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  • 1.
    Af Sandeberg, Margareta
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Children's and Women's Health, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Wenemark, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Bartholdson, Cecilia
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Children's and Women's Health, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lützén, Kim
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet.
    Pergert, Pernilla
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Children's and Women's Health, Karolinska University Hospital.
    To change or not to change - translating and culturally adapting the paediatric version of the Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R)2017In: BMC Medical Ethics, ISSN 1472-6939, E-ISSN 1472-6939, Vol. 18, no 14, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Paediatric cancer care poses ethically difficult situations that can lead to value conflicts about what is best for the child, possibly resulting in moral distress. Research on moral distress is lacking in paediatric cancer care in Sweden and most questionnaires are developed in English. The Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R) is a questionnaire that measures moral distress in specific situations; respondents are asked to indicate both the frequency and the level of disturbance when the situation arises. The aims of this study were to translate and culturally adapt the questionnaire to the context of Swedish paediatric cancer care. In doing so we endeavoured to keep the content in the Swedish version as equivalent to the original as possible but to introduce modifications that improve the functional level and increase respondent satisfaction.

    METHODS: The procedure included linguistic translation and cultural adaptation of MDS-R's paediatric versions for Physicians, Nurses and Other Healthcare Providers to the context of Swedish paediatric cancer care. The process of adjustment included: preparation, translation procedure and respondent validation. The latter included focus group and cognitive interviews with healthcare professionals in paediatric cancer care.

    RESULTS: To achieve a Swedish version with a good functional level and high trustworthiness, some adjustments were made concerning design, language, cultural matters and content. Cognitive interviews revealed problems with stating the level of disturbance hypothetically and items with negations caused even more problems, after having stated that the situation never happens.

    CONCLUSIONS: Translation and cultural adaptation require the involvement of various types of specialist. It is difficult to combine the intention to keep the content as equivalent to the original as possible with the need for modifications that improve the functional level and increase respondent satisfaction. The translated and culturally adapted Swedish MDS-R seems to have equivalent content as well as improved functional level and respondent satisfaction. The adjustments were made to fit paediatric cancer care but it could be argued that the changes are relevant for most areas of paediatric care of seriously ill patients.

  • 2.
    Ahlberg, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Elfström, Johan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Borgstedt Risberg, Madeleine
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Öhrn, Annica
    Region Östergötland, Regional Board.
    Andersson, Christer
    Region Östergötland, Regional Board.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Learning From Incident Reporting?: Analysis of Incidents Resulting in Patient Injuries in a Web-Based System in Swedish Health Care2017In: Journal of patient safety, ISSN 1549-8417, E-ISSN 1549-8425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Incident reporting (IR) systems have the potential to improve patient safety if they enable learningfrom the reported risks and incidents. The aim of this study was to investigate incidents registered in an IR system in a Swedish county council.

    Methods The study was conducted in the County Council of Östergötland, Sweden. Data were retrieved from the IR system, which included 4755 incidents occurring in somatic care that resulted in patient injuries from 2004 to 2012. One hundred correctly classified patient injuries were randomly sampled from 3 injury severity levels: injuries leading to deaths, permanent harm, and temporary harm. Three aspects were analyzed: handling of the incident, causes of the incident, and actions taken to prevent its recurrence.

    Results Of the 300 injuries, 79% were handled in the departments where they occurred. The department head decided what actions should be taken to prevent recurrence in response to 95% of the injuries. A total of 448 causes were identified for the injuries; problems associated with procedures, routines, and guidelines were most common. Decisions taken for 80% of the injuries could be classified using the IR system documentation and root cause analysis. The most commonly pursued type of action was change of work routine or guideline.

    Conclusions The handling, causes, and actions taken to prevent recurrence were similar for injuries of different severity levels. Various forms of feedback (information, education, and dialogue) were an integral aspect of the IR system. However, this feedback was primarily intradepartmental and did not yield much organizational learning.

  • 3.
    Delisle Nyström, Christine
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandin, Sven
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Icahn School Medical Mt Sinai, NY 10029 USA; Icahn School Medical Mt Sinai, NY 10029 USA.
    Henriksson, Pontus
    University of Granada, Spain.
    Henriksson, Hanna
    University of Granada, Spain.
    Trolle-Lagerros, Ylva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Larsson, Christel
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Maddison, Ralph
    Deakin University, Australia.
    Ortega, Francisco B.
    University of Granada, Spain.
    Pomeroy, Jeremy
    Marshfield Clin Research Fdn, WI USA.
    Ruiz, Jonatan R.
    University of Granada, Spain.
    Silfvernagel, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Löf, Marie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mobile-based intervention intended to stop obesity in preschool-aged children: the MINISTOP randomized controlled trial2017In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 105, no 6, p. 1327-1335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Traditional obesity prevention programs are time-and cost-intensive. Mobile phone technology has been successful in changing behaviors and managing weight; however, to our knowledge, its potential in young children has yet to be examined. Objective: We assessed the effectiveness of a mobile health (mHealth) obesity prevention program on body fat, dietary habits, and physical activity in healthy Swedish children aged 4.5 y. Design: From 2014 to 2015, 315 children were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. Parents in the intervention group received a 6-mo mHealth program. The primary outcome was fat mass index (FMI), whereas the secondary outcomes were intakes of fruits, vegetables, candy, and sweetened beverages and time spent sedentary and in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Composite scores for the primary and secondary outcomes were computed. Results: No statistically significant intervention effect was observed for FMI between the intervention and control group (mean +/- SD: -0.23 +/- 0.56 compared with -0.20 +/- 0.49 kg/m(2)). However, the intervention group increased their mean composite score from baseline to follow-up, whereas the control group did not (+ 0.36 +/- 1.47 compared with -0.06 +/- 1.33 units; P = 0.021). This improvement was more pronounced among the children with an FMI above the median (4.11 kg/m(2)) (P = 0.019). The odds of increasing the composite score for the 6 dietary and physical activity behaviors were 99% higher for the intervention group than the control group (P = 0.008). Conclusions: This mHealth obesity prevention study in preschool-aged children found no difference between the intervention and control group for FMI. However, the intervention group showed a considerably higher postintervention composite score (a secondary outcome) than the control group, especially in children with a higher FMI. Further studies targeting specific obesity classes within preschool-aged children are warranted.

  • 4.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin I.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Oxaliplatin-Induced Neurotoxic Side Effects and Their Impact on Daily Activities2019In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oxaliplatin (OXA) is frequently used in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, and OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects are common. Reports on real-time patient-reported neurotoxic side effects and impact on the patient's daily activities are sparse in existing studies. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify and assess patient-reported OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects and their impact on the patient's daily activities, during and after chemotherapy. Methods: In a multicenter prospective longitudinal study, 46 chemo-naïve patients with colorectal cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant OXA-based chemotherapy were monitored during treatment and at 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-ups. Patients were recruited from September 2013 to June 2016. In total, 370 Oxaliplatin-Associated Neurotoxicity Questionnaire responses were available for analysis. A mobile phone-based system was used to receive real-time assessments. Results: All patients reported neurotoxic side effects and impact on daily activities during treatment. The side effects changed in character and body location over time and had an impact on the daily activities. Conclusions: The high prevalence of OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects significantly interfered with the patients' daily activities. We found significant differences between baseline data and follow-up time points for neurotoxicity, and the patients had not returned to baseline after 1 year. Implications for Practice: The real-time assessment using mobile phone technology seems to be a valuable tool for monitoring patient-reported neurotoxicity and interventions for tailored care. Effectively identifying neurotoxicity and its impact on the patient's daily activities is important in supportive cancer care.

  • 5.
    Enkirch, Theresa
    et al.
    European Programme for Public Health Microbiology Training (EUPHEM), European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Stockholm, Sweden; Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Ronnie
    National Food Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Persson, Sofia
    National Food Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Schmid, Daniela
    Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety, Vienna, Austria.
    Aberle, Stephan W
    Center for Virology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Löf, Emma
    European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training (EPIET), European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, (ECDC), Stockholm, Sweden; Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
    Wittesjö, Bengt
    Department of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Blekinge County, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Birgitta
    Department of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Skåne County, Sweden.
    Johnzon, Charlotte
    The Environment and Health Administration of Stockholm Municipality, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Eva X
    Department of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Skåne County, Sweden.
    Svensson, Lena M.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Communicable Disease and Infection Control.
    Sandelin, Lisa Labbé
    Department of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Kalmar County, Sweden.
    Richter, Lukas
    Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety, Vienna, Austria.
    Lindblad, Mats
    National Food Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Brytting, Mia
    Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
    Maritschnik, Sabine
    Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety, Vienna, Austria.
    Tallo, Tatjana
    Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
    Malm, Therese
    Department of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Gävleborg County, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Lena
    Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
    Ederth, Josefine Lundberg
    Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
    Hepatitis A outbreak linked to imported frozen strawberries by sequencing, Sweden and Austria, June to September 20182018In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 23, no 41, article id 1800528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between June-September 2018, 20 hepatitis A cases were notified in six counties in Sweden. Combined epidemiological and microbiological investigations identified imported frozen strawberries produced in Poland as the source of the outbreak. Sequence analysis confirmed the outbreak strain IB in the strawberries with 100 % identity and the respective batch was withdrawn. Sharing the sequence information internationally led to the identification of 14 additional cases in Austria, linked to strawberries from the same producer.

  • 6.
    Fagher, Kristina
    et al.
    Rehabilitation Medicine Research Group, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Lexell, Jan
    Rehabilitation Medicine Research Group, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    An eHealth Application of Self-Reported Sports-Related Injuries and Illnesses in Paralympic Sport: Pilot Feasibility and Usability Study2017In: JMIR Human Factors, E-ISSN 2292-9495, Vol. 4, no 4, article id e30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport participation is associated with a risk of sports-related injuries and illnesses, and Paralympic athletes additional medical issues can be a challenge to health care providers and medical staff. However, few prospective studies have assessed sports-related injuries and illnesses in Paralympic sport (SRIIPS) over time. Advances in mobile phone technology and networking systems offer novel opportunities to develop innovative eHealth applications for collection of athletes self-reports. Using eHealth applications for collection of self-reported SRIIPS is an unexplored area, and before initiation of full-scale research of SRIIPS, the feasibility and usability of such an approach needs to be ascertained.

  • 7.
    Fernlund, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Lund University, Sweden.
    Wålinder Österberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kuchinskaya, Ekaterina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Novel Genetic Variants in BAG3 and TNNT2 in a Swedish Family with a History of Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Sudden Cardiac Death2017In: Pediatric Cardiology, ISSN 0172-0643, E-ISSN 1432-1971, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 1262-1268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Familial dilated cardiomyopathy is a rare cause of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), especially in childhood. Our aim was to describe the clinical course and the genetic variants in a family where the proband was a four-month-old infant presenting with respiratory problems due to DCM. In the family, there was a strong family history of DCM and sudden cardiac death in four generations. DNA was analyzed initially from the deceased girl using next-generation sequencing including 50 genes involved in cardiomyopathy. A cascade family screening was performed in the family after identification of the TNNT2 and the BAG3 variants in the proband. The first-degree relatives underwent clinical examination including biochemistry panel, cardiac ultrasound, Holter ECG, exercise stress test, and targeted genetic testing. The index patient presented with advanced DCM. After a severe clinical course, the baby had external left ventricular assist as a bridge to heart transplantation. 1.5 months after transplantation, the baby suffered sudden cardiac death (SCD) despite maximal treatment in the pediatric intensive care unit. The patient was shown to carry two heterozygous genetic variants in the TNNT2 gene [TNNT2 c.518G amp;gt; A(p.Arg173Gln)] and BAG3 [BAG3 c.785C amp;gt; T(p.Ala262Val)]. Two of the screened individuals (two females) appeared to carry both the familial variants. All the individuals carrying the TNNT2 variant presented with DCM, the two adult patients had mild or moderate symptoms of heart failure and reported palpitations but no syncope or presyncopal attacks prior to the genetic diagnosis. The female carriers of TNNT2 and BAG3 variants had more advanced DCM. In the family history, there were three additional cases of SCD due to DCM, diagnosed by autopsy, but no genetic analysis was possible in these cases. Our findings suggest that the variants in TNNT2 and BAG3 are associated with a high propensity to life-threatening cardiomyopathy presenting from childhood and young adulthood.

  • 8.
    Festin, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thomas, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Choice of measure matters: A study of the relationship between socioeconomic status and psychosocial resources in a middle-aged normal population2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 8, article id e0178929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychosocial resources may serve as an important link to explain socioeconomic differences in health. Earlier studies have demonstrated that education, income and occupational status cannot be used interchangeably as indicators of a hypothetical latent social dimension. In the same manner, it is important to disentangle the effect of measuring different constructs of psychosocial resources. The aim of this study was therefore to analyse if associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and psychosocial resources differ depending on the measures used. A cross-sectional population-based study of a random sample (n = 1007) of middle-aged individuals (45-69 years old, 50% women) in Sweden was performed using questionnaire and register data. SES was measured as education, occupation, household income and self-rated economy. Psychosocial resources were measured as social integration, social support, mastery, self-esteem, sense of coherence (SOC) and trust. Logistic regression models were applied to analyse the relationships controlling for the effects of possible confounders. The measures of SES were low or moderately correlated to each other as were the measures of psychosocial resources. After controlling for age, sex, country of birth and employment status, household income and self-rated economy were associated with all six psychosocial resources; occupation was associated with three (social integration, self-esteem and trust) and education with two (social integration and self-esteem). Social integration and self-esteem showed a significant and graded relationship with all SES measures; trust was associated with all SES measures except education, whereas SOC and mastery were only associated with household income and self-rated economy. After controlling for other SES measures, no associations with psychosocial resources remained for education or occupation. In conclusion, associations between SES and psychosocial resources did differ depending on the measures used. The findings illustrate the importance of the choice of measure when investigating SES as well as psychosocial resources.

  • 9.
    Flodin, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Paues, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Åkerlind, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Communicable Disease and Infection Control.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Sjögren, Bengt
    Karolinska Institutet, Arbetsmiljötoxikologi, Institutet för miljömedicin Stockholm, Sweden Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet - Arbetsmiljötoxikologi Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svetsare – en riskgrupp för septisk pneumoni [Welders - a risk group for septic pneumonia]: Vaccination mot pneumokocker kan vara motiverat för yrkesgruppen2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Gideskog, Maria
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Communicable Disease and Infection Control.
    Melhus, Asa
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Communicable Disease and Infection Control. Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Outbreak of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Hospital Center for Childrens and Womens Health in a Swedish County2019In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 127, no 4, p. 181-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate a sudden increase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cases primarily in one maternity ward at the Center for Childrens and Womens Health at Linkoping University Hospital, Sweden. Approximately 300 individuals including patients, their family members, and healthcare workers were screened for MRSA. The antibiotic susceptibility was tested and isolates polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive for the mecA gene were spa typed. Isolates with the same antibiogram and spa type were further whole genome sequenced. Compliance to current cleaning and hygiene routines was also controlled, and environmental samples collected. The results showed that a total of 13 individuals were involved in the outbreak. It was caused by a t386 MRSA strain (ST-1, NCBI-accession AB505628) with additional resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin. All cases were epidemiologically connected to the index patient, who had recently emigrated from a high-endemic area for MRSA. With improved cleaning and better compliance to basic hygiene routines, no further cases were reported. This study demonstrates how rapid an MRSA strain can disseminate in a ward with susceptible patients and insufficient cleaning and hygiene. For a better control of MRSA, clinical cultures and screening samples need to be obtained early and more extensively than according to the current recommendations.

  • 11.
    Hulme, Adam
    et al.
    Federat University of Australia, Australia.
    Oestergaard Nielsen, Rasmus
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Verhagen, Evert
    Federat University of Australia, Australia; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Finch, Caroline
    Federat University of Australia, Australia.
    Risk and Protective Factors for Middle- and Long-Distance Running-Related Injury2017In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 869-886Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Despite a rapidly growing body of research, a systematic evidence compilation of the risk and protective factors for middle- and long-distance running-related injury (RRI) was lacking. Objectives Our objective was to compile the evidence about modifiable and non-modifiable training-related and behavioral risk and protective factors for middle- and long-distance RRI. Methods We searched five databases (PubMed, CINAHL, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, and PsycINFO) for the dates 1 January 1970 to 31 December 2015, inclusive, for original peer-reviewed articles. The eligible designs were cross-sectional, case-control, longitudinal observational studies, and randomized controlled trials involving runners competing at distances from amp;gt;= 800 m to amp;lt;= 42.2 km. Outcomes were any specific and/or general RRI, and exposures included training-related and behavioral factors. We extracted authors and date, study design, injury type(s), descriptors and comparators for each exposure, and results and measures of association from the selected studies. Methodological quality was independently appraised using two separate checklists: a modified checklist for observational study designs and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale for randomized controlled trials. Results Among 73 articles eligible for inclusion, 19 (26.0%) and 30 (41.0%) were of high or satisfactory methodological quality, respectively. As a non-modifiable exposure, a history of previous injury was found to be associated with an increased risk of both general and specific RRI. In terms of modifiable exposures, irregular and/or absent menstruation was found to be associated with an increased risk of stress fracture development, whereas the use of oral contraceptives was found to be associated with a decreased risk. High clinical, methodological, and statistical heterogeneity meant it was not feasible to estimate a pooled effect size across similar studies. Conclusions A history of previous injury was associated with an increased risk of both general and specific RRI. The use of oral contraceptives was found to be associated with a decreased risk of skeletal stress fracture. Conversely, irregular and/or absent menstruation was associated with an increased risk. The varied effect directions and/or a number of statistically insignificant results associated with the majority of factors hindered our ability to draw any definitive conclusions about their relationship to RRI risk.

  • 12.
    Isaksson, Karolin
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Kari
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Mikiver, Rasmus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Nieweg, Omgo E.
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Royal Prince Alfred Hosp, Australia; Royal Prince Alfred Hosp, Australia.
    Scolyer, Richard A.
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Royal Prince Alfred Hosp, Australia; Royal Prince Alfred Hosp, Australia.
    Thompson, John F.
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Royal Prince Alfred Hosp, Australia; Royal Prince Alfred Hosp, Australia.
    Ingvar, Christian
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with thin melanomas: Frequency and predictors of metastasis based on analysis of two large international cohorts2018In: Journal of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 0022-4790, E-ISSN 1096-9098, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 599-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundSentinel lymph node (SLN) metastasis in patients with thin melanomas (1mm) is uncommon but adverse prognostic factors may indicate an increased risk. We sought to determine how often SLN biopsy (SLNB) was performed in patients with thin melanomas, establish the frequency of SLN metastasis and evaluate the predictive value of ulceration, tumor mitotic rate, and thickness for SLN involvement. MethodsMelanoma patients with a Breslow thicknessgreater than or equal to 0.5 to less than or equal to 1mm, diagnosed 2009-2016, were identified in the Swedish Melanoma Register (SMR) and the Melanoma Institute Australia (MIA) Database. ResultsIn total 8165 patients were included from the SMR and 1603 from MIA. SLNB was performed in 9.5% and 16.2% of patients, respectively. Corresponding figures for T1b (American Joint Committee on Cancer [AJCC] 7th Edition) were 19.5% and 24.6%. The SLN positivity rate were 4.4% (Sweden) and 5.8% (MIA). SLN metastasis was more frequent in tumors with ulceration, mitoses, and Breslow thickness greater than or equal to 0.9mm but none were statistically significant. Younger age was identified as a significant risk factor for SLN positivity at MIA. ConclusionsA minority of patients with thin melanomas had SLNB performed and the SLN positivity rate was low. This study did not confirm tumor ulceration, mitoses, or thickness as statistically significant predictors for SLN metastasis.

  • 13.
    Jungner, Johanna Granhagen
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Wenemark, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Blomgren, Klas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lutzen, Kim
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Pergert, Pernilla
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Development and evaluation of the Communication over Language Barriers questionnaire (CoLB-q) in paediatric healthcare2018In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 101, no 9, p. 1661-1668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To develop a valid and reliable questionnaire addressing the experiences of healthcare personnel of communicating over language barriers and using interpreters in paediatric healthcare. Methods: A multiple- methods approach to develop and evaluate the questionnaire, including focus groups, cognitive interviews, a pilot test and test-retest. The methods were chosen in accordance with questionnaire development methodology to ensure validity and reliability. Results: The development procedure showed that the issues identified were highly relevant to paediatric healthcare personnel and resulted in a valid and reliable Communication over Language Barriers questionnaire (CoLB-q) with 27 questions. Conclusion: The CoLB-q is perceived as relevant, important and easy to respond to by respondents and has satisfactory validity and reliability.amp; nbsp; Practice implications: The CoLB-q can be used to map how healthcare personnel overcome language barriers through communication tools and to identify problems encountered in paediatric healthcare. Furthermore, the transparently described process could be used as a guide for developing similar questionnaires. (C) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 14.
    Kissopoulou, Antheia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Council Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Trinks, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Gréen, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Council Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Homozygous missense MYBPC3 Pro873His mutation associated with increased risk for heart failure development in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy2018In: ESC Heart Failure, E-ISSN 2055-5822, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 716-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary autosomal-dominant disorder of the myocardium with variable expressivity and penetrance. Occasionally, homozygous sarcomere genetic variants emerge while genotyping HCM patients. In these cases, a more severe HCM phenotype is generally seen. Here, we report a case of HCM that was diagnosed clinically at 39years of age. Initial symptoms were shortness of breath during exertion. Successively, he developed a wide array of severe clinical manifestations, which progressed to an ominous end-stage heart failure that resulted in heart transplantation. Genotype analysis revealed a missense MYBPC3 variant NM_000256.3:c.2618Camp;gt;A,p.(Pro873His) that presented in the homozygous form. Conflicting interpretations of pathogenicity have been reported for the Pro873His MYBPC3 variant described here. Our patient, presenting with two copies of the variant and devoid of a normal allele, progressed to end-stage heart failure, which supports the notion of a deleterious effect of this variant in the homozygous form.

  • 15.
    Larnebratt, Anton
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Information is the key to successful participation for patients receiving surgery for upper gastrointestinal cancer2019In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, no 2, article id e12959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fast-track programmes are aimed at improving perioperative care. The purpose of this study was to identify and explore patient participation among patients who had surgery for liver, bile duct or pancreatic cancer and followed a fast-track programme. A total of 116 questionnaires to investigate patient participation were analysed. Information was important for the patients, as was having the opportunity to ask questions and express personal views. The results showed differences by sex; men responded to a greater extent that they did not want to make decisions as a patient (p = 0.044) and that they had been motivated to take more responsibility for their future health (p = 0.011). Patients with pancreatic cancer discussed treatment goals with doctors to a greater extent than did patients with liver cancer (p = 0.041). Half of the patients perceived that they had not been involved in their care planning after discharge but had a desired to be involved. This seems to be an important point to improve in future care, and also that professionals should be aware of patients' needs for information and participation, especially at discharge.

  • 16.
    Liest, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Omran, Ahmed Shaker
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mikiver, Rasmus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    RMI and ROMA are equally effective in discriminating between benign and malignant gynecological tumors: A prospective population-based study2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 24-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Our primary objective was to test the hypothesis that human epididymal protein 4 (HE4) and risk of ovarian malignancy index outperform the CA 125 and risk of malignancy index tests in categorizing a pelvic mass into high or low risk of malignancy in a Swedish population. Furthermore, cut-off values needed to be defined for HE4 and ROMA in premenopausal and postmenopausal women prior to their introduction to clinical practice. A third objective was to investigate the correlation between HE4 levels in serum and urine. Material and methods Women with a pelvic mass scheduled for surgery were recruited from nine hospitals in south-east Sweden. Preoperative blood samples were taken for analyzing CA125 and HE4 as well as urine samples for analyzing HE4. Results We enrolled a total of 901 women, of whom 784 were evaluable. In the premenopausal and postmenopausal groups, no significant differences were found for sensitivity, positive and negative predictive value, either for RMI vs ROMA or for CA125 vs HE4 using a fixed specificity of 75%. Cut-off values indicating malignancy were established for HE4 and ROMA in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. We found no correlation between HE4 concentration in serum and urine. Conclusions We could not confirm that ROMA had diagnostic superiority over RMI in categorizing women with a pelvic mass into low-risk or high-risk groups for malignancy in a Swedish population. We have defined cut-off values for HE4 and ROMA. The lack of correlation between serum and urine HE4 obviates the introduction of urine HE4 analysis in clinical diagnostics.

  • 17.
    Malin, Södling
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Clinicum.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Clinicum.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Färdighetsträning i simulerad miljö: Undervisning av praktiska färdigheter på Clinicum, Läkarutbildning, Stadium III, Termin 92018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Från och med 2009 erbjuds praktiska färdighetsövningar på Clinicum där läkarstudenter under handledning går genom teoretisk bakgrund och övar genomförande av praktiska färdigheter kopplade till mål inom cirkulation, respiration och ortopedi på anatomiska modeller. En observationsstudie genomfördes med fokus på studentcentrerat lärande, meningsfullhet och relevans, samt lärande i samarbete med andra. Det konstaterades att lärmomentet genomförs i enlighet med grundläggande principer för PBL, är stark kopplat till den kliniska praktiken, samt att det bjuder in till att lära i samarbete med andra.

    Förbättringsmöjligheter identifierades i tillgänglighet av referensmaterial om teoretisk bakgrund före utbildningsmomentet för att underlätta undervisningens anpassning till studenternas aktuella kunskaper. Att dessutom göra det möjligt att skicka frågor till lärarna som förberedelse skulle bidra till ökad individualisering och effektivisering av utbildningsmomenten.

  • 18.
    Malmström, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Skovgaard Poulsen, Hans
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Henning Gronberg, Bjorn
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; Trondheim Regional and University Hospital, Norway.
    Stragliotto, Giuseppe
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hansen, Steinbjorn
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Asklund, Thomas
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Lysiak, Malgorzata
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dowsett, Joseph
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Winther Kristensen, Bjarne
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Sweden; Regional Cancer Centre Stockholm Gotland, Sweden.
    Postoperative neoadjuvant temozolomide before radiotherapy versus standard radiotherapy in patients 60 years or younger with anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma: a randomized trial2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 1776-1785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: A pilot study of temozolomide (TMZ) given before radiotherapy (RT) for anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and glioblastoma (GBM) resulted in prolonged survival compared to historical controls receiving RT alone. We therefore investigated neoadjuvant TMZ (NeoTMZ) in a randomized trial. During enrollment, concomitant and adjuvant radio-chemotherapy with TMZ became standard treatment. The trial was amended to include concurrent TMZ.Patients and methods: Patients, after surgery for GBM or AA, age 60 years and performance status (PS) 0-2, were randomized to either 2-3 cycles of TMZ, 200mg/m(2) days 1-5 every 28 days, followed by RT 60Gy in 30 fractions or RT only. Patients without progressive disease after two TMZ cycles, received the third cycle. From March 2005, TMZ 75mg/m(2) was administered daily concomitant with RT. TMZ was recommended first-line treatment at progression. Primary endpoint was overall survival and secondary safety.Results: The study closed prematurely after enrolling 144 patients, 103 with GBM and 41 with AA. Median age was 53 years (range 24-60) and 89 (62%) were male. PS was 0-1 for 133 (92%) patients, 53 (37%) had complete surgical resection and 18 (12%) biopsy. Ninety-two (64%) received TMZ concomitant with RT. Seventy-two (50%) were randomized to neoadjuvant treatment. For the overall study population survival was 20.3 months for RT and 17.7 months for NeoTMZ (p=.76), this not reaching the primary objective. For the preplanned subgroup analysis, we found that NeoTMZ AA patients had a median survival of 95.1 months compared to 35.2 months for RT (p=.022). For patients with GBM, no difference in survival was observed (p=.10). MGMT and IDH status affected outcome.Conclusions: No advantage of NeoTMZ was noted for the overall study population or subgroup of GBM, while NeoTMZ resulted in 5 years longer median survival for patients diagnosed as AA.

  • 19.
    Nadri, Hamed
    et al.
    Urmia University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Rahimi, Bahlol
    Urmia University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Sedghi, Shahram
    Iran University of Medical Science, Iran.
    The Top 100 Articles in the Medical Informatics: a Bibliometric Analysis2017In: Journal of medical systems, ISSN 0148-5598, E-ISSN 1573-689X, Vol. 41, no 10, article id 150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of citations that a research paper receives can be used as a measure of its scientific impact. The objective of this study was to identify and to examine the characteristics of top 100 cited articles in the field of Medical Informatics based on data acquired from the Thomson Reuters Web of Science (WOS) in October, 2016. The data was collected using two procedures: first we included articles published in the 24 journals listed in the "Medical Informatics" category; second, we retrieved articles using the key words: "informatics", "medical informatics", "biomedical informatics", "clinical informatics" and "health informatics". After removing duplicate records, articles were ranked by the number of citations they received. When the 100 top cited articles had been identified, we collected the following information for each record: all WOS database citations, year of publication, journal, author names, authors affiliation, country of origin and topics indexed for each record. Citations for the top 100 articles ranged from 346 to 7875, and citations per year ranged from 11.12 to 525. The majority of articles were published in the 2000s (n=43) and 1990s (n=38). Articles were published across 10 journals, most commonly Statistics in medicine (n=71) and Medical decision making (n=28). The articles had an average of 2.47 authors. Statistics and biostatistics modeling was the most common topic (n=71), followed by artificial intelligence (n=12), and medical errors (n=3), other topics included data mining, diagnosis, bioinformatics, information retrieval, and medical imaging. Our bibliometric analysis illustrated a historical perspective on the progress of scientific research on Medical Informatics. Moreover, the findings of the current study provide an insight on the frequency of citations for top cited articles published in Medical Informatics as well as quality of the works, journals, and the trends steering Medical Informatics.

  • 20.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Ericsson, Carin
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Skagerström, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    Linneuniversitet - Kalmar, Sweden .
    Patientmedverkan från retorik till praktik2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Skagerström, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Ericsson, Carin
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    Linneuniversitet, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Många faktorer påverkar om patienter kan medverka till säkrare vård - Intervjustudie visar läkares och sjuksköterskors perspektiv2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient participation for safer health care - interviews with physicians and nurses

    Patient participation to achieve safer care is an area of growing policy, research and health care management and practice interest. Patients are uniquely placed to observe their treatment, care and physical environment throughout their journey in the health care system. However, very few studies have investigated health care providers attitudes and beliefs concerning patient participation for improved patient safety. This study explored factors that acted as facilitators and/or barriers to patient participation for safer care, as perceived by physicians and nurses in Swedish health care. Interviews were conducted with 13 physicians and 11 nurses, using a purposeful sampling strategy to achieve a heterogeneous sample of providers. We identified nine categories of factors, many of which functioned as barriers to patient participation to achieve safer care.

  • 22.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Borgstedt-Risberg, Madeleine
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Soop, Michael
    Natl Board Hlth and Welf, Sweden.
    Nylen, Urban
    Natl Board Hlth and Welf, Sweden.
    Alenius, Carina
    Swedish Assoc Local Author and Reg, Sweden.
    Rutberg, Hans
    Swedish Assoc Local Author and Reg, Sweden.
    Incidence of adverse events in Sweden during 2013-2016: a cohort study describing the implementation of a national trigger tool2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 3, article id e020833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To describe the implementation of a trigger tool in Sweden and present the national incidence of adverse events (AEs) over a 4-year period during which an ongoing national patient safety initiative was terminated. Design Cohort study using retrospective record review based on a trigger tool methodology. Setting and participants Patients amp;gt;= 18 years admitted to all somatic acute care hospitals in Sweden from 2013 to 2016 were randomised into the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome rneasure was the incidence of AEs, and secondary measures were type of injury, severity of harm, preventability of AEs, estimated healthcare cost of AEs and incidence of AEs in patients cared for in another type of unit than the one specialised for their medical needs (off-site). Results In a review of 64 917 admissions, the average AE rates in 2014 (11.6%), 2015(10.9%) and 2016 (11.4%) were significantly lower than in 2013 (13.1 %). The decrease in the AE rates was seen in different age groups, in both genders and for preventable and non-preventable AEs. The decrease comprised only the least severe AEs. The types of AEs that decreased were hospital-acquired infections, urinary bladder distention and compromised vital signs. Patients cared for off-site had 84% more preventable AEs than patients cared for in the appropriate units. The cost of increased length of stay associated with preventable AEs corresponded to 13%-14% of the total cost of somatic hospital care in Sweden. Conclusions The rate of AEs in Swedish somatic hospitals has decreased from 2013 to 2016. Retrospective record review can be used to monitor patient safety over time, to assess the effects of national patient safety interventions and analyse challenges to patient safety such as the increasing care of patients off-site. It was found that the economic burden of preventable AEs is high.

  • 23.
    Nordenskjold, Anna E.
    et al.
    Southern Alvsborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Fohlin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Arnesson, Lars-Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Einbeigi, Zakaria
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Albertsson, Per
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Per
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Breast cancer survival trends in different stages and age groups - a population-based study 1989-20132019In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During the recent decades, breast cancer survival has gradually improved but there is limited knowledge on the improvement in population-based studies of patients diagnosed with different stages of the disease and in different age groups.Patients and methods: In two Swedish health care regions a total of 42,220 female breast cancer patients below 90years of age were diagnosed between 1989 and 2013. They were treated and followed according to national and regional guidelines and formed a population-based cohort.Results: Using patients diagnosed in 1989-1993 as a reference to the relative risk, 5-year mortality decreased with 49% for patients diagnosed at the end of the observation period (CI 95% 45-58). The mortality tended to decrease for patients with all stages of breast cancer and test for trend resulted in a statistically significant improvement over time in 5-year relative survival in stage III and IV and in 10-year survival in stage I and III. For each operable stage of disease, patients aged below 40years or more than 70years when diagnosed tended to have less favorable survival than patients diagnosed between 40-69years of age. Test for trend resulted in statistically significant improvements over time for patients diagnosed at ages below 40, 40-54 and 54-69, but less marked improvements for patients older than 70 when diagnosed.Conclusions: During the period 1989-2013 the relative risk of 5-year mortality decreased with 49%. Improvements were seen in all age groups but were unevenly distributed between stages and age groups pointing to the need for further improvements for younger and elderly patients.

  • 24.
    Nordqvist, Pernilla
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Roberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Communicable Disease and Infection Control.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Regionledning ledningstab.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Vårdrelaterade infektioner en betydande del av vårdskadorna på sjukhus - Studie i Linköping visar att fler fall borde kunna undvikas2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preventable hospital acquired infections are common A modified GTT (Global trigger tool) was used for 480 patient records from 15 departments at Linköping University Hospital. Sixty-three hospital-acquired infections (HAI) were detected at 59 admissions. Postoperative wound infections were most common (44.4 %). Catheter-related urinary infections occurred in 15.9 %, infections associated with a central venous catheter in 7.9 % and hospital-acquired pneumonia in 6.3 % of all HAI.  Other types of HAI consisting of any abscess or oral Candida infection composed 17.5 %. Some 221 patients were operated (46.0 %). Postoperative wound infections were diagnosed in 28 of them (12.7 %), the majority after discharge from hospital. Most urinary infections were diagnosed in emergency patients (8/10). Prolonged hospital stay or unplanned return to hospital occurred in 54 %. Out of 63 HAI some 76.2 % were judged as probably preventable, and 11.1 % as preventable.

  • 25.
    Patschan, Oliver
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Holmang, Sten
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hosseini, Abolfazl
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Jancke, Georg
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Borje
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    Akad University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Second-look resection for primary stage T1 bladder cancer: a population-based study2017In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 301-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the use of second-look resection (SLR) in stage T1 bladder cancer (BC) in a population-based Swedish cohort. Materials and methods: All patients diagnosed with stage T1 BC in 2008-2009 were identified in the Swedish National Registry for Urinary Bladder Cancer. Registry data on TNM stage, grade, primary treatment and pathological reports from the SLR performed within 8weeks of the primary transurethral resection were validated against patient charts. The endpoint was cancer-specific survival (CSS). Results: In total, 903 patients with a mean age of 74years (range 28-99 years) were included. SLR was performed in 501 patients (55%), who had the following stages at SLR: 172 (35%) T0, 83 (17%) Ta/Tis, 210 (43%) T1 and 26 (5%) T2-4. The use of SLR varied from 18% to 77% in the six healthcare regions. Multiple adjuvant intravesical instillations were given to 420 patients (47%). SLR was associated with intravesical instillations, age younger than 74 years, discussion at multidisciplinary tumour conference, G3 tumour and treatment at high-volume hospitals. Patients undergoing SLR had a lower risk of dying from BC (hazard ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.45-0.84, pamp;lt;.0022). Five-year CSS rates were as follows, in patients with the indicated tumours at SLR (p=.001): 82% in those with T1, 90% in T0, 90% in Ta/Tis and 56% in T2-4. Conclusions: There are large geographical differences in the use of SLR in stage T1 BC in Sweden, which are presumably related to local treatment traditions. Patients treated with SLR have a high rate of residual tumour but lower age, which suggests that a selection bias affects CSS.

  • 26.
    Periard, Julien D.
    et al.
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Racinais, Sebastien
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Spreco, Armin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Athlet Assoc, Sweden.
    Bargoria, Victor
    Linköping University. Moi University, Kenya.
    Halje, Karin
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Alonso, Juan-Manuel
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Strategies and factors associated with preparing for competing in the heat: a cohort study at the 2015 IAAF World Athletics Championships2017In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 264-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Assess exertional heat illness (EHI) history and preparedness in athletes competing in a World Athletics Championships under hot/humid conditions and identify the factors associated with preparedness strategies. Methods Of the 207 registered national teams invited to participate in the study, 50 (24%) accepted. The 957 athletes (49% of all 1965 registered) in these teams were invited to complete a precompetition questionnaire evaluating EHI history, heat stress prevention (heat acclimatisation, precooling and hydration) and recovery. Responses from 307 (32%) athletes were separated in field events, sprints, middle-distance and long-distance running, and decathlon/heptathlon for analysis. Results 48% of athletes had previously experienced EHI symptoms and 8.5% had been diagnosed with EHI. 15% heat acclimatised (similar to 20 days) before the championships. 52% had a precooling strategy, ice slurry ingestion (24%) being the most prevalent and women using it more frequently than men (p=0.005). 96% of athletes had a fluid consumption strategy, which differed between event categories (pamp;lt;0.001). The most common volumes planned on being consumed were 0.5-1 L (27.2%) and amp;gt;= 2 L (21.8%), water being the most frequent. 89% of athletes planned on using at least one recovery strategy. Female sex (p=0.024) and a previous EHI diagnosis increased the likelihood of using all 3 prevention strategies (pamp;lt;0.001). Conclusions At a World Championships with expected hot/humid conditions, less than one-fifth of athletes heat acclimatised, half had a precooling strategy and almost all a hydration plan. Women, and especially athletes with an EHI history, were more predisposed to use a complete heat stress prevention strategy. More information regarding heat acclimatisation should be provided to protect athlete health and optimise performance at major athletics competitions in the heat.

  • 27.
    Rodriguez-Serrano, L. I.
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Young athletes health knowledge system: Qualitative analysis of health learning processes in adolescent sportspersons2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 1272-1280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recognized side effects on health associated with sports participation in youth include overtraining, doping, and exposure to harassment and violence. Many of these effects originate in contexts where young athletes are beginning to make decisions about their sports practices on their own. This study sets out to explore knowledge and reasoning about health among adolescent athletes and to describe how health knowledge management structures are associated with different social systems. Qualitative data were collected from focus groups involving 65 young Swedish athletes aged 16-17years. The participants knowledge and reasoning about health were examined using a deductive thematic analysis, categories from Blooms taxonomy of educational objectives, and Luhmanns social systems theory. The meaning of health was found to have a dynamic character for the young athletes, associated with constantly striving to satisfy immediate needs and fulfill short-time life goals. The athletes thinking about health was associated with a pragmatic health-as-a-resource perspective, characterized by group self-comparisons, rapid cognitive processing, and opportunistic substitutions. They expressed a particular interest in experiential learning and personally relevant procedural knowledge, and they perceived that their factual knowledge about health was saturated. The results of this study add emphasis to the importance of involving adolescent sportspersons in the development of health education programs and contextualizing the programs to the athletes specific age and social environment.

  • 28.
    Rosell, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Bengtsson, Nils-Olof
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hatschek, Thomas
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per-Olof
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Wallgren, Arne
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Long-term effects on the incidence of second primary cancers in a randomized trial of two and five years of adjuvant tamoxifen2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 614-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tamoxifen is a well established treatment for breast cancer, but its long-term effects on the incidence of secondary cancers are not fully evaluated.Material and methods: We have studied 4128 postmenopausal patients with early stage breast cancer who were alive and free of breast cancer recurrence after two years of tamoxifen, and who were randomized to receive totally two or five years of therapy.Results: Compared to patients randomized to two years of tamoxifen the incidence of contralateral breast cancer [hazard ratio (HR) 0.73; 95% CI 0.56-0.96] and of lung cancer (HR 0.45; 95% CI 0.27-0.77), especially squamous cell and small cell lung cancer, were reduced in the five-year group, and similar results were seen when restricting the analysis to the 10-year period after treatment stopped. An increased incidence of endometrial cancer was observed in the five-year group, but the excess risk decreased over time.Conclusion: Further studies of the effects of tamoxifen on the risk of different histological types of lung cancer are needed.

  • 29.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences Linnaeus University Kalmar Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Ericsson, Carin
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Broström, Anders
    Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare Jönköping University Jönköping Sweden.
    Skagerstrom, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Determinants of patient participation for safer care: A qualitative study of physicians experiences and perceptions2018In: Health science reports, ISSN 2398-8835, Vol. 1, no 10, article id e87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a paucity of research on physicians perspectives on involving patients to achieve safer care. This study aims to explore determinants of patient participation for safer care, according to physicians in Swedish health care.

  • 30.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    et al.
    Linneuniversitet - Kalmar, Sweden Linneuniversitet - Kalmar, Sweden.
    Skagerström, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Ericsson, Carin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Så ville patienter förbättra vårdmötet för att få säkrare vård2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients had several suggestions on how to improve healthcare meetings in order to create safer care An open question "Do you have suggestions on how to improve meetings between patients and healthcare professionals in order to create safer care?" was incorporated into a questionnaire survey to 2673 patients in Sweden. The survey addressed patient participation for safer care. The open question was answered by 591 respondents. Content analysis was used to analyze the responses. The proposed suggestions concerned both the individual level (healthcare staffs competence and trust in the patient) and the system level (forms of communication, planning and structure, and time and staffing). The study findings show that there are many ways to improve meetings in healthcare of potential relevance for patient safety. Further research is needed to develop, apply and evaluate interventions based on patient suggestions.

  • 31.
    Schober, Sebastian J
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics and Childrens Cancer Research Center, TUM School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Kinderklinik München Schwabing, 80804 Munich, Germany.
    von Luettichau, Irene
    Department of Pediatrics and Childrens Cancer Research Center, TUM School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Kinderklinik München Schwabing, 80804 Munich, Germany.
    Wawer, Angela
    Department of Pediatrics and Childrens Cancer Research Center, TUM School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Kinderklinik München Schwabing, 80804 Munich, Germany.
    Steinhauser, Maximilian
    Department of Pediatrics and Childrens Cancer Research Center, TUM School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Kinderklinik München Schwabing, 80804 Munich, Germany.
    Salat, Christoph
    Medical Center for Hematology and Oncology Munich MVZ, 80639 Munich, Germany.
    Schwinger, Wolfgang
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Graz, A-8036 Graz, Austria.
    Ussowicz, Marek
    Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Wroclaw Medical University, 50-368 Wroclaw, Poland.
    Antunovic, Petar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Castagna, Luca
    Department of Oncology and Hematology, IRCCS Humanitas Cancer Center, Humanitas University, 20089, Milan, Italy.
    Kolb, Hans-Jochem
    Department of Pediatrics and Childrens Cancer Research Center, TUM School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Kinderklinik München Schwabing, 80804 Munich, Germany.
    Burdach, Stefan E G
    Department of Pediatrics and Childrens Cancer Research Center, TUM School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Kinderklinik München Schwabing, 80804 Munich, Germany; CCC München-Comprehensive Cancer Center, DKTK German Cancer Consortium Munich, 80336 Munich, Germany.
    Thiel, Uwe
    Department of Pediatrics and Childrens Cancer Research Center, TUM School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Kinderklinik München Schwabing, 80804 Munich, Germany.
    Donor lymphocyte infusions in adolescents and young adults for control of advanced pediatric sarcoma2018In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 9, no 32, p. 22741-22748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) and donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) may induce a graft-versus-tumor effect in pediatric sarcoma patients. Here, we describe general feasibility, toxicity and efficacy of DLI after allo-SCT.

  • 32.
    Sjostrom, Carin
    et al.
    Capio St Gorans Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Thorstenson, Andreas
    Capio St Gorans Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Strock, Viveka
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hosseini-Aliabad, Abolfazl
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    Akad Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Gardmark, Truls
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Treatment according to guidelines may bridge the gender gap in outcome for patients with stage T1 urinary bladder cancer2018In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 186-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this investigation was to study differences between male and female patients with stage T1 urinary bladder cancer (UBC) regarding intravesical instillation therapy, second resection and survival. Materials and methods: This study included all patients with non-metastatic primary T1 UBC reported to the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) from 1997 to 2014, excluding those treated with primary cystectomy. Differences between groups were evaluated using chi-squared tests and logistic regression, and survival was investigated using Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards analysis. Results: In all, 7681 patients with T1 UBC (77% male, 23% female) were included. Females were older than males at the time of diagnosis (median age at presentation 76 and 74 years, respectively; p amp;lt; .001). A larger proportion of males than females underwent intravesical instillation therapy (39% vs 33%, pamp;lt;.001). Relative survival was lower in women aged amp;gt;= 75 years and women with G3 tumours compared to men. However, women aged amp;gt;= 75 years who had T1G3 tumours and underwent second resection followed by intravesical instillation therapy showed a relative survival equal to that observed in men. Conclusions: This population-based study demonstrates that women of all ages with T1 UBC undergo intravesical instillation therapy less frequently than men, and that relative survival is poorer in women aged amp;gt;= 75 years than in men of the same age when intravesical instillation therapy and second resection are not used. However, these disparities may disappear with treatment according to guidelines.

  • 33.
    Spreco, Armin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cowling, Benjamin John
    Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Evaluation of Nowcasting for Detecting and Predicting Local Influenza Epidemics, Sweden, 2009-20142018In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1868-1873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing availability of big data in healthcare and public health opens possibilities for infectious disease control in local settings. We prospectively evaluated a method for integrated local detection and prediction (nowcasting) of influenza epidemics over 5 years, using the total population in Ostergotland County, Sweden. We used routine health information system data on influenza-diagnosis cases and syndromic telenursing data for July 2009-June 2014 to evaluate epidemic detection, peak-timing prediction, and peak-intensity prediction. Detection performance was satisfactory throughout the period, except for the 2011-12 influenza A(H3N2) season, which followed a season with influenza B and pandemic influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 virus activity. Peak-timing prediction performance was satisfactory for the 4 influenza seasons but not the pandemic. Peak-intensity levels were correctly categorized for the pandemic and 2 of 4 influenza seasons. We recommend using versions of this method modified with regard to local use context for further evaluations using standard methods.

  • 34.
    Spreco, Armin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cowling, Benjamin John
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Integrated Detection and Prediction of Influenza Activity for Real-Time Surveillance: Algorithm Design2017In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 19, no 6, article id e211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Influenza is a viral respiratory disease capable of causing epidemics that represent a threat to communities worldwide. The rapidly growing availability of electronic "big data" from diagnostic and prediagnostic sources in health care and public health settings permits advance of a new generation of methods for local detection and prediction of winter influenza seasons and influenza pandemics. Objective: The aim of this study was to present a method for integrated detection and prediction of influenza virus activity in local settings using electronically available surveillance data and to evaluate its performance by retrospective application on authentic data from a Swedish county. Methods: An integrated detection and prediction method was formally defined based on a design rationale for influenza detection and prediction methods adapted for local surveillance. The novel method was retrospectively applied on data from the winter influenza season 2008-09 in a Swedish county (population 445,000). Outcome data represented individuals who met a clinical case definition for influenza (based on International Classification of Diseases version 10 [ICD-10] codes) from an electronic health data repository. Information from calls to a telenursing service in the county was used as syndromic data source. Results: The novel integrated detection and prediction method is based on nonmechanistic statistical models and is designed for integration in local health information systems. The method is divided into separate modules for detection and prediction of local influenza virus activity. The function of the detection module is to alert for an upcoming period of increased load of influenza cases on local health care (using influenza-diagnosis data), whereas the function of the prediction module is to predict the timing of the activity peak (using syndromic data) and its intensity (using influenza-diagnosis data). For detection modeling, exponential regression was used based on the assumption that the beginning of a winter influenza season has an exponential growth of infected individuals. For prediction modeling, linear regression was applied on 7-day periods at the time in order to find the peak timing, whereas a derivate of a normal distribution density function was used to find the peak intensity. We found that the integrated detection and prediction method detected the 2008-09 winter influenza season on its starting day (optimal timeliness 0 days), whereas the predicted peak was estimated to occur 7 days ahead of the factual peak and the predicted peak intensity was estimated to be 26% lower than the factual intensity (6.3 compared with 8.5 influenza-diagnosis cases/100,000). Conclusions: Our detection and prediction method is one of the first integrated methods specifically designed for local application on influenza data electronically available for surveillance. The performance of the method in a retrospective study indicates that further prospective evaluations of the methods are justified.

  • 35.
    Spreco, Armin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Influenza detection and prediction algorithms: comparative accuracy trial in Ostergotland county, Sweden, 2008-20122017In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 145, no 10, p. 2166-2175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods for the detection of influenza epidemics and prediction of their progress have seldom been comparatively evaluated using prospective designs. This study aimed to perform a prospective comparative trial of algorithms for the detection and prediction of increased local influenza activity. Data on clinical influenza diagnoses recorded by physicians and syndromic data from a telenursing service were used. Five detection and three prediction algorithms previously evaluated in public health settings were calibrated and then evaluated over 3 years. When applied on diagnostic data, only detection using the Serfling regression method and prediction using the non-adaptive log-linear regression method showed acceptable performances during winter influenza seasons. For the syndromic data, none of the detection algorithms displayed a satisfactory performance, while non-adaptive log-linear regression was the best performing prediction method. We conclude that evidence was found for that available algorithms for influenza detection and prediction display satisfactory performance when applied on local diagnostic data during winter influenza seasons. When applied on local syndromic data, the evaluated algorithms did not display consistent performance. Further evaluations and research on combination of methods of these types in public health information infrastructures for nowcasting (integrated detection and prediction) of influenza activity are warranted.

  • 36.
    Strömgren, M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Holm, E.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Spreco, Armin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Place-based social contact and mixing: a typology of generic meeting places of relevance for infectious disease transmission2017In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 145, no 12, p. 2582-2593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to develop a typology of generic meeting places based on social contact and mixing of relevance for infectious disease transmission. Data were collected by means of a contact diary survey conducted on a representative sample of the Swedish population. The typology is derived from a cluster analysis accounting for four dimensions associated with transmission risk: visit propensity and its characteristics in terms of duration, number of other persons present and likelihood of physical contact. In the analysis, we also study demographic, socio-economic and geographical differences in the propensity of visiting meeting places. The typology identifies the family venue, the fixed activity site, the family vehicle, the trading plaza and the social network hub as generic meeting places. The meeting place typology represents a spatially explicit account of social contact and mixing relevant to infectious disease modelling, where the social context of the outbreak can be highlighted in light of the actual infectious disease.

  • 37.
    Timpka, Toomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Athlet Assoc, Sweden.
    Bargoria, Victor
    Linköping University. Moi University, Kenya.
    Periard, Julien D.
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Racinais, Sebastien
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Ronsen, Ola
    Medical and Antidoping Commiss, Monaco; Aker Solut, Norway.
    Halje, Karin
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Andersson, Christer A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Spreco, Armin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edouard, Pascal
    University Hospital St Etienne, France; University of Lyon, France; Medical Commiss, France.
    Alonso, Juan-Manuel
    Medical and Antidoping Commiss, Monaco; Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Preparticipation predictors for championship injury and illness: cohort study at the Beijing 2015 International Association of Athletics Federations World Championships2017In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 272-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To determine preparticipation predictors of injury and illness at a major Athletics championship. Methods A cohort study design was used. Before the 2015 International Association of Athletics Federations World Championships in Athletics, all 207 registered national teams were approached about partaking in a study of preparticipation health; 50 teams accepted. The athletes (n=957) in the participating teams were invited to complete a preparticipation health questionnaire (PHQ). New injuries and illnesses that occurred at the championships were prospectively recorded. Logistic regression analyses were performed with simple and multiple models using any in-championship injury and in-championship illness as outcomes. Results The PHQ was completed by 307 (32.1%) of the invited athletes; 116 athletes (38.3%) reported an injury symptom during the month before the championships, while 40 athletes (13%) reported an illness symptom. 20 (6.5%) of the participating athletes sustained a health problem during the championships. Endurance athletes were almost 10-fold more likely to sustain an in-championship illness than speed/power athletes (OR, 9.88; 95% CI 1.20 to 81.31; p=0.033). Participants reporting a preparticipation gradual-onset injury symptom were three times more likely (OR, 3.09; 95% CI 1.08 to 8.79; p=0.035) and those reporting an illness symptom causing anxiety were fivefold more likely (OR, 5.56; 95% CI 1.34 to 23.15; p=0.018) to sustain an in-championship injury. Summary and conclusions Analyses of preparticipation predictors of injury and illness at a major Athletics championship suggest that endurance athletes require particular clinical attention. Preparticipation symptoms causing anxiety are interesting predictors for in-championship health problems.

  • 38.
    Timpka, Jonathan
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 2Department of Neurology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Spreco, Armin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Nilsson, Maria H
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 8Memory Clinic, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Iwarsson, Susanne
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Odin, Per
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 2Department of Neurology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; 9Department of Neurology, Central Hospital, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Reduced workforce participation 5 years prior to first Parkinsons disease sick-leave2018In: NPJ Parkinsons disease, ISSN 2373-8057, Vol. 4, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of understanding the prodromal phase of Parkinsons disease (PD) by systematic recording of prediagnostic symptoms and reductions in body functions has been highlighted. The aim of this study was to investigate whether persons later diagnosed with PD exhibit increased physician-certified sickness absence 1, 2, and 5 years prior to a first sick-leave episode attributed to PD. A case-control study was performed to analyze data from all nontrivial (exceeding 14 days) sick-leave episodes in Sweden between 2008 and 2014. The 537 incident PD sick-leave episodes were identified as PD sick-leave cases and compared to 537 sick-leave controls identified by matching age, sex, and date of the first day of the sick-leave episode. The total sickness absence and sickness absence due to musculoskeletal diagnoses were found to be increased among the PD sick-leave cases from 5 years prior to the first sick-leave episode ascribed to PD when compared to the controls. No differences between PD sick-leave cases and sick-leave controls were found with regard to mental and behavioral diagnoses. We conclude that the capacity to participate in working life is reduced already at the early prediagnostic stages of PD. This finding can be used as a basis for further research into the process of identifying individuals at risk for developing PD, particularly in combination with further investigation into biochemical, genetic, and imaging biomarkers.

  • 39.
    Timpka, Toomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Bargoria, Victor
    Moi Univ, Kenya.
    Halje, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Infographic: Elite athletes anxiety over illness ups risk of injury in competition2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 52, no 15, p. 955-955Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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