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  • 1.
    Lagali, Neil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Speech Therapy, Otorhinolaryngology and Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping. Sorlandet Hosp Arendal, Norway.
    Wowra, Bogumil
    Med Univ Silesia, Poland.
    Fries, Fabian Norbert
    UKS, Germany.
    Latta, Lorenz
    UKS, Germany.
    Moslemani, Kayed
    UKS, Germany.
    Utheim, Tor Paaske
    Sorlandet Hosp Arendal, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Wylegala, Edward
    Med Univ Silesia, Poland.
    Seitz, Berthold
    UKS, Germany.
    Kasmann-Kellner, Barbara
    UKS, Germany.
    PAX6 Mutational Status Determines Aniridia-Associated Keratopathy Phenotype2020In: Ophthalmology (Rochester, Minn.), ISSN 0161-6420, E-ISSN 1549-4713, Vol. 127, no 2, p. 273-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Xiao, Jiaxin
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Adil, Mohammed Yasin
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Chen, Xiangjun
    Norwegian Dry Eye Clin, Norway; Sorlandet Hosp, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway; Univ Coll Southeast Norway, Norway.
    Utheim, Oygunn A.
    Norwegian Dry Eye Clin, Norway.
    Raeder, Sten
    Norwegian Dry Eye Clin, Norway.
    Tonseth, Kim Alexander
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Speech Therapy, Otorhinolaryngology and Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping. Sorlandet Hosp, Norway.
    Dartt, Darlene A.
    Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Utheim, Tor P.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Sorlandet Hosp, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway; Univ Coll Southeast Norway, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Stavanger Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Functional and Morphological Evaluation of Meibomian Glands in the Assessment of Meibomian Gland Dysfunction Subtype and Severity2020In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, ISSN 0002-9394, E-ISSN 1879-1891, Vol. 209, p. 160-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To classify subtypes of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) and evaluate the dependency of dry eye signs, symptoms, and parameters on MGD subtype. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Study Population: the right eyes of 447 patients with MGD of various subtypes and 20 healthy volunteers. METHODS: Patients were divided into 4 subtypes of MGD based on meibum expression, meibum quality, and MG loss on meibography images (meibograde of 0-6). Subtypes were patients with high meibum delivery (hypersecretory and nonobvious MGD) and those with low meibum delivery (hyposecretory and obstructive MGD). Additional clinical tests included tear film break-up time (TFBUT), ocular staining, osmolarity, Schirmer I, blink interval timing and the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 78 eyes had hypersecretory MGD; 49 eyes had nonobvious MGD; 66 eyes had hyposecretory MGD; and 254 eyes had obstructive MGD. Increased tear film osmolarity and lower TFBUT were found in the low-delivery groups; hyposecretory (P = 0.006, P = 0.016) and obstructive MGD (P = 0.008, P = 0.006) relative to high-delivery MGD (hypersecretory and nonobvious groups, respectively). Worse ocular symptoms and ocular staining were also found in low-delivery MGD groups than the high delivery MGD groups (P amp;lt; 0.01 and P amp;lt; 0.006, respectively). " CONCLUSIONS: Patients with low-delivery MGD had worse dry eye parameters and ocular symptoms than those with high meibum delivery, indicating the pivotal role of meibum secretion in ocular surface health that should be targeted in MGD therapy. Furthermore, nonobvious MGD cannot be diagnosed using conventional dry eye tests and requires morphologic assessment of meibography images to confirm MG loss. ((C) 2019 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).)

  • 3.
    Zora, Hatice
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Montell Magnusson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Speech Therapy, Otorhinolaryngology and Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Concurrent affective and linguistic prosody with the same emotional valence elicits a late positive ERP response2020In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Change in linguistic prosody generates a mismatch negativity response (MMN), indicating neural representation of linguistic prosody, while change in affective prosody generates a positive response (P3a), reflecting its motivational salience. However, the neural response to concurrent affective and linguistic prosody is unknown. The present paper investigates the integration of these two prosodic features in the brain by examining the neural response to separate and concurrent processing by electroencephalography (EEG). A spoken pair of Swedish words-[|f amp; x251; MODIFIER LETTER TRIANGULAR COLONsen] phase and [|f amp; x251;amp; x300;MODIFIER LETTER TRIANGULAR COLONsen] damn-that differed in emotional semantics due to linguistic prosody was presented to 16 subjects in an angry and neutral affective prosody using a passive auditory oddball paradigm. Acoustically matched pseudowords-[|v amp; x251; MODIFIER LETTER TRIANGULAR COLONsem] and [|v amp; x251;amp; x300;MODIFIER LETTER TRIANGULAR COLONsem]-were used as controls. Following the constructionist concept of emotions, accentuating the conceptualization of emotions based on language, it was hypothesized that concurrent affective and linguistic prosody with the same valence-angry [|f amp; x251;amp; x300;MODIFIER LETTER TRIANGULAR COLONsen] damn-would elicit a unique late EEG signature, reflecting the temporal integration of affective voice with emotional semantics of prosodic origin. In accordance, linguistic prosody elicited an MMN at 300-350 ms, and affective prosody evoked a P3a at 350-400 ms, irrespective of semantics. Beyond these responses, concurrent affective and linguistic prosody evoked a late positive component (LPC) at 820-870 ms in frontal areas, indicating the conceptualization of affective prosody based on linguistic prosody. This study provides evidence that the brain does not only distinguish between these two functions of prosody but also integrates them based on language and experience.

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