liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bajramaj, Ermira
    et al.
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Haggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Malmo Univ, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Dawson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care, Center for Oral Rehabilitation Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    The Effect of Microdialysis Catheter Insertion on Glutamate and Serotonin Levels in Masseter Muscle in Patients with Myofascial Temporomandibular Disorders and Healthy Controls2019In: Diagnostics (Basel), ISSN 2075-4418, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most common cause of chronic pain in the orofacial region. Microdialysis has been used to study metabolic changes in the human masseter muscle. The insertion of the microdialysis probe causes acute tissue trauma that could affect the metabolic milieu and thereby influence the results when comparing healthy subjects to those with TMD. This study aimed to investigate the levels of serotonin and glutamate during the acute tissue trauma period in healthy subjects and in patients with TMD. Microdialysis was carried out in 15 patients with TMD and 15 controls, and samples were collected every 20 min during a period of 140 min. No significant alterations of serotonin or glutamate were observed over the 2 h period for the healthy subjects. For the TMD group, a significant decrease in serotonin was observed over time (p amp;lt; 0.001), followed by a significant increase between 120 and 140 min (p amp;lt; 0.001). For glutamate, a significant reduction was observed at 40 min compared to baseline. The results showed that there was a spontaneous increase of serotonin 2 h after the insertion of the catheter in patients with TMD. In conclusion, the results showed that there are differences in the masseter muscle levels of serotonin and glutamate during acute nociception in patients with myofascial TMD compared to healthy subjects.

  • 2.
    Nilsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care, Center for Oral Rehabilitation Norrköping. Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Brogardh-Roth, Susanne
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Månsson, Johanna
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ekberg, EwaCarin
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Temporomandibular pain in adolescents with a history of preterm birth2019In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 589-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To evaluate the frequency of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain among adolescents with a history of preterm birth compared to a matched control group.

    Methods

    A group of 192 preterm‐born adolescents was followed up at the age of 17‐19 years and compared to matched controls. Self‐report questionnaires included screening questions about TMD pain, chronic diseases, general health, depression, anxiety, anger, antisocial behaviour and self‐concept. TMD pain was defined as answering “yes” to one or both of the following questions: “Do you have pain in the temple, face, temporomandibular joint or jaws once a week or more?” and “Do you have pain when you open your mouth wide or chew once a week or more often?” Data analysis was performed using chi‐square test and logistic regression model with likelihood ratio test.

    Results

    A TMD pain frequency of 23% of preterm‐born adolescents and 26% among the controls was found, with no significant differences between the groups. Neither were there differences regarding anxiety, depression, anger or self‐confidence. Within the preterm group, adolescents with TMD pain registered tension and pain in the body, trouble sleeping, stomach pain and feelings of hopelessness about the future. The controls with TMD pain, more reported having a bad life, feeling like a failure and having bodily pain. Among tested background variables, only TMJ locking or intermittent locking once a week or more was found to explain TMD pain in adolescents.

    Conclusion

    A high frequency of TMD pain was found in both groups, one possible explanation could be TMJ dysfunction.

  • 3.
    Oghli, Ibrahim
    et al.
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Oral Basic Sciences, Taibah University, Medina, Saudi Arabia; Scandinavian Centre for Orofacial Neurosciences, Malmö, Sweden.
    List, T.
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Faculty of Odontology, Malmo University, Malmo, Sweden; Scandinavian Centre for Orofacial Neurosciences, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    John, M.
    Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care, Center for Oral Rehabilitation Norrköping. Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Faculty of Odontology, Malmo University, Malmo, Sweden; Scandinavian Centre for Orofacial Neurosciences, Malmö, Sweden.
    Prevalence and oral health-related quality of life of self-reported orofacial conditions in Sweden2017In: Oral Diseases, ISSN 1354-523X, E-ISSN 1601-0825, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 233-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To (i) determine the prevalences of self‐report in a Swedish adult population, of temporomandibular disorders, burning mouth syndrome, dry mouth, and bad breath and (ii) determine oral health‐related quality‐of‐life impairment in subjects reporting these conditions.

    Subjects and methods

    A cross‐sectional, randomized sample of the adult Swedish population (response rate: 46%, N = 1309 subjects) self‐reported their condition from the preceding month to assess prevalences of self‐report for the studied conditions together with comorbidity group of subjects who reported more than one condition. The 49‐item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) used to assess oral health‐related quality of life.

    Results

    The most prevalent condition was bad breath (39%), followed by dry mouth (22%), temporomandibular disorders (18%) and burning mouth syndrome (4%). High comorbidity of conditions occurred in 27% of the population. Quality‐of‐life impairment increased with the number of comorbid conditions. Among individual conditions, burning mouth syndrome and temporomandibular disorders (57% and 40% OHIP points) presented higher impairment than dry mouth and bad breath (32% and 26% OHIP points).

    Conclusions

    Orofacial conditions were common and often coexist. The comorbidity group experienced the highest impact on oral health‐related quality of life: the more the comorbid conditions, the greater the negative impact.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf