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  • 1.
    Akram Hassan, Kahin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Forsell, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    On the Performance of Stereoscopic Versus Monoscopic 3D Parallel Coordinates2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents the results from an evaluation of stereoscopic versus monoscopic 3D parallel coordinates. The objective of the evaluation was to investigate if stereopsis increases user performance. The results show that stereoscopy has no effect at all on user performance compared to monoscopy. This result is important when it comes to the potential use of stereopsis within the information visualization community.

  • 2.
    Akram, Usman
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Metson, Genevieve
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Quttineh, Nils-Hassan
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wennergren, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Closing Pakistan’s yield gaps through nutrient recycling2018In: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, p. 1-14, article id 00024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving food security will require closing yield gaps in many regions, including Pakistan. Although fertilizer subsidies have facilitated increased nitrogen (N) application rates, many staple crop yields have yet to reach their maximum potential. Considering that current animal manure and human excreta (bio-supply) recycling rates are low, there is substantial potential to increase the reuse of nutrients in bio-supply. We quantified 2010 crop N, phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) needs along with bio-supply nutrient availability for Pakistani districts, and compared these values to synthetic fertilizer use and costs. We found that synthetic fertilizer use combined with low bio-supply recycling resulted in a substantial gap between nutrient supply and P and K crop needs, which would cost 3 billion USD to fill with synthetic fertilizers. If all bio-supply was recycled, it could eliminate K synthetic fertilizer needs and decrease N synthetic fertilizer needs to 43% of what was purchased in 2010. Under a full recycling scenario, farmers would still require an additional 0.28 million tons of synthetic P fertilizers, costing 2.77 billion USD. However, it may not be prohibitively expensive to correct P deficiencies. Pakistan already spends this amount of money on fertilizers. If funds used for synthetic N were reallocated to synthetic P purchases in a full bio-supply recycling scenario, crop needs could be met. Most recycling could happen within districts, with only 6% of bio-supply requiring between-district transport when optimized to meet national N crop needs. Increased recycling in Pakistan could be a viable way to decrease yield gaps.

  • 3.
    Antonson, Hans
    et al.
    VTI Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, MAP Unit, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    VTI Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, Sweden.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Negotiating climate change responses: Regional and local perspectives on transport and coastal zone planning in South Sweden2016In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 52, p. 297-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Putting climate change policy-integration into practice is challenged by problems of institutional misfit, due to, inter alia, deficient vertical administrative interplay. While most focus within the field of climate change research has targeted the national-local interplay, less is known about the interface of regional and local perspectives. Here, the aim is to study that interface with a specific focus on the relation between regional and local spatial planning actors, through a case-study of transport and coastal zone management in a Swedish municipality. The article is based on interviews (focus group and single in-depth) and official planning documents. The material reveals a tricky planning situation, replete with conflict. In practice, various institutional frameworks, claims and ambitions collide. The attempts to steer the local spatial planning initiatives from the regional level led to conflicts, which in turn seems to have hampered the overall work for climate change management through spatial planning. Furthermore, there are few traces of prospects of a smooth vertical institutional interplay able to support the overall aims related to integrating climate change mitigation and adaptation in spatial planning. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Communicating Climate Science: A Matter of Credibility: Swedish Farmers' Perceptions of Climate-Change Information2018In: The International Journal of Climate Change, ISSN 1835-7156, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 23-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the climate change communication literature, the concept of framing is increasingly used to discuss various understandings of climate change. This paper addresses the under-researched question of how specific audiences perceive the adequacy of various climate change frames, by exploring how Swedish farmers make sense of climate change information. Based on focus group discussions with farmers, the paper explores what communicators, or frame articulators, Swedish farmers perceive as central and how farmers judge the credibility of potential frame articulators in climate change communication. The paper discusses 1) the credibility of frame articulators as a matter of perceived independence and impartiality, 2) empirical credibility—whether farmers were able to verify the claims underlying climate change frames—as a matter of practical experience versus analytical reasoning, and 3) frame consistency, i.e. whether climate change frames correspond to audience beliefs and claims.

  • 5.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Natural versus anthropogenic climate change: Swedish farmers joint construction of climate perceptions2016In: Public Understanding of Science, ISSN 0963-6625, E-ISSN 1361-6609, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 560-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While previous research into understandings of climate change has usually examined general public perceptions, this study offers an audience-specific departure point. This article analyses how Swedish farmers perceive climate change and how they jointly shape their understandings. The agricultural sector is of special interest because it both contributes to and is directly affected by climate change. Through focus group discussions with Swedish farmers, this study finds that (1) farmers relate to and understand climate change through their own experiences, (2) climate change is understood either as a natural process subject to little or no human influence or as anthropogenic and (3) various communication tools contribute to the formation of natural and anthropogenic climate change frames. The article ends by discussing frame resonance and frame clash in public understanding of climate change and by comparing potential similarities and differences in how various segments of the public make sense of climate change.

  • 6.
    Backstrand, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kuyper, Jonathan W.
    Stockholm University, Sweden; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. University of Oxford, England.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Non-state actors in global climate governance: from Copenhagen to Paris and beyond2017In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 561-579Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 7.
    Ballantyne, Anne Gammelgaard
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Exploring the Role of Visualization in Climate Change Communication – an Audience Perspective2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change communication is a topical and relevant issue, and it is widely acknowledged that public communication about causes, impacts and action alternatives is integral to addressing the challenges of the changing climate. Climate visualization concerns the communication of climate information and data through the use of different information technologies and different modes of visual representation. In the context of climate change communication, climate visualization is highlighted as a potential way of increasing public engagement with climate change. In particular, developments within information technology have provided significant advancements that are claimed to be transformative in engaging lay audiences with issues relating to the mitigation of and adaptation to climate change. Nevertheless, there is a lack of research exploring climate visualization from an audience perspective. This thesis addresses this gap. The overarching aim is thus to explore the role of climate visualization in climate change communication from an audience perspective, focusing specifically on how lay audiences make meaning of climate change as represented in two examples of climate visualization. In addition, the thesis discusses the potential contributions and/or limitations of climate visualization from a communication perspective.

    Based on a social semiotic theoretical framework, this thesis employs focus group interviews to study participants’ meaning-making related to two cases of climate visualization: a dome theatre movie developed for Swedish high school students with the aim of encouraging reflection on climate change causes, impacts and mitigation alternatives, and a web-based tool for climate change adaptation developed to assist Nordic homeowners in adapting to the local impacts of climate change.

    The results of this thesis show that climate visualization can help audiences concretize otherwise abstract aspects of climate change, and that the localized focus can make climate change appear more personally relevant and interesting for targeted audiences. Nevertheless, despite these communicative qualities, the analyses also show that participants’ interpretations are shaped by their preconceptions of climate change as a global and distant issue to be solved by other actors, such as national governments, or through international policy negotiations. Although climate visualization can enhance a sense of proximity with climate change, the localization of climate risk can also lead to participants downplaying the significance of climate impacts. In addition, despite the intentions of inducing a sense of agency in both cases of climate visualization, participants critically negotiated messages concerning their roles as individuals in mitigating or adapting to climate change, and assigned this responsibility onto other actors. These findings show that although climate visualization presents certain communicative qualities, it is not a panacea for engaging lay audiences with climate change. This also underlines the importance of considering cultural and social aspects of the communicative event when studying and developing climate visualization tools as a means of communication.

    List of papers
    1. Climate change communication: what can we learn from communication theory?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change communication: what can we learn from communication theory?
    2016 (English)In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, ISSN 1757-7780, E-ISSN 1757-7799, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 329-344Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

     The literature on climate change communication addresses a range of issues relevant

    to the communication of climate change and climate science to lay audiences

    or publics. In doing so, it approaches this particular challenge from a

    variety of different perspectives and theoretical frameworks. Analyzing the body

    of scholarly literature on climate change communication, this article critically

    reviews how communication is conceptualized in the literature and concludes

    that the fi eld of climate change communication is characterized by diverging and

    incompatible understandings of communication as a theoretical construct. In

    some instances, communication theory appears reduced to an ‘ad hoc’  toolbox,

    from which theories are randomly picked to provide studies with a fi tting framework.

    Inspired by the paradigm shift from transmission to interaction within

    communication theory, potential lessons from the fi eld of communication theory

    are highlighted and discussed in the context of communicating climate change.

    Rooted in the interaction paradigm, the article proposes a meta-theoretical

    framework that conceptualizes communication as a constitutive process of producing

    and reproducing shared meanings. Rather than operating in separate

    ontological and epistemological perspectives, a meta-theoretical conceptualization

    of communication would ensure a common platform that advances multiperspective

    argumentation and discussion of the role of climate change

    communication in society.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
    Keywords
    Climate change communication
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126416 (URN)10.1002/wcc.392 (DOI)000374771500002 ()
    Projects
    NCoE NORD-STAR
    Funder
    Nordic Council of Ministers, 36780
    Note

    Funding agencies: Nordic Top-Level Research Initiative through the Nordic Centre of Excellence for Strategic Adaptation Research (NORD-STAR)

    Available from: 2016-03-23 Created: 2016-03-23 Last updated: 2018-05-08
    2. Images of climate change: A pilot study of young people’s perceptions of ICT-based climate visualization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Images of climate change: A pilot study of young people’s perceptions of ICT-based climate visualization
    2016 (English)In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 134, no 1, p. 73-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change can be difficult for laypeople to make sense of, because of its complexity, the uncertainties involved and its distant impacts. Research has identified the potentials of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) for visualizing and communicating climate change to lay audiences and thus addressing these communication challenges.However, little research has focused on how ICT-based visualization affects audiences’ understandings of climate change. Employing a semiotic framework and through a combination of focus group interviews and mindmap exercises, we investigated how Swedish students make sense of climate messages presented through an ICT-based visualisation medium; a dome theatre movie. The paper concludes that visualization in immersive environments works well to concretize aspects of climate change and provide a starting point for reflection, but we argue that the potential to add interactive elements should be further explored, as interaction has the potential to influence meaning-making processes. In addition, audiences’ preconceptions of climate change influence their interpretations of climate messages, which may function as a constraint to climate communication.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2016
    Keywords
    Climate change communication, meaning, semiotics, ICT-based visualization, lay audience, dome theatre
    National Category
    Communication Studies Human Aspects of ICT Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122796 (URN)10.1007/s10584-015-1533-9 (DOI)000367198900006 ()
    Projects
    Nordic Top-level Research Initiative through the Nordic Centre of Excellence for Strategic Adaptation Research (NORD-STAR)Vetenskapsrådet / Swedish Research Council project no. 2008-1723
    Funder
    Nordic Council of MinistersSwedish Research Council, 2008-1723
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council [2008-1723]; Nordic Top-level Research Initiative through the Nordic Centre of Excellence for Strategic Adaptation Research (NORD-STAR)

    Available from: 2015-11-23 Created: 2015-11-23 Last updated: 2018-05-08
    3. Visualization for supporting individual climate change adaptation planning: Assessment of a web-based tool
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visualization for supporting individual climate change adaptation planning: Assessment of a web-based tool
    2017 (English)In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 158, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Homeowners are important actors in implementing climate change adaptation. However, individual socio-cognitive constraints related to risk perceptions and perceived capacity may hamper their action. Climate change visualization could help planning and management overcome such constraints by offering accessible information to increase individual adaptive capacity. Such visualization would require that information be perceived as legitimate and credible by emphasizing the diversity of impacts and alternative options, and simultaneously as salient by highlighting context-specific risks and measures. Based on focus group interviews and test sessions, we analysed how homeowners made sense of and discussed a specific interactive planning support tool – VisAdapt™ – integrating climate scenarios, local risk maps, and adaptation measures for various house types. The tool combines precise and general depictions in visualizing climate change to support adaptation among Nordic homeowners. Results reveal that the tool spurred reflection on concrete local risks and various adaptation actions. The tool was less successful in providing a framework for assessing the magnitude of anticipated changes, making these appear as generally small. Visualization aspects that are important for spurring reflection on adaptive action are specifying various climate parameters, relating climate impacts to established practices for managing weather risks, and emphasizing diverse concrete short- and long-term measures.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017
    Keywords
    Adaptation constraints, Climate change communication, Homeowners, Individual adaptive capacity, Planning, Visualization
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131829 (URN)10.1016/j.landurbplan.2016.09.018 (DOI)000390076100001 ()
    Projects
    Nordic Center of Excellence for Strategic Adaptation Research (NORD-STAR)
    Funder
    Nordic Council of Ministers
    Available from: 2016-10-10 Created: 2016-10-10 Last updated: 2018-05-08Bibliographically approved
    4. Localizing Climate Change: Nordic Homeowners' Interpretations of Visual Representations for Climate Adaptation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Localizing Climate Change: Nordic Homeowners' Interpretations of Visual Representations for Climate Adaptation
    2018 (English)In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, no 5, p. 638-652Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, effort has been put into developing various forms of climate visualization to create opportunities for people to explore and learn about local climate change risks and adaptation options. However, how target audiences make sense of such climate visualization has rarely been studied from a communication perspective. This paper analyses how Nordic homeowners made sense of a specific climate visualization tool, the VisAdapt™ tool. Involving 35 homeowners from three cities in 15 group test sessions, this study analyses the interpretive strategies participants applied to make sense of and assess the relevance of the visualized data. The study demonstrates that participants employed a set of interpretive strategies relating to personal experience and well-known places to make sense of the information presented, and that critical negotiation of content played an important role in how participants interpreted the content.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routledge, 2018
    Keywords
    Climate visualization, climate adaptation, lay audiences, visual communication, meaning
    National Category
    Information Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144236 (URN)10.1080/17524032.2017.1412997 (DOI)000434664100005 ()2-s2.0-85038636143 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Nordic Centre of Excellence for Strategic Adaptation Research (NORD-STAR); Nordic Top-level Research Initiative sub-program "Effect studies and adaptation to climate change"

    Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-06-28Bibliographically approved
  • 8.
    Ballantyne, Anne Gammelgaard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Localizing Climate Change: Nordic Homeowners' Interpretations of Visual Representations for Climate Adaptation2018In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, no 5, p. 638-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, effort has been put into developing various forms of climate visualization to create opportunities for people to explore and learn about local climate change risks and adaptation options. However, how target audiences make sense of such climate visualization has rarely been studied from a communication perspective. This paper analyses how Nordic homeowners made sense of a specific climate visualization tool, the VisAdapt™ tool. Involving 35 homeowners from three cities in 15 group test sessions, this study analyses the interpretive strategies participants applied to make sense of and assess the relevance of the visualized data. The study demonstrates that participants employed a set of interpretive strategies relating to personal experience and well-known places to make sense of the information presented, and that critical negotiation of content played an important role in how participants interpreted the content.

  • 9.
    Bohman, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Klein, Johannes
    Geol Survey Finland, Finland.
    Landauer, Mia
    Univ Lapland, Finland; IIASA, Austria.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Inst Sustainabil Sci HELSUS, Finland.
    On the call for issue advocates, or what it takes to make adaptation research useful2018In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 149, no 2, p. 121-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay discusses the concept of usefulness of research for climate change adaptation. Based on prior research and stakeholder interactions with policymakers and practitioners in the Nordic countries, we contend that critical issues related to the usefulness of adaptation research seem less associated with content (i.e. research outputs), but rather centre around the efforts made to design and communicate research, that is, to put research at the service of society and make the case for adaptation on the political agenda. This, we argue, to some extent mirrors the situation and political context in the Nordic countries, where adaptation in many locations still is an issue in its infancy, not firmly established on the political agendas, and where working procedures are not yet institutionally settled. In this context, science is considered and sometimes used as a discursive tool to make the case for adaptation. Based on the calls for research that inspires, raises hope and helps to raise the issue of adaptation on the political agendas, we elaborate the role of honest issue advocates for researchers in the field of adaptation science.

  • 10.
    Brodén Gyberg, Veronica
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Aiding science? Past and present discourses of Swedish research aid policy.2016In: Panel 2: Where are we now? The past and the future of Swedish development research collaboration (conveners: David Nilsson and Sverker Sörlin), 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of research aid is to contribute to development in different ways through the use of research. Sarec (the Swedish Agency for Research Cooperation with Developing Countries) was one of the pioneers within state research aid, and existed between 1975 and 2008. One of the central questions asked in my dissertation on Sarec’s policy history is how the view of the relationship between research and development has changed over time. One of the conclusions is that there are two main policy discourses that can be traced throughout the entire period studied. They share the starting point that modern science can contribute to development and that national research capacity is an important component in this. The localist discourse represents a more multifaceted view of how research can contribute to development, and what that development consist of. It is more explicitly anti-colonialist and to a greater degree prioritizes the local context as basis for decisions regarding support. The universalist discourse places less emphasis on where knowledge is produced since it can be used anywhere, as long as the right structures and priorities are in place. This historical perspective will be complemented with reflections on current developments in Swedish science aid policy, focusing on the issue of how science aid can contribute to the sustainable development goals and transitions to sustainability (work in progress).

  • 11.
    Carlsen, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm Environm Institute, Sweden.
    Klein, Richard
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Stockholm Environm Institute, Germany.
    Wikman-Svahn, Per
    Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Letter: Transparent scenario development in NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE, vol 7, issue 9, pp 613-6132017In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 7, no 9, p. 613-613Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 12.
    Dyer, Mark
    et al.
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    Gleeson, Dick
    City Sounding Board, Ireland.
    Oegmundadottir, Helga
    Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Ballantyne, Anne Gammelgaard
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Bolving, Klaus
    Ctr Def Space and Secur, Denmark.
    Awareness, Communication and Visualisation2017In: GREEN DEFENSE TECHNOLOGY: TRIPLE NET ZERO ENERGY, WATER AND WASTE MODELS AND APPLICATIONS, Springer Netherlands, 2017, p. 269-286Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When attempting to raise awareness about environmental issues, it is important to recognize that the role of the Armed Forces is directly informed by democratic mandate, geared to underpin stability, provide security, and undertake operational missions as required. It can be argued that part of that security and stability involves responding to threats presented by climate change by adopting a Triple Zero approach towards its own consumption of energy and water as well as generation of waste. However a top down technological strategy is unlikely to succeed. Instead there is a need for well-informed communication combined with participatory decision-making to develop trust and good faith to implement a Triple Zero approach to the environment. The tools and techniques available to embark on such a strategy are described in the following pages.

  • 13.
    Francisco, Marcela Miranda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Hesping, Malena
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Dincay, Ayla
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Lorent, Ecaterina
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Policy brief collection from the master course: climate science and policy 2016/172017Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of vulnerability often occurs in climate change research and literature. It is understood that vulnerable groups are particularly affected by climate change and thus, mitigation and adaptation measures regarding climate change need to address these vulnerable groups. The policy briefs in this section present different approaches and measures to deal with climate change from vulnerability and adaptation perspectives. Linda Johansson points out that adaptation measures are often not tackling the issues deeply enough and that transformational change is needed in order to address the roots of climate change issues. Digging somewhat deeper into vulnerability, Sara Litzell points out the importance of including most vulnerable groups in climate change adaptation measures. Her brief focuses on gender as women, especially in developing countries, are particularly vulnerable to climate change, but at the same time women present a great potential to contribute to community-based adaptation as they are very knowledgeable with regard to processes and changes in their local regions. The importance of local knowledge also plays a major roles in Sophie Lindstrand's brief, which focuses on UN-REDD. She points out that REDD projects can be most successful if local stakeholders are effectively included and projects follow and bottom-up approach. Sigrid Nilsson's brief focuses on the importance of biodiversity conservation with regard to climate change. She points out that ecosystems do not follow national borders and that biodiversity conservation measures accordingly require global solutions. 

  • 14.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage: From global potentials  to domestic realities2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores the role of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) in climate governance. It starts by discussing BECCS’ global mitigation potential, as depicted in the idealized world of climate scenarios. Chapter 2 shows that almost all climate scenarios compatible with the high likelihood of limiting global warming to 2°C deploy BECCS. While excluding BECCS from these models’ technology portfolios does not necessarily make 2°C compatible scenarios impossible, it does mean that the projected cost of meeting that goal increases. 

    In this context, based on interviews with integrated assessment modelers, chapter 3 illustrates how the use of the word “projected” is deliberate and significant. The modelers insist that they are dealing with projections, not predictions. At the same time, this modesty is contrasted to a core willingness to wield political influence. 

    Chapter 4, which applies a crude method to map European point sources of biogenic CO2, indicates that the scenarios for Europe can be associated with factual potentials. The European pulp and paper industry emitted approximately 60–66 Mt of biogenic CO2 in 2015. To a lesser extent, there is also potential to capture biogenic CO2 from the production of electricity, heat, and biofuels. 

    While R&D into BECCS has previously been framed as a “slippery slope” triggering objectionable consequences, for example, concerning food security, chapter 5 argues that realizing BECCS should instead be seen as an uphill struggle. This conclusion gains support in chapter 6, which maps existing policy incentives for BECCS. This exercise reveals an almost complete lack of political initiatives to deploy BECCS, indicating that the climate scenarios’ large-scale xi  deployment of BECCS could be seen as detached from reality. 

    The book ends with chapter 7, which illustrates how UN and Swedish climate policy objectives have indeed influenced companies to get involved in planning for negative emissions, but also shows how the lack of policy incentives has put “sticks in the wheel” when it comes to affirmative investment decisions. While some funding sources for R&D and capital expenditures are highlighted, the primary concern is the lack of market pull that would provide revenues to cover operational expenditures. 

    This book highlights the many caveats involved in moving from the theoretical potentials identified at the global scale to economically viable potentials facing investors at the business scale. It concludes that overcoming the challenges associated with realizing the theoretical potentials will be daunting, a true uphill struggle. Yet, with appropriate policy incentives, BECCS may still come to play an important role in the struggle to limit global warming to well below 2°C.

  • 15.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Socio-political prioritization of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage2017In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 104, p. 89-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Limiting global warming to well below 2 °C requires the transformation of the global energy system at a scale unprecedented since the industrial revolution. To meet this 2 °C goal, 87% of integrated assessment models opt for using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). Without BECCS, the models predict that the goal will be either unachievable or substantially more costly to meet. While the modeling literature is extensive, studies of how key climate policy actors perceive and prioritize BECCS are sparse. This article provides a unique intercontinental mapping of the prioritization of BECCS for the long term transition of the electricity supply sector. Based on survey responses from 711 UN climate change conference delegates, the article reports the low prioritization of BECCS relative to alternative technologies, indicating an urgent need for studies of the socio-political preconditions for large-scale BECCS deployment.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-01-31 15:57
  • 16.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Linda
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    An assessment of the potential for spurring transformational change through Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs)2017In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 25, p. 35-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fulfilling the UN Paris Agreement on climate change requires societal change at transformational scales, with associated challenges that are intensified in developing countries. In this context, Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) – a key instrument in support of developing countries’ climate actions – are promoted for their high theoretical transformative potential. However, little is known of how NAMAs are related to transformation in practice. This article studies how developing countries intend to use the instrument to implement climate actions and whether these intentions are related to how transformation can be spurred at landscape, regime, and niche levels. 144 developing countries’ Intended Nationally Determined Contributions to the Paris Agreement are examined alongside 17 representative NAMA proposals. Although there is scope to improve consideration of the instrument’s theoretically high transformative potential in actual design, current practices indicate that spurring transformational change is already a high priority of NAMA designers.

  • 17.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Forum for Reforms, Entrepreneurship and Sustainability (Fores), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lehtveer, Mariliis
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS): Global potential, investment preferences, and deployment barriers2018In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 42, p. 155-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Keeping global warming well below 2 °C entails radically transforming global energy production and use. However, one important mitigation option, the use of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS), has so far received only limited attention as regards the sociopolitical preconditions for its deployment. Using questionnaire data from UN climate change conferences, this paper explores the influence of expertise, actor type, and origin on respondents’ a) preferences for investing in BECCS, b) views of the role of BECCS as a mitigation technology, globally and domestically, and c) assessment of possible domestic barriers to BECCS deployment. Non-parametric statistical analysis reveals the low priority assigned to investments in BECCS, the anticipated high political and social constraints on deployment, and a gap between its low perceived domestic potential to contribute to mitigation and a slightly higher perceived global potential. The most important foreseen deployment constraints are sociopolitical, which in turn influence the economic feasibility of BECCS. However, these constraints (e.g. lack of policy incentives and social acceptance) are poorly captured in climate scenarios, a mismatch indicating a need for both complemented model scenarios and further research into sociopolitical preconditions for BECCS.

  • 18.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Gammelgaard Ballantyne, Anne
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Visualization for supporting individual climate change adaptation planning: Assessment of a web-based tool2017In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 158, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Homeowners are important actors in implementing climate change adaptation. However, individual socio-cognitive constraints related to risk perceptions and perceived capacity may hamper their action. Climate change visualization could help planning and management overcome such constraints by offering accessible information to increase individual adaptive capacity. Such visualization would require that information be perceived as legitimate and credible by emphasizing the diversity of impacts and alternative options, and simultaneously as salient by highlighting context-specific risks and measures. Based on focus group interviews and test sessions, we analysed how homeowners made sense of and discussed a specific interactive planning support tool – VisAdapt™ – integrating climate scenarios, local risk maps, and adaptation measures for various house types. The tool combines precise and general depictions in visualizing climate change to support adaptation among Nordic homeowners. Results reveal that the tool spurred reflection on concrete local risks and various adaptation actions. The tool was less successful in providing a framework for assessing the magnitude of anticipated changes, making these appear as generally small. Visualization aspects that are important for spurring reflection on adaptive action are specifying various climate parameters, relating climate impacts to established practices for managing weather risks, and emphasizing diverse concrete short- and long-term measures.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-10-07 16:05
  • 19.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Jonsson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Conditions Influencing Municipal Strategy-Making for Sustainable Urban Water Management: Assessment of Three Swedish Municipalities2018In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 1-22, article id 1102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strategy-making is key for realizing sustainable urban water management. Though general barriers and factors for change have been identified, fewer studies have assessed how different conditions influence municipalities’ strategy-making ability and, thus, how to plan strategically given these conditions. Healey’s strategy-making notion was applied to delimit a study of how size, finances, development path, and water organization influence Swedish municipalities’ strategy-making ability for urban water. Three municipalities, Laxå, Norrköping, and Skellefteå, with different, yet overlapping, institutional and socio-economic conditions were analyzed using semi-structured interviews, a stakeholder workshop, and document analyses. The study finds that even though key events have filtered urban water issues into the political agenda, this has not induced systemic change, except where the role of water management in urban development has been specified, i.e., has aligned dispersed planning processes. Organizational setup influences the strategy-making ability by prescribing not only when water issues are raised, but also what system perspective should be applied and what actors that should be enrolled. Judging from the three cases, size, finances, and development path do matter for strategy-making ability, but they appear to be less important than the organizational setup. Departures for improving strategy-making under different conditions are discussed.

  • 20.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Insurance sector management of climate change adaptation in three Nordic countries: the influence of policy and market factors2017In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 60, no 9, p. 1601-1621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The insurance industry is important for facilitating climate change adaptation. Insurance companies involvement is, however, influenced by national adaptation policy. The literature suggests that especially policy factors - government interventions, political priorities and public-private cooperation - and market factors - cost offset, cost mitigation, planning flexibility and business opportunities - shape private actor approaches. To increase the understanding of insurance company involvement in adaptation, this study examines how insurance companies approaches are influenced by policy and market factors in three countries: Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The study found that the policy factors tested significantly shaped the approaches of the companies assessed, while market factors currently appear less influential. This is likely due to the absence of climate risk and adaptation in political debates and among insurance policyholders. The study discusses the potential role of the insurance industry in adaptation governance and suggests how barriers facing insurance companies could be overcome.

  • 21.
    Grönwall, Jenny
    et al.
    SIWI, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    The Impact of Zero Coming into Fashion: Zero Liquid Discharge Uptake and Socio-Technical Transitions in Tirupur2017In: Water Alternatives, ISSN 1965-0175, E-ISSN 1965-0175, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 602-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The textile industry is one of the major industrial polluters, and water recycling is yet far from being standard practice. Wastewater generation remains a serious and growing problem, affecting ecosystems, human health and freshwater availability for other uses. India is the worlds third largest exporter of textiles and the sector directly employs 45 million people. This case study explores the socio-technical transition of Tirupur, a textile cluster dubbed as the first in India to shift to zero liquid discharge (ZLD) in a systematic manner. It traces a path towards increased environmental sustainability that takes off in a time characterised by no effluent treatment, to the advanced approach to wastewater handling that was the norm in 2016. By adding a multi-scalar perspective, light is shed on where the system changes emerged that inspired key actors during various phases of the defining 35 years. The process towards ZLD becoming best practice involves conflicts, adaptation, resistance, and vast socioeconomic losses. Eventually, innovative ideas and artefacts replaced old practices, and effluent discharge has become a symbol of noncompliance. Farmers movements, authority directions and court orders drove the development, which came to inform a policy shift to mainstream water recovery in the textiles industry.

  • 22.
    Gålfalk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karlson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Crill, Patrick
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Bousquet, Philippe
    LSCE, France.
    Bastviken, David
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Technical note: A simple approach for efficient collection of field reference data for calibrating remote sensing mapping of northern wetlands2018In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 1549-1557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The calibration and validation of remote sensing land cover products are highly dependent on accurate field reference data, which are costly and practically challenging to collect. We describe an optical method for collection of field reference data that is a fast, cost-efficient, and robust alternative to field surveys and UAV imaging. A lightweight, waterproof, remote-controlled RGB camera (GoPro HERO4 Silver, GoPro Inc.) was used to take wide-angle images from 3.1 to 4.5 m in altitude using an extendable monopod, as well as representative near-ground (amp;lt; 1 m) images to identify spectral and structural features that correspond to various land covers in present lighting conditions. A semi-automatic classification was made based on six surface types (graminoids, water, shrubs, dry moss, wet moss, and rock). The method enables collection of detailed field reference data, which is critical in many remote sensing applications, such as satellite-based wetland mapping. The method uses common non-expensive equipment, does not require special skills or training, and is facilitated by a step-by-step manual that is included in the Supplement. Over time a global ground cover database can be built that can be used as reference data for studies of non-forested wetlands from satellites such as Sentinel 1 and 2 (10 m pixel size).

  • 23.
    Haikola, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hansson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Views of BECCS among modelers and policymakers2018In: Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage: From global potentials to domestic realities / [ed] Mathias Fridahl, Brussels: Liberal European Forum , 2018, p. 17-31Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chapter 3 (“Views of BECCS Among Modelers and Policymakers”) moves from exploring the magnitude of BECCS deployment in climate scenarios to outlining caveats raised by modelers themselves. The chapter addresses how modelers navigate the landscape of political and academic pressures to deliver timely, insightful, and relevant policy advice despite inherent and crucial uncerttainties and increasing model complexity. Based on interviews with modelers, the chapter discusses perspectives on uncertainty, the communication of IAM results, and the models’ relationship to reality. The chapter also discuss views of BECCS among policymakers whom generally want to give relatively low priority to investments in BECCS. Failing to invest in the future delivery of BECCS, combined with today’s lack of mitigation ambition, limits future generations’ maneuvering room to resolve the climate crisis.

  • 24.
    Hallström, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jansson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Simonsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Gyberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Teknik i fritidshem – mellan omsorg och utbildning2018In: Teknikdidaktisk forskning för lärare: Bidrag från en forskningsmiljö / [ed] Karin Stolpe, Gunnar Höst & Jonas Hallström, Norrköping: NATDID, Nationellt centrum för naturvetenskapernas och teknikens didaktik , 2018, p. 41-50Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En stor andel svenska barn mellan sex och nio år gamla går efter skolan till ”fritids”. Fritidshem kännetecknas av både utbildning och omsorg, och därmed av både formella och informella aktiviteter. På senare år har verksamheten blivit mer och mer influerad av skolan och numera finns ett eget kapitel för fritidshem i den nationella läroplanen för grundskolan. Fritidshemmen genomgår därför en förändring som kommer att medföra att mer formella aktiviteter införs, exempelvis inom teknik, samtidigt som praktiskt taget ingen forskning har gjorts på detta. Syftet med det här kapitlet är att presentera några resultat från en pågående forskningsstudie om teknikens roll i aktiviteter på fritidshem. Observationerna fokuserade på de dagliga aktiviteterna på fritidshemmen där teknik hade en central roll. Vi använder begreppet gränsobjekt för att analysera teknik i aktiviteterna. Resultaten visar att det är en speciell sorts teknikundervisning som uppstår i fritidshem, på gränsen mellan den informella och formella verksamheten: från det informella lekrelaterade byggandet med Lego och träklotsar till den mer formella datorundervisningen. I dessa aktiviteter finns ett tydligt fritidsinslag, framför allt i form av ett fritt val av teknik och vad man vill lära sig. Det faktum att barn kan välja fritt pekar inte bara på att teknik i fritidshem är ett gränsobjekt med en stor tolkningsflexibilitet, utan också att teknikundervisning i fritidshem skulle kunna vara en lustfylld och effektiv väg till teknisk allmänbildning.

  • 25.
    Hansson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rayner, Steve
    University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Climate engineering2015In: Research handbook on climate governance / [ed] Karin Bäckstrand, Eva Lövbrand, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, 1, p. 411-422Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Henders, Sabine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. University of Sustainable Dev, Germany; Thunen Institute Forest Ecosyst, Germany.
    Ostwald, Madelene
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; GMV, Sweden.
    Verendel, Vilhelm
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; GMV, Sweden.
    Ibisch, Pierre
    University of Sustainable Dev, Germany.
    Do national strategies under the UN biodiversity and climate conventions address agricultural commodity consumption as deforestation driver?2018In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 70, p. 580-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forest conversion in the tropics is increasingly driven by global demand for agricultural forest-risk commodities such as soy, beef, palm oil and timber. In order to be effective, future forest conservation policies should include measures targeting both producers (the supply side) and consumers (the demand side) to address commodity driven deforestation. Whereas the UN Conventions on Biodiversity (CBD) and Climate Change (UNFCCC) do not make reference to this driving factor, here we explore whether and how recent national strategies by member states to the Conventions acknowledge the role of agricultural commodities in tropical deforestation. A text analysis of 139 Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) to climate change mitigation and 132 National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans (NBSAPs) shows that the general trade-off between national development aspirations and forest conservation is commonly acknowledged. However, only few strategies link deforestation to commodity production and consumption, whereas most documents do not mention this topic. This lack of reference to a key driver of tropical deforestation limits the prospects of safeguarding tropical forests for biodiversity and climate change mitigation purposes as part of the two UN Conventions, and might jeopardise their overall effectiveness. These findings were complemented by a content analysis of INDCs, NBSAPs and REDD + documents from eight case countries affected by commodity-driven deforestation. We investigated whether this driver is acknowledged in the national strategies, and which policy measures are suggested to address forest loss from agricultural commodities. We found that six case countries mention agricultural commodities as deforestation driver in their REDD + documents, whereas the biodiversity and climate change strategies were silent on the topic. Policy measures targeting commodity production were suggested in four REDD + strategies, ranging from incentive payments, sustainable agricultural practices and land-use planning to demand-side approaches such as certification and the promotion of sustainable lifestyles. One conclusion from this exercise is that UN member states seem not to consider climate and biodiversity national plans the adequate forum to discuss detailed forest conservation approaches. We argue that in order to increase effectiveness, strategies under the UN Conventions should take commodity-driven deforestation into account, through measures that address both the producer and the consumer side.

  • 27.
    Himmelsbach, Raffael
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    How scientists advising the European Commission on research priorities view climate engineering proposals2018In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 124-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study contributes to a growing body of research that studies how different societal actors view climate engineering (CE) in an effort to open up received framings and make them amenable to deliberations. CE is an umbrella term for different proposals of how to counteract global warming with technological means, some of which have sparked controversy. Drawing on fifteen interviews, the study explores how scientists who advise the European Commission on research funding priorities regarding climate change and sustainability view CE. They considered CE as treating the symptoms rather than the causes of climate change, as interfering in complex and unpredictable natural systems, and as engendering questions of distributive justice. They also stressed the complexity of governing climate change and expressed support for basic CE research. The concluding discussion dwells on the implications of foresight, the division of labor in research governance, and the challenge of poverty for governing technologies in the service of climate action.

  • 28.
    Himmelsbach, Raffael
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World2016In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 872-873Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 29.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Fenton, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The role of knowledge in climate transition and transformation literatures2017In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 29, p. 26-31Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rooted in different theories and focusing on different elements of the socio-ecological fabric, climate transitions and transformations are conceived to have various forms. Although these literatures recognize the significance of learning and boundary spanning, systematic reviews of the role of knowledge in climate transitions are lacking. We review how targets of transformation, functions, types, and intermediaries of knowledge are conceptualized in five types of literature. We highlight that knowledge has a role as: the motor of transition in Transition Management literature, a consultant supporting transition in Transformational Climate Adaptation literature, an emancipator of transition in Transform Political and Economic Systems literature, the beacon guiding transition in Social-Ecological Transformation literature, and an Ad Hoc Committee motivating transition in Grassroots Transitions literature.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-11-23 14:55
  • 30.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Scrutinizing virtual citizen involvement in planning: Ten applications of an online participatory tool2018In: Politics and Governance, ISSN 1801-3422, E-ISSN 2183-2463, ISSN 2183-2463, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How to organize citizen participation in planning is continuously debated. The amount of Online Participatory Tools (OPTs) to facilitate inclusive and efficient participation has increased. While studies have assessed their functionality, usability and effectiveness in planning, they have rarely analyzed OPTs beyond single-cases, targeted tools that are widely used or assessed how OPTs affect broader values of participation. Targeting this absence, this study analyzes how ten applications of a widely used OPT, CityPlanner™, affect the normative, substantive and instrumental values of citizen participatory planning in Swedish cities. By analyzing 1,354 citizen proposals and interviewing urban planners, we find that citizens more extensively submit proposals and initiate debates on planning when using the OPT. Results suggest a more even age and gender distribution among proposal users than with conventional methods, facilitating normative values of participation. The OPT was generally applied early in planning and generated high-quality inputs. Our results, however, nuance previous analyses by also emphasizing the importance of place-specificity of OPT applications and of joint participation strategies among departments. Key for OPT development includes the need to improve their ability to analyze overarching trends among inputs.

  • 31.
    Iacobuta, Gabriela
    et al.
    Environmental Systems Analysis Group, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, Netherlands; German Development Institute/Deutsches Institut fur Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Bonn, Germany.
    Dubash, Navroz K.
    Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi, India.
    Upadhyaya, Prabhat
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. olicy and Futures Unit, World Wide Fund for Nature, South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Deribe, Mekdelawit
    Environmental Systems Analysis Group, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Hoehne, Niklas
    Environmental Systems Analysis Group, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, Netherlands; NewClimate Institute, Cologne, Germany.
    National climate change mitigation legislation, strategy and targets: a global update2018In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 1114-1132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global climate change governance has changed substantially in the last decade, with a shift in focus from negotiating globally agreed greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets to nationally determined contributions, as enshrined in the 2015 Paris Agreement. This paper analyses trends in adoption of national climate legislation and strategies, GHG targets, and renewable and energy efficiency targets in almost all UNFCCC Parties, focusing on the period from 2007 to 2017. The uniqueness and added value of this paper reside in its broad sweep of countries, the more than decade-long coverage and the use of objective metrics rather than normative judgements. Key results show that national climate legislation and strategies witnessed a strong increase in the first half of the assessed decade, likely due to the political lead up to the Copenhagen Climate Conference in 2009, but have somewhat stagnated in recent years, currently covering 70% of global GHG emissions (almost 50% of countries). In comparison, the coverage of GHG targets increased considerably in the run up to adoption of the Paris Agreement and 89% of global GHG emissions are currently covered by such targets. Renewable energy targets saw a steady spread, with 79% of the global GHG emissions covered in 2017 compared to 45% in 2007, with a steep increase in developing countries.

    Key policy insights

    • The number of countries that have national legislation and strategies in place increased strongly up to 2012, but the increase has levelled off in recent years, now covering 70% of global emissions by 2017 (48% of countries and 76% of global population).

    • Economy-wide GHG reduction targets witnessed a strong increase in the build up to 2015 and are adopted by countries covering 89% of global GHG emissions (76% not counting USA) and 90% of global population (86% not counting USA) in 2017.

    • Renewable energy targets saw a steady increase throughout the last decade with coverage of countries in 2017 comparable to that of GHG targets.

    • Key shifts in national measures coincide with landmark international events – an increase in legislation and strategy in the build-up to the Copenhagen Climate Conference and an increase in targets around the Paris Agreement – emphasizing the importance of the international process to maintaining national momentum.

  • 32.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tomasz, Opach
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rød, Jan Ketil
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    VisAdapt: A Visualization Tool to Support Climate Change Adaptation2017In: IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, ISSN 0272-1716, E-ISSN 1558-1756, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 54-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Web-based visualization VisAdapt tool was developed to help laypeople in the Nordic countries assess how anticipated climate change will impact their homes. The tool guides users through a three-step visual process that helps them explore risks and identify adaptive actions specifically modified to their location and house type. This article walks through the tool's multistep, user-centered design process. Although VisAdapt's target end users are Nordic homeowners, the insights gained from the development process and the lessons learned from the project are applicable to a wide range of domains.

  • 33.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Aalto University, Finland.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Neset, Tina Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Redefining maladaptation2016In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 135-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As experiences of implementation of climate change adaptation are accumulating, there is a need toincrease the understanding of the potential negative consequences of adaptation actions that mightoccur, and the capacity of research to assess them. Maladaptation used in this context has remainedelusively defined and sparingly used, and therefore difficult to apply. Based on a literature review, wediscuss the conceptual boundaries of maladaptation and how it can be used to analyse negativeoutcomes of adaptation and propose a refined definition. We present a typology of maladaptation thatdistinguishes between three types of maladaptive outcomes – rebounding vulnerability, shiftingvulnerability and eroding sustainable development, and argue that maladaptation can be defined as a resultof an intentional adaptation policy or measure directly increasing vulnerability for the targeted and/orexternal actor(s), and/or eroding preconditions for sustainable development by indirectly increasing society’svulnerability. We note that the recognition of adaptation as an intentional action and the importance ofsetting clear spatial and temporal boundaries, as well as thresholds, are key to analysing negativeoutcomes.

  • 34.
    Kaijser, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Larsson Heidenblad, David
    Department of History, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Young activists in muddy boots: Fältbiologerna and the ecological turn in Sweden, 1959–19742018In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 301-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish youth organization Fältbiologerna was founded in 1947 with the mission to inspire learning about nature through outdoor activities. Since then, the members have stayed true to their slogan ‘keep your boots muddy’ through engaging in bird watching and forest excursions; however, in the late 1960s and early 1970s – a period that environmental historians refer to as the ‘ecological turn’ – the organization’s activities were extended to also include political activism. Fältbiologerna increasingly evolved into a fertile terrain for young environmentalists. In this article, we explore how this Swedish branch of modern environmental youth activism came about. Based on a close reading of the members’ journal, Fältbiologen,between 1959 and 1974, we identify four key characteristics that were communicated in the journal during the years of study: adventurous, knowledgeable, influential, and radical. We demonstrate that Fältbiologerna took an increasingly radical position and began to engage in environmental debates and actions, while still holding on to ideals of learning through spending time in nature. Participation in these different activities shaped the young members into environmentalists.

  • 35.
    Karlsson, Emilia
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Working Hard or Hardly Working? How the Swedish Building Trade Magazines Mediate Issues Regarding Energy Efficiency2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The building sector accounts for 40 % of the energy usage, and to be able to reach the energy reduction goals set within the EU and Sweden, the building sector needs to change toward energy efficiency. The building sector has a lot of energy saving potential, and within the sector, the HVAC- and plumbing section has the greatest saving potential. Since building trade magazines are directed to practitioners within the building sector, and also their main channel for information regarding projects and developments, this study has used qualitative content analysis on articles, regarding energy efficiency, between the years of 2002-2014. Two building magazines and one HVAC- and plumbing magazine were used to cover the field of what issues regarding energy efficiency were mediated to the readers. The study found out that during the first years, the magazines mediated a positive image towards energy efficiency measures, but mentioned little concrete action plans. After the implementation of more stringent laws, the magazines mediated different issues in a more equal spreading, however two different issues battled to be heard. These were concerns regarding the risks of using new methods not tried before, the lack of clear definitions from the authorities and a focus on a holistic perspective that included environmental thinking. The most recent years focused on practical solutions, adopting a holistic perspective that included both buildings and individual behaviors. During the years, the magazines in general framed energy efficiency measures as something positive and mediated the image of that energy efficiency measures would be taken in the future.

  • 36.
    Kuyper, Jonathan
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Schroeder, Heike
    Univ East Anglia, England.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Univ Oxford, England; Stockholm Environm Inst, Sweden.
    The Evolution of the UNFCCC2018In: ANNUAL REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENT AND RESOURCES, VOL 43, Vol. 43, p. 343-368Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes stock of the evolution of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) through the prism of three recent shifts: the move away from targeting industrial country emissions in a legally binding manner under the Kyoto Protocol to mandating voluntary contributions from all countries under the Paris Agreement; the shift from the top-down Kyoto architecture to the hybrid Paris outcome; and the broadening out from a mitigation focus under Kyoto to a triple goal comprising mitigation, adaptation, and finance under Paris. This review discusses the implications of these processes for the effectiveness, efficiency, and equity of the UNFCCCs institutional and operational settings for meeting the conventions objectives. It ends by sketching three potential scenarios facing the UNFCCC as it seeks to coordinate the Paris Agreement and its relationship to the wider landscape of global climate action.

  • 37.
    Kuyper, Jonathan W.
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Norway; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Schroeder, Heike
    University of East Anglia, England.
    Non-state actors in hybrid global climate governance: justice, legitimacy, and effectiveness in a post-Paris era2018In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, ISSN 1757-7780, E-ISSN 1757-7799, Vol. 9, no 1, article id UNSP e497Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we outline the multifaceted roles played by non-state actors within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and place this within the wider landscape of global climate governance. In doing so, we look at both the formation and aftermath of the 2015 Paris Agreement. We argue that the Paris Agreement cements an architecture of hybrid multilateralism that enables and constrains non-state actor participation in global climate governance. We flesh out the constitutive features of hybrid multilateralism, enumerate the multiple positions non-state actors may employ under these conditions, and contend that non-state actors will play an increasingly important role in the post-Paris era. To substantiate these claims, we assess these shifts and ask how non-state actors may affect the legitimacy, justice, and effectiveness of the Paris Agreement. (c) 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 38.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rayner, Steve
    Institute for Science, Innovations and Society, University of Oxford.
    Innovation investments2015In: Research handbook on climate governance / [ed] Karin Bäckstrand, Eva Lövbrand, Northamton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 547-554Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Livingston, Jasmine E.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Alkan Olsson, Johanna
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    From climates multiple to climate singular: Maintaining policy-relevance in the IPCC synthesis report2018In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 90, p. 83-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has provided periodic assessments of the state of knowledge on climate change for 30 years. While these assessments have been central to the making of international climate policy, their relevance has been questioned in the post-Paris era. Can the IPCCs global kinds of knowledge match the demands of an increasingly decentralized and polycentric policy landscape? In this paper we respond to this question by analysing how the IPCC renders a multiple object such as climate change amenable to political intervention. We are particularly interested in the socio-material practices undertaken to translate a complex body of knowledge into a synthesis relevant to climate policy-making. To that end we trace the production of the Synthesis Report (SYR) to the IPCCs 5th Assessment Report (AR5), from scoping, to chapter crafting and final plenary approval, using author interviews, document analysis and observations. We argue that the writing of an IPCC synthesis is a constitutive process that rests upon numerous practices of standardization, aggregation and simplification. While these practices allow the authors to produce a coherent story of global climate change, they are less attuned to demands for geographically-sensitive representations of climate impacts, vulnerabilities and a diversity of response options. As the ways of responding to a changing climate multiply, we argue, so should the understanding and making of policy-relevant knowledge.

  • 40.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. University of Oxford, England.
    Making climate governance global: how UN climate summitry comes to matter in a complex climate regime2017In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 580-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the role the UNFCCC plays in a polycentric climate regime complex. Through an extended questionnaire survey at the UN Climate Conferences in Warsaw (2013), Lima (2014) and Paris (2015), we study what government delegates and non-state observers see as the main purpose of UN climate summitry and their roles therein. Only a minority of these actors attend UN Climate Conferences to actively influence the outcome of the intergovernmental negotiation process. Instead, most come to these meetings to network, build interpersonal relationships, learn from each other and foster a sense of community across scales of difference. The ability of the UNFCCC to bring together different actors across time and space, to perform multiple policy tasks, has become one of its notable strengths and is an important facilitative practice that holds the polycentric regime complex together.

  • 41.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    et al.
    Environmental Analysis, Swedish Board of Agriculture.
    Ostwald, Madelene
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nissanka, SP
    Department of Crop Science, University of Peradeniya.
    Food security in Sri Lankan homegardens – what does science tell us?2017Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Agroforestry and other types of multifunctional land-use systems have increasingly been highlighted as win-win-win solutions to meet the challenges of climate change, agricultural intensification, secure ecosystem services as well as support to food security. In this brief the authors seek in the literature for evidence and information on the food security link to homegardens; a traditional agroforestry system common in Sri Lanka, and promoted by the Sri Lankan government . 

  • 42.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    et al.
    Centre for Environment and Sustainability, Chalmers University of Technology; University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ostwald, Madelene
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Nissanka, SP
    Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.
    What is good about Sri Lankan homegardens with regards to food security?: A synthesis of the current scientific knowledge of a multifunctional land-use system2018In: Agroforestry Systems, ISSN 0167-4366, E-ISSN 1572-9680, Vol. 92, p. 1469-1484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there has been growing interest in agroforestry systems due to their great potential to mitigate threats to household food and nutrition security from soaring food prices but also as carbon sinks. In Sri Lanka, smallholder farms such as homegardens constitute a majority of Sri Lanka’s total annual crop and timber production. Despite Sri Lankan homegardens being considered desirable and sustainable land-use systems, their role in food and nutrition security is not yet entirely understood. By synthesising scientific articles and grey literature we sought the link between food security and homegardens by quantifying their products or services and ascertaining whether food security characteristics are assessed as direct or indirect impacts. The results show that 27% of 92 identified articles directly quantified aspects that are relevant to food security. Another 51% of the articles quantified indirect aspects that have relevance for food security, including climate, soil, ecosystem services, structural and floristic diversity and economic aspects. Twenty-two percent of the articles were categorised as being qualitative or conceptual and contained no direct assessments or quantification of food security. The presence of significant merits from homegardens includes providing food security throughout the year at low-cost while sustaining numerous ecosystem services. This benefits particularly the poor farmers. However, many studies are descriptive and only provide location-specific information on single research focuses such as plant species, yield and management. There are few comparisons with crop land, forests or other production systems, and there is even less empirical evidence and quantification of the food security and other benefits. Seven areas where more scientific focus would be beneficial are identified. Homegardens are strong in national policies and to reach a greater level of efficiency within these activities our findings suggest more emphasis on a higher degree of inclusiveness of relevant stakeholders and long-term engagements with context specific guidance.

  • 43.
    Muthumanickam, Prithiviraj
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vrotsou, Katerina
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vitoria, Aida
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Identification of Temporally Varying Areas of Interest in Long-Duration Eye-Tracking Data Sets2018In: IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, ISSN 1077-2626, E-ISSN 1941-0506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eye-tracking has become an invaluable tool for the analysis of working practices in many technological fields of activity. Typically studies focus on short tasks and use static expected areas of interest (AoI) in the display to explore subjects’ behaviour, making the analyst’s task quite straightforward. In long-duration studies, where the observations may last several hours over a complete work session, the AoIs may change over time in response to altering workload, emergencies or other variables making the analysis more difficult. This work puts forward a novel method to automatically identify spatial AoIs changing over time through a combination of clustering and cluster merging in the temporal domain. A visual analysis system based on the proposed methods is also presented. Finally, we illustrate our approach within the domain of air traffic control, a complex task sensitive to prevailing conditions over long durations, though it is applicable to other domains such as monitoring of complex systems. 

  • 44.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Cordell, Dana
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Mohr, Steven
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    van Riper, Froggi
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    White, Stuart
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Visualizing alternative phosphorus scenarios for future food security2016In: Frontiers Nutrition, E-ISSN 2296-861X, Vol. 47, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of global phosphorus scarcity on food security has increasingly been the focus of scientific studies over the past decade. However, systematic analyses of alternative futures for phosphorus supply and demand throughout the food system are still rare and provide limited inclusion of key stakeholders. Addressing global phosphorus scarcity requires an integrated approach exploring potential demand reduction as well as recycling opportunities. This implies recovering phosphorus from multiple sources, such as food waste, manure, and excreta, as well as exploring novel opportunities to reduce the long-term demand for phosphorus in food production such as changing diets. Presently, there is a lack of stakeholder and scientific consensus around priority measures. To therefore enable exploration of multiple pathways and facilitate a stakeholder dialog on the technical, behavioral, and institutional changes required to meet long-term future phosphorus demand, this paper introduces an interactive web-based tool, designed for visualizing global phosphorus scenarios in real time. The interactive global phosphorus scenario tool builds on several demand and supply side measures that can be selected and manipulated interactively by the user. It provides a platform to facilitate stakeholder dialog to plan for a soft landing and identify a suite of concrete priority options, such as investing in agricultural phosphorus use efficiency, or renewable fertilizers derived from phosphorus recovered from wastewater and food waste, to determine how phosphorus demand to meet future food security could be attained on a global scale in 2040 and 2070. This paper presents four example scenarios, including (1) the potential of full recovery of human excreta, (2) the challenge of a potential increase in non-food phosphorus demand, (3) the potential of decreased animal product consumption, and (4) the potential decrease in phosphorus demand from increased efficiency and yield gains in crop and livestock systems.

  • 45.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Wiréhn, Lotten
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Tomasz, Opach
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway .
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Evaluation of indicators for agricultural vulnerability to climate change: The case of Swedish agriculture2018In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agriculture is often described as one of the sectors most vulnerable to future climate change, and its vulnerability is commonly assessed through quantitative indices. However, such indices differ significantly depending on their selected indicators, weighting mechanisms, and summarizing methods, often leading to divergent assessments of vulnerability for the same geographic area. The use of generic indicators might also lead to a loss of information about contextual risks and vulnerabilities. This may reduce the perceived usefulness of indices among stakeholders.

    This study analyses the role of indicators in assessing agricultural vulnerability to climate change. It analyses how indices are understood and used through three separate focus group sessions, involving agricultural experts professionally active in south-eastern Sweden. The paper presents how agricultural practitioners perceive a set of common vulnerability indicators, presented through a visualization tool, and their relevance, logic, and applicability to assess and address vulnerability to climate change. The results of this study contribute with perspectives on (i) the relevance and applicability of the commonly used generic indicators for agricultural vulnerability (ii) the assumed correlation of indicators with climate vulnerability and (iii) the identification of missing vulnerability indicators. The study finds that commonly used vulnerability indicators are perceived hard to apply in practice, as definitions and thresholds are often depending on the geographical and temporal scale, as well as the regional context. Additional exposure factors that were identified included extreme events, such as heavy precipitation and external factors such as global food demand and trade-patterns. Further, participants expressed that it is important to include indices that combine effects of multiple climatic changes and in-direct factors, such as policies, regulations and measures. Inherent complexities, context dependencies, and multiple factors should further be included, but entail difficulties in developing suitable indicators. These factors must be addressed by a broader set of qualitative and quantitative indicators, and greater flexibility in the assessment methodology. The interactive vulnerability assessments presented in this paper indicate a need for an integration of quantitative and qualitative aspects and how such indicators could be developed and applied.

  • 46.
    Nesme, Thomas
    et al.
    Univ Bordeaux, France; INRA, France; McGill Univ, Canada.
    Metson, Genevieve
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Natl Acad Sci, DC 20001 USA; Washington State Univ, WA 98686 USA.
    Bennett, Elena M.
    McGill Univ, Canada; McGill Univ, Canada.
    Global phosphorus flows through agricultural trade2018In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 50, p. 133-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global phosphorus cycle has been transformed in recent decades through increased use of mineral phosphorus fertilizer in agriculture and losses to water bodies, leading to risks of fossil phosphorus resource depletion and freshwater eutrophication. By moving phosphorus resources across world regions, international trade of agricultural products (food, feed, fiber and fuel) may contribute to these changes in the global phosphorus cycle, including critical nutrient imbalances. However, we lack a comprehensive, quantitative understanding of the role of agricultural trade in the global phosphorus cycle. By combining detailed data on international trade and the phosphorus content of agricultural products, we demonstrate that phosphorus flows through trade increased nearly eight-fold from 0.4 Tg P/yr in 1961 to 3.0 Tg P/yr in 2011, leading to an increase in the fraction of phosphorus taken up by crops that is subsequently exported from 9% in 1961 to 20% in 2011. The P flows in traded agricultural products was equivalent to 27% of the P traded in mineral fertilizers in 2011. Agricultural P flows were mostly driven by trade of cereals, soybeans and feed-cakes, with 28% of global phosphorus traded in human food, 44% in animal feed and 28% in crops for other uses in 2011. We found a strong spatial pattern in traded phosphorus in agricultural products, with most flows originating from the Americas and ending in Western Europe and Asia, with large amounts of phosphorus moving through trade within Western Europe, in strong contrast with the pattern of the mineral P fertilizer trade. We demonstrate that international trade of agricultural products has affected the domestic phosphorus cycle within many countries, making phosphorus exporters susceptible to the volatility of the mineral phosphorus fertilizer market. Overall, these results highlight the importance of trade as key component of the global phosphorus cycle.

  • 47.
    Nyberg, Gert
    et al.
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, SLU, Umeå, Sweden .
    Knutsson, Per
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ostwald, Madelene
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Centre for Environment and Sustainability, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Chalmers University of Technology,Göteborg, Sweden .
    Öborn, Ingrid
    Department Crop Production Ecology, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden; World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wredle, Ewa
    Department Animal Nutrition and Management, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jakinda Otieno, David
    Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Mureithi, Stephen
    Department of Land Resource Management and Agricultural Technology, University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Mwangi, Peter
    Department of Botany, Jomo-Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Said, Mohammed
    International Livestock Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Jirström, Magnus
    Department of Human Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Grönvall, Antonia
    Department Animal Nutrition and Management, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wernersson, Julia
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Food and Resource Economics (IFRO), University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Svanlund, Sara
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Saxer, Laura
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Geutjes, Lotje
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Karmebäck, Vera
    Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya; Department of Human Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wairore, John N
    Department of Land Resource Management and Agricultural Technology, University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wambui, Regina
    Department of Botany, Jomo-Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya.
    De Leeuw, Jan
    World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Nairobi, Kenya.
    Malmer, Anders
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Enclosures in West Pokot, Kenya: Transforming land, livestock and livelihoods in drylands2015In: Pastoralism: Research, Policy and Practice, ISSN 2041-7128, Vol. 5, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dryland livestock production systems are changing in many parts of the world, as a result of growing human populations and associated pressure on water and land. Based on a combination of social and natural science methods, we studied a 30-year transformation process from pastoralism to a livestock-based agro-pastoral system in northwestern Kenya, with the overall aim to increase the understanding of the ongoing transition towards intensified agro-pastoralist production systems in dryland East Africa.

    Key to this transformation was the use of enclosures for land rehabilitation, fodder production, and land and livestock management. Enclosures have more soil carbon and a higher vegetation cover than adjacent areas with open grazing. The level of adoption of enclosures as a management tool has been very high, and their use has enabled agricultural diversification, e.g. increased crop agriculture, poultry production and the inclusion of improved livestock. Following the use of enclosures, livelihoods have become less dependent on livestock migration, are increasingly directed towards agribusinesses and present new opportunities and constraints for women. These livelihood changes are closely associated with, and depend on, an ongoing privatization of land under different tenure regimes.

    The results indicate that the observed transformation provides opportunities for a pathway towards a sustainable livestock-based agro-pastoral system that could be valid in many dryland areas in East Africa. However, we also show that emergent risks of conflicts and inequalities in relation to land, triggered by the weakening of collective property rights, pose a threat to the sustainability of this pathway. 

  • 48.
    Parker, Charles F.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Assessing the European Unions global climate change leadership: from Copenhagen to the Paris Agreement2017In: Journal of European Integration, ISSN 0703-6337, E-ISSN 1477-2280, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 239-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution examines the role European Union (EU) leadership played in the outcome of the 2015 COP21 climate summit in Paris. The EUs attempts to realise its bid for climate change leadership are scrutinised by investigating to what extent the EU is actually recognised as a leader by potential followers and to what extent the EU has succeeded in achieving its negotiation objectives. To address these issues we utilize survey data collected at eight UN climate summits from 2008 to 2015 and evaluate the results of the climate negotiations particularly with respect to the Unions goal attainment in Copenhagen and Paris. Our findings, which reveal a fragmented leadership landscape in which the EU must adjust its leadership strategies in relation to other powerful actors, such as the United States and China, provide insights into leadership theory and the EUs prospects for exerting influence as an external actor on the world stage.

  • 49.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Gammelgaard Ballantyne, Anne
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Bohman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Rod, Jan Ketil
    Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Goodsite, Michael
    Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Denmark; SDU Department of Technology and Innovation (ITI), Odense, Denmark.
    Climate change effects at your doorstep: Geographic visualization to support Nordic homeowners in adapting to climate change2016In: Applied Geography, ISSN 0143-6228, E-ISSN 1873-7730, Vol. 74, p. 65-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of climate information, particularly as related to climate scenarios, impacts, and action alternatives, poses significant challenges for science communication. This study presents a geographic visualization approach involving lay audiences to address these challenges. VisAdapt (TM) is a web-based visualization tool designed to improve Nordic homeowners understanding of climate change vulnerability and to support their adaptive actions. VisAdapt is structured to enable individual users to explore several climate change impact parameters, including temperature and precipitation, for their locations and to find information on specific adaptation measures for their house types and locations. The process of testing the tool included a focus group study with homeowners in Norway, Denmark, and Sweden to assess key challenges in geographic visualization, such as the level of interactivity and information. The paper concludes that geographic visualization tools can support homeowners climate adaptation processes, but that certain features, such as downscaled climate information are a key element expected by users. Although the assessment of interactivity and data varied both across countries and user experience, a general conclusion is that a geographic visualization tool, like VisAdapt, can make climate change effects and adaptation alternatives tangible and initiate discussions and collaborative reflections. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 50.
    Sovacool, Benjamin K.
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark; University of Sussex, England.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. University of Oxford, England.
    Klein, Richard J. T.
    Stockholm Environm Institute, Sweden.
    Climate change adaptation and the Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF): Qualitative insights from policy implementation in the Asia-Pacific2017In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 140, no 2, p. 209-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Least developed countries often lack the requisite capacity to implement climate change adaptation projects. The Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF) is a scheme where industrialized countries have (as of early 2016) disbursed $934.5 million in voluntary contributions, raised more than four times that amount in co-financing, and supported 213 adaptation projects across 51 least developed countries. But what sorts of challenges have arisen during implementation? Based on extensive field research in five least developed countries-Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, the Maldives, and Vanuatu-and original data collected from almost 150 research interviews, this article qualitatively explores both the benefits and challenges of LDCF projects in the Asia-Pacific. It finds that while LDCF projects do contribute to enhancing multiple types of infrastructural, institutional, and community-based adaptive capacity, they also suffer from uncertainty, a convoluted management structure, and an inability to fully respond to climate risks. Based on these findings, the study concludes that adaptation must be pursued as a multidimensional process; and that LDCF activities have tended to promote marginal rather than more radical or systematic transformations.

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