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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Systemisk vaskulit2018In: Internmedicin / [ed] Ulf Dahlström, Stergios Kechagias, Leif Stenke, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, 6, Vol. Sidorna 939-949, p. 939-949Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Eskilsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Inflammatory Signaling Across the Blood-Brain Barrier and the Generation of Fever2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fever is a cardinal sign of inflammation and is evolutionary conserved. Fever is known to be beneficial during acute inflammation, but over time and if very high it can be detrimental. The signaling pathways by which fever is initiated by the brain and the peripheral mechanisms through which the temperature increase is generated were studied from several point of views. Fever is known to be dependent on prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) binding to its receptors in the median preoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus, which signals to the brainstem and through sympathetic nerves to heat conserving and heat producing effector organs. This thesis focuses on identifying the cells that produce the PGE2 critical for the fever response; showing where in the brain the critical PGE2 production takes place; demonstrating how peripheral inflammation activates these cells to produce PGE2; and finally, identifying the effector mechanisms behind the temperature elevation in fever. By using a newly developed specific antibody we showed that the enzyme responsible for the terminal step in the production of PGE2, microsomal prostaglandin E-synthase 1 (mPGES-1), is expressed in endothelial cells of brain blood vessels in mice where it is co-expressed with the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), which is known to be induced in these cells and to be rate limiting for the PGE2 production. The mPGES-1 enzyme was also expressed in several other cell types and structures which however did not express Cox-2, such as capillary-associated pericytes, astroglial cells, leptomeninges, and the choroid plexus. The role of the mPGES-1 in these other cells/structures remains unknown. Next, by using mice with selective deletion of Cox-2 in brain endothelial cells, we showed that local PGE2 production in deep brain areas, such as the hypothalamus, is critical for the febrile response to peripheral inflammation. In contrast, PGE2 production in other brain areas and the overall PGE2 level in the brain were not critical for the febrile response. Partly restoring the PGE2 synthesizing capacity in the anterior hypothalamus of mice lacking such capacity with a lentiviral vector resulted in a temperature elevation in response to an intraperitoneal injection of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The data show that the febrile response is dependent on the local release of PGE2 onto its target neurons, possibly by a paracrine mechanism. Deletion of the receptor for the pyrogenic cytokine IL-6 on brain endothelial cells, but not on neurons or peripheral nerves, strongly attenuated the febrile response to LPS and reduced the induction of the Cox-2 expression in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, mice deficient of the IL- 6Rα gene in the brain endothelial cells showed a reduced SOCS3 mRNA induction, whereas IκB mRNA-levels were unaffected, suggesting that the IL-6 signaling occurs via STAT3 activation and not signaling through the transcription factor NF-κB. This idea was confirmed by the observation of attenuated fever in mice deficient of STAT3 in brain endothelial cells. These data show that IL-6, when endogenously released during systemic inflammation, is pyrogenic by binding to IL-6R on brain endothelial cells to induce prostaglandin synthesis in these cells. Finally, we demonstrate that mice with genetic deletion of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1), hence lacking functional brown adipose tissue, had a normal fever response to LPS, and that LPS caused no activation of brown adipose tissue in wild type mice. However, blocking peripheral cutaneous vasoconstriction resulted in a blunted fever response to LPS, suggesting that heat conservation, possibly together with shivering or non-shivering thermogenesis in the musculature, is responsible for the generation of immune-induced fever, whereas brown adipose tissue thermogenesis is not involved.  

    List of papers
    1. Distribution of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 in the mouse brain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distribution of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 in the mouse brain
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Comparative Neurology, ISSN 0021-9967, E-ISSN 1096-9861, Vol. 522, no 14, p. 3229-3244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies in rats have demonstrated that microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) is induced in brain vascular cells that also express inducible cyclooxygenase-2, suggesting that such cells are the source of the increased PGE2 levels that are seen in the brain following peripheral immune stimulation, and that are associated with sickness responses such as fever, anorexia, and stress hormone release. However, while most of what is known about the functional role of mPGES-1 for these centrally evoked symptoms is based on studies on genetically modified mice, the cellular localization of mPGES-1 in the mouse brain has not been thoroughly determined. Here, using a newly developed antibody that specifically recognizes mouse mPGES-1 and dual-labeling for cell-specific markers, we report that mPGES-1 is constitutively expressed in the mouse brain, being present not only in brain endothelial cells, but also in several other cell types and structures, such as capillary-associated pericytes, astroglial cells, leptomeninges, and the choroid plexus. Regional differences were seen with particularly prominent labeling in autonomic relay structures such as the area postrema, the subfornical organ, the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, the arcuate nucleus, and the preoptic area. Following immune stimulation, mPGES-1 in brain endothelial cells, but not in other mPGES-1-positive cells, was coexpressed with cyclooxygenase-2, whereas there was no coexpression between mPGES-1 and cyclooxygenase-1. These data imply a widespread synthesis of PGE2 or other mPGES-1-dependent products in the mouse brain that may be related to inflammation-induced sickness symptom as well as other functions, such as blood flow regulation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2014
    Keywords
    Astroglial cells; Cyclooxygenase; Endothelial cells; Immune challenge; Pericytes; Prostaglandin synthesis
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109962 (URN)10.1002/cne.23593 (DOI)000339967300006 ()24668417 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84904553311 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2014-09-12 Created: 2014-08-29 Last updated: 2020-01-08
    2. Immune-Induced Fever Is Dependent on Local But Not Generalized Prostaglandin E-2 Synthesis in the Brain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Immune-Induced Fever Is Dependent on Local But Not Generalized Prostaglandin E-2 Synthesis in the Brain
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 37, no 19, p. 5035-5044Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Fever occurs upon binding of prostaglandin E-2 (PGE(2)) to EP3 receptors in the median preoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus, but the origin of the pyrogenic PGE(2) has not been clearly determined. Here, using mice of both sexes, we examined the role of local versus generalized PGE(2) production in the brain for the febrile response. In wild-type mice and in mice with genetic deletion of the prostaglandin synthesizing enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 in the brain endothelium, generated with an inducible CreER(T2) under the Slco1c1 promoter, PGE(2) levels in the CSF were only weakly related to the magnitude of the febrile response, whereas the PGE(2) synthesizing capacity in the hypothalamus, as reflected in the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA, showed strong correlation with the immune-induced fever. Histological analysis showed that the deletion of cyclooxygenase-2 in brain endothelial cells occurred preferentially in small-and medium-sized vessels deep in the brain parenchyma, such as in the hypothalamus, whereas larger vessels, and particularly those close to the neocortical surface and in the meninges, were left unaffected, hence leaving PGE(2) synthesis largely intact in major parts of the brain while significantly reducing it in the region critical for the febrile response. Furthermore, injection of a virus vector expressing microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) into the median preoptic nucleus of fever-refractive mPGES-1 knock-out mice, resulted in a temperature elevation in response to LPS. We conclude that the febrile response is dependent on local release of PGE(2) onto its target neurons and not on the overall PGE(2) production in the brain.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SOC NEUROSCIENCE, 2017
    Keywords
    cyclooxygenase-2; endothelial cells; fever; median preoptic nucleus; microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1; prostaglandin E2
    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-138257 (URN)10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3846-16.2017 (DOI)000401118600015 ()28438967 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Medical Research Council; Swedish Cancer Foundation; European Research Council; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Swedish Brain foundation; County Council of Ostergotland

    Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2020-01-08
    3. Immune-Induced Fever Is Mediated by IL-6 Receptors on Brain Endothelial Cells Coupled to STAT3-Dependent Induction of Brain Endothelial Prostaglandin Synthesis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Immune-Induced Fever Is Mediated by IL-6 Receptors on Brain Endothelial Cells Coupled to STAT3-Dependent Induction of Brain Endothelial Prostaglandin Synthesis
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 34, no 48, p. 15957-15961Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The cytokine IL-6, which is released upon peripheral immune challenge, is critical for the febrile response, but the mechanism by which IL-6 is pyrogenic has remained obscure. Herewegenerated mice with deletion of themembranebound IL-6 receptor alpha (IL-6R alpha) onneural cells, on peripheral nerves, on fine sensory afferent fibers, and on brain endothelial cells, respectively, and examined its role for the febrile response to peripherally injected lipopolysaccharide. We show that IL-6R alpha on neural cells, peripheral nerves, and fine sensory afferents are dispensable for the lipopolysaccharide-induced fever, whereas IL-6R alpha in the brain endothelium plays an important role. Hence deletion of IL-6R alpha on brain endothelial cells strongly attenuated the febrile response, and also led to reduced induction of the prostaglandin synthesizing enzyme Cox-2 in the hypothalamus, the temperature-regulating center in the brain, as well as reduced expression of SOCS3, suggesting involvement of the STAT signaling pathway. Furthermore, deletion of STAT3 in the brain endothelium also resulted in attenuated fever. These data show that IL-6, when endogenously released during systemic inflammation, is pyrogenic by binding to IL-6R alpha on brain endothelial cells to induce prostaglandin synthesis in these cells, probably in concerted action with other peripherally released cytokines.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Society for Neuroscience, 2014
    Keywords
    blood-brain barrier; cell-specific gene deletions; fever; interleukin-6; prostaglandins; STAT3
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113199 (URN)10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3520-14.2014 (DOI)000345923600013 ()25429137 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Medical Research Council; Swedish Cancer Foundation; European Research Council; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Swedish Brain foundation; County CouncilO Ostergotland

    Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-12 Last updated: 2020-01-08
  • 3.
    Håkansson, Irene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology in Linköping.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ekdahl, Kristina N.
    Centre of Biomaterials Chemistry, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden ; Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Complement activation in cerebrospinal fluid in clinically isolated syndrome and early stages of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis2020In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 340, article id 577147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To assess if markers of complement activation are associated with disease activity, C1q, C3, C3a and sC5b-9 levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were determined in 41 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) or remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), in a prospective longitudinal four-year cohort study. C1q in CSF (CSF-C1q) was significantly higher in patients than in controls. Baseline CSF-C1q and CSF-C3a correlated with several neuroinflammatory markers and neurofilament light chain levels. Baseline CSF-C3a correlated with the number of T2 lesions at baseline and new T2 lesions during follow-up. Baseline CSF-C3a was also significantly higher in patients with (n = 21) than in patients without (n = 20) signs of disease activity according to the NEDA-3 concept during one year of follow-up (p ≀ .01) Study results support that complement activation is involved in MS pathophysiology and that CSF-C3a carries prognostic information.

  • 4.
    Sjöwall, Christoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Reumatiska systemsjukdomar2018In: Internmedicin / [ed] Ulf Dahlström, Stergios Kechagias, Leif Stenke, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, 6, Vol. Sidorna 920-939, p. 920-939Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 4 of 4
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