington Univ, MO 63110 USA.
    Mroczko, Barbara
    Med Univ Bialystok, Poland.
    Nordlund, Arto
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Prabhakar, Sudesh
    Postgrad Inst Med Educ and Res PGIMER, India.
    Peters, Oliver
    German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis DZNE, Germany.
    Rami, Lorena
    Clin Univ Hosp, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Eloy
    Univ Hosp Marques Valdecilla, Spain.
    Roe, Catherine M.
    Washington Univ, MO 63110 USA.
    Ruther, Eckart
    Georg August Univ, Germany.
    Santana, Isabel
    CHU Coimbra, Portugal.
    Schroder, Johannes
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Seo, Sang W.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Soininen, Hilkka
    Univ Eastern Finland, Finland; Kuopio Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Spiru, Luiza
    Carol Davila Univ Med and Pharm, Romania.
    Stomrud, Erik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Struyfs, Hanne
    Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Teunissen, Charlotte E.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Verhey, Frans R. J.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Vos, Stephanie J. B.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    van Doorn, Linda J. C. van Waalwijk
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Waldemar, Gunhild
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wallin, Asa K.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Wiltfang, Jens
    Georg August Univ, Germany; Georg August Univ, Germany.
    Vandenberghe, Rik
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Brooks, David J.
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Fladby, Tormod
    Akershus Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Rowe, Christopher C.
    Austin Hlth, Australia; Austin Hlth, Australia.
    Drzezga, Alexander
    Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Verbeek, Marcel M.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Sarazin, Marie
    Sorbonne Paris Cite, France.
    Wolk, David A.
    Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Fleisher, Adam S.
    Banner Alzheimers Inst, AZ USA; Eli Lilly, IN USA; Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92103 USA.
    Klunk, William E.
    Univ Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Na, Duk L.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Sanchez-Juan, Pascual
    Univ Hosp Marques Valdecilla, Spain.
    Lee, Dong Young
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Nordberg, Agneta
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Tsolaki, Magda
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Camus, Vincent
    Univ Francois Rabelais Tours, France.
    Rinne, Juha O.
    Univ Turku, Finland; Univ Turku, Finland; Turku Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Fagan, Anne M.
    Washington Univ, MO 63110 USA.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    UCL, England; UK Dementia Res Inst, England; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rabinovici, Gil D.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Hansson, Oskar
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    van Berckel, Bart N. M.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    van der Flier, Wiesje M.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Scheltens, Philip
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Visser, Pieter Jelle
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Ossenkoppele, Rik
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Prevalence of the apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele in amyloid beta positive subjects across the spectrum of Alzheimers disease2018In: Alzheimer's & Dementia, ISSN 1552-5260, E-ISSN 1552-5279, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 913-924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon 4 is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimers disease (AD), but its prevalence is unclear because earlier studies did not require biomarker evidence of amyloid beta(A beta) pathology. Methods: We included 3451 A beta+ subjects (853 AD-type dementia, 1810 mild cognitive impairment, and 788 cognitively normal). Generalized estimating equation models were used to assess APOE epsilon 4 prevalence in relation to age, sex, education, and geographical location. Results: The APOE epsilon 4 prevalence was 66% in AD-type dementia, 64% in mild cognitive impairment, and 51% in cognitively normal, and it decreased with advancing age in A beta+ cognitively normal and A beta+ mild cognitive impairment (P amp;lt;.05) but not in A beta+ AD dementia (P =.66). The prevalence was highest in Northern Europe but did not vary by sex or education. Discussion: The APOE E4 prevalence in AD was higher than that in previous studies, which did not require presence of A beta pathology. Furthermore, our results highlight disease heterogeneity related to age and geographical location. (C) 2018 the Alzheimers Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Rustner, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Results from a cognitive group rehabilitation programme from an occupational performance perspective2016In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 79, no 12, p. 734-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used for treatment planning and to evaluate the effect of a cognitive group rehabilitation programme. The aim was to identify occupational performance problems defined as important and to analyse the outcome, and to link those problems to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) core set for traumatic brain injury and stroke.

    Method: A retrospective design was used, including an analysis of COPM data recorded before and two months after the programme. COPM data from 124 clients were linked to the ICF core sets.

    Results: A clinically important difference of 2 COPM scores was reached in 32% of the clients for occupational performance and in 47% for satisfaction with occupational performance. A majority of the problems identified (62%) were classified within the activities and participation component in the ICF, and 38% in body functions. All occupational performance problems could be linked to the ICF; just one of the 36 categories (caring for household objects) was not found in any of the ICF core sets.

    Conclusion: By linking the COPM data to the core sets, occupational therapists can be confident in addressing the typical problems of the group of clients identified.

  • 13.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Träff, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Yumba, Wycliffe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Toronto, Canada; University of Health Network, Canada; Baycrest Hospital, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hearing impairment, cognition and speech understanding: exploratory factor analyses of a comprehensive test battery for a group of hearing aid users, the n200 study2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 11, p. 623-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of the current n200 study were to assess the structural relations between three classes of test variables (i.e. HEARING, COGNITION and aided speech-in-noise OUTCOMES) and to describe the theoretical implications of these relations for the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model. Study sample: Participants were 200 hard-of-hearing hearing-aid users, with a mean age of 60.8 years. Forty-three percent were females and the mean hearing threshold in the better ear was 37.4dB HL. Design: LEVEL1 factor analyses extracted one factor per test and/or cognitive function based on a priori conceptualizations. The more abstract LEVEL 2 factor analyses were performed separately for the three classes of test variables. Results: The HEARING test variables resulted in two LEVEL 2 factors, which we labelled SENSITIVITY and TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE; the COGNITIVE variables in one COGNITION factor only, and OUTCOMES in two factors, NO CONTEXT and CONTEXT. COGNITION predicted the NO CONTEXT factor to a stronger extent than the CONTEXT outcome factor. TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE and SENSITIVITY were associated with COGNITION and all three contributed significantly and independently to especially the NO CONTEXT outcome scores (R-2 = 0.40). Conclusions: All LEVEL 2 factors are important theoretically as well as for clinical assessment.

  • 14.
    Sackmann, Valerie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Ansell - Schultz, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Sackmann, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Lund, Harald
    Karolinska Hospital Solna, Sweden.
    Harris, Robert A.
    Karolinska Hospital Solna, Sweden.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Nilsberth, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophage media reduce transmission of oligomeric amyloid beta in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells2017In: Neurobiology of Aging, ISSN 0197-4580, E-ISSN 1558-1497, Vol. 60, p. 173-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroinflammation plays an influential role in Alzheimers disease (AD), although the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain largely unknown. Microglia are thought to be responsible for the majority of these effects and can be characterized into resting (M0), proinflammatory (M1), or anti-inflammatory (M2) functional phenotypes. We investigated the effects of conditioned macrophage media, as an analogue to microglia, on the transfer of oligomeric amyloid beta (oA beta) between differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. We also investigated how the different inflammatory environments related to intercellular and intracellular changes. We demonstrate that M2 products decrease interneuronal transfer of oA beta, while recombinant interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, and IL-13 increase transfer. There were no alterations to the mRNA of a number of AD-related genes in response to the combination of oA beta and M0, M1, or M2, but several intracellular proteins, some relating to protein trafficking and the endosomal/lysosomal system, were altered. Stimulating microglia to an M2 phenotype may thus slow down the progression of AD and could be a target for future therapies. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Modig-Arding, Ingalill
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Driving after an injury or disease affecting the brain: an analysis of clinical data2018In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 81, no 7, p. 376-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Traffic safety may be affected if a licence holder has experienced illness or injury that may have an impact on cognition. Occupational therapists are involved in assessing cognitive functions that might affect a patients ability to drive a car using different evaluation tools in different countries and settings. The aim of this study was to look at the predictive value of some of the assessment tools available to occupational therapists for making judgements about resuming driving after cognitive impairment due to brain trauma or disease. Method: A retrospective study based on clinical data from 204 patients referred to a specialist department for recommendations on ability to drive after brain injury or disease. All patients underwent three assessments: stroke drivers screening assessment, useful field of view and simulated driving skill. In addition, an on-road assessment was added in 76% of the sample. Results: Useful field of view had the highest sensitivity (78%) and, combined with the results from the simulator, the sensitivity was 87 degrees/o. The specificity for the two methods was 55%. Conclusion: The results from useful field of view and a simulator test combined best predicted the final recommendation from the multi-professional team discussion on which clients should be recommended not to resume driving.

  • 16.
    Sandin, Linnea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bergkvist, Liza
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry.
    Nath, Sangeeta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kielkopf, Claudia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Helmfors, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden / UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Li, Hongyun
    Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Nilsberth, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Garner, Brett
    Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Australia / School of Biological Sciences, University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Brorsson, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Beneficial effects of increased lysozyme levels in Alzheimer’s disease modelled in Drosophila melanogaster2016In: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658, Vol. 283, no 19, p. 3508-3522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic polymorphisms of immune genes that associate with higher risk to develop Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have led to an increased research interest on the involvement of the immune system in AD pathogenesis. A link between amyloid pathology and immune gene expression was suggested in a genome-wide gene expression study of transgenic amyloid mouse models. In this study, the gene expression of lysozyme, a major player in the innate immune system, was found to be increased in a comparable pattern as the amyloid pathology developed in transgenic mouse models of AD. A similar pattern was seen at protein levels of lysozyme in human AD brain and CSF, but this lysozyme pattern was not seen in a tau transgenic mouse model. Lysozyme was demonstrated to be beneficial for different Drosophila melanogaster models of AD. In flies that expressed Aβ1-42 or AβPP together with BACE1 in the eyes, the rough eye phenotype indicative of toxicity was completely rescued by coexpression of lysozyme. In Drosophila flies bearing the Aβ1-42 variant with the Arctic gene mutation, lysozyme increased the fly survival and decreased locomotor dysfunction dose dependently. An interaction between lysozyme and Aβ1-42 in the Drosophila eye was discovered. We propose that the increased levels of lysozyme, seen in mouse models of AD and in human AD cases, were triggered by Aβ1-42 and caused a beneficial effect by binding of lysozyme to toxic species of Aβ1-42, which prevented these from exerting their toxic effects. These results emphasize the possibility of lysozyme as biomarker and therapeutic target for AD.

  • 17.
    Simmons, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Brüggemann, Adrianus Jelmer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden .
    Disclosing victimisation to healthcare professionals in Sweden: a constructivist grounded theory study of experiences among men exposed to interpersonal violence2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 6, article id e010847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite associations between being subjected to violence and ill-health being well known, most victims have never told health care professionals about their victimisation. Although both experiences of victimisation and help-seeking behaviour are gendered, male victims’ encounters with the health care system are under-researched. The aim of this study was to develop a theoretical model concerning male victims’ processes of disclosing experiences of being subjected to violence to health care professionals in Sweden. Constructivist grounded theory was used. Twelve men who had reported experiences of emotional, sexual, and/or physical violence by any type of perpetrator in an earlier quantitative study were interviewed. Conflicting thoughts within the men affected their likelihood of disclosing their victimisation. For example, a sense of urgency to seek help increased their likelihood, whereas shame and fear of negative consequences decreased their likelihood. Conformity to hegemonic masculinity had a strong negative influence, and was tipping the men towards a low likelihood of disclosing victimisation. Health care professionals strongly influence the disclosing process. For example, a good patient-provider relationship would help the men disclose, whereas a strong factor hindering disclosure was professionals’ adherence to gender norms, thus neither validating men’s experiences of violence nor acknowledging their psychological suffering.

  • 18.
    Törnvall, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Health-related quality in life in relation to mobility and fall risk in 85-year-old people: a population study in Sweden2016In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 1982-1997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optimal mobility is fundamental for healthy ageing and quality of life. This study is part of a cross-sectional population-based study of 85-year-old people residing in Linköping municipality, Sweden. The purpose was to describe 85-year-old peoples' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in relation to mobility and fall risk while adjusting for gender and body mass index. Data collection included a postal questionnaire, a home visit and a reception visit. HRQoL was assessed with EQ-5D-3L, mobility with the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and fall risk with the Downton Fall Risk Index (DFRI). All those who completed the DFRI, TUG and EQ-5D-3L were included in the present study (N = 327). Lower HRQoL was associated with longer time taken to complete TUG and higher fall risk in both genders but not with body mass index. Women had higher risk of falling, took a longer time to complete TUG and reported less physical activity compared with men. Health-care professionals should address mobility capacity and fall risk in order to maintain quality of life in elderly people. This is of utmost importance, especially for elderly women because impaired mobility, high risk of falling and occurrence of pain are common among women, and related to lower HRQoL.

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