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  • 1.
    Danielsson, Marita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Regionledning ledningstab.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rutberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    The professional culture among physicians in Sweden: potential implications for patient safety2018In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Patient safety culture, i.e. a subset of an organization’s culture, has become an important focus of patient safety research. An organization’s culture consists of many cultures, underscoring the importance of studying subcultures. Professional subcultures in health care are potentially important from a patient safety point of view. Physicians have an important role to play in the effort to improve patient safety. The aim was to explore physicians’ shared values and norms of potential relevance for patient safety in Swedish health care.

    Methods

    Data were collected through group and individual interviews with 28 physicians in 16 semi-structured interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim before being analysed with an inductive approach.

    Results

    Two overarching themes, “the competent physician” and “the integrated yet independent physician”, emerged from the interview data. The former theme consists of the categories Infallible and Responsible, while the latter theme consists of the categories Autonomous and Team player. The two themes and four categories express physicians’ values and norms that create expectations for the physicians’ behaviours that might have relevance for patient safety.

    Conclusions

    Physicians represent a distinct professional subculture in Swedish health care. Several aspects of physicians’ professional culture may have relevance for patient safety. Expectations of being infallible reduce their willingness to talk about errors they make, thus limiting opportunities for learning from errors. The autonomy of physicians is associated with expectations to act independently, and they use their decisional latitude to determine the extent to which they engage in patient safety. The physicians perceived that organizational barriers make it difficult to live up to expectations to assume responsibility for patient safety. Similarly, expectations to be part of multi-professional teams were deemed difficult to fulfil. It is important to recognize the implications of a multi-faceted perspective on the culture of health care organizations, including physicians’ professional culture, in efforts to improve patient safety.

  • 2.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Ericsson, Carin
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Skagerström, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    Linneuniversitet - Kalmar, Sweden .
    Patientmedverkan från retorik till praktik2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Skagerström, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Ericsson, Carin
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    Linneuniversitet, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Många faktorer påverkar om patienter kan medverka till säkrare vård - Intervjustudie visar läkares och sjuksköterskors perspektiv2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient participation for safer health care - interviews with physicians and nurses

    Patient participation to achieve safer care is an area of growing policy, research and health care management and practice interest. Patients are uniquely placed to observe their treatment, care and physical environment throughout their journey in the health care system. However, very few studies have investigated health care providers attitudes and beliefs concerning patient participation for improved patient safety. This study explored factors that acted as facilitators and/or barriers to patient participation for safer care, as perceived by physicians and nurses in Swedish health care. Interviews were conducted with 13 physicians and 11 nurses, using a purposeful sampling strategy to achieve a heterogeneous sample of providers. We identified nine categories of factors, many of which functioned as barriers to patient participation to achieve safer care.

  • 4.
    Nordqvist, Pernilla
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Roberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Communicable Disease and Infection Control.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Regionledning ledningstab.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Vårdrelaterade infektioner en betydande del av vårdskadorna på sjukhus - Studie i Linköping visar att fler fall borde kunna undvikas2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preventable hospital acquired infections are common A modified GTT (Global trigger tool) was used for 480 patient records from 15 departments at Linköping University Hospital. Sixty-three hospital-acquired infections (HAI) were detected at 59 admissions. Postoperative wound infections were most common (44.4 %). Catheter-related urinary infections occurred in 15.9 %, infections associated with a central venous catheter in 7.9 % and hospital-acquired pneumonia in 6.3 % of all HAI.  Other types of HAI consisting of any abscess or oral Candida infection composed 17.5 %. Some 221 patients were operated (46.0 %). Postoperative wound infections were diagnosed in 28 of them (12.7 %), the majority after discharge from hospital. Most urinary infections were diagnosed in emergency patients (8/10). Prolonged hospital stay or unplanned return to hospital occurred in 54 %. Out of 63 HAI some 76.2 % were judged as probably preventable, and 11.1 % as preventable.

  • 5.
    O'Donnell, Amy
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Abidi, Latifa
    Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Limburg, Netherlands.
    Brown, Jamie
    Research Department of Behavioural Science and Health, University College London, London, UK, Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skagerström, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Thomas, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Beliefs and attitudes about addressing alcohol consumption in health care: a population survey in England2018In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite robust evidence for their effectiveness, it has proven difficult to translate alcohol prevention activities into routine health care practice. Previous research has identified numerous provider-level barriers affecting implementation, but these have been less extensively investigated in the wider population. We sought to: (1) investigate patients' beliefs and attitudes to being asked about alcohol consumption in health care; and (2) identify the characteristics of those who are supportive of addressing alcohol consumption in health care.

    METHODS: Cross-sectional household interviews conducted as part of the national Alcohol Toolkit Study in England between March and April 2017. Data were collected on age, gender, social grade, drinking category, and beliefs and attitudes to being asked about alcohol in routine health care. Unadjusted and multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models were performed to investigate associations between socio-demographic characteristics and drinking category with being "pro-routine" (i.e. 'agree completely' that alcohol consumption should be routinely addressed in health care) or "pro-personal" (i.e. 'agree completely' that alcohol is a personal matter and not something health care providers should ask about).

    RESULTS: Data were collected on 3499 participants, of whom 50% were "pro-routine" and 10% were "pro-personal". Those in social grade C1, C2, D and E were significantly less likely than those in AB of being "pro-routine". Women were less likely than men to be "pro-personal", and those aged 35-44 or 65 years plus more likely to be "pro-personal" compared with participants aged 16-24. Respondents aged 65 plus were twice as likely as those aged 16-24 to agree completely that alcohol consumption is a personal matter and not something health care providers should ask about (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.34-2.99).

    CONCLUSIONS: Most adults in England agree that health care providers should routinely ask about patients' alcohol consumption. However, older adults and those in lower socio-economic groups are less supportive. Drinking status appears to have limited impact on whether people believe that alcohol is a personal matter and not something health care providers should ask about.

    REGISTRATION: Open Science Framework ( https://osf.io/xn2st/ ).

  • 6.
    Skagerström, Janna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Ericsson, Carin
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden, .
    Patient involvement for improved patient safety: A qualitative study of nurses’ perceptions and experiences2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 230-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore nurses’ perceptions and experiences of patient involvement relevant to patient safety.

    Design

    Qualitative design using individual semi-structured interviews.

    Methods

    Interviews with registered nurses (= 11) and nurse assistants (= 8) were conducted in 2015–2016. Nurses were recruited from five different healthcare units in Sweden. The material was analysed using conventional content analysis.

    Results

    The analysis resulted in four categories: healthcare professionals’ ways of influencing patient involvement for safer care; patients’ ways of influencing patient involvement for safer care; barriers to patient involvement for safer care; and relevance of patient involvement for safer care. The nurses expressed that patient involvement is a shared responsibility. They also emphasized that healthcare provider has a responsibility to create opportunities for the patient to participate. According to the nurses, involvement can be hindered by factors related to the patient, the healthcare provider and the healthcare system. However, respondents expressed that patient involvement can lead to safer care and benefits for individual patients.

  • 7.
    Utjes, Deborah
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Lapins, Jan
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Hanna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Reduced disease-specific survival following a diagnosis of multiple primary cutaneous malignant melanomas-a nationwide, population-based study2017In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 141, no 11, p. 2243-2252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outcome data comparing patients with multiple primary invasive cutaneous malignant melanomas (MPMs) to single primary invasive cutaneous malignant melanomas (SPMs) show conflicting results. We have analyzed differences in disease-specific survival between these patients in a nationwide population-based setting. From the Swedish Melanoma Register, 27,235 patients were identified with a first invasive cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) between 1990 and 2007, followed-up through 2013. Of these, 700 patients developed MPMs. Cox proportional hazard regression was used for adjusted cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs). An interval of amp;lt;= 5 years between CMM diagnoses was significantly correlated to a decreased CMM-specific survival in Stage I-II MPM-vs. SPM-patients (HR 1.32; 95% CI 1.04-1.67; p=0.02). MPM-patients with longer time interval between diagnoses experienced similar risk of CMM-death as SPM-patients. The risk of CMM-death increased by almost 50% above the expected outcome according to stage of the index CMM by the diagnosis of a second CMM (HR 1.48; 95% CI 1.19-1.85; p amp;lt; 0.001). MPM vs. SPM-patients had a worse outcome (HR 1.38; 95% CI 1.05-1.83; p=0.001). This emphasizes the importance of prevention efforts in SPM-patients to decrease the risk of subsequent CMMs and has implications for more vigilant follow-up in MPM-patients.

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