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  • 1.
    Abrikossova, Natalia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Investigation of nanoparticle-cell interactions for development of next generation of biocompatible MRI contrast agents2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Progress in synthesis technologies and advances in fundamental understanding of materials with low dimensionality has led to the birth of a new scientific field, nanoscience, and to strong expectations of multiple applications of nanomaterials. The physical properties of small particles are unique, bridging the gap between atoms and molecules, on one side, and bulk materials on the other side. The work presented in this thesis investigates the potential of using magnetic nanoparticles as the next generation of contrast agents for biomedical imaging. The focus is on gadolinium-based nanoparticles and cellular activity including the uptake, morphology and production of reactive oxygen species.

    Gd ion complexes, like Gd chelates, are used today in the clinic, world-wide. However, there is a need for novel agents, with improved contrast capabilities and increased biocompatibility. One avenue in their design is based on crystalline nanoparticles. It allows to reduce the total number of Gd ions needed for an examination. This can be done by nanotechnology, which allows one to improve and fine tune the physico- chemical properties on the nanomaterial in use, and to increase the number of Gd atoms at a specific site that interact with protons and thereby locally increase the signal. In the present work, synthesis, purification and surface modification of crystalline Gd2O3-based nanoparticles have been performed. The nanoparticles are selected on the basis of their physical properties, that is they show enhanced magnetic properties and therefore may be of high potential interest for applications as contrast agents.

    The main synthesis method of Gd2O3 nanoparticles in this work was the modified “polyol” route, followed by purification of as-synthesized DEG-Gd2O3 nanoparticles suspensions. In most cases the purification step involved dialysis of the nanoparticle samples. In this thesis, organosilane were chosen as an exchange agent for further functionalization. Moreover, several paths have been explored for modification of the nanoparticles, including Tb3+ doping and capping with sorbitol.

    Biocompatibility of the newly designed nanoparticles is a prerequisite for their use in medical applications. Its evaluation is a complex process involving a wide range of biological phenomena. A promising path adopted in this work is to study of nanoparticle interactions with isolated blood cells. In this way one could screen nanomaterial prior to animal studies.

    The primary cell type considered in the thesis are polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) which represent a type of the cells of human blood belonging to the granulocyte family of leukocytes. PMNs act as the first defense of the immune system against invading pathogens, which makes them valuable for studies of biocompatibility of newly synthesized nanoparticles. In addition, an immortalized murine alveolar macrophage cell line (MH-S), THP-1 cell line, and Ba/F3 murine bone marrow-derived cell line were considered to investigate the optimization of the cell uptake and to examine the potential of new intracellular contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging.

    In paper I, the nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as potential probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence from human neutrophils was studied in presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In paper II, a new design of functionalized ultra-small rare earth-based nanoparticles was reported. The synthesis was done using polyol method followed by PEGylation, and dialysis. Supersmall gadolinium oxide (DEG-Gd2O3) nanoparticles, in the range of 3-5 nm were obtained and carefully characterized. Neutrophil activation after exposure to this nanomaterial was studied by means of fluorescence microscopy. In paper III, cell labeling with Gd2O3 nanoparticles in hematopoietic cells was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In paper IV, ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles doped with terbium ions were synthesized as a potentially bifunctional material with both fluorescent and magnetic contrast agent properties. Paramagnetic behavior was studied. MRI contrast enhancement was received, and the luminescent/ fluorescent property of the particles was attributable to the Tb3+ ion located on the crystal lattice of the Gd2O3 host. Fluorescent labeling of living cells was obtained. In manuscript V, neutrophil granulocytes were investigated with rapid cell signaling communicative processes in time frame of minutes, and their response to cerium-oxide based nanoparticles were monitored using capacitive sensors based on Lab-on-a-chip technology. This showed the potential of label free method used to measure oxidative stress of neutrophil granulocytes. In manuscript VI, investigations of cell-(DEGGd2O3) nanoparticle interactions were carried out. Plain (DEG-Gd2O3) nanoparticles, (DEG-Gd2O3) nanoparticles in presence of sorbitol and (DEG-Gd2O3) nanoparticles capped with sorbitol were studied. Relaxation studies and measurements of the reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils were based on chemiluminescence. Cell morphology was evaluated as a parameter of the nanoparticle induced inflammatory response by means of the fluorescence microscopy.

    The thesis demonstrates high potential of novel Gd2O3-based nanoparticles for development of the next generation contrast agents, that is to find biocompatible compounds with high relaxivity that can be detected at lower doses, and in the future enable targeting to provide great local contrast.

    List of papers
    1. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes
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    2012 (English)In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, E-ISSN 1361-6528, Vol. 23, no 27, p. 275101-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd2O3 nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institute of Physics, 2012
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79667 (URN)10.1088/0957-4484/23/27/275101 (DOI)000305802000001 ()
    Available from: 2012-08-14 Created: 2012-08-13 Last updated: 2018-11-12
    2. Synthesis and Characterization of PEGylated Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for MRI Contrast Enhancement
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Synthesis and Characterization of PEGylated Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for MRI Contrast Enhancement
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    2010 (English)In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 5753-5762Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, much attention has been given to the development of biofunctionalized nanoparticles with magnetic properties for novel biomedical imaging. Guided, smart, targeting nanoparticulate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents inducing high MRI signal will be valuable tools for future tissue specific imaging and investigation of molecular and cellular events. In this study, we report a new design of functionalized ultrasmall rare earth based nanoparticles to be used as a positive contrast agent in MRI. The relaxivity is compared to commercially available Gd based chelates. The synthesis, PEGylation, and dialysis of small (3−5 nm) gadolinium oxide (DEG-Gd2O3) nanoparticles are presented. The chemical and physical properties of the nanomaterial were investigated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Neutrophil activation after exposure to this nanomaterial was studied by means of fluorescence microscopy. The proton relaxation times as a function of dialysis time and functionalization were measured at 1.5 T. A capping procedure introducing stabilizing properties was designed and verified, and the dialysis effects were evaluated. A higher proton relaxivity was obtained for as-synthesized diethylene glycol (DEG)-Gd2O3 nanoparticles compared to commercial Gd-DTPA. A slight decrease of the relaxivity for as-synthesized DEG-Gd2O3 nanoparticles as a function of dialysis time was observed. The results for functionalized nanoparticles showed a considerable relaxivity increase for particles dialyzed extensively with r1 and r2 values approximately 4 times the corresponding values for Gd-DTPA. The microscopy study showed that PEGylated nanoparticles do not activate neutrophils in contrast to uncapped Gd2O3. Finally, the nanoparticles are equipped with Rhodamine to show that our PEGylated nanoparticles are available for further coupling chemistry, and thus prepared for targeting purposes. The long term goal is to design a powerful, directed contrast agent for MRI examinations with specific targeting possibilities and with properties inducing local contrast, that is, an extremely high MR signal at the cellular and molecular level.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Chemical Society (ACS), 2010
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54946 (URN)10.1021/la903566y (DOI)000276562300061 ()
    Available from: 2010-04-23 Created: 2010-04-23 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
    3. Gd2O3 nanoparticles in hematopoietic cells for MRI contrast enhancement
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gd2O3 nanoparticles in hematopoietic cells for MRI contrast enhancement
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    2011 (English)In: International journal of nano medicine, ISSN 1178-2013, Vol. 6, p. 3233-3240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    As the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) broadens, the importance of having specific and efficient contrast agents increases and in recent time there has been a huge development in the fields of molecular imaging and intracellular markers. Previous studies have shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles generate higher relaxivity than currently available Gd chelates: In addition, the Gd2O3 nanoparticles have promising properties for MRI cell tracking. The aim of the present work was to study cell labeling with Gd2O3 nanoparticles in hematopoietic cells and to improve techniques for monitoring hematopoietic stem cell migration by MRI. Particle uptake was studied in two cell lines: the hematopoietic progenitor cell line Ba/F3 and the monocytic cell line THP-1. Cells were incubated with Gd2O3 nanoparticles and it was investigated whether the transfection agent protamine sulfate increased the particle uptake. Treated cells were examined by electron microscopy and MRI, and analyzed for particle content by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry. Results showed that particles were intracellular, however, sparsely in Ba/F3. The relaxation times were shortened with increasing particle concentration. Relaxivities, r1 and r2 at 1.5 T and 21°C, for Gd2O3 nanoparticles in different cell samples were 3.6–5.3 s-1 mM-1 and 9.6–17.2 s-1 mM-1, respectively. Protamine sulfate treatment increased the uptake in both Ba/F3 cells and THP-1 cells. However, the increased uptake did not increase the relaxation rate for THP-1 as for Ba/F3, probably due to aggregation and/or saturation effects. Viability of treated cells was not significantly decreased and thus, it was concluded that the use of Gd2O3 nanoparticles is suitable for this type of cell labeling by means of detecting and monitoring hematopoietic cells. In conclusion, Gd2O3 nanoparticles are a promising material to achieve positive intracellular MRI contrast; however, further particle development needs to be performed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Manchester, UK: Dove Medical Press Ltd, 2011
    Keywords
    gadolinium oxide, magnetic resonance imaging, contrast agent, cell labeling, Ba/F3 cells, THP-1 cells
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-72275 (URN)10.2147/IJN.S23940 (DOI)000298164300001 ()
    Note

    funding agencies|Swedish Research Council| 621-2007-3810 621-2009-5148 521-2009-3423 |VINNOVA| 2009-00194 |Center in Nanoscience and Technology at LiTH (CeNano)||

    Available from: 2011-11-24 Created: 2011-11-24 Last updated: 2018-10-29
    4. Synthesis and Characterization of Tb3+-Doped Gd2O3 Nanocrystals: A Bifunctional Material with Combined Fluorescent Labeling and MRI Contrast Agent Properties
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Synthesis and Characterization of Tb3+-Doped Gd2O3 Nanocrystals: A Bifunctional Material with Combined Fluorescent Labeling and MRI Contrast Agent Properties
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    2009 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 113, no 17, p. 6913-6920Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles doped with terbium ions were synthesized by the polyol route and characterized as a potentially bifunctional material with both fluorescent and magnetic contrast agent properties. The structural, optical, and magnetic properties of the organic-acid-capped and PEGylated Gd2O3:Tb3+ nanocrystals were studied by HR-TEM, XPS, EDX, IR, PL, and SQUID. The luminescent/fluorescent property of the particles is attributable to the Tb3+ ion located on the crystal lattice of the Gd2O3 host. The paramagnetic behavior of the particles is discussed. Pilot studies investigating the capability of the nanoparticles for fluorescent labeling of living cells and as a MRI contrast agent were also performed. Cells of two cell lines (THP-1 cells and fibroblasts) were incubated with the particles, and intracellular particle distribution was visualized by confocal microscopy. The MRI relaxivity of the PEGylated nanoparticles in water at low Gd concentration was assessed showing a higher T-1 relaxation rate compared to conventional Gd-DTPA chelates and comparable to that of undoped Gd2O3 nanoparticles.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12944 (URN)10.1021/jp808708m (DOI)000265529700009 ()
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Submitted

    Available from: 2008-02-21 Created: 2008-02-21 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Abrikossova, Natalia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Torbjorn
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes2012In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, E-ISSN 1361-6528, Vol. 23, no 27, p. 275101-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd2O3 nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  • 3.
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Metal Oxide Nanoparticles for Contrast Enhancement in Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Synthesis, Functionalization and Characterization2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis work focuses on the design and production of nanoparticle based contrast agents for signal enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three different synthesis routes are explored, primarily to produce crystalline gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles, and surface modification is done to obtain stable, dispersible, biocompatible probes inducing high proton relaxivities.

    In Paper I and II we utilized the polyol synthesis method and nanoparticle purification was performed with dialysis. Active surface functionalization was achieved by an innermost layer of 3-mercaptopropyl trimetoxy silanes (MPTS) and an outer layer of bifunctional PEG. Surface capping was shown to greatly affect the water proton relaxation to a degree which is strongly dependent on the purification time. PEGylation also induced stabilizing effects and the ability to provide the nanoparticles with luminescent properties was proven by linking the fluorescent dye Rhodamine to the bifunctional PEG.

    In Paper III the magnetic behavior of yttrium (Y) alloyed Gd2O3 nanoparticles was investigated as a function of Y concentration. This was done by performing magnetic measurements and by studying the signal line width in electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy for Gd2O3, Y2O3 and a series of (GdxY1-x)2O3 samples produced using the combustion synthesis. The results verified that the signal line width is dependent on the percent of yttrium dilution. This is considered as an indication of that yttrium dilution changes the electron spin relaxation time in Gd2O3.

    Paper IV and V present a novel precipitation synthesis method for Gd2O3 nanoparticles. Acetate molecular groups were found to coordinate the nanoparticle surface increasing the water dispersability. The Gd2O3 nanoparticles induce a twice as high relaxivity per gadolinium atom, as compared to the commercially available contrast agent Magnevist. Incorporation of luminescent europium (Eu3+) ions into the Gd2O3 nanoparticles in combination with surface modification with a fluorescent branched carboxyl terminated TEG, produced dual probes with tunable luminescence, maintained relaxivity and thus a bright contrast in MRI.

    In Paper VI, a new approach to accomplish a dual probe was investigated. Luminescent ZnO nanoparticles decorated with Gd ions bound in an organic matrix were evaluated for MR signal enhancement and ability to function as fluorescent probes. Interestingly, these nanoprobes did show an enhanced capability to both strengthen the MR signal and increase the fluorescent quantum yield, as compared to the pure oxides.

    In Paper VII we investigate sub 5 nm crystalline manganese based nanoparticles produced by the precipitation synthesis used for Gd2O3 nanoparticles. Manganese oxide was chosen as another candidate for MRI contrast enhancement as it is expected to have a straight forward surface coupling chemistry. Characterization of the crystal structure and chemical composition indicated nanoparticles with a MnO core and presence of manganese species of higher valences at the nanoparticle surface. The MnO nanomaterial showed a superparamagnetic behavior and less capability to increase the MR signal as compared to Gd2O3.

    Characterization of the nanoparticle crystal structure and size is, throughout the work, performed by means of transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and dynamic light scattering. The chemical composition is studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and the fluorescence characteristics are evaluated with fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, theoretical models and calculated IR spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy data have been used for evaluation of experimental results.

    To conclude, the aim of this work is the design, production and characterization of ultrasmall rare earth based nanoparticles for signal enhancement in biomedical imaging. Surface modification clearly increases the colloidal stability and biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. Compared to the agents in clinical use today, these nanoprobes have a higher capability to enhance the MR-signal, and they will in the near future be equipped with tags for specific targeting.

    List of papers
    1. Positive MRI Enhancement in THP-1 Cells with Gd2O3 Nanoparticles
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Positive MRI Enhancement in THP-1 Cells with Gd2O3 Nanoparticles
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    2008 (English)In: Contrast Media and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1555-4309, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 106-111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    There is a demand for more efficient and tissue-specific MRI contrast agents and recent developments involve the design of substances useful as molecular markers and magnetic tracers. In this study, nanoparticles of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) have been investigated for cell labeling and capacity to generate a positive contrast. THP-1, a monocytic cell line that is phagocytic, was used and results were compared with relaxivity of particles in cell culture medium (RPMI 1640). The results showed that Gd2O3-labeled cells have shorter T1 and T2 relaxation times compared with untreated cells. A prominent difference in signal intensity was observed, indicating that Gd2O3 nanoparticles can be used as a positive contrast agent for cell labeling. The r1 for cell samples was 4.1 and 3.6 s-1 mm-1 for cell culture medium. The r2 was 17.4 and 12.9 s-1 mm-1, respectively. For r1, there was no significant difference in relaxivity between particles in cells compared to particles in cell culture medium, (pr1 = 0.36), but r2 was significantly different for the two different series (pr2 = 0.02). Viability results indicate that THP-1 cells endure treatment with Gd2O3 nanoparticles for an extended period of time and it is therefore concluded that results in this study are based on viable cells.

    Keywords
    gadolinium oxide, nanoparticles, contrast agent, THP-1 cells, magnetic resonance imaging
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12945 (URN)10.1002/cmmi.236 (DOI)000257982000002 ()
    Available from: 2008-02-21 Created: 2008-02-21 Last updated: 2017-09-22Bibliographically approved
    2. Synthesis and Characterization of PEGylated Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for MRI Contrast Enhancement
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Synthesis and Characterization of PEGylated Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for MRI Contrast Enhancement
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 5753-5762Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, much attention has been given to the development of biofunctionalized nanoparticles with magnetic properties for novel biomedical imaging. Guided, smart, targeting nanoparticulate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents inducing high MRI signal will be valuable tools for future tissue specific imaging and investigation of molecular and cellular events. In this study, we report a new design of functionalized ultrasmall rare earth based nanoparticles to be used as a positive contrast agent in MRI. The relaxivity is compared to commercially available Gd based chelates. The synthesis, PEGylation, and dialysis of small (3−5 nm) gadolinium oxide (DEG-Gd2O3) nanoparticles are presented. The chemical and physical properties of the nanomaterial were investigated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Neutrophil activation after exposure to this nanomaterial was studied by means of fluorescence microscopy. The proton relaxation times as a function of dialysis time and functionalization were measured at 1.5 T. A capping procedure introducing stabilizing properties was designed and verified, and the dialysis effects were evaluated. A higher proton relaxivity was obtained for as-synthesized diethylene glycol (DEG)-Gd2O3 nanoparticles compared to commercial Gd-DTPA. A slight decrease of the relaxivity for as-synthesized DEG-Gd2O3 nanoparticles as a function of dialysis time was observed. The results for functionalized nanoparticles showed a considerable relaxivity increase for particles dialyzed extensively with r1 and r2 values approximately 4 times the corresponding values for Gd-DTPA. The microscopy study showed that PEGylated nanoparticles do not activate neutrophils in contrast to uncapped Gd2O3. Finally, the nanoparticles are equipped with Rhodamine to show that our PEGylated nanoparticles are available for further coupling chemistry, and thus prepared for targeting purposes. The long term goal is to design a powerful, directed contrast agent for MRI examinations with specific targeting possibilities and with properties inducing local contrast, that is, an extremely high MR signal at the cellular and molecular level.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Chemical Society (ACS), 2010
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54946 (URN)10.1021/la903566y (DOI)000276562300061 ()
    Available from: 2010-04-23 Created: 2010-04-23 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
    3. Magnetic and Electron Spin Relaxation Properties of (GdxY1-x)2O3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) Nanoparticles Synthesized by the Combustion Method. Increased Electron Spin Relaxation Times with Increasing Yttrium Content
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Magnetic and Electron Spin Relaxation Properties of (GdxY1-x)2O3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) Nanoparticles Synthesized by the Combustion Method. Increased Electron Spin Relaxation Times with Increasing Yttrium Content
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    2011 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 115, no 13, p. 5469-5477Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent (CA) depends on several factors, including the relaxation times of the unpaired electrons in the CA. The electron spin relaxation time may be a key factor for the performance of new CAs, such as nanosized Gd2O3 particles. The aim of this work is, therefore, to study changes in the magnetic susceptibility and the electron spin relaxation time of paramagnetic Gd2O3 nanoparticles diluted with increasing amounts of diamagnetic Y2O3. Nanoparticles of (GdxY1-x)2O3 (0 e x e 1) were prepared by the combustion method and thoroughly characterized (by X-ray di.raction, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetry coupled with mass spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements). Changes in the electron spin relaxation time were estimated by observations of the signal line width in electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and it was found that the line width was dependent on the concentration of yttrium, indicating that diamagnetic Y2O3 may increase the electron spin relaxation time of Gd2O3 nanoparticles.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    United States: American Chemical Society, 2011
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67439 (URN)10.1021/jp111368t (DOI)000288885900036 ()
    Available from: 2011-04-13 Created: 2011-04-12 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    4. A simple polyol-free synthesis route to Gd2O3 nanoparticles for MRI applications: an experimental and theoretical study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A simple polyol-free synthesis route to Gd2O3 nanoparticles for MRI applications: an experimental and theoretical study
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    2012 (English)In: Journal of nanoparticle research, ISSN 1388-0764, E-ISSN 1572-896X, Vol. 14, no 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Chelated gadolinium ions, e. g., GdDTPA, are today used clinically as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An attractive alternative contrast agent is composed of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as they have shown to provide enhanced contrast and, in principle, more straightforward molecular capping possibilities. In this study, we report a new, simple, and polyol-free way of synthesizing 4-5-nm-sized Gd2O3 nanoparticles at room temperature, with high stability and water solubility. The nanoparticles induce high-proton relaxivity compared to Gd-DTPA showing r(1) and r(2) values almost as high as those for free Gd3+ ions in water. The Gd2O3 nanoparticles are capped with acetate and carbonate groups, as shown with infrared spectroscopy, near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and combined thermogravimetric and mass spectroscopy analysis. Interpretation of infrared spectroscopy data is corroborated by extensive quantum chemical calculations. This nanomaterial is easily prepared and has promising properties to function as a core in a future contrast agent for MRI.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Verlag (Germany), 2012
    Keywords
    Gadolinium oxide, Synthesis, Relaxivity, XPS, IR, Toxicity
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81505 (URN)10.1007/s11051-012-1006-2 (DOI)000307273400028 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|VINNOVA|2008-03011|Centre in Nanoscience and Technology at LiTH (CeNano)||Swedish research council|621-2010-5014|SERC (Swedish e-Science Research Center)||

    Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2012-09-18 Last updated: 2017-12-07
    5. Highly Water-Dispersible Surface-Modified Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for Potential Dual-Modal Bioimaging
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Highly Water-Dispersible Surface-Modified Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for Potential Dual-Modal Bioimaging
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    2013 (English)In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 19, no 38, p. 12658-12667Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Water-dispersible and luminescent gadolinium oxide (GO) nanoparticles (NPs) were designed and synthesized for potential dual-modal biological imaging. They were obtained by capping gadolinium oxide nanoparticles with a fluorescent glycol-based conjugated carboxylate (HL). The obtained nanoparticles (GO-L) show long-term colloidal stability and intense blue fluorescence. In addition, L can sensitize the luminescence of europium(III) through the so-called antenna effect. Thus, to extend the spectral ranges of emission, europium was introduced into L-modified gadolinium oxide nanoparticles. The obtained Eu-III-doped particles (Eu:GO-L) can provide visible red emission, which is more intensive than that without L capping. The average diameter of the monodisperse modified oxide cores is about 4nm. The average hydrodynamic diameter of the L-modified nanoparticles was estimated to be about 13nm. The nanoparticles show effective longitudinal water proton relaxivity. The relaxivity values obtained for GO-L and Eu:GO-L were r(1)=6.4 and 6.3s(-1)mM(-1) with r(2)/r(1) ratios close to unity at 1.4T. Longitudinal proton relaxivities of these nanoparticles are higher than those of positive contrast agents based on gadolinium complexes such as Gd-DOTA, which are commonly used for clinical magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, these particles are suitable for cellular imaging and show good biocompatibility.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2013
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-98690 (URN)10.1002/chem.201301687 (DOI)000324316300018 ()
    Available from: 2013-10-11 Created: 2013-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    6. Bifunctional gadolinium decorated ZnO nanocrystals integrating both enhanced MR signal and bright fluorescence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bifunctional gadolinium decorated ZnO nanocrystals integrating both enhanced MR signal and bright fluorescence
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    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gadolinium decorated ZnO nanoparticles simultaneously possess both fluorescent and MR enhancement properties. These ZnO nanoparticles are crystalline and shielded by an amorphous gadolinium acetate matrix. Interestingly, the Gd-acetate decoration enhances the fluorescence emission of the ZnO nanoparticles. The quantum yield does increase for samples with high Gd/Zn relative ratios and these samples do also show a higher colloidal stability.

    In addition, these nanoparticles show an enhanced relaxivity value per Gd atom (r119.9mM1s-1) compared to results earlier reported both on Gd alloyed ZnO nanoparticles and pure Gd2O3 nanoparticles. This improvement is considered to be due to the close proximity of Gd atoms and surrounding water molecules. A comprehensive study of the quantum yield and the relaxivity, as a function of composition, enable us to identify the ultimate design/composition of gadolinium decorated ZnO nanoparticles for optimum fluorescence and MR enhancement properties.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91847 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-05-03 Created: 2013-05-03 Last updated: 2015-05-29Bibliographically approved
    7. One-step synthesis of sub 5 nm sized manganese oxide based nanoparticles
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>One-step synthesis of sub 5 nm sized manganese oxide based nanoparticles
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    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sub 5 nm sized manganese oxide nanoparticles; MnOx (1 ≤ x ≤ 2), were synthesized via a short time room temperature synthesis route. The nanoparticles are crystalline, spherically shaped and in the size range of 2-4 nm as shown by transmission electron microscopy studies. Selected area electron diffraction patterns were collected and their appearance indicated that the nanoparticle cores are composed of MnO. Also, co-existence of the (II) and (III) oxidation states at the nanoparticle surface was verified by results achieved from infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These measurements also supported presence of a minor amount of acetate groups as well as a negligible fraction of carbonate groups at the nanoparticle surfaces. The interpretation of the IR spectra was confirmed by quantum chemical calculations using the high spin manganese nanoparticle Mn12O12(OAc)16(H2O)4, as a model system for the MnOx nanoparticle surface. Bulk MnO and Mn2O3 are known to be antiferromagnetic. The magnetic properties are however somewhat dependent of the crystallite size and changes when scaling down to the nanoregion. The MnOx (1 ≤ x ≤ 2) nanoparticles investigated in this work show a superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of approximately 12 K proven by means of SQUID measurements. The relaxivities of the nanoparticles and the Mn(OAc)2 precursors were studied with a bench top NMR analyzer verifying nanoparticle r1 and r2 of 0.5 and 6 mMs-1 respectively. The r1 relaxivity is lower than what is earlier reported for Gd based contrast agent, but improvements are expected by further surface modification, due to increased rotational time and higher water dispersability.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-98692 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-10-11 Created: 2013-10-11 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved
  • 4.
    Ahrén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selegård, Linnéa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Klasson, Anna
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abrikossova, Natalia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Synthesis and Characterization of PEGylated Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for MRI Contrast Enhancement2010In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 5753-5762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, much attention has been given to the development of biofunctionalized nanoparticles with magnetic properties for novel biomedical imaging. Guided, smart, targeting nanoparticulate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents inducing high MRI signal will be valuable tools for future tissue specific imaging and investigation of molecular and cellular events. In this study, we report a new design of functionalized ultrasmall rare earth based nanoparticles to be used as a positive contrast agent in MRI. The relaxivity is compared to commercially available Gd based chelates. The synthesis, PEGylation, and dialysis of small (3−5 nm) gadolinium oxide (DEG-Gd2O3) nanoparticles are presented. The chemical and physical properties of the nanomaterial were investigated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Neutrophil activation after exposure to this nanomaterial was studied by means of fluorescence microscopy. The proton relaxation times as a function of dialysis time and functionalization were measured at 1.5 T. A capping procedure introducing stabilizing properties was designed and verified, and the dialysis effects were evaluated. A higher proton relaxivity was obtained for as-synthesized diethylene glycol (DEG)-Gd2O3 nanoparticles compared to commercial Gd-DTPA. A slight decrease of the relaxivity for as-synthesized DEG-Gd2O3 nanoparticles as a function of dialysis time was observed. The results for functionalized nanoparticles showed a considerable relaxivity increase for particles dialyzed extensively with r1 and r2 values approximately 4 times the corresponding values for Gd-DTPA. The microscopy study showed that PEGylated nanoparticles do not activate neutrophils in contrast to uncapped Gd2O3. Finally, the nanoparticles are equipped with Rhodamine to show that our PEGylated nanoparticles are available for further coupling chemistry, and thus prepared for targeting purposes. The long term goal is to design a powerful, directed contrast agent for MRI examinations with specific targeting possibilities and with properties inducing local contrast, that is, an extremely high MR signal at the cellular and molecular level.

  • 5.
    Ahrén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Selegård, Linnéa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kauczor, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Norman, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A simple polyol-free synthesis route to Gd2O3 nanoparticles for MRI applications: an experimental and theoretical study2012In: Journal of nanoparticle research, ISSN 1388-0764, E-ISSN 1572-896X, Vol. 14, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chelated gadolinium ions, e. g., GdDTPA, are today used clinically as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An attractive alternative contrast agent is composed of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as they have shown to provide enhanced contrast and, in principle, more straightforward molecular capping possibilities. In this study, we report a new, simple, and polyol-free way of synthesizing 4-5-nm-sized Gd2O3 nanoparticles at room temperature, with high stability and water solubility. The nanoparticles induce high-proton relaxivity compared to Gd-DTPA showing r(1) and r(2) values almost as high as those for free Gd3+ ions in water. The Gd2O3 nanoparticles are capped with acetate and carbonate groups, as shown with infrared spectroscopy, near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and combined thermogravimetric and mass spectroscopy analysis. Interpretation of infrared spectroscopy data is corroborated by extensive quantum chemical calculations. This nanomaterial is easily prepared and has promising properties to function as a core in a future contrast agent for MRI.

  • 6.
    Ahrén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nordblad, Per
    Division of Solid State Physics, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Norman, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    One-step synthesis of sub 5 nm sized manganese oxide based nanoparticles2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sub 5 nm sized manganese oxide nanoparticles; MnOx (1 ≤ x ≤ 2), were synthesized via a short time room temperature synthesis route. The nanoparticles are crystalline, spherically shaped and in the size range of 2-4 nm as shown by transmission electron microscopy studies. Selected area electron diffraction patterns were collected and their appearance indicated that the nanoparticle cores are composed of MnO. Also, co-existence of the (II) and (III) oxidation states at the nanoparticle surface was verified by results achieved from infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These measurements also supported presence of a minor amount of acetate groups as well as a negligible fraction of carbonate groups at the nanoparticle surfaces. The interpretation of the IR spectra was confirmed by quantum chemical calculations using the high spin manganese nanoparticle Mn12O12(OAc)16(H2O)4, as a model system for the MnOx nanoparticle surface. Bulk MnO and Mn2O3 are known to be antiferromagnetic. The magnetic properties are however somewhat dependent of the crystallite size and changes when scaling down to the nanoregion. The MnOx (1 ≤ x ≤ 2) nanoparticles investigated in this work show a superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of approximately 12 K proven by means of SQUID measurements. The relaxivities of the nanoparticles and the Mn(OAc)2 precursors were studied with a bench top NMR analyzer verifying nanoparticle r1 and r2 of 0.5 and 6 mMs-1 respectively. The r1 relaxivity is lower than what is earlier reported for Gd based contrast agent, but improvements are expected by further surface modification, due to increased rotational time and higher water dispersability.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Viktor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Preparation of amyloidlike fibrils containing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Effect of protein aggregation on proton relaxivity2012In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 419, no 4, p. 682-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method to prepare amyloid-like fibrils functionalized with magnetic nanoparticles has been developed. The amyloid-like fibrils are prepared in a two step procedure, where insulin and magnetic nanoparticles are mixed simply by grinding in the solid state, resulting in a water soluble hybrid material. When the hybrid material is heated in aqueous acid, the insulin/nanoparticle hybrid material self assembles to form amyloid-like fibrils incorporating the magnetic nanoparticles. This results in magnetically labeled amyloid-like fibrils which has been characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and electron tomography. The influence of the aggregation process on proton relaxivity is investigated. The prepared materials have potential uses in a range of bio-imaging applications.

  • 8.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Petoral Jr, Rodrigo M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for investigations on ion permeation in ?-functionalized self-assembled monolayers2007In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 79, no 21, p. 8391-8398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was employed to explore the possibility of relating the permeation of electrolyte ions in ?-functionalized self-assembled monolayers to structural or polarity changes induced by interaction with metal ions. The monolayers were based on alkanethiols modified with a phosphorylated tyrosine analogue, which from previous work are known to drastically change their organization on gold surfaces upon interaction with aluminum and magnesium ions. The ion permeation was evaluated by using relatively low excitation frequencies, 1000 to 2 Hz, and quantified by an extra resistive component in the equivalent circuit (R SAM). The extent of ion permeation influenced by the dc potential, the electrolyte concentration, the functional group, and the thiol length were also investigated. It was, for example, found that RSAM decreased ~20% when the thiol organization collapsed and that RSAM increased ~4-5 times when the electrolyte concentration was decreased by 1 order of magnitude. Interesting observations were also made regarding the potential dependence of RSAM and the double layer capacitance. The evaluation of the ion permeation can be used to indirectly detect whether the organization of a SAM is influenced by, for example, electric fields or chemical and biological interactions. This analysis can be performed without addition of redox species, but is on the other hand complicated by the fact that other factors also influence the presence of ions within the monolayer. In addition, a second parallel RC process was obtained in some of the impedance spectra when using even lower frequencies, and its resistive component revealed different results compared to RSAM. Such data may be useful for the understanding of complex double layer phenomena at modified electrodes. © 2007 American Chemical Society.

  • 9.
    Cui, Yang
    et al.
    University of Science and Technology China, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Sheng
    Huaibei Normal University, Peoples R China.
    Wei, Kaiju
    University of Science and Technology China, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yangzhong
    University of Science and Technology China, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnetic solid-phase extraction of trace-level mercury(II) ions using magnetic core-shell nanoparticles modified with thiourea-derived chelating agents2015In: Microchimica Acta, ISSN 0026-3672, E-ISSN 1436-5073, Vol. 182, no 7-8, p. 1337-1344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a method for magnetic solid phase extraction of trace-levels of Hg(II) ions by using Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) covered with a shell of silica and modified with the chelator N-(2-acetylaminoethyl)-N-(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)thiourea. The new magnetic NPs enable rapid magnetic separation, thus leading to higher efficiency and accuracy. The extracted Hg(II) ions on the NPs were directly quantified using a mercury analyzer. Possible interferents are widely eliminated in this highly selective extraction process, and the NPs are not exerting an interfering effect either. The method has an enrichment factor of 100, and extraction recoveries are between 95 and 107 % when using 10 mg of the extracting NPs. The method works over a wide range of pH values and can be applied to even complex natural samples. The effects of pH value, extraction time, sample volume and adsorbent amount on the extraction efficiency were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit is as low as 17 ng L-1. The method was applied to the preconcentration and detection of Hg(II) in three natural water samples using the standard addition method.

  • 10.
    Ding, Aixiang
    et al.
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Longmei
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Yuyang
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Gaobin
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Kong, Lin
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tian, Yupeng
    Anhui University, Peoples R China; Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Tao, Xutang
    Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Jiaxiang
    Anhui University, Peoples R China; Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Complex-Formation-Enhanced Fluorescence Quenching Effect for Efficient Detection of Picric Acid2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 38, p. 12215-12222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amine-functionalized alpha-cyanostilbene derivatives (Z)-2-(4-aminophenyl)-3-(4-butoxyphenyl) acrylonitrile (ABA) and (Z)-3-(4-butoxyphenyl)-2-[4-(butylamino) phenyl] acrylonitrile (BBA) were designed for specific recognition of picric acid (PA), an environmental and biological pollutant. The 1:1 host-guest complexes formed between the chemosensors and PA enhanced fluorescence quenching, thus leading to sensitive and selective detection in aqueous media and the solid phase.

  • 11.
    Dullin, Christian
    et al.
    University of Medical Centre Gottingen, Germany.
    dal Monego, Simeone
    Cluster Biomed, Italy.
    Larsson, Emanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy; University of Trieste, Italy.
    Mohammadi, Sara
    Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy.
    Krenkel, Martin
    University of Gottingen, Germany.
    Garrovo, Chiara
    IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Italy.
    Biffi, Stefania
    IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Italy.
    Lorenzon, Andrea
    Cluster Biomed, Italy.
    Markus, Andrea
    University of Medical Centre Gottingen, Germany.
    Napp, Joanna
    University of Medical Centre Gottingen, Germany; University of Medical Centre Gottingen, Germany; Max Planck Institute Expt Med, Germany.
    Salditt, Tim
    University of Gottingen, Germany.
    Accardo, Agostino
    University of Trieste, Italy.
    Alves, Frauke
    University of Medical Centre Gottingen, Germany; University of Medical Centre Gottingen, Germany; Max Planck Institute Expt Med, Germany.
    Tromba, Giuliana
    Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy.
    Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples2015In: Journal of Synchrotron Radiation, ISSN 0909-0495, E-ISSN 1600-5775, Vol. 22, p. 143-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functionalized computed tomography (CT) in combination with labelled cells is virtually non-existent due to the limited sensitivity of X-ray-absorption-based imaging, but would be highly desirable to realise cell tracking studies in entire organisms. In this study we applied in-line free propagation X-ray phase-contrast CT (XPCT) in an allergic asthma mouse model to assess structural changes as well as the biodistribution of barium-labelled macrophages in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophages that were barium-sulfate-loaded and fluorescent-labelled were instilled intratracheally into asthmatic and control mice. Mice were sacrificed after 24 h, lungs were kept in situ, inflated with air and scanned utilizing XPCT at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra Synchrotron Light Source, Italy). Single-distance phase retrieval was used to generate data sets with ten times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than absorption-based CT (in our setup), thus allowing to depict and quantify structural hallmarks of asthmatic lungs such as reduced air volume, obstruction of airways and increased soft-tissue content. Furthermore, we found a higher concentration as well as a specific accumulation of the barium-labelled macrophages in asthmatic lung tissue. It is believe that XPCT will be beneficial in preclinical asthma research for both the assessment of therapeutic response as well as the analysis of the role of the recruitment of macrophages to inflammatory sites.

  • 12.
    Dullin, Christian
    et al.
    University of Medical Centre Goettingen, Germany.
    Larsson, Emanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy; University of Trieste, Italy.
    Tromba, Giuliana
    Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy.
    Markus, Andrea M.
    University of Medical Centre Goettingen, Germany.
    Alves, Frauke
    University of Medical Centre Goettingen, Germany; University of Medical Centre Goettingen, Germany; Max Planck Institute Expt Med, Germany.
    Phase-contrast computed tomography for quantification of structural changes in lungs of asthma mouse models of different severity2015In: Journal of Synchrotron Radiation, ISSN 0909-0495, E-ISSN 1600-5775, Vol. 22, p. 1106-1111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lung imaging in mouse disease models is crucial for the assessment of the severity of airway disease but remains challenging due to the small size and the high porosity of the organ. Synchrotron inline free-propagation phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) with its intrinsic high soft-tissue contrast provides the necessary sensitivity and spatial resolution to analyse the mouse lung structure in great detail. Here, this technique has been applied in combination with single-distance phase retrieval to quantify alterations of the lung structure in experimental asthma mouse models of different severity. In order to mimic an in vivo situation as close as possible, the lungs were inflated with air at a constant physiological pressure. Entire mice were embedded in agarose gel and imaged using inline free-propagation phase-contrast CT at the SYRMEP beamline (Synchrotron Light Source, Elettra, Trieste, Italy). The quantification of the obtained phase-contrast CT data sets revealed an increasing lung soft-tissue content in mice correlating with the degree of the severity of experimental allergic airways disease. In this way, it was possible to successfully discriminate between healthy controls and mice with either mild or severe allergic airway disease. It is believed that this approach may have the potential to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies that target airway remodelling processes in asthma.

  • 13.
    Eriksson, Jens
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Puglisi, Donatella
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strandqvist, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Graphensic AB Linköping, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekeroth, Sebastian
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ivanov, Ivan Gueorguiev
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Helmersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Graphensic AB Linköping, Sweden.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Modified Epitaxial Graphene on SiC for Extremely Sensitive andSelective Gas Sensors2016In: Materials Science Forum, ISSN 0255-5476, E-ISSN 1662-9752, Vol. 858, p. 1145-1148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two-dimensional materials offer a unique platform for sensing where extremely high sensitivity is a priority, since even minimal chemical interaction causes noticeable changes inelectrical conductivity, which can be used for the sensor readout. However, the sensitivity has to becomplemented with selectivity, and, for many applications, improved response- and recovery times are needed. This has been addressed, for example, by combining graphene (for sensitivity) with metal/oxides (for selectivity) nanoparticles (NP). On the other hand, functionalization or modification of the graphene often results in poor reproducibility. In this study, we investigate thegas sensing performance of epitaxial graphene on SiC (EG/SiC) decorated with nanostructured metallic layers as well as metal-oxide nanoparticles deposited using scalable thin-film depositiontechniques, like hollow-cathode pulsed plasma sputtering. Under the right modification conditions the electronic properties of the surface remain those of graphene, while the surface chemistry can betuned to improve sensitivity, selectivity and speed of response to several gases relevant for airquality monitoring and control, such as nitrogen dioxide, benzene, and formaldehyde.

  • 14.
    Eriksson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tal, Alexey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skallberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brommesson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Boyd, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Olovsson, Weine
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fairley, Neal
    Casa Software Ltd, Bay House, Teignmouth, United Kingdom.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Modeling and Development Laboratory, National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Moscow, Russia.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macau, SAR, China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cerium oxide nanoparticles with antioxidant capabilities and gadolinium integration for MRI contrast enhancement2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 6999Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chelating gadolinium-complex is routinely used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) -contrast enhancer. However, several safety issues have recently been reported by FDA and PRAC. There is an urgent need for the next generation of safer MRI-contrast enhancers, with improved local contrast and targeting capabilities. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) are designed with fractions of up to 50% gadolinium to utilize the superior MRI-contrast properties of gadolinium. CeNPs are well-tolerated in vivo and have redox properties making them suitable for biomedical applications, for example scavenging purposes on the tissue-and cellular level and during tumor treatment to reduce in vivo inflammatory processes. Our near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) studies show that implementation of gadolinium changes the initial co-existence of oxidation states Ce3+ and Ce4+ of cerium, thereby affecting the scavenging properties of the nanoparticles. Based on ab initio electronic structure calculations, we describe the most prominent spectral features for the respective oxidation states. The as-prepared gadolinium-implemented CeNPs are 3-5 nm in size, have r(1)-relaxivities between 7-13 mM(-1) s(-1) and show clear antioxidative properties, all of which means they are promising theranostic agents for use in future biomedical applications.

  • 15.
    Fortin, Marc-André
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petoral Jr, Rodrigo M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klasson, Anna
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Veres, Teodor
    National Research Council of Canada (CNRC-IMI) 75, Boucherville, QC, Canada.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Polyethylene glycol-cover ultra-small Gd2O3 nanoparticles for positive contras at 1.5 T magnetic resonance clinical scanning2007In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, Vol. 18, no 39, p. 395501-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The size distribution and magnetic properties of ultra-small gadolinium oxide crystals (US-Gd2O3) were studied, and the impact of polyethylene glycol capping on the relaxivity constants (r1, r2) and signal intensity with this contrast agent was investigated. Size distribution and magnetic properties of US-Gd2O3 nanocrystals were measured with a TEM and PPMS magnetometer. For relaxation studies, diethylene glycol (DEG)-capped US-Gd2O3 nanocrystals were reacted with PEG-silane (MW 5000). Suspensions were adequately dialyzed in water to eliminate traces of Gd3+ and surfactants. The particle hydrodynamic radius was measured with dynamic light scattering (DLS) and the proton relaxation times were measured with a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Parallel studies were performed with DEG–Gd2O3 and PEG-silane–SPGO (Gd2O3,< 40 nm diameter). The small and narrow size distribution of US-Gd2O3 was confirmed with TEM (~3 nm) and DLS. PEG-silane–US-Gd2O3 relaxation parameters were twice as high as for Gd–DTPA and the r2/r1 ratio was 1.4. PEG-silane–SPGO gave low r1 relaxivities and high r2/r1 ratios, less compatible with positive contrast agent requirements. Higher r1 were obtained with PEG-silane in comparison to DEG–Gd2O3. Treatment of DEG–US-Gd2O3 with PEG-silane provides enhanced relaxivity while preventing aggregation of the oxide cores. This study confirms that PEG-covered Gd2O3 nanoparticles can be used for positively contrasted MR applications requiring stability, biocompatible coatings and nanocrystal functionalization.

  • 16.
    Fursatz, Marian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skog, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. S2Med AB, Linnegatan 9, SE-58225 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sivlér, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. S2Med AB, Linnegatan 9, SE-58225 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Palm, Eleonor
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Aronsson, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skallberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khalaf, Hazem
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Torbjorn
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Functionalization of bacterial cellulose wound dressings with the antimicrobial peptide epsilon-poly-L-Lysine2018In: Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1748-6041, E-ISSN 1748-605X, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 025014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wound dressings based on bacterial cellulose (BC) can form a soft and conformable protective layer that can stimulate wound healing while preventing bacteria from entering the wound. Bacteria already present in the wound can, however, thrive in the moist environment created by the BC dressing which can aggravate the healing process. Possibilities to render the BC antimicrobial without affecting the beneficial structural and mechanical properties of the material would hence be highly attractive. Here we present methods for functionalization of BC with epsilon-poly-L-Lysine (epsilon-PLL), a non-toxic biopolymer with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Low molecular weight epsilon-PLL was crosslinked in pristine BC membranes and to carboxymethyl cellulose functionalized BC using carbodiimide chemistry. The functionalization of BC with epsilon-PLL inhibited growth of S. epidermidis on the membranes but did not affect the cytocompatibility to cultured human fibroblasts as compared to native BC. The functionalization had no significant effects on the nanofibrous structure and mechanical properties of the BC. The possibility to functionalize BC with epsilon-PLL is a promising, green and versatile approach to improve the performance of BC in wound care and other biomedical applications.

  • 17.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Córdoba Gallego, José M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nordblad, Per
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Westlund, Per-Olof
    Umeå Universitet.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnetic and Electron Spin Relaxation Properties of (GdxY1-x)2O3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) Nanoparticles Synthesized by the Combustion Method. Increased Electron Spin Relaxation Times with Increasing Yttrium Content2011In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 115, no 13, p. 5469-5477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent (CA) depends on several factors, including the relaxation times of the unpaired electrons in the CA. The electron spin relaxation time may be a key factor for the performance of new CAs, such as nanosized Gd2O3 particles. The aim of this work is, therefore, to study changes in the magnetic susceptibility and the electron spin relaxation time of paramagnetic Gd2O3 nanoparticles diluted with increasing amounts of diamagnetic Y2O3. Nanoparticles of (GdxY1-x)2O3 (0 e x e 1) were prepared by the combustion method and thoroughly characterized (by X-ray di.raction, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetry coupled with mass spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements). Changes in the electron spin relaxation time were estimated by observations of the signal line width in electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and it was found that the line width was dependent on the concentration of yttrium, indicating that diamagnetic Y2O3 may increase the electron spin relaxation time of Gd2O3 nanoparticles.

  • 18.
    Hedlund, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Abrikossova, Natalia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Warntjes, Marcel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jönsson, Jan-Ivar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical and Physiological Chemistry.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gd2O3 nanoparticles in hematopoietic cells for MRI contrast enhancement2011In: International journal of nano medicine, ISSN 1178-2013, Vol. 6, p. 3233-3240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) broadens, the importance of having specific and efficient contrast agents increases and in recent time there has been a huge development in the fields of molecular imaging and intracellular markers. Previous studies have shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles generate higher relaxivity than currently available Gd chelates: In addition, the Gd2O3 nanoparticles have promising properties for MRI cell tracking. The aim of the present work was to study cell labeling with Gd2O3 nanoparticles in hematopoietic cells and to improve techniques for monitoring hematopoietic stem cell migration by MRI. Particle uptake was studied in two cell lines: the hematopoietic progenitor cell line Ba/F3 and the monocytic cell line THP-1. Cells were incubated with Gd2O3 nanoparticles and it was investigated whether the transfection agent protamine sulfate increased the particle uptake. Treated cells were examined by electron microscopy and MRI, and analyzed for particle content by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry. Results showed that particles were intracellular, however, sparsely in Ba/F3. The relaxation times were shortened with increasing particle concentration. Relaxivities, r1 and r2 at 1.5 T and 21°C, for Gd2O3 nanoparticles in different cell samples were 3.6–5.3 s-1 mM-1 and 9.6–17.2 s-1 mM-1, respectively. Protamine sulfate treatment increased the uptake in both Ba/F3 cells and THP-1 cells. However, the increased uptake did not increase the relaxation rate for THP-1 as for Ba/F3, probably due to aggregation and/or saturation effects. Viability of treated cells was not significantly decreased and thus, it was concluded that the use of Gd2O3 nanoparticles is suitable for this type of cell labeling by means of detecting and monitoring hematopoietic cells. In conclusion, Gd2O3 nanoparticles are a promising material to achieve positive intracellular MRI contrast; however, further particle development needs to be performed.

  • 19.
    Hu, Jiwen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Shanghai University, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Zhiwen
    Shanghai University, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Hong-Wen
    Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A logic gate-based fluorogenic probe for Hg2+ detection and its applications in cellular imaging2016In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 919, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new colorimetric and fluorogenic probe (RN3) based on rhodamine-B has been successfully designed and synthesized. It displays a selective response to Hg2+ in the aqueous buffer solution over the other competing metals. Upon addition of Hg2+, the solution of RN3 exhibits a naked eye observable color change from colorless to red and an intensive fluorescence with about 105-fold enhancement. The changes in the color and fluorescence are ascribed to the ring-opening of spirolactam in rhodamine fluorophore, which is induced by a binding of the constructed receptor to Hg2+ with the association and dissociation constants of 0.22 x 10(5) M-1 and 25.2 mM, respectively. The Jobs plot experiment determines a 1: 1 binding stoichiometry between RN3 and Hg2+. The resultant "turn-on" fluorescence in buffer solution, allows the application of a method to determine Hg2+ levels in the range of 4.0-15.0 mu M, with the limit of detection (LOD) calculated at 60.7 nM (3 sigma/slope). In addition, the fluorescence turn-off and color fading-out happen to the mixture of RN3-Hg2+ by further addition of I- or S2-. The reversible switching cycles of fluorescence intensity upon alternate additions of Hg2+ and S2- demonstrate that RN3 can perform as an INHIBIT logic gate. Furthermore, the potential of RN3 as a fluorescent probe has been demonstrated for cellular imaging. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 20.
    Hu, Jiwen
    et al.
    Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    Cui, Yang
    Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gao, Hong-Wen
    Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A rhodamine-based fluorescent probe for Hg2+ and its application for biological visualization2014In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 203, p. 452-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new visible light excitable fluorescent probe (1) is synthesized by appending a hydroxymethyl-pyridine to rhodamine B hydrazide. The probe displays very specific Hg2+-induced colour change and fluorescent enhancement in the aqueous systems. The "turn-on" response of fluorescence is based on a binding-induced ring-opening process from the spirolactam (nonfluorescent) to acyclic xanthene (fluorescent) in rhodamine B. The coordinating atoms O-center dot-N-N-O-center dot from the hydroxymethyl-pyridine and rhodamine B hydrazide play dominant role in the formation of a complex with 1:1 stoichiometry of Hg2+ to 1. It exhibits a linear response in the range of 0.1-5 mu M with the limit of detection (LOD) of 15.7 nM (3 sigma/slope), while the calculated value of the association constant of Hg2+/1 is 0.70 x 10(5) M-1. Furthermore, confocal microscopy imaging experiment demonstrates the probe 1 can be applied as a fluorescent probe for visualization of Hg2+ in living HeLa cells.

  • 21.
    Hu, Jiwen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Sheng
    Huaibei Normal University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Qiong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gao, Hong-Wen
    Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A new ratiometric fluorescent chemodosimeter based on an ICT modulation for the detection of Hg2+2016In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 230, p. 639-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We design and synthesize a new ratiometric fluorescent chemodosimeter (S1) for the selective and sensitive detection of Hg2+. Upon addition of Hg2+, the emission of the S1 exhibits a large bathochromic shift from 393 to 515 nm (up to 122 nm) which is ascribed to an intramolecular charge transfer process in the resultant. The Hg2+-induced dethioacetalization for sensing mechanism has been demonstrated by using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the sensing process. The interference experiments further demonstrate that S1 exhibits very high selectivity towards Hg2+ over other coexisting cations/anions. Subsequently, a good linearity of the concentrations of Hg2+ (0-15 mu M) vs the ratiometric signals (I-515/I-393) allows a fluorogenic method for the quantitative detection of Hg2+, with the limitation of detection determined to be 5.22 x 10(-7) M. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Hu, Jiwen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Shanghai Univ, Peoples R China.
    Liu, TingTing
    Tongji Univ, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Hong-Wen
    Tongji Univ, Peoples R China.
    Lu, Senlin
    Shanghai Univ, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Shanghai Univ, Peoples R China.
    Selective detections of Hg2+ and F- by using tailor-made fluorogenic probes2018In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 269, p. 368-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By ingeniously using a (imino)coumarin-precursor, three reactive fluorogenic probes of MP, FP, and FMP have been fabricated in a single facile synthetic route. MP and FP are able to respectively act as selective "turn-on" fluorescent probes for detecting Hg2+ and F- in buffer solution via specific analyte-induced reactions. Linear ranges for the detection of Hg2+ and F- are 0-10 mu M and 0-100 mu M with the limits of detection (LODs) of 4.0 x 10(-8) M and 1.14 x 10(-6) M (3 delta/slope), respectively. FMP is able to work as a molecular "AND" logic gate-based fluorogenic probe for monitoring the coexistence of Hg2+ and F- via a multistep reaction cascade. The analytes-induced sensing mechanisms have been determined by using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis (HPLC). In addition, three probes show negligible toxicity under the experimental conditions, and are successfully used for monitoring Hg2+ and F- in living cells with good cell permeability. The success of the work demonstrates that ingenious utility of specific analyte-induced reactions and conventional concepts on the appropriate molecular scaffold can definitely deliver tailor-made probes for various intended sensing purposes. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-05-05 01:20
  • 23.
    Hu, Zhangjun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Selegård, Linnéa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Highly Water-Dispersible Surface-Modified Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for Potential Dual-Modal Bioimaging2013In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 19, no 38, p. 12658-12667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water-dispersible and luminescent gadolinium oxide (GO) nanoparticles (NPs) were designed and synthesized for potential dual-modal biological imaging. They were obtained by capping gadolinium oxide nanoparticles with a fluorescent glycol-based conjugated carboxylate (HL). The obtained nanoparticles (GO-L) show long-term colloidal stability and intense blue fluorescence. In addition, L can sensitize the luminescence of europium(III) through the so-called antenna effect. Thus, to extend the spectral ranges of emission, europium was introduced into L-modified gadolinium oxide nanoparticles. The obtained Eu-III-doped particles (Eu:GO-L) can provide visible red emission, which is more intensive than that without L capping. The average diameter of the monodisperse modified oxide cores is about 4nm. The average hydrodynamic diameter of the L-modified nanoparticles was estimated to be about 13nm. The nanoparticles show effective longitudinal water proton relaxivity. The relaxivity values obtained for GO-L and Eu:GO-L were r(1)=6.4 and 6.3s(-1)mM(-1) with r(2)/r(1) ratios close to unity at 1.4T. Longitudinal proton relaxivities of these nanoparticles are higher than those of positive contrast agents based on gadolinium complexes such as Gd-DOTA, which are commonly used for clinical magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, these particles are suitable for cellular imaging and show good biocompatibility.

  • 24.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Tongji University, Shanghai, China .
    Hu, Jiwen
    Tongji University, Shanghai, China .
    Cui, Yang
    Tongji University, Shanghai, China .
    Wang, Guannan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gao, Hong-Wen
    Tongji University, Shanghai, China .
    A facile "click" reaction to fabricate a FRET-based ratiometric fluorescent Cu2+ probe2014In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 2, no 28, p. 4467-4472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A facile one-step Cu(I)-catalyzed "click" reaction, between a dansyl-azide and a propargyl-substituted rhodamine B hydrazide, is employed to fabricate a novel FRET ratiometric "off-on" fluorescent probe. The sensitive emission of the donor, a dansyl group, overlaps perfectly with the absorption of the acceptor, xanthene in the open-ring rhodamine. The proposed probe shows high selectivity towards Cu2+. The ratio of emission intensities at 568 and 540 nm (I-568/I-540) exhibits a drastic 28-fold enhancement upon addition of Cu2+. The probe shows an excellent linear relationship between emission ratios and the concentrations of Cu2+ from 10 to 50 mu M, with a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.12 mu M. The preliminary cellular studies demonstrated that the probe is cell membrane permeable and could be applied for ratiometric fluorescence imaging of intracellular Cu2+ with almost no cytotoxicity. The ingenuity of the probe design is to construct a FRET donor-acceptor interconnector and a selective receptor simultaneously by "click" reaction. The strategy was verified to have great potential for developing novel FRET probes for Cu2+.

  • 25.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hu, Jiwen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Hui
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Qiong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhao, Meng
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Brommesson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tian, Yupeng
    Anhui University, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Hongwen
    Tongji University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Macau, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A TPA-caged precursor of (imino)coumarin for "turn-on" fluorogenic detection of Cu+2016In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 933, p. 189-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We strategize to utilize the precursors of (imino) coumarin fluorophores to deliver novel reactive Cu+ probes, where tris[(2-pyridyl)-methyl] amine (TPA) works as a reactive receptor towards Cu+. To verify this strategy, CP1, a representative probe and relevant sensing behaviors towards Cu+ are presented here. CP1 features good solubility and fast response for monitoring labile copper in aqueous solution and live cells. The sensing mechanism of CP1 is determined by HPLC titration and mass spectrometric analysis. The probe CP1 exhibits a 60-fold fluorescence enhancement and a detection limitation of 10.8 nM upon the detection of Cu+. CP1 is further applied for imaging labile copper in live cells. This work provides a starting point for future development of Cu+ probes, based on in situ formation of (imino) coumarin scaffolds, as well as their further investigations of copper signaling and biological events. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yang, Guanqing
    Anhui Univ, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Jiwen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Hui
    Anhui Univ, Peoples R China.
    Eriksson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Ruilong
    Anhui Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Zhongping
    Anhui Univ, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Real-time visualizing the regulation of reactive oxygen species on Zn2+ release in cellular lysosome by a specific fluorescent probe2018In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 264, p. 419-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulating the release of free zinc ions (Zn2+) in cellular lysosome is closely related to various pathways of cellular signal transduction, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Directly visualizing Zn2+ release in lysosome is essential for in-depth understanding these physiological processes, and is still an atelic challenge. In this work, we successfully fabricate a lysosome-specific Zn2+ fluorescent probe and achieve the visualization of ROS-induced Zn2+ release in lysosome of inflammatory cells. The as-prepared probe combines a green fluorophore, an ionophore with five-dentate sites, and a morpholine as the lysosome-specific localization moiety. The fluorescence of the fluorophore in the free probe is suppressed by a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process from nitrogen atoms in the ionophore. Upon the addition of Zn2+, the fluorescence can be promoted immediately, achieving the real-time detection. Meanwhile, the probe is sensitive and selective to Zn2+, which provides the capability to detect low-concentration of free Zn2+ in lysosomes. Accordingly, the Zn2+ release was clearly observed in lysosome with the increase of ROS levels when the inflammation occurred in living cells. (c) 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-03-07 12:11
  • 27.
    Kanungo, J
    et al.
    Jadavpur University.
    Maji, S
    Jadavpur University.
    K Mandal, A
    CSIR.
    Sen, S
    CSIR.
    Bontempi, E
    University of Brescia.
    Balamurugan, A K
    Indira Gandhi Centre for Atom Research.
    Tyagi, A K
    Indira Gandhi Centre for Atom Research.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sinha, S
    University of New Haven.
    Saha, H
    Jadavpur University.
    Basu, S
    Jadavpur University.
    Surface treatment of nanoporous silicon with noble metal ions and characterizations2010In: APPLIED SURFACE SCIENCE, ISSN 0169-4332, Vol. 256, no 13, p. 4231-4240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A very large surface to volume ratio of nanoporous silicon (PS) produces a high density of surface states, which are responsible for uncontrolled oxidation of the PS surface. Hence it disturbs the stability of the material and also creates difficulties in the formation of a reliable electrical contact. To passivate the surface states of the nanoporous silicon, noble metals (Pd, Ru, and Pt) were dispersed on the PS surface by an electroless chemical method. GIXRD (glancing incidence X-ray diffraction) proved the crystallinity of PS and the presence of noble metals on its surface. While FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy) showed the morphology, the EDX (energy dispersive X-ray) line scans and digital X-ray image mapping indicated the formation of the noble metal islands on the PS surface. Dynamic SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy) further confirmed the presence of noble metals and other impurities near the surface of the modified PS. The variation of the surface roughness after the noble metal modification was exhibited by AFM (atomic force microscopy). The formation of a thin oxide layer on the modified PS surface was verified by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy).

  • 28.
    Kanungo, J
    et al.
    Jadavpur University.
    Selegård, Linnéa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Saha, H
    Jadavpur University.
    Basu, S
    Jadavpur University.
    XPS study of palladium sensitized nano porous silicon thin film2010In: BULLETIN OF MATERIALS SCIENCE, ISSN 0250-4707, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 647-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nano porous silicon (PS) was formed on p-type monocrystalline silicon of 2-5 Omega cm resistivity and (100) orientation by electrochemical anodization method using HF and ethanol as the electrolytes. High density of surface states, arising due to its nano structure, is responsible for the uncontrolled oxidation in air and for the deterioration of the PS surface with time. To stabilize the material PS surface was modified by a simple and low cost chemical method using PdCl2 solution at room temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was performed to reveal the chemical composition and the relative concentration of palladium on the nanoporous silicon thin films. An increase of SiO2 formation was observed after PdCl2 treatment and presence of palladium was also detected on the modified surface. I-V characteristics of Al/PS junction were studied using two lateral Al contacts and a linear relationship was obtained for Pd modified PS surface. Stability of the contact was studied for a time period of around 30 days and no significant ageing effect could be observed.

  • 29.
    Karlsson, Helen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Work and Environmental Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ljungman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry in studies of nanoparticle-protein interactions2012In: Gel electrophoresis-Advanced Techniques / [ed] Sameh Magdeldin, Rijeka, Croatia: In Tech , 2012, p. 1-32Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the years a number of epidemiological studies have shown that PM from combustion sources such as motor vehicles contributes to respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Especially so do the ultra-fine particles (UFPs) with a diameter less than 0.1 micrometer.UFPs from combustion engines are capable to translocate over the alveolar–capillary barrier.  When nano-sized PM (nanoparticles, NP), which are small enough to enter the blood stream, do so they are likely to interact with plasma proteins and this protein-NP interaction will probably affect the fate of and the effects caused by the NPs in the human body. Here, by using a proteomic approach, we present results showing that several proteins indeed are associated to NPs that have in vitro been introduced to human blood plasma.

  • 30.
    Kilpijarvi, Joni
    et al.
    Univ Oulu, Finland.
    Halonen, Niina
    Univ Oulu, Finland.
    Sobocinski, Maciej
    Univ Oulu, Finland.
    Hassinen, Antti
    Univ Oulu, Finland.
    Senevirathna, Bathiya
    Univ Maryland, MD 20742 USA.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abshire, Pamela
    Univ Maryland, MD 20742 USA.
    Smela, Elisabeth
    Univ Maryland, MD 20742 USA.
    Kellokumpu, Sakari
    Univ Oulu, Finland.
    Juuti, Jari
    Univ Oulu, Finland.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    LTCC Packaged Ring Oscillator Based Sensor for Evaluation of Cell Proliferation2018In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 18, no 10, article id 3346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) chip biosensor was developed for cell viability monitoring based on an array of capacitance sensors utilizing a ring oscillator. The chip was packaged in a low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) module with a flip chip bonding technique. A microcontroller operates the chip, while the whole measurement system was controlled by PC. The developed biosensor was applied for measurement of the proliferation stage of adherent cells where the sensor response depends on the ratio between healthy, viable and multiplying cells, which adhere onto the chip surface, and necrotic or apoptotic cells, which detach from the chip surface. This change in cellular adhesion caused a change in the effective permittivity in the vicinity of the sensor element, which was sensed as a change in oscillation frequency of the ring oscillator. The sensor was tested with human lung epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) during cell addition, proliferation and migration, and finally detachment induced by trypsin protease treatment. The difference in sensor response with and without cells was measured as a frequency shift in the scale of 1.1 MHz from the base frequency of 57.2 MHz. Moreover, the number of cells in the sensor vicinity was directly proportional to the frequency shift.

  • 31.
    Klarstrom Engstrom, Kristin
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kälvegren, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bengtsson, Torbjoern
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Toll like receptor 2/1 mediated platelet adhesion and activation on bacterial mimetic surfaces is dependent on src/Syk-signaling and purinergic receptor P2X1 and P2Y12 activation2014In: BIOINTERPHASES, ISSN 1934-8630, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 041003-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platelets are considered to have important functions in inflammatory processes as key players in innate immunity. Toll like receptors (TLRs), expressed on platelets, recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns and trigger immune responses. Pathogens are able to adhere to human tissues and form biofilms which cause a continuous activation of the immune system. The authors aimed to investigate how immobilized Pam(3)CSK(4) (a synthetic TLR2/1 agonist) and IgG, respectively, resembling a bacterial focus, affects adhesion and activation of platelets including release of two cytokines, regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). The authors also aim to clarify the signaling downstream of TLR2/1 and Fc gamma RII (IgG receptor) and the role of adenine nucleotides in this process. Biolayers of Pam(3)CSK(4) and IgG, respectively, were confirmed by null-ellipsometry and contact angle measurements. Platelets were preincubated with signaling inhibitors for scr and Syk and antagonists for P2X1 or P2Y1 [adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptors] prior to addition to the surfaces. The authors show that platelets adhere and spread on both Pam(3)CSK(4)- and IgG-coated surfaces and that this process is antagonized by scr and Syc inhibitors as well as P2X1 and P2Y antagonists. This suggests that Pam(3)CSK(4) activated platelets utilize the same pathway as Fc gamma RII. Moreover, the authors show that ATP-ligation of P2X1 is of importance for further platelet activation after TLR2/1-activation, and that P2Y12 is the prominent ADP-receptor involved in adhesion and spreading. RANTES and MIF were secreted over time from platelets adhering to the coated surfaces, but no MIF was released upon stimulation with soluble Pam(3)CSK(4). These results clarify the importance of TLR2/1 and Fc gamma RII in platelet adhesion and activation, and strengthen the role of platelets as an active player in sensing bacterial infections. (C) 2014 American Vacuum Society.

  • 32.
    Klasson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hellqvist, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Positive MRI Enhancement in THP-1 Cells with Gd2O3 Nanoparticles2008In: Contrast Media and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1555-4309, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 106-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a demand for more efficient and tissue-specific MRI contrast agents and recent developments involve the design of substances useful as molecular markers and magnetic tracers. In this study, nanoparticles of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) have been investigated for cell labeling and capacity to generate a positive contrast. THP-1, a monocytic cell line that is phagocytic, was used and results were compared with relaxivity of particles in cell culture medium (RPMI 1640). The results showed that Gd2O3-labeled cells have shorter T1 and T2 relaxation times compared with untreated cells. A prominent difference in signal intensity was observed, indicating that Gd2O3 nanoparticles can be used as a positive contrast agent for cell labeling. The r1 for cell samples was 4.1 and 3.6 s-1 mm-1 for cell culture medium. The r2 was 17.4 and 12.9 s-1 mm-1, respectively. For r1, there was no significant difference in relaxivity between particles in cells compared to particles in cell culture medium, (pr1 = 0.36), but r2 was significantly different for the two different series (pr2 = 0.02). Viability results indicate that THP-1 cells endure treatment with Gd2O3 nanoparticles for an extended period of time and it is therefore concluded that results in this study are based on viable cells.

  • 33.
    Larsson, Emanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Evaluation of the Dual-Modal usage of contrast agents by means of Synchrotron X-ray Computed Microtomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging using Macrophages loaded with Barium Sulfate and Gadolinium Nanoparticles for Detection and Monitoring in Animal Disease Models2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ¨This thesis focuses on evaluating the dual-modal Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) capabilities of contrast agents. For such purposes a gadolinium based contrast agent is of high interest, due to its paramagnetic properties, which while present inside a magnetic field will hence interact with the protons spins of water (in tissue and fat) and shorten their the T1 relaxation time, thereby creating a positive image contrast in MRI. Furthermore, the X-ray Mass Attenuation Coefficient (MAC) of gadolinium is relatively high, thus suggesting its potential use, also as a CT contrast agent.

    Gadolinium nanoparticles (GdNPs) can be loaded into cells, such as macrophages, which offers the possibility to track cells inside entire organisms. In the first step the uptake of GdNPs inside cells was investigated, together with a test for toxicity. To show the potential of using GdNP loaded macrophages for functional imaging of inflammation, an acute allergic airway inflammation mouse model (mimicking asthma in humans) was used and analyzed by in-situ synchrotron phase contrast CT. In the first step this approach was evaluated using macrophages loaded with a clinical contrast agent containing barium sulphate (BaSO4), since this agent is known to provide high contrast in CT. In the ultimate step a combination of both BaSO4 and GdNP loaded macrophages was used in the same asthmatic mouse model and analyzed by dual modal Synchrotron phase contrast CT and Micro Magnetic Resonance Imaging (μ-MRI).

    Complementary results in terms of the biodistribution of injected macrophages could only be obtained by the combination of both synchrotron phase contrast CT and μ-MRI, where the first modality allows a detailed localization of clustered BaSO4 loaded macrophages, but fails to detect single macrophages, which could instead be indirectly observed by μ-MRI as an increase of the T1-contrast, coming from the soft tissue of mice injected with GdNP loaded macrophages.

    List of papers
    1. Quantitative evaluation of a single-distance phase-retrieval method applied on in-line phase-contrast images of a mouse lung
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantitative evaluation of a single-distance phase-retrieval method applied on in-line phase-contrast images of a mouse lung
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Synchrotron Radiation, ISSN 0909-0495, E-ISSN 1600-5775, Vol. 21, p. 784-789Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PBI) has already proven its potential in a great variety of soft-tissue-related applications including lung imaging. However, the strong edge enhancement, caused by the phase effects, often hampers image segmentation and therefore the quantitative analysis of data sets. Here, the benefits of applying single-distance phase retrieval prior to the three-dimensional reconstruction (PhR) are discussed and quantified compared with three-dimensional reconstructions of conventional PBI data sets in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and preservation of image features. The PhR data sets show more than a tenfold higher CNR and only minor blurring of the edges when compared with PBI in a predominately absorption-based set-up. Accordingly, phase retrieval increases the sensitivity and provides more functionality in computed tomography imaging.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
    Keywords
    computed tomography; phase-contrast imaging; phase retrieval; lung imaging
    National Category
    Physical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109252 (URN)10.1107/S1600577514009333 (DOI)000338124300019 ()24971975 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-08-12 Created: 2014-08-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Synchrotron Radiation, ISSN 0909-0495, E-ISSN 1600-5775, Vol. 22, p. 143-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Functionalized computed tomography (CT) in combination with labelled cells is virtually non-existent due to the limited sensitivity of X-ray-absorption-based imaging, but would be highly desirable to realise cell tracking studies in entire organisms. In this study we applied in-line free propagation X-ray phase-contrast CT (XPCT) in an allergic asthma mouse model to assess structural changes as well as the biodistribution of barium-labelled macrophages in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophages that were barium-sulfate-loaded and fluorescent-labelled were instilled intratracheally into asthmatic and control mice. Mice were sacrificed after 24 h, lungs were kept in situ, inflated with air and scanned utilizing XPCT at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra Synchrotron Light Source, Italy). Single-distance phase retrieval was used to generate data sets with ten times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than absorption-based CT (in our setup), thus allowing to depict and quantify structural hallmarks of asthmatic lungs such as reduced air volume, obstruction of airways and increased soft-tissue content. Furthermore, we found a higher concentration as well as a specific accumulation of the barium-labelled macrophages in asthmatic lung tissue. It is believe that XPCT will be beneficial in preclinical asthma research for both the assessment of therapeutic response as well as the analysis of the role of the recruitment of macrophages to inflammatory sites.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    International Union of Crystallography, 2015
    Keywords
    phase-contrast CT; single-distance phase retrieval; functional CT imaging
    National Category
    Physical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113733 (URN)10.1107/S1600577514021730 (DOI)000346850200022 ()25537601 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|European Commission [230739]; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) [DU 1403/1-1]; EXTREMA COST action [MP1207]

    Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-29 Last updated: 2017-12-05
    3. Quantification of structural alterations in lung disease—a proposed analysis methodology of CT scans of preclinical mouse models and patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantification of structural alterations in lung disease—a proposed analysis methodology of CT scans of preclinical mouse models and patients
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Biomedical Physics & Engineering Express, ISSN 2057-1976, Vol. 1, no 3, article id 035201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we have established a general investigative methodology for quantitative computed tomography (CT) lung image analysis in the sagittal, coronal and transversal orientation of lungs with various lung diseases. Mean values were recorded for the two parameters percentage volume and structural thickness based on stripe shaped volumes of interest (VOIs) from the XY (transversal), YZ (sagittal) and ZX (coronal) orientation, placed out in the left and right lung side. A one-way ANOVA with Tukey–Kramer 90% simultaneous confidence intervals for pair wise comparison of means was performed on each considered parameter, in order to detect any statistically significant differences in between the samples. This methodology was first tested on high resolution synchrotron micro-computed tomography images of a preclinical asthma mouse model, injected with barium sulfate filled alveolar macrophages, with the purpose of marking out asthmatic inflammation sites. Preclinical mouse models are today commonly used as artificial models for studying various human diseases, e.g. asthma. Therefore, in order to translate our methodology protocol also to clinical applications the proposed methodology was also tested on lung data sets of patients, with various lung diseases. The presented general methodology was proven to be successful for the quantification of lung structural differences in an asthma mouse model, as well as being applicable also on patient lungs with various lung diseases. The outlined analysis protocol was tested on images obtained only by means of CT, but could also potentially be applied on images of the lung obtained by other 3D-imaging techniques.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institute of Physics (IOP), 2015
    Keywords
    lung imaging, asthma mouse model, quantitative image analysis, computed tomography, synchrotron microtomography, phase contrast
    National Category
    Medical Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121940 (URN)10.1088/2057-1976/1/3/035201 (DOI)
    Funder
    EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, GA 230739Swedish Research Council
    Available from: 2015-10-13 Created: 2015-10-13 Last updated: 2015-11-11
    4. Optimization of the loading efficacy for dual-modal CT/MRI macrophage tracking in lungs of an asthma mouse model
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optimization of the loading efficacy for dual-modal CT/MRI macrophage tracking in lungs of an asthma mouse model
    Show others...
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present novel cell uptake methodologies related to the usage of MRI/CT contrast agents for the purpose of performing dual-modal cell tracking with macrophages in both MRI and CT. Two different techniques, namely Synchrotron X-rays microtomography and Micro Magnetic Resonance Imaging were used to investigate the contrast  enhancement, as an effect of the MRI/CT contrast agent cell uptake of mouse alveolar macrophages. Macrophages loaded with the  commercial contrast agent Micropaque® CT, containing barium sulphate (BaSO4) immersed in Sorbitol, showed a much higher contrast enhancement in CT, than an MRI/CT contrast agent based on Gadolinium nanoparticles (GdNPs). The CT contrast of GdNPs (at 5 mM of Gd) could be increased, by immersing the GdNPs in Sorbitol, while still maintaining a positive T1-contrast in MRI. The idea of co-loading macrophages with both BaSO4 and GdNP inside the same cells  presented a valid "trade off" between the optimal contrast in CT vs. MRI etc. It was concluded that while optimizing the cell uptake of contrast agent for cell tracking in MRI/CT, it is important to make a "trade off" between the following 3 parameters, 1) optimal contrast in CT, 2) optimal contrast in MRI and 3) metabolic cell activity, depending on the given application. These cell optimization ideas may be of importance to every field aiming to image an inflammatory disease, based on the utilization of contrast agent loaded macrophages.

    Keywords
    Gd2O3 nanoparticle; Gadolinium oxide; dual-modal MRI/CT contrast agent; barium sulphate; macrophages; cell loading efficacy
    National Category
    Physical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122602 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-11-11 Created: 2015-11-11 Last updated: 2015-11-11Bibliographically approved
    5. Dual-modal CT and MRI functional and anatomical imaging using barium sulphate and gadolinium nanoparticle loaded macrophages in a preclinical asthma mouse model
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dual-modal CT and MRI functional and anatomical imaging using barium sulphate and gadolinium nanoparticle loaded macrophages in a preclinical asthma mouse model
    Show others...
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives In this study we investigated the potentials of dual-modal CT-MRI macrophage tracking, by a intratracheal instillation of a mixture of either gadolinium nanoparticles or barium sulphate loaded alveolar macrophages into mice of an allergic airway inflammation (asthma) model and their respective healthy control, imaged with Synchrotron X-rays microtomography (SR μCT) and Micro Magnetic Resonance Imaging (μMRI).

    Materials and Methods The mice were scanned ex vivo using SRμCT at 22 keV and with a 9.4 Tesla μMRI scanner. The CT and MRI data sets were registered and fused together, followed by quantitative and statistical analysis.

    Results The asthmatic sample injected with contrast agent loaded macrophages showed high absorbing spots inside the soft-tissue regions of the lung for the CT data set, as well as higher contrast for the soft-tissue in the MRI data set. Furthermore, the correlation analysis showed a perfect negative correlation between the soft tissue mean grey value in CT and the soft tissue mean grey value in MRI.

    Conclusion The dual-modal CT-MRI cell tracking of intratracheally administered macrophages (loaded with contrast agent) in an asthmatic mouse helps to extract synergistic information about the migration  behaviour of macrophages, where clusters of cells were detected in CT, while as a general increase of the soft-tissue contrast could be observed in MRI, due to a homogeneous cell distribution.

    Keywords
    Gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3); alveolar macrophages; asthma; magnetic resonance imaging; Synchrotron X-Ray Computed Microtomography
    National Category
    Physical Sciences Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122603 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-11-11 Created: 2015-11-11 Last updated: 2015-11-11Bibliographically approved
  • 34.
    Larsson, Emanuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture and Engineering, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Trieste, Italy .
    Brun, F.
    Department of Architecture and Engineering, University of of Trieste, Trieste, Italy, Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Trieste, Italy.
    Tromba, G.
    Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Trieste, Italy.
    Cataldi, P.
    Department of Pathological Anatomy, Bassa Friulana, Italy.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Accardo, A.
    Department of Architecture and Engineering, University of of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.
    Morphological characterization of the human calvarium in relation to the diploic and cranial thickness utilizing X-ray computed microtomography2014In: 13th Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing 2013, MEDICON 2013; Seville; Spain; 25 September 2013 through 28 September 2013, Springer, 2014, Vol. 41, p. 194-197Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When attempting to establish accurate models for the human diploe, micro-scale morphological differences in the four main areas of the calvaria could also be considered. In this study, X-ray computed microtomography (μ-CT) images were analyzed in order to quantitatively characterize the micro-architecture of the human calvarium diploe. A bone specimen from each area of the skull (temporal, frontal, parietal and occipital) was extracted from a set of 5 human donors and each specimen was characterized in terms of density, specific surface area, trabecular thickness, trabecular spacing. The obtained results revealed that subject-individual structural differences could be related with the diploic as well as the total cranial thickness of the human skull bones. Some tendencies of dependency could also be made with respect to the age of the subject. A consideration of these individual variations can improve traditional models that assume equal conditions throughout the skull. 

  • 35.
    Larsson, Emanuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy; University of Trieste, Italy.
    Dullin, Christian
    Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Goettingen, Germany.
    Abrikossova, Natalia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brommesson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mikac, Urša
    Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Garrovo, Chiara
    Institute for Maternal and Child Health, IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Trieste, Italy.
    Accardo, Agostino
    Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste, Italy.
    Tromba, Giuliana
    SYRMEP Beamline, Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A, Italy.
    Serša, Igor
    Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Optimization of the loading efficacy for dual-modal CT/MRI macrophage tracking in lungs of an asthma mouse model2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present novel cell uptake methodologies related to the usage of MRI/CT contrast agents for the purpose of performing dual-modal cell tracking with macrophages in both MRI and CT. Two different techniques, namely Synchrotron X-rays microtomography and Micro Magnetic Resonance Imaging were used to investigate the contrast  enhancement, as an effect of the MRI/CT contrast agent cell uptake of mouse alveolar macrophages. Macrophages loaded with the  commercial contrast agent Micropaque® CT, containing barium sulphate (BaSO4) immersed in Sorbitol, showed a much higher contrast enhancement in CT, than an MRI/CT contrast agent based on Gadolinium nanoparticles (GdNPs). The CT contrast of GdNPs (at 5 mM of Gd) could be increased, by immersing the GdNPs in Sorbitol, while still maintaining a positive T1-contrast in MRI. The idea of co-loading macrophages with both BaSO4 and GdNP inside the same cells  presented a valid "trade off" between the optimal contrast in CT vs. MRI etc. It was concluded that while optimizing the cell uptake of contrast agent for cell tracking in MRI/CT, it is important to make a "trade off" between the following 3 parameters, 1) optimal contrast in CT, 2) optimal contrast in MRI and 3) metabolic cell activity, depending on the given application. These cell optimization ideas may be of importance to every field aiming to image an inflammatory disease, based on the utilization of contrast agent loaded macrophages.

  • 36.
    Larsson, Emanuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy; University of Trieste, Italy.
    Dullin, Christian
    Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Goettingen, Germany.
    Abrikossova, Natalia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mikac, Urša
    Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Brommesson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Accardo, Agostino
    Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste, Italy.
    Tromba, Giuliana
    SYRMEP Beamline, Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A, Italy.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Serša, Igor
    Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Dual-modal CT and MRI functional and anatomical imaging using barium sulphate and gadolinium nanoparticle loaded macrophages in a preclinical asthma mouse model2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives In this study we investigated the potentials of dual-modal CT-MRI macrophage tracking, by a intratracheal instillation of a mixture of either gadolinium nanoparticles or barium sulphate loaded alveolar macrophages into mice of an allergic airway inflammation (asthma) model and their respective healthy control, imaged with Synchrotron X-rays microtomography (SR μCT) and Micro Magnetic Resonance Imaging (μMRI).

    Materials and Methods The mice were scanned ex vivo using SRμCT at 22 keV and with a 9.4 Tesla μMRI scanner. The CT and MRI data sets were registered and fused together, followed by quantitative and statistical analysis.

    Results The asthmatic sample injected with contrast agent loaded macrophages showed high absorbing spots inside the soft-tissue regions of the lung for the CT data set, as well as higher contrast for the soft-tissue in the MRI data set. Furthermore, the correlation analysis showed a perfect negative correlation between the soft tissue mean grey value in CT and the soft tissue mean grey value in MRI.

    Conclusion The dual-modal CT-MRI cell tracking of intratracheally administered macrophages (loaded with contrast agent) in an asthmatic mouse helps to extract synergistic information about the migration  behaviour of macrophages, where clusters of cells were detected in CT, while as a general increase of the soft-tissue contrast could be observed in MRI, due to a homogeneous cell distribution.

  • 37.
    Larsson, Emanuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy; University of Trieste, Italy..