liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Lee, Mary R.
    et al.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA; NIDA, MD 20892 USA.
    Tapocik, Jenica D.
    NIDA, MD 20892 USA.
    Ghareeb, Mwlod
    Univ Rhode Isl, RI 02881 USA.
    Schwandt, Melanie L.
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Dias, Alexandra A.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA; NIDA, MD 20892 USA.
    Le, April N.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA; NIDA, MD 20892 USA.
    Cobbina, Enoch
    Univ Rhode Isl, RI 02881 USA.
    Farinelli, Lisa A.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA; NIDA, MD 20892 USA.
    Bouhlal, Sofia
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA; NIDA, MD 20892 USA.
    Farokhnia, Mehdi
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA; NIDA, MD 20892 USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken inkl beroendekliniken. NIDA, MD 20892 USA.
    Akhlaghi, Fatemeh
    Univ Rhode Isl, RI 02881 USA.
    Leggio, Lorenzo
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA; NIDA, MD 20892 USA; Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA.
    The novel ghrelin receptor inverse agonist PF-5190457 administered with alcohol: preclinical safety experiments and a phase 1b human laboratory study2020In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 461-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rodent studies indicate that ghrelin receptor blockade reduces alcohol consumption. However, no ghrelin receptor blockers have been administered to heavy alcohol drinking individuals. Therefore, we evaluated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD) and behavioral effects of a novel ghrelin receptor inverse agonist, PF-5190457, when co-administered with alcohol. We tested the effects of PF-5190457 combined with alcohol on locomotor activity, loss-of-righting reflex (a measure of alcohol sedative actions), and on blood PF-5190457 concentrations in rats. Then, we performed a single-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject human study with PF-5190457 (placebo/0 mg b.i.d., 50 mg b.i.d., 100 mg b.i.d.). Twelve heavy drinkers during three identical visits completed an alcohol administration session, subjective assessments, and an alcohol cue-reactivity procedure, and gave blood samples for PK/PD testing. In rats, PF-5190457 did not interact with the effects of alcohol on locomotor activity or loss-of-righting reflex. Alcohol did not affect blood PF-5190457 concentrations. In humans, all adverse events were mild or moderate and did not require discontinuation or dose reductions. Drug dose did not alter alcohol concentration or elimination, alcohol-induced stimulation or sedation, or mood during alcohol administration. Potential PD markers of PF-5190457 were acyl-to-total ghrelin ratio and insulin-like growth factor-1. PF-5190457 (100 mg b.i.d.) reduced alcohol craving during the cue-reactivity procedure. This study provides the first translational evidence of safety and tolerability of the ghrelin receptor inverse agonist PF-5190457 when co-administered with alcohol. PK/PD/behavioral findings support continued research of PF-5190457 as a potential pharmacological agent to treat alcohol use disorder.

  • 2.
    MacRitchie, Jennifer
    et al.
    Western Sydney Univ, Australia.
    Breaden, Matthew
    Western Sydney Univ, Australia.
    Milne, Andrew J.
    Western Sydney Univ, Australia.
    Mcintyre, Sarah
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Western Sydney Univ, Australia.
    Cognitive, Motor and Social Factors of Music Instrument Training Programs for Older Adults Improved Wellbeing2020In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 2868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given emerging evidence that learning to play a musical instrument may lead to a number of cognitive benefits for older adults, it is important to clarify how these training programs can be delivered optimally and meaningfully. The effective acquisition of musical and domain-general skills by later-life learners may be influenced by social, cultural and individual factors within the learning environment. The current study examines the effects of a 10-week piano training program on healthy older adult novices cognitive and motor skills, in comparison to an inactive waitlisted control group. Fifteen participants completed piano training led by a music facilitator in small groups (max n = 4 per lesson class; two experimental, two waitlisted control groups). Data was collected using an explanatory sequential design: quantitative data from a battery of cognitive and motor tests was collected pre/post-test on all participants, with further post-test data from the waitlisted control group (n = 7). Qualitative data included weekly facilitator observations, participant practice diaries, and an individual, semi-structured, post-experiment interview. Bayesian modelling demonstrated moderate evidence of a strong positive impact of training on part A of the Trail Making test (TMT), indicating improved visuo-motor skills. Moderate evidence for negative impacts of training on part B of the Trail Making Test (and difference score delta) was also found, suggesting no benefit of cognitive switching. Qualitative results revealed that the group learning environment motivated participants to play in musical ensembles and to socialize. Motivation was optimal when all participants were happy with the chosen repertoire (participants reported they were motivated by learning to play familiar music) and when the facilitator observed that groups had formed cohesive bonds. Informed by these factors, exploratory analyses demonstrated strong evidence that a participants lesson class had an impact on post-test scores (TMT part A). These results not only demonstrate the extent of cognitive benefits of a short-term piano training intervention for older adults, but also the importance of considering the group dynamics in the learning environment.

  • 3.
    Marshall, Andrew G.
    et al.
    Univ Liverpool, England; Liverpool John Moores Univ, England; Walton Ctr NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Sharma, Manohar L.
    Walton Ctr NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Marley, Kate
    Aintree Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Aintree Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    McGlone, Francis P.
    Liverpool John Moores Univ, England; Univ Liverpool, England.
    Spinal signalling of C-fiber mediated pleasant touch in humans2019In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 8, article id e51642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    C-tactile afferents form a distinct channel that encodes pleasant tactile stimulation. Prevailing views indicate they project, as with other unmyelinated afferents, in lamina I-spinothalamic pathways. However, we found that spinothalamic ablation in humans, whilst profoundly impairing pain, temperature and itch, had no effect on pleasant touch perception. Only discriminative touch deficits were seen. These findings preclude privileged C-tactile-lamina I-spinothalamic projections and imply integrated hedonic and discriminative spinal processing from the body.

  • 4.
    Ousdal, Olga Therese
    et al.
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Argyelan, Miklos
    Feinstein Inst Med Res, NY USA.
    Narr, Katherine L.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA.
    Abbott, Christopher
    Univ New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Wade, Benjamin
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA.
    Vandenbulcke, Mathieu
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Urretavizcaya, Mikel
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; Univ Barcelona, Spain; Carlos III Hlth Inst, Spain.
    Tendolkar, Indira
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Ctr Cognit Neuroimaging, Netherlands; Univ Duisburg Essen, Germany; Univ Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Takamiya, Akihiro
    Keio Univ, Japan; Komagino Hosp, Japan.
    Stek, Max L.
    Geestelijke GezondheidsZorg InGeest Specialized M, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Soriano-Mas, Carles
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain; Carlos III Hlth Inst, Spain.
    Redlich, Ronny
    Univ Munster, Germany.
    Paulson, Olaf B.
    Rigshosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Oudega, Mardien L.
    Geestelijke GezondheidsZorg InGeest Specialized M, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Opel, Nils
    Univ Munster, Germany; Univ Munster, Germany.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken inkl beroendekliniken.
    Kishimoto, Taishiro
    Keio Univ, Japan.
    Kämpe, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jorgensen, Anders
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Hanson, Lars G.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark; Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Hamilton, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Espinoza, Randall
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA.
    Emsell, Louise
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    van Eijndhoven, Philip
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Ctr Cognit Neuroimaging, Netherlands.
    Dols, Annemieke
    Geestelijke GezondheidsZorg InGeest Specialized M, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Dannlowski, Udo
    Univ Munster, Germany.
    Cardoner, Narcis
    Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain; Carlos III Hlth Inst, Spain; Univ Hosp Parc Tauli I3PT, Spain.
    Bouckaert, Filip
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Anand, Amit
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Bartsch, Hauke
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA; Ctr Multimodal Imaging and Genet, CA USA; Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Kessler, Ute
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Oedegaard, Ketil J.
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Dale, Anders M.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA; Ctr Multimodal Imaging and Genet, CA USA; Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Oltedal, Leif
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Brain Changes Induced by Electroconvulsive Therapy Are Broadly Distributed2020In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 87, no 5, p. 451-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is associated with volumetric enlargements of corticolimbic brain regions. However, the pattern of whole-brain structural alterations following ECT remains unresolved. Here, we examined the longitudinal effects of ECT on global and local variations in gray matter, white matter, and ventricle volumes in patients with major depressive disorder as well as predictors of ECT-related clinical response. METHODS: Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging and clinical data from the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) were used to investigate changes in white matter, gray matter, and ventricle volumes before and after ECT in 328 patients experiencing a major depressive episode. In addition, 95 nondepressed control subjects were scanned twice. We performed a mega-analysis of single subject data from 14 independent GEMRIC sites. RESULTS: Volumetric increases occurred in 79 of 84 gray matter regions of interest. In total, the cortical volume increased by mean +/- SD of 1.04 +/- 1.03% (Cohens d = 1.01, p amp;lt; .001) and the subcortical gray matter volume increased by 1.47 +/- 1.05% (d = 1.40, p amp;lt; .001) in patients. The subcortical gray matter increase was negatively associated with total ventricle volume (Spearmans rank correlation rho = -.44, p amp;lt; .001), while total white matter volume remained unchanged (d = -0.05, p = .41). The changes were modulated by number of ECTs and mode of electrode placements. However, the gray matter volumetric enlargements were not associated with clinical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that ECT induces gray matter volumetric increases that are broadly distributed. However, gross volumetric increases of specific anatomically defined regions may not serve as feasible biomarkers of clinical response.

  • 5.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Hanell, H. Erneroth
    Stockholm City Council, Sweden.
    Wadsby, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cocozza, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Validation of the Systemic Clinical Outcome and Routine Evaluation (SCORE-15) self-report questionnaire: index of family functioning and change in Swedish families2020In: Journal of Family Therapy, ISSN 0163-4445, E-ISSN 1467-6427, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 129-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Instruments for evaluating the progress and outcome of systemic therapeutic treatments in clinical practice need to be easily administered and have sound psychometric properties. The Systemic Clinical Outcome and Routine Evaluation, 15-item version (SCORE-15), is a self-report instrument that measures aspects of family functioning. This study investigates the psychometric qualities of a Swedish version of SCORE-15. Seventy Swedish families with healthy children and 159 families with children with psychiatric or behavioural problems were included in the study, resulting in a total of 397 individuals. Results showed that SCORE-15 differentiated clinical from non-clinical families with acceptable psychometric properties for test-retest, internal consistency, convergent and construct validity, as well as sensitivity to change for the clinical sample. The three-factor solution of strengths, difficulties and communication was tested. Results imply preliminary psychometric support for the use of the Swedish version of SCORE-15 to evaluate progress and outcome in clinical practice. Practitioner points SCORE-15 is an easily administered questionnaire suitable for use in clinical practice to evaluate systemic therapeutic progress and outcome The Swedish version of SCORE-15 has acceptable psychometric properties

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf