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  • 1.
    Azharuddin, Mohammad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zhu, Geyunjian H.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Das, Debapratim
    Indian Inst Technol Guwahati, India.
    Ozgur, Erdogan
    Hacettepe Univ, Turkey.
    Uzun, Lokman
    Hacettepe Univ, Turkey.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Cranfield Univ, England.
    Patra, Hirak K.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Cambridge, England.
    A repertoire of biomedical applications of noble metal nanoparticles2019In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 55, no 49, p. 6964-6996Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Noble metals comprise any of several metallic chemical elements that are outstandingly resistant to corrosion and oxidation, even at elevated temperatures. This group is not strictly defined, but the tentative list includes ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, silver, osmium, iridium, platinum and gold, in order of atomic number. The emerging properties of noble metal nanoparticles are attracting huge interest from the translational scientific community and have led to an unprecedented expansion of research and exploration of applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. Noble metal nanomaterials can be synthesised both by top-down and bottom up approaches, as well as via organism-assisted routes, and subsequently modified appropriately for the field of use. Nanoscale analogues of gold, silver, platinum, and palladium in particular, have gained primary importance owing to their excellent intrinsic properties and diversity of applications; they offer unique functional attributes, which are quite unlike the bulk material. Modulation of noble metal nanoparticles in terms of size, shape and surface functionalisation has endowed them with unusual capabilities and manipulation at the chemical level, which can lead to changes in their electrical, chemical, optical, spectral and other intrinsic properties. Such flexibility in multi-functionalisation delivers Ockhams razor to applied biomedical science. In this feature article, we highlight recent advances in the adaptation of noble metal nanomaterials and their biomedical applications in therapeutics, diagnostics and sensing.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-05-21 00:01
  • 2.
    Bandyopadhyay, Souvik K.
    et al.
    GlaxoSmithKline Asia Pvt. Ltd., Bangalore, India.
    Azharuddin, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dasgupta, Anjan K.
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India.
    Ganguli, Bhaswati
    Department of Statistics, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India.
    SenRoy, Sugata
    Department of Statistics, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India.
    Patra, Hirak K.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Wolfson College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Deb, Suryyani
    Department of Biotechnology, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, Kolkata, India.
    Probing ADP Induced Aggregation Kinetics During Platelet-Nanoparticle Interactions: Functional Dynamics Analysis to Rationalize Safety and Benefits2019In: Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology, E-ISSN 2296-4185, Vol. 7, p. 163-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platelets, one of the most sensitive blood cells, can be activated by a range of external and internal stimuli including physical, chemical, physiological, and/or non-physiological agents. Platelets need to respond promptly during injury to maintain blood haemostasis. The time profile of platelet aggregation is very complex, especially in the presence of the agonist adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP), and difficult to probe such complexity using traditional linear dose response models. In the present study, we explored functional data to characterise the pattern of platelet aggregation over time in response to nanoparticle induced perturbations. This has obviated the need to represent the pattern of aggregation by a single summary measure and allowed us to treat the entire aggregation profile over time as the response. The modelling has been performed in a flexible manner, without any imposition of shape restrictions on the curve, allowing smooth platelet aggregation over time. The use of a probabilistic framework not only allowed statistical prediction and inference of the aggregation signatures, but also provided a novel method for the estimation of higher order derivatives of the curve, thereby allowing plausible estimation of the extent and rate of platelet aggregation kinetics over time. In the present study, we focused on the estimated first derivative of the curve obtained from the platelet optical aggregometric profile over time, and used it to discern the underlying kinetics as well as to study the effects of ADP dosage and perturbation with gold nanoparticles. In addition, our method allowed the quantification of the extent of inter-individual signature variations.

  • 3.
    Chasapis, Christos T.
    et al.
    Hellas Forth, Greece.
    Makridakis, Manousos
    Acad Athens BRFAA, Greece.
    Damdimopoulos, Anastassios E.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zoidakis, Jerome
    Acad Athens BRFAA, Greece.
    Lygirou, Vasiliki
    Acad Athens BRFAA, Greece.
    Mavroidis, Manolis
    Acad Athens BRFAA, Greece.
    Vlahou, Antonia
    Acad Athens BRFAA, Greece.
    Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio
    Univ Seville, Spain.
    Spyrou, Giannis
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vlamis-Gardikas, Alexios
    Univ Patras, Greece.
    Implications of the mitochondrial interactome of mammalian thioredoxin 2 for normal cellular function and disease2019In: Free Radical Biology & Medicine, ISSN 0891-5849, E-ISSN 1873-4596, Vol. 137, p. 59-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple thioredoxin isoforms exist in all living cells. To explore the possible functions of mammalian mitochondrial thioredoxin 2 (Trx2), an interactome of mouse Trx2 was initially created using (i) a monothiol mouse Trx2 species for capturing protein partners from different organs and (ii) yeast two hybrid screens on human liver and rat brain cDNA libraries. The resulting interactome consisted of 195 proteins (Trx2 included) plus the mitochondrial 16S RNA. 48 of these proteins were classified as mitochondrial (MitoCarta2.0 human inventory). In a second step, the mouse interactome was combined with the current four-membered mitochondrial sub-network of human Trx2 (BioGRID) to give a 53-membered human Trx2 mitochondrial interactome (52 interactor proteins plus the mitochondrial 16S RNA). Although thioredoxins are thiol-employing disulfide oxidoreductases, approximately half of the detected interactions were not due to covalent disulfide bonds. This finding reinstates the extended role of thioredoxins as moderators of protein function by specific non-covalent, protein-protein interactions. Analysis of the mitochondrial interactome suggested that human Trx2 was involved potentially in mitochondrial integrity, formation of iron sulfur clusters, detoxification of aldehydes, mitoribosome assembly and protein synthesis, protein folding, ADP ribosylation, amino acid and lipid metabolism, glycolysis, the TCA cycle and the electron transport chain. The oxidoreductase functions of Trx2 were verified by its detected interactions with mitochondrial peroxiredoxins and methionine sulfoxide reductase. Parkinsons disease, triosephosphate isomerase deficiency, combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, and lactate dehydrogenase b deficiency are some of the diseases where the proposed mitochondrial network of Trx2 may be implicated.

  • 4.
    Macwan, Ankit
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Ntzouni, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Gibbins, Jonathan M.
    Univ Reading, England.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Gradient-dependent inhibition of stimulatory signaling from platelet G protein-coupled receptors2019In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 104, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As platelet activation is an irreversible and potentially harmful event, platelet stimulatory signaling must be tightly regulated to ensure the filtering-out of inconsequential fluctuations of agonist concentrations in the vascular milieu. Herein, we show that platelet activation via G protein-coupled receptors is gradient-dependent, i.e., determined not only by agonist concentrations per se but also by how rapidly concentrations change over time. We demonstrate that gradient-dependent inhibition is a common feature of all major platelet stimulatory G protein-coupled receptors, while platelet activation via the non-G protein-coupled receptor glycoprotein VI is strictly concentration-dependent. By systematically characterizing the effects of variations in temporal agonist concentration gradients on different aspects of platelet activation, we demonstrate that gradient-dependent inhibition of protease-activated receptors exhibits different kinetics, with platelet activation occurring at lower agonist gradients for protease-activated receptor 4 than for protease-activated receptor 1, but shares a characteristic bimodal effect distribution, as gradient-dependent inhibition increases over a narrow range of gradients, below which aggregation and granule secretion is effectively shut off. In contrast, the effects of gradient-dependent inhibition on platelet activation via adenosine diphosphate and thromboxane receptors increase incrementally over a large range of gradients. Furthermore, depending on the affected activation pathway, gradient-dependent inhibition results in different degrees of refractoriness to subsequent autologous agonist stimulation. Mechanistically, our study identifies an important role for the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent pathway in gradient-dependent inhibition. Together, our findings suggest that gradient-dependent inhibition may represent a new general mechanism for hemostatic regulation in platelets.

  • 5.
    Patra, Hirak K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Cambridge University, Cambridge, UK; Wolfson College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Azharuddin, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Schepens Eye Research Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
    Papapavlou, Georgia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Deb, Suryyani
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Biochemistry, University of Calcutta, Calcutta, India; Department of Biotechnology, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology (MAKAUT), West Bengal, India.
    Osterrieth, Johannes
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Cambridge University, Philippa Fawcett Drive, Cambridge, UK.
    Zhu, Geyunjian Harry
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Cambridge University, Philippa Fawcett Drive, Cambridge, UK.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dhara, Ashis K.
    Centre for Image Analysis, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Electrical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Durgapur, West Bengal, India.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gadheri, Amineh
    Department of Oncology‐Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hinkula, Jorma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rajan, Madhavan S.
    Department of Ophthalmology, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust and Vision and Eye Research Institute (VERI), Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Slater, Nigel K. H.
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Cambridge University, Philippa Fawcett Drive, Cambridge, UK.
    Rational Nanotoolbox with Theranostic Potential for Medicated Pro-Regenerative Corneal Implants2019In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, article id 1903760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Cornea diseases are a leading cause of blindness and the disease burden is exacerbated by the increasing shortage around the world for cadaveric donor corneas. Despite the advances in the field of regenerative medicine, successful transplantation of laboratory-made artificial corneas is not fully realized in clinical practice. The causes of failure of such artificial corneal implants are multifactorial and include latent infections from viruses and other microbes, enzyme overexpression, implant degradation, extrusion or delayed epithelial regeneration. Therefore, there is an urgent unmet need for developing customized corneal implants to suit the host environment and counter the effects of inflammation or infection, which are able to track early signs of implant failure in situ. This work reports a nanotoolbox comprising tools for protection from infection, promotion of regeneration, and noninvasive monitoring of the in situ corneal environment. These nanosystems can be incorporated within pro-regenerative biosynthetic implants, transforming them into theranostic devices, which are able to respond to biological changes following implantation.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-07-15 00:01
  • 6.
    Singh, Sukhi
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Damen, Tor
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nygren, Andreas
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hakimi, Caroline Shams
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Dellborgl, Mikael
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hesse, Camilla
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Jeppsson, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Adrenaline Improves Platelet Reactivity in Ticagrelor-Treated Healthy Volunteers2019In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 119, no 5, p. 735-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Administration of agents that enhance platelet reactivity may reduce the perioperative bleeding risk in patients treated with the adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-receptor antagonist ticagrelor. Adrenaline potentiates ADP-induced aggregation and activation in blood samples from ticagrelor-treated patients, but it has not previously been evaluated in vivo. Methods Ten healthy male subjects were included in an interventional study. A loading dose of ticagrelor (180 mg) was administered, followed 2 hours later by a gradually increased intravenous adrenaline infusion (0.01, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15 mu g/kg/min; 15 minutes at each step). Blood pressure, heart rate, platelet aggregation (impedance aggregometry), platelet activation (flow cytometry), clot formation (rotational thromboelastometry) and adrenaline plasma concentration were determined before and after ticagrelor administration and at the end of each adrenaline step. Results Infusion of adrenaline increased ADP-induced aggregation at all doses above 0.01 mu g/kg/min. The aggregation increased from median 17 (25-75th percentiles: 14-31) to 25 (21-34) aggregation units (p = 0.012) at 0.10 mu g/kg/min. Adrenaline infusion also increased ADP-induced fibrinogen receptor activation (from 29 [22-35] to 46 [38-57%]) and P-selectin expression (from 3.7 [3.0-4.3] to 7.7 [4.7-8.6%]), both p=0.012. Adrenaline infusion reduced clot formation time (97 [89-110] to 83 [76-90] seconds, p = 0.008) and increased maximum clot firmness (59 [57-60] to 62 [61-64] mm, p = 0.007). Conclusion Infusion of adrenaline at clinically relevant doses improves in vivo platelet reactivity and clot formation in ticagrelor-treated subjects. Adrenaline could thus potentially be used to prevent perioperative bleeding complications in ticagrelor-treated patients. Studies in patients are necessary to determine the clinical importance of our observations.

  • 7.
    Sundman, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    van Poucke, Enya
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Roth, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Long-term stress levels are synchronized in dogs and their owners2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 7391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reveals, for the first time, an interspecific synchronization in long-term stress levels. Previously, acute stress, has been shown to be highly contagious both among humans and between individuals of other species. Here, long-term stress synchronization in dogs and their owners was investigated. We studied 58 dog-human dyads and analyzed their hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) at two separate occasions, reflecting levels during previous summer and winter months. The personality traits of both dogs and their owners were determined through owner-completed Dog Personality Questionnaire (DPQ) and human Big Five Inventory (BFI) surveys. In addition, the dogs activity levels were continuously monitored with a remote cloud-based activity collar for one week. Shetland sheepdogs (N = 33) and border collies (N = 25), balanced for sex, participated, and both pet dogs and actively competing dogs (agility and obedience) were included to represent different lifestyles. The results showed significant interspecies correlations in long-term stress where human HCC from both summer and winter samplings correlated strongly with dog HCC (summer: N = 57, chi(2) = 23.697, P amp;lt; 0.001, beta = 0.235; winter: N = 55, chi(2) = 13.796, P amp;lt; 0.001, beta = 0.027). Interestingly, the dogs activity levels did not affect HCC, nor did the amount of training sessions per week, showing that the HCC levels were not related to general physical activity. Additionally, there was a seasonal effect in HCC. However, although dogs personalities had little effects on their HCC, the human personality traits neuroticism, conscientiousness, and openness significantly affected dog HCC. Hence, we suggest that dogs, to a great extent, mirror the stress level of their owners.

  • 8.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Törnblom, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Gäddlin, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Nelson Follin, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Women born with very low birth weight have similar menstrual cycle pattern, pregnancy rates and hormone profiles compared with women born at term2019In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Individuals born very preterm or with very low birth weight (VLBW) have a reduced likelihood to reproduce according to population-based register studies. Extremely low-birth weight born adults had a lower reproduction rate for both men and women in a follow-up study.

    Aim

    To investigate if being born with VLBW is associated with differences in the reproductive health, i.e. age of menarche, menstrual cycle pattern, pregnancy rates and hormone profile compared with women born at term.

    Methods

    A prospective long-term follow-up of a cohort of live-born VLBW children and their controls studied repeatedly since birth and now assessed at 26–28 years of age. Of the totally 80 girls enrolled from birth 49 women (24 VLBW women and 25 controls) participated in the current follow-up. The women’s anthropometric data and serum hormone levels were analysed.

    Results

    The reproductive hormone levels, including Anti-Mullerian Hormone, did not differ significantly between VLBW women and their controls. Both groups reported menstrual cycle irregularities and pregnancies to the same extent but the VLBW women reported 1.5 years later age of menarche. The VLBW subjects had a catch-up growth within 18 months of birth but remained on average 5 cm shorter in adult height. There were no significant differences in BMI, sagittal abdominal diameter, blood pressure or in their answers regarding life style between the VLBW women and the controls.

    Conclusion

    No differences in the reproductive hormone levels were found between VLBW women and their controls. Although age at menarche was somewhat higher in the VLBW group menstrual cycles and pregnancy rates were similar in the VLBW and control groups. Further follow-up studies are required to elucidate the health outcomes of being born VLBW.

  • 9.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Tallinn Univ Technol, Estonia.
    Fernström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Knapen, Marjo H. J.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Vermeer, Cees
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Long-term follow-up of biomarkers of vascular calcification after switch from traditional hemodialysis to online hemodiafiltration2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 174-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid progression of vascular calcification (VC) in hemodialysis (HD) patients is caused by several factors including inflammation and an imbalance between active inducers and inhibitors of VC. Growing evidence shows that online hemodiafiltration (ol-HDF), a combination of diffusive and convective solute transport, has positive effects on the uremic environment that affects patients on dialysis. However, we recently reported that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) decreased after a switch from HD to ol-HDF. As a consequence of this finding, the present study was undertaken to investigate if inducers and inhibitors of VC (i.e. the inactive matrix Gla protein fractions dp-ucMGP and t-ucMGP, fetuin-A, Gla-rich protein (GRP), osteopontin (OPN), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), and osteoprotegerin (OPG)) also are affected by ol-HDF. This non-comparative prospective study comprised 35 prevalent patients who were investigated 6, 12, and 24 months after their switch from HD to ol-HDF. Most patients had increased levels of the calcification inhibitors OPN and OPG; and of the inactive calcification inhibitor dp-ucMGP during the study period irrespective of the dialysis modality. BALP and t-ucMGP were mostly within the reference interval, but fetuin-A was mostly below the reference interval during the study period. OPN was significantly associated with BALP and parathyroid hormone, r = 0.62 and r = 0.65 (p amp;lt; .001), respectively. In conclusion, in contrast to decreased 25(OH)D levels, no differences were found for any of the measured biomarkers of VC following the switch from HD to ol-HDF. Further studies are needed to elucidate how these biomarkers can contribute to calcification risk assessment.

  • 10.
    Zimdahl Kahlin, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Helander, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skoglund, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mårtensson, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindqvist Appell, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Comprehensive study of thiopurine methyltransferase genotype, phenotype, and genotype-phenotype discrepancies in Sweden2019In: Biochemical Pharmacology, ISSN 0006-2952, E-ISSN 1356-1839, Vol. 164, p. 263-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thiopurines are widely used in the treatment of leukemia and inflammatory bowel diseases. Thiopurine metabolism varies among individuals because of differences in the polymorphic enzyme thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT, EC 2.1.1.67), and to avoid severe adverse reactions caused by incorrect dosing it is recommended that the patients TPMT status be determined before the start of thiopurine treatment. This study describes the concordance between genotyping for common TPMT alleles and phenotyping in a Swedish cohort of 12,663 patients sampled before or during thiopurine treatment. The concordance between TPMT genotype and enzyme activity was 94.5%. Compared to the genotype, the first measurement of TPMT enzyme activity was lower than expected for 4.6% of the patients. Sequencing of all coding regions of the TPMT gene in genotype/phenotype discrepant individuals led to the identification of rare and novel TPMT alleles. Fifteen individuals (0.1%) with rare or novel genotypes were identified, and three TPMT alleles (TPMT*42, *43, and *44) are characterized here for the first time. These 15 patients would not have been detected as carrying a deviating TPMT genotype if only genotyping of the most common TPMT variants had been performed. This study highlights the benefit of combining TPMT genotype and phenotype determination in routine testing. More accurate dose recommendations can be made, which might decrease the number of adverse reactions and treatment failures during thiopurine treatment.

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