liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1234 1 - 50 of 153
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Agebratt, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ström, Edvin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A Randomized Study of the Effects of Additional Fruit and Nuts Consumption on Hepatic Fat Content, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Basal Metabolic Rate2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, p. e0147149-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Fruit has since long been advocated as a healthy source of many nutrients, however, the high content of sugars in fruit might be a concern.

    Objectives

    To study effects of an increased fruit intake compared with similar amount of extra calories from nuts in humans.

    Methods

    Thirty healthy non-obese participants were randomized to either supplement the diet with fruits or nuts, each at +7 kcal/kg bodyweight/day for two months. Major endpoints were change of hepatic fat content (HFC, by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), basal metabolic rate (BMR, with indirect calorimetry) and cardiovascular risk markers.

    Results

    Weight gain was numerically similar in both groups although only statistically significant in the group randomized to nuts (fruit: from 22.15±1.61 kg/m2 to 22.30±1.7 kg/m2, p = 0.24 nuts: from 22.54±2.26 kg/m2 to 22.73±2.28 kg/m2, p = 0.045). On the other hand BMR increased in the nut group only (p = 0.028). Only the nut group reported a net increase of calories (from 2519±721 kcal/day to 2763±595 kcal/day, p = 0.035) according to 3-day food registrations. Despite an almost three-fold reported increased fructose-intake in the fruit group (from 9.1±6.0 gram/day to 25.6±9.6 gram/day, p<0.0001, nuts: from 12.4±5.7 gram/day to 6.5±5.3 gram/day, p = 0.007) there was no change of HFC. The numerical increase in fasting insulin was statistical significant only in the fruit group (from 7.73±3.1 pmol/l to 8.81±2.9 pmol/l, p = 0.018, nuts: from 7.29±2.9 pmol/l to 8.62±3.0 pmol/l, p = 0.14). Levels of vitamin C increased in both groups while α-tocopherol/cholesterol-ratio increased only in the fruit group.

    Conclusions

    Although BMR increased in the nut-group only this was not linked with differences in weight gain between groups which potentially could be explained by the lack of reported net caloric increase in the fruit group. In healthy non-obese individuals an increased fruit intake seems safe from cardiovascular risk perspective, including measurement of HFC by MRI.

  • 2.
    Al-Karkhi, Isam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Al-Rubaiy, Raad
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rosenqvist, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Comparisons of automated blood pressures in a primary health care setting with self-measurements at the office and at home using the Omron i-C10 device2015In: Blood Pressure Monitoring, ISSN 1359-5237, E-ISSN 1473-5725, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to compare blood pressure (BP) levels recorded using the semiautomatic oscillometric Omron i-C10 BP device in patients with or without hypertension in three different settings: (a) when used by a doctor or a nurse at the office (OBP); (b) when used for self-measurement by the patient at the office (SMOBP); and (c) when used for 7 consecutive days at home (HBP).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 247 individuals were invited to participate, but 78 of these individuals declined and a further seven were excluded, leaving a final cohort of 162 participants.

    RESULTS: The mean OBP was higher than HBP (difference 8.1±14/3.1±8.8 mmHg, P<0.0001) and so was SMOBP compared with HBP (difference 7.0±13/4.2±7.3 mmHg, P<0.0001). Sixteen participants (9.9%) had at least 10 mmHg higher systolic SMOBP than OBP and 28 (17%) participants had at least 10 mmHg lower systolic SMOBP than OBP. Participants who were current smokers had a larger mean difference between systolic OBP and SMOBP than nonsmokers (OBP-SMOBP in smokers: 6.6±9.4 mmHg, OBP-SMOBP in nonsmokers: 0.5±9.2 mmHg, P=0.011 between groups).

    CONCLUSION: Self-measurement of BP in the office does not preclude an increase in BP when levels in the individual patients are compared with HBP using the same equipment. Thus, SMOBP with a semiautomatic device does not lead to a reduction in the white-coat effect in the same manner as fully automatic devices.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License, where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0.

  • 3. Anfelter, P
    et al.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Stenström, Hugo
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    The effect of percutaneous dilatation of renal arterial stenosis on captopril renography in hypertension2005In: Blood Pressure, ISSN 0803-7051, E-ISSN 1651-1999, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 359-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The clinical effects of percutaneous transluminal renal artery angioplasty (PTRA) in patients with renal vascular stenosis and hypertension is controversial. Methods. We consecutively recruited all 23 patients referred for evaluation of renovascular hypertension that eventually underwent unilateral PTRA, to be investigated with captopril MAG3 renography (CR), both before and after the endovascular procedure. Data were evaluated on an intention-to-treat basis. Results. We found that the relative MAG3 clearance of the stenotic kidney increased (from 29.9 ± 14% to 35.1 ± 14%, p=0.01) and that the creatinine levels fell following the intervention (from 110 ± 19 to 99 ± 17 μmol/l, p=0.0003). Blood pressure levels were also lowered (from 173 ± 32/93 ± 17 to 158 ± 31/86 ± 15 mmHg, p<0.006) while the mean number of anti-hypertensive drugs was unchanged following PTRA (2.9 ± 1.4 before and 2.8 ± 1.3 drugs after the intervention, respectively, p-0.6). Conclusion. This prospective trial showed statistically significant improvements of individual kidney function as measured by CR and blood pressure in subjects with suspected renovascular hypertension treated with PTRA. Although the endovascular procedure was found to be safe, the magniture of the absolute improvements was rather modest. © 2005 Taylor & Francis.

  • 4.
    Barmano, Neshro
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden,.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kronstrand, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linko¨ping, Sweden.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    The association between alcohol consumption, cardiac biomarkers, left atrial size and re-ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation referred for catheter ablation2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0215121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Information on alcohol consumption in patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of atrial fibrillation (AF) is often limited by the reliance on self-reports. The aim of this study was to describe the long-term alcohol consumption, measured as ethyl glucuronide in hair (hEtG), in patients undergoing RFA due to AF, and to examine potential associations with cardiac biomarkers, left atrial size and re-ablation within one year after the initial RFA.

    Methods

    The amount of hEtG was measured in patients referred for RFA, and a cut-off of 7 pg/mg was used. N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and the mid-regional fragment of pro atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) were examined and maximum left atrium volume index (LAVI) was measured. The number of re-ablations was examined up to one year after the initial RFA. Analyses were stratified by gender, and adjusted for age, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, presence of heart failure and heart rhythm for analyses regarding NT-proBNP, MR-proANP and LAVI and heart rhythm being replaced by type of AF for analyses regarding re-ablation.

    Results

    In total, 192 patients were included in the study. Median (25th– 75th percentile) NT-proBNP in men with hEtG ≥ 7 vs. < 7 pg/mg was 250 (96–695) vs. 130 (49–346) pg/ml (p = 0.010), and in women it was 230 (125–480) vs. 230 (125–910) pg/ml (p = 0.810). Median MR-proANP in men with hEtG ≥ 7 vs. < 7 pg/mg was 142 (100–224) vs. 117 (83–179) pmol/l (p = 0.120) and in women it was 139 (112–206) vs. 153 (93–249) pmol/l (p = 0.965). The median of maximum LAVI was 30.1 (26.7–33.9) vs. 25.8 (21.4–32.0) ml/m2 (p = 0.017) in men, and 25.0 (18.9–29.6) vs. 25.7 (21.7–34.6) ml/m2 (p = 0.438) in women, with hEtG ≥ 7 vs. < 7 pg/ml, respectively. Adjusted analyses showed similar results, except for MR-proANP turning out significant in men with hEtG ≥ 7 vs. < 7 pg/mg (p = 0.047). The odds ratio of having a re-ablation was 3.5 (95% CI 1.3–9.6, p = 0.017) in men with hEtG ≥ 7 vs. < 7 pg/mg, while there was no significant difference in women.

    Conclusions

    In male patients with AF and hEtG ≥ 7 pg/mg, NT-proBNP and MR-proANP were higher, LA volumes larger, and there was a higher rate of re-ablations, as compared to men with hEtG < 7 pg/mg. This implies that men with an alcohol consumption corresponding to an hEtG-value ≥ 7, have a higher risk for LA remodelling that could potentially lead to a deterioration of the AF situation.

  • 5. Berggren, Bosse
    et al.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Cizinsky, Stella
    Universitetssjukhuset Örebro.
    Weiss, Lars
    Centralsjukhuset Karlstad.
    Willenheimer, Ronnie
    Lunds universitet Malmö.
    Slopande av subventioner för viss hypertonibehandling ej genomtänkt2008In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 105, no 35, p. 2345-2346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    [No abstract available]

  • 6.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Maret, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Maret-Ouda, John
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Left ventricular diastolic function, assessed by echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging, is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events, superior to global left ventricular longitudinal strain, in patients with type 2 diabetes.2015In: European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 1000-1007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to determine whether left ventricular systolic function, in terms of global left ventricular longitudinal strain (GLS), and diastolic function, expressed as the ratio between early diastolic transmitral flow and mitral annular motion velocities (E/e'), can predict cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We prospectively investigated 406 consecutive patients, aged 55-65 years, with diabetes mellitus, who participated in the CARDIPP study. Echocardiography, pulse pressure (pp), and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were analysed. Twelve cases of myocardial infarction and seven cases of stroke were identified during the follow-up period of 67 ± 17 months. Univariate Cox regression analysis showed that E/e' was a strong predictor of cardiovascular events (hazards ratio 1.12; 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.18, P < 0.001). E/e' was prospectively associated with cardiovascular events independent of age, sex, GLS, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), pp, and HbA1c in multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that E/e' and HbA1c were the strongest predictors for cardiovascular events, both having an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.71 followed by LVEF with an AUC of 0.65 and GLS of 0.61. In a Kaplan-Meyer analysis, the cumulative probability of an event during the follow-up period was 8.6% for patients with an E/e' ratio >15 compared with 2.6% for patients with E/e' ≤15, P = 0.011.

    CONCLUSION: In middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes, E/e' is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction and stroke, comparable with HbA1c and superior to GLS and LVEF.

  • 7.
    Bojestig, M
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Med & Care, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Karlberg, BE
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Reduction of ACE activity is insufficient to decrease microalbuminuria in normotensive patients with type 1 diabetes2001In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 919-924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE - To study whether administration of 1.25 and 5.0 mg ramipril daily, compared with placebo treatment, reduces the urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) in normotensive patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Ramipril was administered double blind at two different doses(1.25 [n = 19] and 5.0 mg [n = 18]), and compared with placebo [n = 18] after a single-blind placebo period of 1-4 weeks. The patients (total, n = 55, women, n = 14) were followed for 2 years. To document an effect on the renin-angiotensin system, ACE activity and plasma-renin activity (PRA) were measured. In addition, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) was recorded at baseline and repeated after 1 and 2 years using a Spacelab 90207 ambulatory BP recording device (Spacelab, Redmont, CA). RESULTS - Both doses of ramipril were sufficient to reduce ACE activity and to increase PRA significantly as compared with placebo (P < 0.05 for both). On the other hand, neither ambulatory nor clinic BP was affected by either dose of ramipril compared with the placebo group. There was no progression of UAER in the placebo group during the 2 years of the study. Analysis of covariance showed no differences in UAER between the three treatment groups at year 1 (P = 0.94) or year 2 (P = 0.97), after adjusting for baseline. Furthermore, there were no statistically significant changes from baseline UAER within any of the three treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS - Treatment with ramipril did not affect microalbuminuria or clinic or ambulatory BP in this study. On the basis of the present study, we question the clinical use of ACE inhibitors in stably normotensive patients with type 1 diabetes and microalbuminuria in whom a concomitant reduction in BP is not demonstrated.

  • 8. Bojestig, M
    et al.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: endomed.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: endomed.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Karlberg, Bengt E
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: endomed.
    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is suppressed in adults with Type 1 diabetes2000In: jraas. Journal of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, ISSN 1470-3203, E-ISSN 1752-8976, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 353-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poor glycaemic control and high blood pressure are two important risk factors for the development of retinopathy and nephropathy in Type 1 diabetes. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may be involved in this process, since treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors postpones the development of these complications. We investigated whether plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) differed in Type 1 diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. We recruited 80 patients with Type 1 diabetes of more than 10 years' duration and 75 age-matched controls. We found that PRA and Ang II concentrations were significantly lower in patients than in the controls. The levels of ANP, on the other hand, were higher in patients than in controls. PRA correlated negatively to the mean value of HbA1c during the previous five years. PRA and Ang II were significantly lower in patients with mean HbA1c. >8.4% compared with those with mean HbA1c 7.2%. In summary, we found patients with Type 1 diabetes to have RAAS suppression and increased ANP levels, suggesting a state of fluid retention.

  • 9.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ståhlkrantz, A
    n/a.
    Albers, J
    n/a.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sunnergren, O
    n/a.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Difference in clinical characteristics, self rated sleep and daytime sleepiness between hypertensive patients with or without risk of obstructive sleep apnoea - a pilot study in a primary care setting2008In: ESC - European Society of Cardiology EruoPRevent Congress, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Leptin and adiponectin in cord blood from children of normal weight, overweight and obese mothers2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 6, p. 620-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To study cord blood concentrations of adiponectin and leptin in children born by normal weight, overweight and obese mothers and to study these parameters in relation to a weight gain intervention programme for obese mothers. Methods Ten millilitre cord blood was collected and analysed for leptin and adiponectin concentrations in children with gestational age andgt;37weeks born by 60 normal weight, 45 overweight and 145 obese mothers. 82 obese mothers took part in a weight gain intervention programme. Results Concentrations of leptin and adiponectin were higher in cord blood from children of overweight and obese mothers compared with children of normal weight mothers (leptin: Md 13.2, 30, 3 and 90.2ng/mL respectively, pandlt;0.001; adiponectin 35.9, 205.4, 213.8ng/L pandlt;0.001). No differences were found between overweight and obese mothers. The weight gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women had significant effects on the weight gain during pregnancy but had no effects on cord blood serum concentrations of leptin and adiponectin. Conclusion Cord blood leptin and adiponectin concentrations were higher in children born by overweight or obese women compared with children of normal weight mothers. A weight gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women did not affect these results. Intrauterine exposition to high concentrations of leptin and adiponectin may play a role in weight development later in life.

  • 11.
    Brändström, H.
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Stiger, F.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kahan, T.
    Division of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Melhus, H.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Öhman, K.P.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Departments of Experimental and Clinical Science, Astra Zeneca R&D Mölndal, Sweden.
    Malmqvist, K.
    Division of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lind, L.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kindmark, A.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden and Departments of Experimental and Clinical Science, Astra Zeneca R&D Mölndal, Sweden.
    A single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of the osteoprotegerin gene is related to intima-media thickness of the carotid artery in hypertensive patients. The Swedish Irbesartan Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Investigation vs Atenolol (SILVHIA)2004In: Blood Pressure, ISSN 0803-7051, E-ISSN 1651-1999, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 152-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a secreted member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, and in previous studies has been shown to regulate osteoclast activity and differentiation. Ablation of the OPG gene in mice results in calcification of the aorta and renal arteries. We have previously reported an association between a single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of OPG and vascular morphology and function in healthy humans. The objective with this study was to confirm our previous results in a larger population, and in addition, to study subjects with hypertension. The OPG genotype was determined by restriction fragment length and the intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery was measured by ultrasound in 100 patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy, and 75 healthy normotensive control subjects. In the hypertensive group subjects with the CC genotype (n = 24) showed a significantly increased IMT compared to those with the TC (n = 52, p = 0.007) and TT (n = 24, p = 0.009) genotype, in the hypertensive group only (mean ± SD for TT = 0.88 ± 0.21 mm, TC = 0.90 ± 0.16 mm, CC = 1.05 ± 0.31 mm). The allele distribution did not differ between hypertensive and control individuals. The present study confirms our previous finding and shows that polymorphism in the promoter region of OPG is associated with vascular morphology in hypertensive subjects. © 2004 Taylor & Francis on licence from Blood Pressure.

  • 12.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jennersjö, Pär
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Arnlov, Johan
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Dalarna University,Falun Sweden.
    Association of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 with nephropathy, cardiovascular events, and total mortality in type 2 diabetes2016In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 40-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis: Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) contribute to experimental diabetic kidney disease, a condition with substantially increased cardiovascular risk when present in patients. Therefore, we aimed to explore the levels of sTNFRs, and their association with prevalent kidney disease, incident cardiovascular disease, and risk of mortality independently of baseline kidney function and microalbuminuria in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. In pre-defined secondary analyses we also investigated whether the sTNFRs predict adverse outcome in the absence of diabetic kidney disease. Methods: The CARDIPP study, a cohort study of 607 diabetes patients [mean age 61 years, 44 % women, 45 cardiovascular events (fatal/non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke) and 44 deaths during follow-up (mean 7.6 years)] was used. Results: Higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 were associated with higher odds of prevalent kidney disease [odd ratio (OR) per standard deviation (SD) increase 1.60, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.32-1.93, p &lt; 0.001 and OR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.21-1.97, p = 0.001, respectively]. In Cox regression models adjusting for age, sex, glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 predicted incident cardiovascular events [hazard ratio (HR) per SD increase, 1.66, 95 % CI 1.29-2.174, p &lt; 0.001 and HR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.13-1.91, p = 0.004, respectively]. Results were similar in separate models with adjustments for inflammatory markers, HbA1c, or established cardiovascular risk factors, or when participants with diabetic kidney disease at baseline were excluded (p &lt; 0.01 for all). Both sTNFRs were associated with mortality. Conclusions/Interpretations: Higher circulating sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 are associated with diabetic kidney disease, and predicts incident cardiovascular disease and mortality independently of microalbuminuria and kidney function, even in those without kidney disease. Our findings support the clinical utility of sTNFRs as prognostic markers in type 2 diabetes.

  • 13.
    Carlsson, Axel Carl
    et al.
    Division of Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    The association between endostatin and kidney disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes2016In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Circulating endostatin, a biologically active derivate of collagen XVIII, is considered to be a marker of kidney disease and a risk factor for its related mortality. However, less is known of the role of endostatin in diabetes and the development of diabetic nephropathy. For this reason, our study investigated the associations between circulating endostatin and the prevalence and progression of kidney disease, and its mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D).

    METHODS: This was a cohort study of 607 patients with T2D (mean age: 61 years, 44% women). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) creatinine equation, was used to assess the patients' kidney function decline and mortality.

    RESULTS: Of the total study cohort, 20 patients declined by ≥20% in eGFR over 4 years, and 44 died during the follow-up (mean duration: 6.7 years). At baseline, participants with diabetic nephropathy (defined as eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m(2)) and/or microalbuminuria [defined as a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR)>3g/mol] had higher median levels of endostatin than those without nephropathy (62.7μg/L vs 57.4μg/L, respectively; P=0.031). In longitudinal analyses adjusted for age, gender, baseline eGFR and ACR, higher endostatin levels were associated with a higher risk of decline (≥20% in eGFR, OR per 1 SD increase: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.13-2.65) and a higher risk of mortality (HR per 1 SD increase: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.19-2.07).

    CONCLUSION: In patients with T2D, circulating endostatin levels can predict the progression of kidney disease and mortality independently of established kidney disease markers. The clinical usefulness of endostatin as a risk marker in such patients merits further studies.

  • 14.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Nylander, Eva
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Symptom burden, Metabolic profile, Ultrasound findings, Rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and health-related quality of life in patients with atrial Fibrillation (SMURF): a protocol for an observational study with a randomised interventional component2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 12, article id e008723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, with an estimated prevalence of 1.5-2%. It is an independent risk factor for ischaemic stroke and is estimated to cause about 20-25% of all stroke cases. AF has a great impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL); however, one unresolved issue related to AF is the wide variation in its symptoms.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The symptom burden, metabolic profile, ultrasound findings, rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and HRQoL in patients with AF (Symptom burden, Metabolic profile, Ultrasound findings, Rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and health-related quality of life in patients with atrial Fibrillation, SMURF) study is a prospective observational, cohort study, with a randomised interventional part. The aim of the study is to investigate, in patients with AF, the relationship between symptom burden and metabolic aspects, atrial function and different neurohormones, and the effect of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The interventional part of the study will give an insight into the neurohormonal and intracardiac pressure changes directly after initiation of AF. Consecutive patients with symptomatic AF accepted for treatment with RFA for the first time at Linköping University Hospital are eligible for participation. The enrolment started in January 2012, and a total of 200 patients are to be included into the study, with 45 of them being enrolled into the interventional study with initiation of AF. The sample size of the interventional study is based on a small pilot study with 5 patients induced to AF while 2 served as controls. The results indicated that, in order to find a statistically significant difference, there was a need to include 28 patients; for safety reasons, 45 patients will be included.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The SMURF study is approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden. The results will be presented through peer-review journals and conference presentation.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01553045; Pre-results.

  • 15. Chen, H
    et al.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: endomed.
    Dong, LQ
    Cong, L
    Li, Y
    Liu, F
    Insulin-stimulated activation of phosphoinositide-dependent Kinase-1 (PDK1): potential role in translocation of CLUT4 in rat adipose cells.2001In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 30, p. 11851-11859Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Claesson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holm, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernersson, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Two weeks of overfeeding with candy, but not peanuts, increases insulin levels and body weight2009In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL and LABORATORY INVESTIGATION, ISSN 0036-5513, Vol. 69, no 5, p. 598-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study the effects of snacking based on fast acting carbohydrates (candy) or fat and protein (peanuts) in a prospective randomized, parallel intervention study. Methods: Basal metabolic rate (BMR) and cardiovascular risk factors were measured before and after hyper-alimentation by addition of 20 kcal/kg (84 kJ/kg) body weight of either candy or roasted peanuts, to the regular caloric intake, for two weeks in healthy subjects. Eleven men and 14 women completed the randomized study. Results: Energy-intake increased similarly in the groups (candy: +46.1 +/- 35%, peanuts: +46.8 +/- 28%, p = 0.96). Body-weight (candy: from 67.3 +/- 7.6 kg to 68.1 +/- 7.3 kg, p = 0.01, nuts: from 68.7 +/- 6.1 kg to 69.0 +/- 5.7 kg, p = 0.3) and waist circumference increased significantly only in the candy group. At the end of the study LDL cholesterol (candy: 2.6 +/- 0.4 mmol/L, peanuts: 2.1 +/- 0.4 mmol/L, p = 0.005) and ApoB/ApoA-1-ratio (candy: 0.68 +/- 0.16, peanuts: 0.53 +/- 0.11, p = 0.01) were higher in the candy group than in the peanut group. On the other hand, BMR increased only in the peanut group (candy: from 6.657 +/- 1.1 MJ/24 h to 6.762 +/- 1.1 MJ/24 h, p - 0.3, nuts: from 6.896 +/- 0.98 MJ/24 h to 7.256 +/- 1.1 MJ/24 h, p = 0.02). Conclusion: Two weeks of snacking based on peanuts does not cause the same negative metabolic effects as an isocaloric diet in which the snacking is based on short acting carbohydrates in the form of candy in non-obese healthy subjects.

  • 17.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Cedergren, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Consumer satisfaction with a weight-gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women.2008In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to investigate women's attitudes and satisfaction with a weight-gain intervention programme during pregnancy.

    Design: exploratory, descriptive study. Data were collected via interviews.

    Setting: University hospital.

    Participants: 56 obese pregnant women who attended antenatal care at the University Hospital of Linköping's obstetrical department and took part in an intervention programme aimed at reducing weight gain during pregnancy, between November 2003 and August 2004.

    Findings: the interviews comprised several questions concerning attitudes and opinions of the programme. Most of the women expressed positive experiences with the treatment and would attend the programme if they became pregnant again. Most of the women stated that they had changed their eating and exercise habits during pregnancy, and almost all of them had continued with these new habits. Even though the weight gain goal of a maximum 6.9 kg was reached by less than half of the participants, most of the women were satisfied with their weight gain. A total of 71.4% of the women participated in aqua aerobics classes. They stated that they were most satisfied with this form of exercise, and that it also was a good social experience.

    Key conclusions and implications for practice: a pregnant woman herself must be actively involved in setting her own goals to prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy. Considerable effort and support must be placed on discussing strategies, pitfalls and risks. In order for the woman to maintain the change in attitude and habits, she must probably be given continuous feedback and reinforcement over the long term.

  • 18.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Cedergren, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Weight gain restriction for obese pregnant women: A case-control intervention study2008In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 115, no 1, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To minimise obese women's total weight gain during pregnancy to less than 7 kg and to investigate the delivery and neonatal outcome. Design: A prospective case-control intervention study. Setting: Antenatal care clinics in the southeast region of Sweden. Population: One hundred fifty-five pregnant women in an index group and one hundred ninety-three women in a control group. Methods: An intervention programme with weekly motivational talks and aqua aerobic classes for obese pregnant women. Main outcome measures: Weight gain in kilograms, delivery and neonatal outcome. Results: The index group had a significantly lower weight gain during pregnancy compared with the control group (P < 0.001). The women in the index group weighed less at the postnatal check-up compared with the weight registered in early pregnancy (P < 0.001). The percentage of women in the index group who gained less than 7 kg was greater than that of women in the control group who gained less than 7 kg (P = 0.003). The percentage of nulliparous women in this group was greater than that in the control group (P = 0.018). In addition, the women in the index group had a significantly lower body mass index at the postnatal check-up, compared with the control group (P < 0.001). There were no differences between the index group and the control group regarding birthweight, gestational age and mode of delivery. Conclusion: The intervention programme was effective in controlling weight gain during pregnancy and did not affect delivery or neonatal outcome.

  • 19.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rydell, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Quantification of abdominal fat accumulation during hyperalimentation using MRI2009In: Proceedings of the ISMRM Annual Meeting (ISMRM'09), 2009, Berkeley, CA, USA: International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine , 2009, p. 206-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing demand for imaging methods that can be used for automatic, accurate and quantitative determination of the amounts of abdominal fat. Such methods are important as they will allow the evaluation of some of the risk factors underlying the ’metabolic syndrome’. The metabolic syndrome is becoming common in large parts of the world, and it appears that a dominant risk factor for developing this syndrome is abdominal obesity. Subjects that are afflicted with the metabolic syndrome are exposed to a high risk for developing a large range of diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiac failure, and stroke. The aim of this work

  • 20.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gjellan, Solveig
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zanjani, Sepehr
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Validation of whole-­‐body adipose tissue quantification using air displacement plethysmometry2012In: ISMRM workshop on Fat-­‐Water Separation: Insights, Applications & Progress in MRI, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andreasson, Thomas
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Cinthio, Magnus
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Is there an underestimation of intima-media thickness based on M-mode ultrasound technique in the abdominal aorta?2012In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measuring intima-media thickness (IMT) in the common carotid artery (CCA) is a valuable resource for the evaluation of subclinical atherosclerosis. The main objective of this study was to explore whether a B-mode ultrasound technique, Philips ATL, and an M-mode ultrasound technique, Wall Track System (WTS), show interchangeable results when measured in CCA and the abdominal aorta (AA). A total of 24 healthy, young subjects were examined. IMT and lumen diameter (LD) of the AA and the CCA were measured twice by two skilled ultrasonographers with two different ultrasound equipment B-mode: (Philips, ATL and M-mode: WTS).The intra-observer variability of IMT in CCA and AA using B-mode showed a coefficient of variation 8% and 9%, and with M-mode 11% and 15%, respectively. Interobserver variability of IMT in CCA and AA using B-mode was 6% and 12%, and with M-mode 11% and 18%, respectively. CCA IMT was 0·53 ± 0·07 and 0·53 ± 0·09 mm using B-mode and M-mode, respectively. However, in AA, IMT was 0·61 ± 0·5 and 0·54 ± 0·10 mm using B-mode and M-mode, respectively. Thus, AA IMT was 11·5% thicker using B-mode (P<0·01). We received adequate IMT readings from the carotid artery as well as the AA using two commonly used B-mode and M-mode techniques. B-mode technique seems to show less variability, especially in the AA. More importantly, the two techniques measured different IMT thickness in the aorta, emphasizing the importance of using similar technique when comparing the impact of absolute values of IMT on cardiovascular disease.

  • 22.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Sagittal abdominal diameter is a more independent measure compared with waist circumference to predict arterial stiffness in subjects with type 2 diabetes - a prospective observational cohort study2013In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Anthropometric measurements are useful in clinical practice since they are non-invasive and cheap. Previous studies suggest that sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) may be a better measure of visceral fat depots. The aim of this study was to prospectively explore and compare how laboratory and anthropometric risk markers predicted subclinical organ damage in 255 patients, with type 2 diabetes, after four years.

    Methods

    Baseline investigations were performed in 2006 and were repeated at follow-up in 2010. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries at baseline and at follow-up in a cohort of subjects with type 2 diabetes aged 55–65 years old.

    Results

    There were significant correlations between apolipoprotein B (apoB) (r = 0.144, p = 0.03), C - reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.172, p = 0.009) at baseline and IMT measured at follow-up. After adjustment for sex, age, treatment with statins and Hba1c, the associations remained statistically significant. HbA1c, total cholesterol or LDL-cholesterol did not correlate to IMT at follow-up. Baseline body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.130, p = 0.049), waist circumference (WC) (r = 0.147, p = 0.027) and sagittal Abdominal Diameter (SAD) (r = 0.184, p = 0.007) correlated to PWV at follow-up. Challenged with sex, SBP and HbA1c, the association between SAD, not WC nor BMI, and PWV remained statistically significant (p = 0.036). In a stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    Conclusions

    We conclude that apoB and CRP, but not LDL-cholesterol predicted subclinical atherosclerosis. Furthermore, SAD was more independent in predicting arterial stiffness over time, compared with WC, in middle-aged men and women with type 2 diabetes.

  • 23.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bjarnegård, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Sagittal Abdominal Diameter is a more Independent Measure compared with Waist Circumference to predict Arterial Stiffness in subjects with Type 2 DiabetesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to prospectively explore how laboratory and anthropometric risk factors predicted subclinical organ damage in 255 patients, with type 2 diabetes, after four years.

    Methods: Baseline investigations were performed in 2006 and were repeated at follow-up in 2010. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries at baseline and at follow-up in a cohort of subjects with type 2 diabetes aged 55-65 years old.

    Results: There were significant correlations between apolipoprotein B (apoB) (r= 0.144, p=0.03), C - reactive protein (CRP) (r=0.172, p=0.009) at baseline and IMT measured at follow-up. After adjustment for sex, age, treatment with statins and Hba1c, the associations remained statistically significant. HbA1c, total cholesterol or LDL-cholesterol did not correlate to IMT at follow-up. Baseline body mass index (BMI) (r=0.130, p=0.049), waist circumference (WC) (r=0.147, p=0.027) and sagittal Abdominal Diameter (SAD) (r=0.184, p=0.007) correlated to PWV at follow-up. Challenged with sex, SBP and HbA1c, the association between SAD, not WC nor BMI, and PWV remained statistically significant (p=0.036). In a stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    Conclusion: We conclude that apoB and CRP, but not LDL-cholesterol predicted subclinical atherosclerosis. Furthermore, SAD was more independent in predicting arterial stiffness over time, compared with WC, in middle-aged men and women with type 2 diabetes.

  • 24.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Abdominal Obesity and low grade Systemic Inflammation as Markers for Subclinical Organ Damage in type 2 diabetes2014In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore associations between abdominal obesity, inflammatory markers, and subclinical organ damage in 740 patients with type 2 diabetes. Waist circumference (WC) and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) was measured. Blood samples were analyzed for; C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL) -1β and IL-6. Carotid intimamedia thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry.

    Abdominal obesity were significantly correlated with; IL-6, CRP (both p= <0.001, WC and SAD, respectively), IMT (WC p=0.012, SAD p=0.003) and PWV (p<0.001, for WC and SAD, respectively). In multiple linear regressions with IMT as dependent variable and age, sex, statins, systolic blood pressure (SBP), Body Mass Index (BMI), CRP and HbA1c, as independent variables, SAD (p=0.047) but not WC, remained associated with IMT. In stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    We conclude that SAD and WC are feasible measures of obesity that provides information on inflammation, atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness in type 2 diabetes. However, SAD was slightly more robustly associated to subclinical organ damage, compared with WC.

  • 25.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, T
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Complications Carotid intima-media thickness and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratio in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes2009In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 384-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To explore the association between carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and the apolipoprotein B (apoB)/apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) ratio compared with conventional lipids in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We analysed data from 247 patients with Type 2 diabetes, aged 55-66 years, in the Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes-a Prospective study in Primary care (CARDIPP-1) study. Primary care nurses measured blood pressure and anthropometric characteristics. Blood samples were taken for laboratory analyses. The carotid IMT was determined by ultrasonography at the University Hospital in Linköping and at the County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden. RESULTS: The ApoB/apoA-I ratio (r = 0.207, P = 0.001), apoB (r = 0.166, P = 0.009) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-c) (r = 0.129, P = 0.046) correlated with IMT. Conventional lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) and systolic blood pressure were not significantly correlated to IMT. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was conducted with IMT as the dependent variable and the apoB/apoA-I ratio, HbA(1c), hsCRP, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), total cholesterol, non-HDL-c and treatment with statins as independent variables. Following adjustment for age and gender, only the apoB/apoA-I ratio remained significantly associated with IMT (odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence intervals 1.7-10.8, P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that there was a significant association between the apoB/apoA-I ratio and IMT in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes. The association was independent of conventional lipids, hsCRP, glycaemic control and use of statins.

  • 26.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Carotid intima-media thickness and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratio in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes2009In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 384-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To explore the association between carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and the apolipoprotein B (apoB)/apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) ratio compared with conventional lipids in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    Methods We analysed data from 247 patients with Type 2 diabetes, aged 55–66 years, in the Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes—a Prospective study in Primary care (CARDIPP-1) study. Primary care nurses measured blood pressure and anthropometric characteristics. Blood samples were taken for laboratory analyses. The carotid IMT was determined by ultrasonography at the University Hospital in Linköping and at the County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.

    Results The ApoB/apoA-I ratio (r = 0.207, P = 0.001), apoB (r = 0.166, P = 0.009) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-c) (r = 0.129, P = 0.046) correlated with IMT. Conventional lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and systolic blood pressure were not significantly correlated to IMT. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was conducted with IMT as the dependent variable and the apoB/apoA-I ratio, HbA1c, hsCRP, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), total cholesterol, non-HDL-c and treatment with statins as independent variables. Following adjustment for age and gender, only the apoB/apoA-I ratio remained significantly associated with IMT (odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence intervals 1.7–10.8, P = 0.002).

    Conclusions We conclude that there was a significant association between the apoB/apoA-I ratio and IMT in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes. The association was independent of conventional lipids, hsCRP, glycaemic control and use of statins.

  • 27.
    Danielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fagerholm, Siri
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öst, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franck, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Short-Term Overeating Induces Insulin Resistance in Fat Cells in Lean Human Subjects2009In: Molecular medicine (Cambridge, Mass. Print), ISSN 1076-1551, E-ISSN 1528-3658, Vol. 15, no 7-8, p. 228-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are closely linked to obesity. Numerous prospective studies have reported on weight gain, insulin resistance, and insulin signaling in experimental animals, but not in humans. We examined insulin signaling in adipocytes from lean volunteers, before and at the end of a 4-wk period of consuming a fast-food, high-calorie diet that led to weight gain. We also examined adipocytes from patients with T2D. During the high-calorie diet, subjects gained 10% body weight and 19% total body fat, but stayed lean (body mass index = 24.3 kg/m2) and developed moderate systemic insulin resistance. Similarly to the situation in T2D subjects, in subjects on the high-calorie diet, the amount of insulin receptors was reduced and phosphorylation of IRS1 at tyrosine and at serine-307 (human sequence, corresponding to murine serine-302) were impaired. The amount of insulin receptor substrate protein-1 (IRS1) and the phosphorylation of IRS1 at serine-312 (human sequence, corresponding to murine serine-307) were unaffected by the diet. Unlike the T2D subjects, in subjects on the high-calorie diet, likely owing to the ongoing weight-gain, phosphorylation of MAP-kinases ERK1/2 became hyperresponsive to insulin. To our knowledge this study is the first to investigate insulin signaling during overeating in humans, and it demonstrates that T2D effects on intracellular insulin signaling already occur after 4 wks of a high-calorie diet and that the effects in humans differ from those in laboratory animals.

  • 28.
    Danielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Phosphorylation of IRS1 at serine 307 and serine 312 in response to insulin in human adipocytes2006In: Biochemical and biophysical research communications, ISSN 0006-291X, Vol. 342, no 4, p. 1183-1187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feedback control in insulin signaling involves serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1). By analyzing the insulin-induced phosphorylation of IRS1 at serine 307, serine 312, and tyrosine in the same primary human adipocytes, we now report that negative feedback phosphorylation of serine 312 (corresponding to murine serine 307) required relatively high concentrations of insulin (EC50 = 3 nM) for a long time (t1/2 ca. 30 min) and reduced the steady-state tyrosine phosphorylation, without affecting the cellular concentration, of IRS1. In contrast, positive feedback phosphorylation of serine 307 was a rapid (t1/2 ca. 2 min) event at physiological concentrations of insulin (EC50 = 0.2 nM).

  • 29.
    Danielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öst, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lystedt, Erika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Insulin resistance in human adipocytes occurs downstream of IRS1 after surgical cell isolation but at the level of phosphorylation of IRS1 in type 2 diabetes2005In: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658, Vol. 272, no 1, p. 141-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insulin resistance is a cardinal feature of type 2 diabetes and also a consequence of trauma such as surgery. Directly after surgery and cell isolation, adipocytes were insulin resistant, but this was reversed after overnight incubation in 10% CO2 at 37 °C. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (IRS)1 was insulin sensitive, but protein kinase B (PKB) and downstream metabolic effects exhibited insulin resistance that was reversed by overnight incubation. MAP-kinases ERK1/2 and p38 were strongly phosphorylated after surgery, but was dephosphorylated during reversal of insulin resistance. Phosphorylation of MAP-kinase was not caused by collagenase treatment during cell isolation and was present also in tissue pieces that were not subjected to cell isolation procedures. The insulin resistance directly after surgery and cell isolation was different from insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes; adipocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes remained insulin resistant after overnight incubation. IRS1, PKB, and downstream metabolic effects, but not insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor, exhibited insulin resistance. These findings suggest a new approach in the study of surgery-induced insulin resistance and indicate that human adipocytes should recover after surgical procedures for analysis of insulin signalling. Moreover, we pinpoint the signalling dysregulation in type 2 diabetes to be the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of IRS1 in human adipocytes.

  • 30.
    Danielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öst, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Attenuation of insulin-stimulated insulin receptor substrate-1 serine 307 phosphorylation in insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes2005In: Journal of biological chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, Vol. 280, no 41, p. 34389-3492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insulin resistance is a primary characteristic of type 2 diabetes and likely causally related to the pathogenesis of the disease. It is a result of defects in signal transduction from the cell surface receptor of insulin to target effects. We found that insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of serine 307 (corresponding to serine 302 in the murine sequence) in the immediate downstream mediator protein of the insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1), is required for efficient insulin signaling and that this phosphorylation is attenuated in adipocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes. Inhibition of serine 307 phosphorylation by rapamycin mimicked type 2 diabetes and reduced the sensitivity of IRS1 tyrosine phosphorylation in response to insulin, while stimulation of the phosphorylation by okadaic acid, in cells from patients with type 2 diabetes, rescued cells from insulin resistance. EC50 for insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of serine 307 was about 0.2 nM with a t1/2 of about 2 min. The amount of IRS1 was similar in cells from non-diabetic and diabetic subjects. These findings identify a molecular mechanism for insulin resistance in non-selected patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 31.
    Ekman, Bertil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A dose titration model for recombinant GH substitution aiming at normal plasma concentrations of IGF-I in hypopituitary adults2002In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 147, no 1, p. 49-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a dose titration model for recombinant human GH substitution in adult patients with GH deficiency, aiming at normal plasma levels of IGF-I.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: Eighteen patients participated and a start dose of 0.17 mg GH/day was used except by two men who started with 0.33 mg/day. To demonstrate a clear GH effect the patients were first titrated, with steps of 0.17 mg GH/day every 6-8 weeks, to IGF-I levels in the upper range of age-adjusted reference values. The GH dose was then reduced 1 dose step and kept for a further 6 months. For comparison we investigated 17 healthy control subjects.

    RESULTS: Plasma IGF-I was increased after 2 weeks on the start dose and did not increase further for up to 8 weeks. Women had significantly lower GH sensitivity than men measured as net increment of IGF-I on the start dose of GH. GH sensitivity was not changed by age. The plasma IGF-I levels increased from 76.3+/-47.0 (s.d.) to 237+/-97 microg/l at the end of the study (P<0.001), and similar IGF-I levels were obtained in both sexes. The maintenance median GH dose was 0.33 mg/day in males and 0.83 mg/day in females (P=0.017). The GH dose correlated negatively with age in both sexes. Body weight, very low density triglycerides, lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), and fasting insulin increased, whereas insulin sensitivity index (QUICKI) decreased significantly. In comparison with the controls, the patients had lower fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin and Lp(a) levels at baseline, but these differences disappeared after GH substitution. The two groups had equal insulin sensitivity (QUICKI), but 2 h oral glucose tolerance test values of blood glucose and insulin were significantly higher in the patients at the end of the study.

    CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion our data suggest that the starting dose of GH substitution and the dose titration steps should be individualised according to GH sensitivity (gender) and the IGF-I level aimed for (age). The reduced insulin sensitivity induced by GH substitution could be viewed as a normalisation if compared with control subjects.

  • 32.
    Ekman, Bertil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Circulating IGF-I concentrations are low and not correlated to glycaemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes2000In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 143, no 4, p. 505-510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study plasma concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in adults with type 1 diabetes (IDDM) in comparison with a reference population, and the influence of glycaemic control, dose of insulin, and sex on the concentration of circulating IGF-I in IDDM.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: Patients with type 1 diabetes were recruited consecutively from our outpatient diabetes unit. In all, 79 men and 55 women aged 20-60 years with a disease duration >/=6 years (range 6-51 years) took part in the study. A reference population of 80 men and 83 women aged 20-60 years was randomly obtained from the population registry. IGF-I was measured with radioimmunoassay after acid-ethanol extraction.

    RESULTS: Mean +/- s. d. values of IGF-I were lower in patients with diabetes (146+/-66 microg/l) than in controls (238+/-83 microg/l, P<0.001). Those with diabetes had lower IGF-I concentrations in all age groups and the differences were highly significant in all decades except in women aged 50-59 years. IGF-I was negatively correlated with age in patients and controls. No correlation was found between IGF-I and glycaemic control measured as haemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) in the patients. IGF-I was positively associated with the dose of insulin/kg body weight in male patients independently of age, HbA(1c) and body mass index (P<0.03), but not in female patients (P=0.14).

    CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that IGF-I concentrations are low in adult patients with type 1 diabetes with a disease duration >/=6 years, independently of glycaemic control. This suggests that subcutaneous insulin substitution is inadequate to normalize circulating IGF-I concentrations in patients without endogenous insulin secretion.

  • 33.
    Ekman, Bertil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Peter K
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Individualized growth hormone substitution with normalized IGF-I levels does not stimulate the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system2002In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 473-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    objective To study the effects of individualized recombinant GH substitution, aiming at normal circulating IGF-I levels, in GH-deficient adults on blood pressure, the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS), natriuretic peptides and urine free cortisol.

    study design Open study with control group. The patients were titrated in dose steps of 0·17 mg GH/day every 6–8 weeks until an IGF-I level around the mean + 1 SD was attained (Tmax). After another month the dose was reduced by 0·17 mg (minimum dose 0·17 mg/day) to produce IGF-I levels at or slightly below the age-related mean (Tend), and this maintenance dose was held constant for 6 months.

    subjects Eighteen patients (11 males and seven females) with GH deficiency participated. For comparison we also prospectively evaluated 17 matched control subjects.

    measurements Blood pressure and heart rate, circulating levels of IGF-I, plasma renin activity (PRA), immunoreactive active renin (IRR), angiotensin II, aldosterone, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and 24-h urine aldosterone and urine free cortisol levels.

    results Blood pressure was unchanged by GH substitution but heart rate increased significantly (P < 0·03). PRA was elevated on the highest GH dose (Tmax) compared to baseline (P < 0·01), but returned to baseline and levels of controls at Tend. Four patients developed transient oedema and tended to have higher PRA levels than the rest of the subjects (P = 0·09). The circulating levels of IRR, angiotensin II, aldosterone, BNP and 24-h urine aldosterone and urine free cortisol levels were unchanged by GH substitution, and did not differ from the levels in the control subjects. Baseline ANP levels in the patients were lower than in the controls (P < 0·01), but increased after GH substitution (P < 0·01) to levels found in with the controls.

    conclusions We found no major changes of the variables in the circulating renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and a normalization of atrial natriuretic peptide when an individualized dose of GH was titrated to near-normal IGF-I levels.

  • 34.
    Engvall, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: endomed.
    Daytime ambulatory blood pressure correlates strongly with the echocardiographic diameter of aortic coarctation2001In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 335-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective.-To relate the echocardiographic aortic arch-diameter to ambulatory and clinic blood pressure (BP) in patients with aortic coarctation. Design.-Eighteen adult patients (50% men) were recruited from the coarctation registry of the Linkoping Heart Centre. Biplane-trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was performed with Acuson XP 128/10, ambulatory BP was recorded with Spacelab models 90202/90205. Results.-Systolic clinic and ambulatory BP levels were higher in patients than in the 36 controls (clinic BP: 146 ▒ 25 mmHg vs 119 ▒ 10 mmHg, p = 0.0009, ambulatory BP: 140 ▒ 18 mmHg vs 124 ▒ 11 mmHg, p = 0.009). The differences in diastolic BP levels were less obvious (clinic BP: 87 ▒ 16 mmHg vs 76 ▒ 8 mmHg, p = 0.02, ambulatory BP: 84 ▒ 13 mmHg vs 77 ▒ 9 mmHg, p = 0.052). Daytime ambulatory BP was more strongly related than clinic BP to the coarctation diameter (AD) (systolic BP r = -0.73, p = 0.0006 and r = -0.61, p = 0.007, respectively). In surgically corrected patients (n = 14) only the correlations between ambulatory systolic daytime (r = -0.61, p = 0.02) and night-time (r = -0.58, p = 0.03) BP to AD was statistically significant. Conclusion.-Ambulatory BP correlates strongly with aortic coarctation measured by TEE and would thus be the preferred technique for evaluating BP in this patient category.

  • 35.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Mohammed, Ahmed Abdulilah
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    De Geer, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Non-invasive investigations of potential renal artery stenosis in renal insufficiency2010In: Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, ISSN 0931-0509, E-ISSN 1460-2385, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 3607-3614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The diagnostic value of non-invasive methods for diagnosing renal artery stenosis in patients with renal insufficiency is incompletely known.

    Methods. Forty-seven consecutive patients with moderately impaired renal function and a clinical suspicion of renal artery stenosis were investigated with computed tomography angiography (CTA), gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), contrast-enhanced Doppler ultrasound and captopril renography. The primary reference standard was stenosis reducing the vessel diameter by at least 50% on CTA, and an alternative reference standard (‘morphological and functional stenosis’) was defined as at least 50% diameter reduction on CTA or MRA, combined with a positive finding from ultrasound or captopril renography.

    Results. The frequency of positive findings, calculated on the basis of individual patients, was 70% for CTA, 60% for MRA, 53% for ultrasound and 30% for captopril renography. Counting kidneys rather than patients, corresponding frequencies were 53%, 41%, 29% and 15%, respectively. In relation to the CTA standard, the sensitivity (and specificity) at the patient level was 0.81 (0.79) for MRA, 0.70 (0.89) for ultrasound and 0.42 (1.00) for captopril renography, and at the kidney level 0.76 (0.82), 0.53 (0.81) and 0.30 (0.86), respectively. Relative to the alternative reference standard, corresponding values at the patient level were 1.00 (0.62) for CTA, 0.90 (0.69) for MRA, 0.91 (1.00) for ultrasound and 0.67 (1.00) for captopril renography, and at the kidney level 0.96 (0.76), 0.85 (0.79), 0.71 (0.97) and 0.50 (0.97), respectively.

    Conclusions. CTA and MRA are superior to ultrasound and captopril renography at diagnosing morphological stenosis, but ultrasound may be useful as a screening method and captopril renography for verifying renin-dependent hypertension.

  • 36.
    Erlingsson, Styrbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Herard, Sebastian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Men develop more intraabdominal obesity and signs of the metabolic syndrome after hyperalimentation than women2009In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 58, no 7, p. 995-1001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We prospectively studied the effects of fast food-based hyperalimentation on insulin sensitivity and components of the metabolic syndrome and analyzed this with respect to sex. Twelve nonobese men and 6 nonobese women (26 +/- 6.6 years old), and an age-matched control group were recruited. Subjects in the intervention group aimed for 5% to 15% weight increase by doubling their regular caloric intake based on at least 2 fast food meals a day while also adopting a sedentary lifestyle for 4 weeks (andlt;5000 steps a day). Weight of Subjects in the intervention group increased from 67.6 +/- 9.1 to 74.0 +/- 11 kg (P andlt;.001), with no sex difference with regard to this or with respect to changes of total abdominal fat volumes or waist circumferences. Fasting insulin (men: before, 3.8 +/- 1.7 mu U/mL, after, 7.4 +/- 3.1 mu U/mL; P=.004; women: before, 4.9 +/- 2.3 mu U/mL; after, 5.9 +/- 2.8 mu U/mL; P =.17), systolic blood pressure (men: before, 117 +/- 13 mm Hg; after, 127 +/- 9.1 mm Hg; P =.002; women: before, 102 +/- 5.1 mm Hg; after, 98 +/- 5.4 mm Hg; P =.39), serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B increased only in the men of the intervention group. The sex differences in the metabolic responses to the intervention were linked to a considerable difference in the fat accumulation pattern; 41.4% +/- 9.2% of the increase of the fat volume in the abdominal region was accumulated intraabdominally in men and 22.7 +/- 6.5% in women (P andlt;.0001). This Study thus showed that women are protected, compared with men, against developing intraabdominal obesity when adopting a standardized obesity-provoking lifestyle. Our findings suggest that it is not different lifestyles and/or behaviors that underlie the fact that men have a higher cardiovascular risk at the same level of percentage of body fat than women.

  • 37.
    Ernersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sepa Frostell, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    An obesity provoking behaviour negatively influences young normal weight subjects' Health Related Quality of Life and causes depressive symptoms2010In: Eating Behaviors, ISSN 1471-0153, E-ISSN 1873-7358, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 247-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many parts of the world the prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle in combination with high consumption of food has increased, which contributes to increased risk for becoming overweight. Our primary aim was, in an intervention, to examine the influence on health related quality of life (HRQoL) and mood in young normal weight subjects of both sexes, when adopting an obesity provoking behaviour by increasing the energy intake via fast food and simultaneously adopting a sedentary lifestyle. A secondary aim was to follow-up possible long-term effects on HRQoL and mood 6 and 12 months after this short-term intervention.

    In this prospective study, 18 healthy normal weight subjects (mean age 26 ± 6.6 years), mainly university students were prescribed doubled energy intake, and maximum 5000 steps/day, during 4 weeks. An age and sex matched control group (n = 18), who were asked to have unchanged eating habits and physical activity, was recruited. Before and after the intervention questionnaires including Short Form-36, Hospital Anxiety Depression scale, Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression scale, Sense of Coherence and Mastery scale were completed by the subjects in the intervention group and by the controls with 4 weeks interval. Six and 12 months after the intervention the subjects underwent the same procedure as at baseline and the controls completed the same questionnaires.

    During the intervention, subjects in the intervention group increased their bodyweight and developed markedly lower physical and mental health scores on Short Form-36 as well as depressive symptoms while no changes appeared in the controls. The increase of depressive symptoms was associated with increases of energy intake, body weight and body fat. When followed up, 6 and 12 months after the intervention, physical and mental health had returned completely to baseline values, despite somewhat increased body weight.

    In conclusion, adopting obesity provoking behaviour for 4 weeks decreases HRQoL and mood in young normal weight subjects. The effect is temporary and when followed up 6 and 12 months after the short-term intervention no remaining influence is found.

  • 38.
    Ernersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Young healthy individuals develop lack of energy when adopting an obesity provoking behaviour for four weeks; A phenomenological2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Ernersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Young healthy individuals develop lack of energy when adopting an obesity provoking behaviour for 4 weeks: a phenomenological analysis2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 565-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past 20 years, a sedentary lifestyle has become more common and simultaneously the consumption of energy-dense food has increased. These are two major risk factors associated with the increase of overweight and obesity, which is found in all ages over the world. The low well-being reported by obese individuals could be associated with increased food intake or it might be a specific consequence of obesity and lack of physical fitness. The aim of this study was to describe the experience of the phenomenon, adopting an obesity provoking behaviour, by increasing energy intake and simultaneously having a sedentary lifestyle for 4 weeks in healthy, normal-weight individuals of both genders. Eighteen healthy individuals (12 men and 6 women; median age 23, range 21-44 years) were included in an intervention, with a doubled energy intake and a maximum physical activity of 5000 steps per day during 4 weeks. After completing this intervention the participants were interviewed and asked to describe their experience during the past 4 weeks. A phenomenological approach was used to gain understanding of the phenomenon and analyses of the transcripts were performed in four steps according to Giorgis method. The main essence of the phenomenon, adopting an obesity provoking behaviour, was found to be lack of energy, related to emotional life, relations and life habits. Lack of energy emerged from five structures: influenced self-confidence, commitment to oneself and others, managing eating, feelings of tiredness and physical impact. These five structures were manifested through 12 constituents. These lifestyle changes decreased the sense of well-being in nonobese healthy individuals of both genders.

  • 40.
    Ernersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Long-term increase of fat mass after a four week intervention with fast food based hyper-alimentation and limitation of physical activity2010In: Nutrition & Metabolism, ISSN 1743-7075, Vol. 7, no 68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A sedentary lifestyle and increased consumption of energy dense food have become more common in many parts of the world. The aim of this study was to study long term effects on body composition after a four week intervention with fast food based hyper-alimentation and limited physical activity in young normal weight subjects.

    Method: Eighteen subjects, mean age 26 (6.6) years, increased their energy intake with in average 70% and physical activity were not to exceed 5000 steps/day. Body composition was measured by Dual energy x-ray (DXA) at baseline, after the intervention and after 12 months. A matched control group was also included. ANOVA and Student's paired and unpaired t-test were used.

    Result: During the intervention body weight increased with 6.4 (2.8) kg and DXA measurements showed increases of both fat free mass and fat mass. Six months after the intervention the subjects had lost most of the weight gain, - 4.7 (3.1) kg. Twelve months after the intervention body weight had increased with 1.5 (2.4) kg compared to baseline (p = 0.018). DXA measurements at 12 months showed unchanged fat free mass compared to baseline but higher fat mass, + 1.4 (1.9) kg (p = 0.01). After 2.5 years the increase of body weight was 3.1 (4.0) kg (p = 0.01) while there was no change in controls compared to baseline, + 0.1(2.5) kg (p = 0.88).

    Conclusion: One year after a short term intervention with increased fast food based hyper-alimentation there was an increase of fat mass but unchanged fat free mass. As the change of fat mass was larger than expected from prospective epidemiological studies and as there was no increase of body weight in controls it raises the issue whether there is a long-term effect to increase fat mass of a short period of hyper-alimentation.

  • 41.
    Fernemark, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaredsson, Christine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bunjaku, Bekim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosenqvist, Ulf
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Randomized Cross-Over Trial of the Postprandial Effects of Three Different Diets in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 11, p. e79324-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the clinic setting both fasting levels of glucose and the area under the curve (AUC) of glucose, by determination of HbA1c levels, are used for risk assessments, in type 2 diabetes (NIDDM). However little is known about postprandial levels, and hence AUC, regarding other traditional risk factors such as insulin and blood-lipids and how this is affected by different diets. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective: To study postprandial effects of three diets, during a single day, in NIDDM. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A low-fat diet (45-56 energy-% from carbohydrates), and a low-carbohydrate diet (16-24 energy-% from carbohydrates) was compared with a Mediterranean-style diet (black coffee for breakfast and the same total-caloric intake as the other two diets for lunch with red wine, 32-35 energy-% from carbohydrates) in a randomized cross-over design. Total-caloric intake/test-day at the clinic from food was 1025-1080 kCal in men and 905-984 kCal in women. The test meals were consumed at a diabetes ward under supervision. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Twenty-one participants were recruited and 19 completed the studies. The low-carbohydrate diet induced lower insulin and glucose excursions compared with the low-fat diet (pandlt;0.0005 for both AUC). The insulin-response following the single Mediterranean-style lunch-meal was more pronounced than during the low-fat diet lunch (insulin increase-ratio of the low-fat diet: 4.35 +/- 2.2, of Mediterranean-style diet: 8.12 +/- 5.2, p=0.001) while postprandial glucose levels were similar. The increase-ratio of insulin correlated with the elevation of the incretin glucose-dependent insulinotropic-polypeptide following the Mediterranean-style diet lunch (Spearman, r = 0.64, p = 0.003). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The large Mediterranean-style lunch-meal induced similar postprandial glucose-elevations as the low-fat meal despite almost double amount of calories due to a pronounced insulin-increase. This suggests that accumulation of caloric intake from breakfast and lunch to a single large Mediterranean style lunch-meal in NIDDM might be advantageous from a metabolic perspective.

  • 42.
    Forsgren, Mikael F
    et al.
    Linköping University. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    On the Evaluation of 31P MRS Human Liver Protocols2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Franck, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gummesson, Anders
    Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jernås, Margareta
    Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Guillot, Gilles
    Department of Mathematical Statistics, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Applied Mathematics and Computer Sciences Department,National Research Institute for Agronomy, Paris, France; Centre for Ecology and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Glad, Camilla
    Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Per-Arne
    Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden;.
    Rudemo, Mats
    Department of Mathematical Statistics, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Carlsson, Lena M. S.
    Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsson, Bob
    Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Identification of adipocyte genes regulated by caloric intake2011In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 96, no 2, p. E413-E418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: Changes in energy intake have marked and rapid effects on metabolic functions and some of the effects may be due to changes in adipose tissue gene expression that precede alterations in body weight.

    OBJECTIVE: To identify genes in adipose tissue regulated by changes in caloric intake independent of changes in body weight.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Obese subjects were given a very-low calorie diet (VLCD; 450 kcal/day) for 16 weeks. After the diet, ordinary food was gradually reintroduced during 2 weeks while there were minimal changes in body weight. Adipose tissue gene expression was measured by microarray analysis. First, genes regulated during caloric restriction and in the opposite direction during the weight stable re-feeding phase were identified. To verify opposite regulation to that observed during caloric restriction, identified genes were further analyzed using adipocyte expression profiles from healthy subjects before and after overfeeding. Results were confirmed using real time PCR or immunoassay.

    RESULTS: Using a significance level of p<0.05 for all comparisons, 52 genes were downregulated and 50 were up-regulated by caloric restriction and regulated in the opposite direction by re-feeding and overfeeding. Among these were genes that affect lipogenesis (ACLY, ACACA, FASN, SCD), protein synthesis (4EBP1, 4EBP2), beta-oxidation (CPT1B), liberation of fatty acids (CIDEA) and glyceroneogenesis (PCK2). Interestingly, several of these are under control of the master regulator mTOR.

    CONCLUSIONS: The observed transcriptional changes indicate that mTOR plays a central role in the control of diet-regulated adipocyte genes involved in lipogenesis and protein synthesis.

  • 44.
    Franck, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Åstrand, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Lindström, Torbjön
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Cardiovascular risk factors related to the PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism in patients with type 2 diabetes are gender dependent2012In: Blood Pressure, ISSN 0803-7051, E-ISSN 1651-1999, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 122-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction of the PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism with diabetes and cardiovascular risk is controversial. We studied 173 women and 309 men in the observational CARDIPP trial in which determination of left ventricular mass, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were performed. Blood pressures were measured with 24-h ambulatory technique (ABP). Heterozygotes and homozygotes of Ala were defined as Ala in the analyses. Men with Ala-isoform displayed higher waist circumference (Ala: 107 ± 14 cm, Pro: 104 ± 11 cm, p = 0.045) and body weight (Ala: 95.7 ± 18 kg, Pro: 91.6 ± 14 kg, p = 0.042) than Pro-homozygotes. Men with ALA-isoform also showed higher systolic ABP levels (Ala: 134 ± 15 mmHg, Pro: 130 ± 14 mmHg, p = 0.004), whereas left ventricular mass index, IMT and PWV were unrelated to isoforms. In contrast, carotid–radial PWV was lower in women with the Ala-isoform (Ala: 7.9 ± 1.0 m/s, Pro: 8.5 ± 1.3 m/s, p = 0.01) and levels of apolipoprotein A1 were higher (Ala: 1.43 ± 0.27 g/l, Pro: 1.35 ± 0.17 g/l, p = 0.03). In conclusion, we found that men with type 2 diabetes having the Ala-isoform of PPARγ Pro12Ala had an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile, whereas women with this isoform had lower carotid–radial PWV and higher apolipoprotein A1 levels suggesting a beneficial prognosis. These differences according to gender of the ALA isoform in type 2 diabetes deserve further attention.

  • 45.
    Franck, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Åstrand, Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    The Ala isoform of the PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism is related to increased abdominal obesity in men but has little impact on cardiovascular risk markers in patients with type 2 diabetes2009Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The interaction of the PPARγ Pro12Ala with obesity and cardiovascular risk is controversial. We aimed to study potential associations of the Ala isoform of this polymorphism with obesity, blood pressure and markers of cardiovascular disease and organ damage in middle aged patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Subjects and methods: We recruited 148 women and 246 men in the CArdiovascular Risk factors in Patients with DIabetes – a Prospective study in the Primary health care setting (CARDIPP) study in which early markers of organ damage by cardiac echocardiography, determination of carotid intima media thickness (IMT) and measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV) was performed. Blood pressures were measured as both as 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and as a noninvasive recording of central blood pressure. Allelic discrimination was detected with the ABI prism 7500HT Sequence Detection System. Due to the low prevalence of Ala homozygotes, heterozygotes and homozygotes of Ala were defined as Ala isoform in the analyses.

    Results: Men with Ala isoform exhibited higher sagittal abdominal diameter (Pro: 25.4±3.4 cm, Ala: 26.7±4.9 cm, p= 0.04) waist circumference (Pro: 104±11 cm, Ala: 108±15 cm, p= 0.046) and body weight (Pro: 91.6±14, Ala: 96.5±18, p= 0.035) than homozygotes for the Pro isoform. However, there were no differences in either gender with respect to blood pressures, left-ventricular mass-index, carotid IMT or carotid-femoral PWV in the participants.

    Conclusion: It is unlikely that determination of the PPARγ Pro12Ala isoform in clinic practice adds any major information on cardiovascular risk or circulatory organ damage in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 46.
    Franck, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenkula, Karin G.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öst, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Insulin-induced GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane is blunted in large compared with small primary fat cells isolated from the same individual2007In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 1716-1722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis: Several studies have suggested that large fat cells are less responsive to insulin than small fat cells. However, in these studies, large fat cells from obese individuals were compared with smaller fat cells from leaner participants, in effect making it impossible to draw conclusions about whether there is a causal relationship between fat cell size and insulin sensitivity. We hypothesised that small fat cells might be more insulin-responsive than large adipocytes when obtained from the same individual.

    Materials and methods: We developed a method of sorting isolated primary human fat cells by using nylon filters of two different pore sizes. The cells were stained to visualise DNA, which allowed discrimination from artefacts such as lipid droplets. The sorted cells were left to recover overnight, since we had previously demonstrated that this is necessary for correct assessment of insulin response.

    Results: We found similar amounts of the insulin receptor (IR), IRS-1 and GLUT4 when we compared small and large adipocytes from the same volunteer by immunoblotting experiments using the same total cell volume from both cell populations. Activation of IR, IRS-1 and Akt1 (also known as protein kinase B) by insulin was similar in the two cell populations. However, immunofluorescence confocal microscopy of plasma membrane sheets did not reveal any increase in the amount of GLUT4 in the plasma membrane following insulin stimulation in the large fat cells, whereas we saw a twofold increase in the amount of GLUT4 in the small fat cells.

    Conclusions/interpretation: Our results support a causal relationship between the accumulation of large fat cells in obese individuals and reduced insulin responsiveness.

  • 47.
    Fredriksson, Ingemar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Johan Östgren, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care Centre.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Reduced Arteriovenous Shunting Capacity After Local Heating and Redistribution of Baseline Skin Blood Flow in Type 2 Diabetes Assessed With Velocity-Resolved Quantitative Laser Doppler Flowmetry2010In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 59, no 7, p. 1578-1584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE-To compare the microcirculatory velocity distribution in type 2 diabetic patients and nondiabetic control subjects at baseline and after local heating. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-The skin blood flow response to local heating (44 degrees C for 20 mm) was assessed in 28 diabetic patients and 29 control subjects using a new velocity-resolved quantitative laser Doppler flowmetry technique (qLDF). The qLDF estimates erythrocyte (RBC) perfusion (velocity X concentration), in a physiologically relevant unit (grams RBC per 100 g tissue X millimeters per second) in a fixed output volume, separated into three velocity regions: v less than1 mm/s, v 1-10 mm/s, and v greater than10 mm/s. RESULTS-The increased blood flow occurs in vessels with a velocity greater than1 mm/s. A significantly lower response in qLDF total perfusion was found in diabetic patients than in control subjects after heat provocation because of less high-velocity blood flow (v greater than10 mm/s). The RBC concentration in diabetic patients increased sevenfold for v between 1 and 10 mm/s, and 15-fold for v greater than10 mm/s, whereas no significant increase was found for v less than1 mm/s. The mean velocity increased from 0.94 to 7.3 mm/s in diabetic patients and from 0.83 to 9.7 mm/s in control subjects. CONCLUSIONS-The perfusion increase occurs in larger shunting vessels and not as an increase in capillary flow. Baseline diabetic patient data indicated a redistribution of flow to higher velocity regions, associated with longer duration of diabetes. A lower perfusion was associated with a higher BMI and a lower toe-to-brachial systolic blood pressure ratio.

  • 48.
    Fridell, Sara
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care, Center for Oral Rehabilitation Linköping.
    Ström, Edvin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Agebratt, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A randomised study in young subjects of the effects of eating extra fruit or nuts on periodontal inflammation2018In: BDJ open, ISSN 2056-807X, Vol. 3, article id 17022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives/Aims:

    Fruit is often advocated as a healthy source of nutrients and vitamins. However, the high contents of sugars in many fruits could potentially counteract positive effects on the teeth.

    Materials and methods:

    We recruited 30 healthy non-obese participants who were randomised to either supplement their diet with extra fruits or nuts, each at +7 kcal/kg body weight/day, for 2 months.

    Results:

    Fructose intake increased from 9.1±6.0 to 25.6±9.6 g/day, P<0.0001, in the fruit group and was reduced from 12.4±5.7 to 6.5±5.3 g/day, P=0.007, in the nut group. Serum-vitamin C increased in both groups (fruit: P=0.017; nuts: P=0.009). α-Tocopherol/cholesterol ratio increased in the fruit group (P=0.0033) while β-carotene/cholesterol decreased in the nut group (P<0.0001). The amount of subjects with probing pocket depths ⩾4 mm in the fruit group was reduced (P=0.045) according to blinded examinations, and the difference in the changes in probing pockets ⩾4 mm was also statistically significant between the food groups (P=0.010).

    Conclusion:

    A large increase of fruit intake, compared with nuts, had a favourable effect on periodontal status in some respects, despite the high sugar contents. To search for potential protective micronutrients in fruit that protect the teeth could be an aim for further research.

  • 49.
    Fryk, Emanuel
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Perman Sundelin, Jeanna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strindberg, Lena
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pereira, Maria J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Federici, Massimo
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Marx, Nikolaus
    University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Germany.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Schmelz, Martin
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Svensson, Per-Arne
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Jan W.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Boren, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jansson, Per-Anders
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Microdialysis and proteomics of subcutaneous interstitial fluid reveals increased galectin-1 in type 2 diabetes patients2016In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 65, no 7, p. 998-1006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To identify a potential therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes by comparing the subcutaneous interstitial fluid from type 2 diabetes patients and healthy men. Methods. Proteomics was performed on the interstitial fluid of subcutaneous adipose tissue obtained by microdialysis from 7 type 2 diabetes patients and 8 healthy participants. 851 proteins were detected, of which 36 (including galectin-1) showed significantly altered expression in type 2 diabetes. We also measured galectin-1 expression in: (1) adipocytes isolated from adipose tissue biopsies from these participants; (2) subcutaneous adipose tissue of 24 obese participants before, during and after 16 weeks on a very low calorie diet (VLCD); and (3) adipocytes isolated from 6 healthy young participants after 4 weeks on a diet and lifestyle intervention to promote weight gain. We also determined the effect of galectin-1 on glucose uptake in human adipose tissue. Results. Galectin-1 protein levels were elevated in subcutaneous dialysates from type 2 diabetes compared with healthy controls (p amp;lt; 0.05). In agreement, galectin-1 mRNA expression was increased in adipocytes from the type 2 diabetes patients (p amp;lt; 0.05). Furthermore, galectin-1 mRNA expression was decreased in adipose tissue after VLCD (p amp;lt; 0.05) and increased by overfeeding (p amp;lt; 0.05). Co-incubation of isolated human adipocytes with galectin-1 reduced glucose uptake (p amp;lt; 0.05) but this was independent of the insulin signal. Conclusion. Proteomics of the interstitial fluid in subcutaneous adipose tissue in vivo identified a novel adipokine, galectin-1, with a potential role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 50.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dizdar, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bunjaku, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    In type 2 diabetes, randomisation to advice to follow a low-carbohydrate diet transiently improves glycaemic control compared with advice to follow a low-fat diet producing a similar weight loss2012In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 2118-2127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The study aimed to compare the effects of a 2 year intervention with a low-fat diet (LFD) or a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD), based on four group meetings to achieve compliance. METHODS: This was a prospective randomised parallel trial involving 61 adults with type 2 diabetes consecutively recruited in primary care and randomised by drawing ballots. Patients that did not speak Swedish could not be recruited. The primary outcomes in this non-blinded study were weight and HbA(1c). Patients on the LFD aimed for 55-60 energy per cent (E%) and those on LCD for 20 E% from carbohydrate. RESULTS: The mean BMI and HbA(1c) of the participants were 32.7 ± 5.4 kg/m(2) and 57.0 ± 9.2 mmol/mol, respectively. No patients were lost to follow-up. Weight loss did not differ between groups and was maximal at 6 months: LFD -3.99 ± 4.1 kg (n = 31); LCD -4.31 ± 3.6 kg (n = 30); p < 0.001 within groups. At 24 months, patients on the LFD had lost -2.97 ± 4.9 kg and those on LCD -2.34 ± 5.1 kg compared with baseline (p = 0.002 and p = 0.020 within groups, respectively). HbA(1c) fell in the LCD group only (LCD at 6 months -4.8 ± 8.3 mmol/mol, p = 0.004, at 12 months -2.2 ± 7.7 mmol/mol, p = 0.12; LFD at 6 months -0.9 ± 8.8 mmol/mol, p = 0.56). At 6 months, HDL-cholesterol had increased with the LCD (from 1.13 ± 0.33 mmol/l to 1.25 ± 0.47 mmol/l, p = 0.018) while LDL-cholesterol did not differ between groups. Insulin doses were reduced in the LCD group (0 months, LCD 42 ± 65 E, LFD 39 ± 51 E; 6 months, LCD 30 ± 47 E, LFD 38 ± 48 E; p = 0.046 for between-group change). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Weight changes did not differ between the diet groups, while insulin doses were reduced significantly more with the LCD at 6 months, when compliance was good. Thus, aiming for 20% of energy intake from carbohydrates is safe with respect to cardiovascular risk compared with the traditional LFD and this approach could constitute a treatment alternative. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01005498 FUNDING: University Hospital of Linköping Research Funds, Linköping University, the County Council of Östergötland, and the Diabetes Research Centre of Linköping University.

1234 1 - 50 of 153
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf