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  • 1.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, County Council of Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Norrköping, Sweden.
    Consequences of high-sensitivity troponin T testing applied in a primary care population with chest pain compared with a commercially available point-of-care troponin T analysis: an observational prospective study2015In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test.METHODS:This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3years.RESULTS:Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the [greater than or equal to]15ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50ng/L. Troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L was correlated to age [greater than or equal to]65years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3years.CONCLUSIONS:A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65years. For patients older than 65-70years, a higher decision limit than [greater than or equal to]15ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ljungsbro.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Internal Med, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Characteristics of patients with acute myocardial infarction contacting primary healthcare before hospitalisation: a cross-sectional study2018In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 19, article id 167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The characteristics of patients with on-going myocardial infarction (MI) contacting the primary healthcare (PHC) centre before hospitalisation are not well known. Prompt diagnosis is crucial in patients with MI, but many patients delay seeking medical care. The aims of this study was to 1) describe background characteristics, symptoms, actions and delay times in patients contacting the PHC before hospitalisation when falling ill with an acute MI, 2) compare those patients with acute MI patients not contacting the PHC, and 3) explore factors associated with a PHC contact in acute MI patients. Methods: This was a cross-sectional multicentre study, enrolling consecutive patients with MI within 24 hours of admission to hospital from Nov 2012 until Feb 2014. Results: A total of 688 patients with MI, 519 men and 169 women, were included; the mean age was 66 +/- 11 years. One in five people contacted PHC instead of the recommended emergency medical services (EMS), and 94% of these patients experienced cardinal symptoms of an acute MI; i.e., chest pain, and/or radiating pain in the arms, and/or cold sweat. Median delay time from symptom-onset-to-decision-to-seek-care was 2:15 hours in PHC patients and 0:40 hours in non-PHC patients (pamp;lt;0.01). The probability of utilising the PHC before hospitalisation was associated with fluctuating symptoms (OR 1.74), pain intensity (OR 0.90) symptoms during off-hours (OR 0.42), study hospital (OR 3.49 and 2.52, respectively, for two of the county hospitals) and a final STEMI diagnosis (OR 0.58). Conclusions: Ambulance services are still underutilized in acute MI patients. A substantial part of the patients contacts their primary healthcare centre before they are diagnosed with MI, although experiencing cardinal symptoms such as chest pain. There is need for better knowledge in the population about symptoms of MI and adequate pathways to qualified care. Knowledge and awareness amongst primary healthcare professionals on the occurrence of MI patients is imperative.

  • 3.
    Flook, Nigel
    et al.
    University of Alberta .
    Unge, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Karlson, Bjoern W
    AstraZeneca Research and Development .
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Approach to managing undiagnosed chest pain - Could gastroesophageal reflux disease be the cause?2007In: Canadian family physician, ISSN 0008-350X, E-ISSN 1715-5258, Vol. 53, p. 261-266Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To highlight gastroesophageal reflux disease as a common cause of undiagnosed chest pain. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Diagnostic considerations are based on information in peer-reviewed articles retrieved from MEDLINE. Studies had to be in English and involve at least 30 subjects. Population-based studies had to have a sample size of at least 300 and a response rate of at least 60%. Thirty-seven relevant articles were found. MAIN MESSAGE Clinical management of patients presenting with diagnostically challenging chest pain starts with a careful search for coronary artery disease and other potentially life-threatening causes. Investigations must continue until the underlying disease is identified and symptoms have been effectively controlled. Ongoing symptoms of undiagnosed chest pain cause considerable suffering, impair quality of life, and add unnecessary costs to the health care system. In more than half the patients with undiagnosed chest pain, symptoms are caused by gastroesophageal disease. Empirical acid-suppressive therapy with a proton pump inhibitor can assist clinicians in identifying patients whose symptoms are acid-related. CONCLUSION Many patients with undiagnosed chest pain can be managed in primary care, minimizing the need for referrals and costly investigations.

  • 4.
    Grönlund, V.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Carlsson, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The desire for a good life - patients beliefs of self-care after a coronary event2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

         

    Introduction: After a first coronary event there is an increased risk for a recurrent event. Despite that risk, 1/5 of the patients continue to smoke, 1/3 is obese and more than half of the patients have elevated blood pressure and total cholesterol. Secondary preventive self-care activities are needed to improve outcomes and the belief of patients plays a vital role in changing behavior.                         

    Aim: To examine patients’ beliefs of self-care 6-12 months after a coronary event.                         

    Method: The study design was qualitative. Twenty-five patients, including 10 women, mean age 65 years with stable coronary artery disease participated in four focus group interviews. Data were taped, transcribed and analyzed according to the conventional content analysis.                         

    Findings: Patients’ belief of self-care is influenced by their desire of a good life even though life seems fragile. Patients try to live up to the standard of health care prescription and advices. However, these achievements require behavior change and conscious boundaries, which are challenged by various obstacles such as fear of, overstrain and stress. Physical activity is considered as both a source to well-being and a necessity, but patients are uncertain and afraid for overstraining. A healthy diet is seen as important but the advices given are sometimes contradictory and create confusion. Medication is found important but not at the cost of all the side-effects. Patients also report that in order to believe in their ability and to be responsible for self-care, support from health care providers is expected. But at the same time the invaluable support and information is often not provided, creating uncertainty.                         

    Discussion: The study highlights the patients’ perspective of self-care and what they view as important in self-care after an event of coronary artery disease. The patients’ expectations on health services comprise information, support and continuous follow-up. This is necessary to facilitate the patient’s responsibility for their own care.                         

    Conclusion: Patients’ beliefs about the concept of self-care after an event of coronary artery disease are multifaceted and voluminous compared to the health care definition. The findings of the study challenge health care policies approach to self-care. There is a need to reconsider and assess what and how secondary preventive patient education should be performed after an event of coronary artery disease.  

                        

  • 5.
    Grönlund, V.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Rudenas, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Appel, M.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Ednarsson, T.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner Köhler, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Problem-based learning after Coronary artery disease - how do patients experience it?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Haasenritter, Joerg
    et al.
    University of Marburg, Germany .
    Aerts, Marc
    University of Louvain, Belgium .
    Boesner, Stefan
    University of Marburg, Germany .
    Buntinx, Frank
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Burnand, Bernard
    University of Lausanne Hospital, Switzerland .
    Herzig, Lilli
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland .
    Andre Knottnerus, J
    University of Maastricht, Netherlands .
    Minalu, Girma
    University of Louvain, Belgium .
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Renier, Walter
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Sox, Carol
    Dartmouth Medical Sch, NH USA .
    Sox, Harold
    Dartmouth Medical Sch, NH USA .
    Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert
    University of Marburg, Germany .
    Coronary heart disease in primary care: accuracy of medical history and physical findings in patients with chest pain - a study protocol for a systematic review with individual patient data2012In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 13, no 81Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chest pain is a common complaint in primary care, with coronary heart disease (CHD) being the most concerning of many potential causes. Systematic reviews on the sensitivity and specificity of symptoms and signs summarize the evidence about which of them are most useful in making a diagnosis. Previous meta-analyses are dominated by studies of patients referred to specialists. Moreover, as the analysis is typically based on study-level data, the statistical analyses in these reviews are limited while meta-analyses based on individual patient data can provide additional information. Our patient-level meta-analysis has three unique aims. First, we strive to determine the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs for myocardial ischemia in primary care. Second, we investigate associations between study-or patient-level characteristics and measures of diagnostic accuracy. Third, we aim to validate existing clinical prediction rules for diagnosing myocardial ischemia in primary care. This article describes the methods of our study and six prospective studies of primary care patients with chest pain. Later articles will describe the main results. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods/Design: We will conduct a systematic review and IPD meta-analysis of studies evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs for diagnosing coronary heart disease in primary care. We will perform bivariate analyses to determine the sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios of individual symptoms and signs and multivariate analyses to explore the diagnostic value of an optimal combination of all symptoms and signs based on all data of all studies. We will validate existing clinical prediction rules from each of the included studies by calculating measures of diagnostic accuracy separately by study. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDiscussion: Our study will face several methodological challenges. First, the number of studies will be limited. Second, the investigators of original studies defined some outcomes and predictors differently. Third, the studies did not collect the same standard clinical data set. Fourth, missing data, varying from partly missing to fully missing, will have to be dealt with. Despite these limitations, we aim to summarize the available evidence regarding the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs for diagnosing CHD in patients presenting with chest pain in primary care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanReview registration: Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (University of York): CRD42011001170

  • 7.
    Järemo, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Eriksson, M.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Platelets and acute cerebral infarction2013In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 407-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stroke is worldwide a leading cause of death and disability. Its etiology is regarded as heterogeneous. Platelets are implicated in its pathophysiology, but our understanding of their specific role is incomplete. Only sparse and conflicting information exists about platelet reactivity and activity in acute stroke. Some scientists take the view that platelets activate in conjunction with acute cerebral infarctions. Others put forward evidence corroborating the contrary notion. Increased soluble P-selectin as a sign of platelet and/or endothelial activity seems to be a feature of the disease. The latter point of view is opposed by other researchers. Due to these conflicting opinions, this study is devoted to platelet characteristics in acute cerebral infarctions. We studied subjects (n = 72; age 74 +/- 10(SD) years; 31 females) having acute stroke. As controls served atrial fibrillation (AF) patients (n = 58; age 69 +/- 7(SD) years; 12 females) subject to electrical cardioversion, a flow cytometer was put to use for measuring platelet reactivity and activity. After agonist provocation, both platelet bound P-selectin and fibrinogen were employed as estimates of platelet reactivity. Dilutions of a thrombin-receptor-activating peptide (TRAP-6) (74 and 57 mmol/l) (P-selectin and fibrinogen) and ADP (8.5 and 1.7 mmol/l) (fibrinogen only) were put to use as platelet agonists. Membrane-bound P-selectin without agonist stimulation served as a measure of in vivo platelet activation. Soluble P-selectin, as determined from a commercial ELISA, was used to assess platelet and/or endothelial activity. In acute stroke neither platelet-bound P-selectin nor fibrinogen after stimulation, i.e. reactivity, differed from AF controls. In contrast, lower platelet activity as judged from surface attached and circulating P-selectin without agonist stimulation proved to be a feature of cerebral infarctions. The p-values were p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively. It is concluded that acute stroke is not associated with platelet reactivity platelets circulate less activated during the disease. It is evident that the mechanisms reflecting platelet reactivity and activity being investigated in this study play minor roles in stroke pathophysiology. New powerful platelet inhibitory drugs are currently introduced. To avoid major bleeding studies on platelet, behavior in acute stroke are necessary before including these medications in stroke treatment protocols.

  • 8.
    Järemo, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Buller, Caroline
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Alzheimer's disease and granulocyte density diversity2013In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 545-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The current study investigates circulating eosinophils and neutrophils in Alzheimer's (AD) type dementia with respect to density (kg/L). The existence of β-amyloid plaques in the brain is a feature of AD. Sporadic scientific reports indicate that the disease affects circulating neutrophils. In contrast, numerous publications investigate inflammatory reactions in AD brains. Locally, the plaques evoke a substantial inflammatory response involving activated microglia and astrocytes.

    METHODS:

    Subjects with probable AD (n = 39) were included and compared with elderly individuals (n = 22) lacking apparent memory problems. We sampled 10 mL venous blood in citrate. Granulocytes were separated according to density in linear Percoll™ gradients. Subsequently, the gradients were divided into density subfractions (n = 16). In every fraction, determination of eosinophil and neutrophil counts was carried out.

    RESULTS:

    AD sufferers displayed less granulocytes in fractions nos. 13-15 containing light cells. For these fractions, the P-values proved to be (P < 0·001; not significant; P = 0·03) and (P = 0·01; P = 0·01; not significant), for eosinophils and neutrophils, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The present work describes that less circulating light granulocytes are a feature of AD demented individuals. It is to hypothesize that it is a sign of impaired granulocyte turnover and cell damage. It is concluded that AD affects inflammatory cells in the periphery and that the behaviour of granulocytes in dementia is worthwhile further studies.

  • 9.
    Järemo, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Buller, Caroline
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Low-density platelet populations demonstrate low in vivo activity in sporadic Alzheimer disease2012In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 116-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platelets contain a substantial quantity of amyloid-precursor protein (APP) and β-amyloid. However, despite the large importance of APP and β-amyloid to dementia, little is known about platelets in sporadic Alzheimer dementia (AD). Furthermore, platelet heterogeneity influences human pathology and has been described to affect the progression of AD. This study investigated AD platelets with respect to density diversity and in vivo activity associated with density sub-fractions. We included 39 AD patients and used, as controls, 22 elderly individuals without apparent memory disorder. A continuous Percoll™ gradient covering the density span 1.04–1.09 kg/l provided the basis to divide platelets of whole blood into density fractions (n = 16). All platelet populations were evaluated accordingly. Platelet counts were determined electronically. A flow-cytometer was put to use to measure surface-bound fibrinogen as a measure of platelet in vivo activity. Samples obtained from patients diagnosed with sporadic AD contained platelets (fractions numbers 4–16) that circulated with significantly less surface-bound fibrinogen, i.e., their platelet activation in vivo was reduced, compared with controls. In particular, highly significant differences (p < 0.001) were obtained for the six less dense platelet populations (fractions numbers 11–16) when comparing sporadic AD with controls. In contrast, the densest AD platelets in fractions numbers 1–3 did not differ significantly from control cells with respect to in vivo platelet-bound fibrinogen. It is concluded that sporadic AD is characterized by lower density platelet populations that, while circulating, exhibited reduced activation. The clinical significance of this finding is unclear but these results suggest the importance of platelet heterogeneity in dementia as a topic for further investigation.

  • 10.
    Järemo, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Buller, Caroline
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    P-selectin paradox and dementia of the Alzheimer type: Circulating P-selectin is increased but platelet-bound P-selectin after agonist provocation is compromised2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 170-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Knowledge concerning the neurobiological importance of platelets in Alzheimers disease (AD) is sparse. P-selectin, which is located together with beta-amyloid precursor proteins in platelet alpha-granules, is also found in endothelial cells. Upon activation, P-selectin is relocated to cell surfaces where it acts as a receptor. Subsequently, the protein is cleaved from the membrane, to then be circulated. We investigated P-selectin behavior in AD dementia. Methods. We recruited 23 persons diagnosed moderate AD and 17 healthy elders without obvious memory problems. Circulating P-selectin was analyzed using an ELISA technique and flow cytometry was used to measure surface-bound P-selectin. The latter measure was carried out without provocation (platelet activity) and after in vitro agonist stimulation (platelet reactivity). A thrombin-receptor activating peptide (TRAP-6) (74 mu mol/L)) was used as a platelet agonist. Results. Soluble P-selectin was augmented in AD (p = 0.019) but platelet membrane-attached P-selectin did not differ from controls. AD diagnosis was associated with less surface-bound P-selectin after provocation. Significant results were obtained when 74 mu mol/L TRAP-6 was used as a platelet agonist (p = 0.0008). Conclusion. This study describes apparently paradoxical P-selectin reactions in moderate AD. While soluble P-selectin was higher in the disease group, membrane-attached P-selectin without agonist stimulation was no different between the disease and control groups. In contrast, AD was linked to lower platelet reactivity. The current findings encourage further research into this P-selectin paradox and its relevance for AD and, perhaps, other types of dementia as well.

  • 11.
    Järemo, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Buller, Caroline
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Post, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), KI-Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge; Sweden.
    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by more low-density erythrocytes with increased volume and enhanced β-amyloid x-40 content2011In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 270, no 5, p. 489-492Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Karlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    A clinical decision support tool for improving adherence to guidelines on anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke: A cluster-randomized trial in a Swedish primary care setting (the CDS-AF study)2018In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 15, no 3, article id e1002528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with substantial morbidity, in particular stroke. Despite good evidence for the reduction of stroke risk with anticoagulant therapy, there remains significant undertreatment. The main aim of the current study was to investigate whether a clinical decision support tool (CDS) for stroke prevention integrated in the electronic health record could improve adherence to guidelines for stroke prevention in patients with AF.

    Methods and findings

    We conducted a cluster-randomized trial where all 43 primary care clinics in the county of Östergötland, Sweden (population 444,347), were randomized to be part of the CDS intervention or to serve as controls. The CDS produced an alert for physicians responsible for patients with AF and at increased risk for thromboembolism (according to the CHA2DS2-VASc algorithm) without anticoagulant therapy. The primary endpoint was adherence to guidelines after 1 year. After randomization, there were 22 and 21 primary care clinics in the CDS and control groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in baseline adherence to guidelines regarding anticoagulant therapy between the 2 groups (CDS group 70.3% [5,186/7,370; 95% CI 62.9%–77.7%], control group 70.0% [4,187/6,009; 95% CI 60.4%–79.6%], p = 0.83). After 12 months, analysis with linear regression with adjustment for primary care clinic size and adherence to guidelines at baseline revealed a significant increase in guideline adherence in the CDS (73.0%, 95% CI 64.6%–81.4%) versus the control group (71.2%, 95% CI 60.8%–81.6%, p = 0.013, with a treatment effect estimate of 0.016 [95% CI 0.003–0.028]; number of patients with AF included in the final analysis 8,292 and 6,508 in the CDS and control group, respectively). Over the study period, there was no difference in the incidence of stroke, transient ischemic attack, or systemic thromboembolism in the CDS group versus the control group (49 [95% CI 43–55] per 1,000 patients with AF in the CDS group compared to 47 [95% CI 39–55] per 1,000 patients with AF in the control group, p = 0.64). Regarding safety, the CDS group had a lower incidence of significant bleeding, with events in 12 (95% CI 9–15) per 1,000 patients with AF compared to 16 (95% CI 12–20) per 1,000 patients with AF in the control group (p = 0.04). Limitations of the study design include that the analysis was carried out in a catchment area with a high baseline adherence rate, and issues regarding reproducibility to other regions.

    Conclusions

    The present study demonstrates that a CDS can increase guideline adherence for anticoagulant therapy in patients with AF. Even though the observed difference was small, this is the first randomized study to our knowledge indicating beneficial effects with a CDS in patients with AF.

  • 13.
    Kärner, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Wodlin, Peter
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effect of problem-based learning in patient education after an event of CORONARY heart disease - a randomised study in PRIMARY health care: design and methodology of the COR-PRIM study2012In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 13, no 110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Even though there is convincing evidence that self-care, such as regular exercise         and/or stopping smoking, alters the outcomes after an event of coronary heart disease         (CHD), risk factors remain. Outcomes can improve if core components of secondary prevention         programmes are structurally and pedagogically applied using adult learning principles         e.g. problem-based learning (PBL). Until now, most education programs for patients         with CHD have not been based on such principles. The basic aim is to discover whether         PBL provided in primary health care (PHC) has long-term effects on empowerment and         self-care after an event of CHD.     

    Methods/Design

    A randomised controlled study is planned for patients with CHD. The primary outcome         is empowerment to reach self-care goals. Data collection will be performed at baseline         at hospital and after one, three and five years in PHC using quantitative and qualitative         methodologies involving questionnaires, medical assessments, interviews, diaries and         observations. Randomisation of 165 patients will take place when they are stable in         their cardiac condition and have optimised cardiac medication that has not substantially         changed during the last month. All patients will receive conventional care from their         general practitioner and other care providers. The intervention consists of a patient         education program in PHC by trained district nurses (tutors) who will apply PBL to         groups of 6–9 patients meeting on 13 occasions for two hours over one year. Patients         in the control group will not attend a PBL group but will receive home-sent patient         information on 11 occasions during the year.     

    Discussion

    We expect that the 1-year PBL-patient education will improve patients’ beliefs, self-efficacy         and empowerment to achieve self-care goals significantly more than one year of standardised         home-sent patient information. The assumption is that PBL will reduce cardiovascular         events in the long-term and will also be cost-effective compared to controls. Further,         the knowledge obtained from this study may contribute to improving patients’ ability         to handle self-care, and furthermore, may reduce the number of patients having subsequent         CHD events in Sweden.

  • 14.
    Kärner, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahl, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Asklund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    COR-PRIM: Patient education after coronary disease - Long-term evaluation in primary care2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Kärner, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    P161 Poster COR-PRIM: Longitudinal Study on PBL in Self-Care after CVD Preliminary Results from a Pilot Study2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Kärner Köhler, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Patient empowerment and general self-efficacy in patients with coronary heart disease: a cross-sectional study2018In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 19, article id 76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In managing a life with coronary heart disease and the possibility of planning and following a rehabilitation plan, patients’ empowerment and self-efficacy are considered important. However, currently there is limited data on levels of empowerment among patients with coronary heart disease, and demographic and clinical characteristics associated with patient empowerment are not known.

    The purpose of this study was to assess the level of patient empowerment and general self-efficacy in patients six to 12 months after the cardiac event. We also aimed to explore the relationship between patient empowerment, general self-efficacy and other related factors such as quality of life and demographic variables.

    Methods

    A sample of 157 cardiac patients (78% male; age 68 ± 8.5 years) was recruited from a Swedish hospital. Patient empowerment was assessed using the SWE-CES-10. Additional data was collected on general self-efficacy and well-being (EQ5D and Ladder of Life). Demographic and clinical variables were collected from medical records and interviews.

    Results

    The mean levels of patient empowerment and general self-efficacy on a 0–4 scale were 3.69 (±0.54) and 3.13 (±0.52) respectively, and the relationship between patient empowerment and general self-efficacy was weak (r = 0.38). In a simple linear regression, patient empowerment and general self-efficacy were significantly correlated with marital status, current self-rated health and future well-being. Multiple linear regressions on patient empowerment (Model 1) and general self-efficacy (Model 2) showed an independent significant association between patient empowerment and current self-rated health. General self-efficacy was not independently associated with any of the variables.

    Conclusions

    Patients with a diagnosis of coronary heart disease reported high levels of empowerment and general self-efficacy at six to 12 months after the event. Clinical and demographic variables were not independently associated with empowerment or low general self-efficacy. Patient empowerment and general self-efficacy were not mutually interchangeable, and therefore both need to be measured when planning for secondary prevention in primary health care.

  • 17.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Eriksson, Kristoffer
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Post, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Järemo, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Alzheimer and platelets: Low-density platelet populations reveal increased serotonin content in Alzheimer type dementia2014In: Clinical Biochemistry, ISSN 0009-9120, E-ISSN 1873-2933, Vol. 47, no 15, p. 51-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Alzheimers disease (AD) is a progressive form of dementia characterized by an increase in the toxic substance beta-amyloid in the brain. Platelets display a substantial heterogeneity with respect to density. They further contain a substantial amount of beta-amyloid precursor protein. Platelets take up and store serotonin (5-HT) that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of severe depression. The current study aims to investigate platelet serotonin content in different platelet density populations. Material and methods: The study involved 8 patients (age 70 +/- 8 (SD) years) (3 females/5 males) with moderate AD. 6 healthy elderly subjects (age 66 +/- 9 (SD) years) (3 females/3 males) served as controls. The platelet population was divided into 17 subpopulations according to density, using a linear Percoll (TM) gradient. Platelets were counted in all fractions. After cell lysis an ELISA technique was employed to determine the 5-HT content in each platelet subfraction. Results: The two study groups did not differ significantly regarding platelet distribution in the gradients, but AD sufferers have a significantly higher 5-HT content (p less than 0.05) in the lighter platelet populations. Discussion: AD-type dementia proved to be associated with lighter platelets containing more 5-HT. It is possible that platelets from AD patients release less 5-HT. It is speculated that AD synapses are affected in a manner comparable to platelets, which could explain why 5-HT reuptake inhibitors are less effective in AD dementia.

  • 18.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Harakka, PI
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Post, C.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gerlde, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    High in vivo platelet activity in female fibromyalgia patients2016In: Journal of Biomedical Sciences, ISSN 2254-609X, Vol. 5, no 3:21, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Fibromyalgia (FMS) is a pain syndrome characterized by chronic widespread pain and hyperalgesia/allodynia. Many affected are women and risk factors are unidentified. Today, a certain number of set criteria of disease signs and symptoms must be met for the diagnosis to be made. These criteria are used because of the lack of reliable biomarkers or other medical examination. The current study examines if in vivo platelet activity varies between FMS and controls without FMS.

    Material and Methods: The study involves 24 females (age 38 + 9 (SD) years) with diagnosed FMS. 25 healthy females (age 50 + 12 (SD) years) without FMS served as controls. After sampling the whole platelet population was separated according to density with a linear Percoll™, into 17 density fractions. Platelet counts was carried out in all fractions using a routine cell counter. In addition, a flow cytometer was used to measure platelet bound fibrinogen without platelet agonist, reflecting in vivo platelet activity.

    Results: The study groups did not differ with respect to the distribution of platelets in the gradient. FMS sufferers demonstrated a significant higher platelet bound fibrinogen in most of the platelet density fractions. In particular, significant differences (p < 0.05) were obtained in fractions numbers 2-14 and 16. In difference, fractions numbers 1, 15 and 17 did not show any significant variance.

    Discussion: This is the first study to examine in vivo platelet activity in FMS. The results indicate that FMS is associated with elevated in vivo platelet activity compared to individuals without FMS. The clinical significance and the biochemical mechanisms regarding platelet heterogeneity are still uncertain. The results stimulate further research to elucidate the importance of platelet diversity in FMS

  • 19.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Arbetsprov på patienter som söker för bröstsmärta i primärvården2013In: Kliniska arbetsprov: metoder för diagnos och prognos / [ed] Lennart Jorfeldt, Olle Pahlm, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, 1, p. 329-332Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Chest pain and ischemic heart disease: Diagnosis and management in primary health care2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims. In patients consulting for chest pain, it is of great importance to evaluate the possibility of ischemic heart disease (IHD). The aims in this thesis were to investigate the accuracy of the general practitioners’ clinical assessments and the applicability of exercise testing and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients consulting for chest pain in primary care.

    Statins are known to prevent IHD. A further aim was therefore to investigate if a relation could be detected on a population basis between the use of statins and the morbidity of acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

    Methods. All patients from 20 to 79 years, consulting for a new episode of chest pain in three primary health care centres, were included during almost two years from 1998 to 2000. The patients were managed according to the clinical evaluation. The presence of IHD was excluded either by clinical examination only, or if stable IHD was in question, by exercise testing and if the exercise test was inconclusive by an additional MPS. If unstable IHD or myocardial infarction was suspected, referral for emergency hospital examination was made.

    Correlations between statin sales and the morbidity of AMI in Sweden’s municipalities were analysed in an ecological, register based study. Adjustment was made for sales of antidiabetics, socio-economic deprivation indexes and geographic coordinates.

    Results. Consultations for chest pain represented 1.5% of all consultations in the ages 20 to 79 and were made by 554 patients. In 281 patients IHD was excluded by clinical examination only. In 208 patients stable IHD and in 65 unstable IHD was in question. Four patients (1.4%) evaluated as not having IHD, were diagnosed with angina pectoris or AMI within three months. Exercise testing was performed in 191 patients and revealed no IHD in 134 and IHD in 14 patients. In 43 patients the exercise test results were equivocal. Thirty-nine of these patients underwent MPS, which showed no IHD in 20 and IHD in 19 of the patients.

    In a follow up almost six years later, neither mortality rate nor prevalence of IHD differed significantly between the 384 study patients evaluated not to have IHD and the population controls.

    Statin sales and AMI-incidence or mortality showed no strong associations from 1998 to 2002.

    Conclusions.

    ·Primary care is an appropriate level of care for ruling out IHD as the cause of chest pain, with sufficient safety and for diagnostics of stable IHD.

    ·Exercise testing and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy are useful procedures when investigating chest pain patients in primary care.

    ·The results indicate that preventive measures other than increased statin treatment should be considered to further decrease AMI-morbidity.

    List of papers
    1. Chest pain and ischaemic heart disease in primary care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chest pain and ischaemic heart disease in primary care
    Show others...
    2003 (English)In: British Journal of General Practice, ISSN 0960-1643, Vol. 53, no 490, p. 378-382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chest pain is the main symptom of first presentation with ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Little is known about the incidence of IHD among patients consulting the general practitioner (GP) for chest pain.

    Aims: To estimate the occurrence of IHD among patients consulting for chest pain, to study the results of the bicycle exercise test, and to estimate the incidence of IHD in the population.

    Design of study: Prospective descriptive study.

    Setting: Three primary health centres in south-eastern Sweden

    Method: All patients without a current IHD diagnosis, aged 20 to 79 years, and consulting for a new episode of chest pain, were included consecutively. The outcome was classified as IHD, possible IHD or not IHD, according to the results of a postal questionnaire, an exercise test or hospital care. Data from the hospital registry on patients with a diagnosis of IHD were analysed retrospectively.

    Results: Out of 38 075 GP consultations, 577 (1.5%) were for chest pain. IHD was diagnosed in 41 (8%) of the chest pain patients, in 41 (83%) the diagnosis was excluded, and in 50 (9%) the diagnosis was judged as being uncertain. Even though the diagnostic criteria were strict, the exercise tests led to a diagnostic conclusion in 77% of the cases, most frequently a normal test result. Combining data from primary and hospital care, the yearly incidence of IHD was 6.5 diagnosed per 1000 inhabitants (aged 20 to 79 years old).

    Conclusion: The incidence of a new episode of chest pain bringing the patient to the GP was low. Eight per cent of the patients received an IHD diagnosis, and in 9% further investigation or clinical assessment is needed.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13082 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-03-25 Created: 2008-03-25 Last updated: 2009-08-20
    2. Exercise testing and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in primary care patients with chest pain of new onset
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise testing and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in primary care patients with chest pain of new onset
    2007 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 117-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To analyse the outcome of exercise testing and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in primary care patients with chest pain of new onset.

    Design: Prospective, observational. Patients aged 20-79 years, consulting due to chest pain of new onset, were enrolled consecutively.

    Setting: Three primary care health centres in south-eastern Sweden.

    Patients: 191 patients where the possibility of stable ischaemic heart disease (IHD) could not be excluded by clinical examination alone.

    Main outcome measures: Exercise test results, when equivocal completed by MPS.

    Results: Exercise testing revealed IHD in 14 (7%) and no IHD in 134 (70%) of the cases. In 43 (23%) the exercise test results were equivocal. Thirty-nine of these patients underwent MPS, which showed IHD in 19 and no IHD in 20 cases. Among previously diagnosed cardiovascular disease and risk factors only atrial fibrillation in the male group showed a significant correlation to the outcome IHD.

    Conclusion: Exercise testing and MPS are both useful when investigating chest pain patients in primary care.

    Keywords
    Chest pain, exercise test, family practice, myocardial ischaemia, myocardial perfusion imaging, primary healthcare, risk factors
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13083 (URN)10.1080/02813430601116249 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-03-25 Created: 2008-03-25 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. The accuracy of general practitioners' clinical assessment of chest pain patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The accuracy of general practitioners' clinical assessment of chest pain patients
    2008 (English)In: European Journal of General Practice, ISSN 1381-4788, E-ISSN 1751-1402, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 50-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study general practitioners' (GP) assessment of the probability of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and GP action in daily practice regarding chest pain patients.

    Methods: All chest pain patients aged 20-79 years, attending three primary health-care centres in south-east Sweden and assessed by the GP to have high, low or very low probability of IHD, were included consecutively over a two year period. The “GP action in daily practice” was classed as “active decisions” (investigation or treatment) or “wait and see”. “IHD” or “not IHD” was settled according to the results of acute hospital investigation or exercise testing/myocardial perfusion scintigraphy.

    Results: 516 patients were included, 93 high, 145 low and 278 very low probability cases. The outcome was “IHD” in 47%, 9% and 1% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the “GP assessment of the probability of IHD” were 72% and 89%. The sensitivity and specificity of the “GP action in daily practice” were 88% and 72%, respectively. The negative predictive value was 98%.

    Conclusion: GP assessment, after clinical evaluation, that the probability of IHD was low did not safely rule out IHD. GP action in daily practice however, indicates that general practice is an appropriate level of care for chest pain patients.

    Keywords
    Chest Pain, Primary Health-care, Myocardial Ischaemia, Decision Making
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13084 (URN)10.1080/13814780802342622 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-03-25 Created: 2008-03-25 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. No connection between the level of exposition to statins in the population and the incidence/mortality of acute myocardial infarction: An ecological study based on Sweden’s municipalities
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>No connection between the level of exposition to statins in the population and the incidence/mortality of acute myocardial infarction: An ecological study based on Sweden’s municipalities
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Negative Results in Biomedicine, ISSN 1477-5751, E-ISSN 1477-5751, Vol. 10, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Randomised controlled trials have shown an excellent preventive effect of statins on ischemic heart disease. Our objective was to investigate if a relation can be detected between acute myocardial infarction- (AMI) mortality or incidence and statin utilisation, for men and women in different age-groups on a population basis.

    Results

    The utilisation rate of statins increased almost three times for both men and women between 1998 and 2002. During 1998-2000 the incidence of AMI decreased clearly for men but only slightly for women. Mortality decreased from 1998 to 2002. The change in statin utilisation from 1998 to 2000 showed no correlation to the change in AMI mortality from 2000 to 2002. Statin utilisation and AMI- incidence or mortality showed no correlations when adjusting for socio-economic deprivation, antidiabetic drugs and geographic coordinates.

    Conclusions

    Despite a widespread and increasing utilisation of statins, no correlation to the incidence or mortality of AMI could be detected. Other factors than increased statin treatment should be analysed especially when discussing the allocation of public resources.

    Keywords
    Myocardial infarction, Incidence, Antilipemic agents, Sweden; Population, Ecological study
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13085 (URN)10.1186/1477-5751-10-6 (DOI)
    Note

    On the day of the defence day the status of this article was: Submitted

    Available from: 2008-03-25 Created: 2008-03-25 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 21.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cost consequences of point-of-care troponin T testing in a Swedish primary health care setting2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate the safety and cost-effectiveness of point-of-care troponin T testing (POCT-TnT) for the management of patients with chest pain in primary care. Design. Prospective observational study with follow-up. Setting. Three primary health care (PHC) centres using POCT-TnT and four PHC centres not using POCT-TnT in south-east Sweden. Patients. All patients greater than= 35 years of age, contacting one of the PHC centres for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue, with no other probable cause than cardiac, were included. Symptoms must have commenced or worsened during the previous seven days. Main outcome measures. Emergency referral rates, diagnoses of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or unstable angina (UA), and costs were collected for 30 days after the patient sought care at the PHC centre. Results. A total of 196 patients with chest pain were included: 128 in PHC centres with POCT-TnT and 68 in PHC centres without POCT-TnT. Fewer patients from the PHC centres with POCT-TnT (n = 32, 25%) were emergently referred to hospital than from centres without POCT-TnT (n = 29, 43%; p = 0.011). Eight patients (6.2%) from PHC centres with POCT-TnT were diagnosed with AMI or UA compared with six patients (8.8%) from centres without POCT-TnT (p = 0.565). Two patients with AMI or UA were classified as missed cases from PHC centres with POCT-TnT and there were no missed cases from PHC centres without POCT-TnT. SKr290 000 was saved per missed case of AMI or UA. Conclusion. The use of POCT-TnT in primary care may be cost saving but at the expense of missed cases.

  • 22.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Per O.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kvick, Magnus
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Point-of-Care Troponin T Testing in the Management of Patients with Chest Pain in the Swedish Primary Care2013In: International Journal of Family Medicine, ISSN 2090-2042, E-ISSN 2090-2050, Vol. 2013Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Andersson, Pär
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Department of Internal Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Efficiency of point-of-care Troponin-T testing in a Swedish primary care setting2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale Swedish general practitioners and cardiologists are concerned of the use of point-of-care Troponin-T testing (PCTT) in primary care i.e. the risk of overlooking a recent acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or unstable angina (UA) relaying too much on a laboratory finding. In this study we aimed to evaluate both missed and properly managed AMI or UA in relation to the use of PCTT. Methods & Results Setting: Seven primary health care centres (PHCC) in southeast Sweden participated. In three of the PHCCs, PCTT was analysed in conjunction with clinical assessment of all study patients, i.e. PCTT-PHCCs. In four of the PHCCs, PCTT was not used, i.e. Control-PHCCs. All patients ≥ 35 years old consulting for chest pain, having commenced or aggravated the last seven days, were included in the study. A systematic review of hospital medical records was done of all patients hospitalised the same day as inclusion or within 30 days there after. In patients who were sent home from the PHCC and hospitalised for any reason within thirty days, the PHCC medical records were systematically reviewed, by one GP and one cardiologist. 196 patients were included, 128 patients in the three PCTT-PHCCs and 68 patients in the four Control-PHCCs. In the PCTT-PHCCs two patients were identified as missed AMI or UA and none in the Control-PHCCs. Properly managed patients with AMI or UA were five in the PCTT-PHCCs and six in the Control-PHCCs. Conclusion The use of PCTT in primary care does not seem to enhance a total safety manageing of chest pain patients. Clinical Relevance The use of PCTT in primary care could be discussed due to the risk of false safety.

  • 24.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlberg, Catarina
    Unit of R&D in Primary Care, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Department of Internal Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Persson, Lars-Göran
    Unit of R&D in Primary Care, Jönköping, Sweden .
    No connection between the level of exposition to statins in the population and the incidence/mortality of acute myocardial infarction: An ecological study based on Sweden’s municipalities2011In: Journal of Negative Results in Biomedicine, ISSN 1477-5751, E-ISSN 1477-5751, Vol. 10, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Randomised controlled trials have shown an excellent preventive effect of statins on ischemic heart disease. Our objective was to investigate if a relation can be detected between acute myocardial infarction- (AMI) mortality or incidence and statin utilisation, for men and women in different age-groups on a population basis.

    Results

    The utilisation rate of statins increased almost three times for both men and women between 1998 and 2002. During 1998-2000 the incidence of AMI decreased clearly for men but only slightly for women. Mortality decreased from 1998 to 2002. The change in statin utilisation from 1998 to 2000 showed no correlation to the change in AMI mortality from 2000 to 2002. Statin utilisation and AMI- incidence or mortality showed no correlations when adjusting for socio-economic deprivation, antidiabetic drugs and geographic coordinates.

    Conclusions

    Despite a widespread and increasing utilisation of statins, no correlation to the incidence or mortality of AMI could be detected. Other factors than increased statin treatment should be analysed especially when discussing the allocation of public resources.

  • 25.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Scheike, Morten
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Lars-Göran
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Örtoft, Kjell
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Chest pain and ischaemic heart disease in primary care2003In: British Journal of General Practice, ISSN 0960-1643, Vol. 53, no 490, p. 378-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chest pain is the main symptom of first presentation with ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Little is known about the incidence of IHD among patients consulting the general practitioner (GP) for chest pain.

    Aims: To estimate the occurrence of IHD among patients consulting for chest pain, to study the results of the bicycle exercise test, and to estimate the incidence of IHD in the population.

    Design of study: Prospective descriptive study.

    Setting: Three primary health centres in south-eastern Sweden

    Method: All patients without a current IHD diagnosis, aged 20 to 79 years, and consulting for a new episode of chest pain, were included consecutively. The outcome was classified as IHD, possible IHD or not IHD, according to the results of a postal questionnaire, an exercise test or hospital care. Data from the hospital registry on patients with a diagnosis of IHD were analysed retrospectively.

    Results: Out of 38 075 GP consultations, 577 (1.5%) were for chest pain. IHD was diagnosed in 41 (8%) of the chest pain patients, in 41 (83%) the diagnosis was excluded, and in 50 (9%) the diagnosis was judged as being uncertain. Even though the diagnostic criteria were strict, the exercise tests led to a diagnostic conclusion in 77% of the cases, most frequently a normal test result. Combining data from primary and hospital care, the yearly incidence of IHD was 6.5 diagnosed per 1000 inhabitants (aged 20 to 79 years old).

    Conclusion: The incidence of a new episode of chest pain bringing the patient to the GP was low. Eight per cent of the patients received an IHD diagnosis, and in 9% further investigation or clinical assessment is needed.

  • 26.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Örtoft, Kjell
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The accuracy of general practitioners' clinical assessment of chest pain patients2008In: European Journal of General Practice, ISSN 1381-4788, E-ISSN 1751-1402, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 50-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study general practitioners' (GP) assessment of the probability of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and GP action in daily practice regarding chest pain patients.

    Methods: All chest pain patients aged 20-79 years, attending three primary health-care centres in south-east Sweden and assessed by the GP to have high, low or very low probability of IHD, were included consecutively over a two year period. The “GP action in daily practice” was classed as “active decisions” (investigation or treatment) or “wait and see”. “IHD” or “not IHD” was settled according to the results of acute hospital investigation or exercise testing/myocardial perfusion scintigraphy.

    Results: 516 patients were included, 93 high, 145 low and 278 very low probability cases. The outcome was “IHD” in 47%, 9% and 1% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the “GP assessment of the probability of IHD” were 72% and 89%. The sensitivity and specificity of the “GP action in daily practice” were 88% and 72%, respectively. The negative predictive value was 98%.

    Conclusion: GP assessment, after clinical evaluation, that the probability of IHD was low did not safely rule out IHD. GP action in daily practice however, indicates that general practice is an appropriate level of care for chest pain patients.

  • 27.
    Norlund, Lena
    et al.
    Laboratoriemedicin, Norrbottens läns landsting.
    Norlund, Petra
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Skov-Poulsen, Katarina
    Central­lasarettet, Växjö .
    Karlsson, Pia
    Länssjukhuset ­Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Nordin, Gunnar
    Equalis.
    Patientnära analyser används inte enhetligt i primärvården2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 24, p. 1054-1056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary health care encompasses laboratory testing where the entire analysis is performed by health care professionals in close proxim­ity to the patient. The purpose of this survey was to understand the range of testing performed in primary health care in Sweden. The results obtained from the survey have been compared to data on the same topic published twenty years ago. The most frequently performed analyses in primary health care have barely changed in the last twenty years. For example, hemoglobin and sedimentation rate analyses are still prevalent. The variety of analyses performed in primary health care has increased, however. C-reactive protein is now a commonly performed analysis. Moreover, in this survey, the degree to which laboratories are quality assured and accredited has been investigated. Accreditation and quality assurance of laboratories varies regionally in Sweden with those facilities meeting the criteria varying from 0% in a province to 100%.

  • 28.
    Scheike, Morten
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Exercise testing and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in primary care patients with chest pain of new onset2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 117-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To analyse the outcome of exercise testing and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in primary care patients with chest pain of new onset.

    Design: Prospective, observational. Patients aged 20-79 years, consulting due to chest pain of new onset, were enrolled consecutively.

    Setting: Three primary care health centres in south-eastern Sweden.

    Patients: 191 patients where the possibility of stable ischaemic heart disease (IHD) could not be excluded by clinical examination alone.

    Main outcome measures: Exercise test results, when equivocal completed by MPS.

    Results: Exercise testing revealed IHD in 14 (7%) and no IHD in 134 (70%) of the cases. In 43 (23%) the exercise test results were equivocal. Thirty-nine of these patients underwent MPS, which showed IHD in 19 and no IHD in 20 cases. Among previously diagnosed cardiovascular disease and risk factors only atrial fibrillation in the male group showed a significant correlation to the outcome IHD.

    Conclusion: Exercise testing and MPS are both useful when investigating chest pain patients in primary care.

  • 29.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bromley, Catherine
    Public Health Observatory Division, NHS Health Scotland, Edinburgh, UK..
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Frank, John
    Scottish Collaboration of Public Health Research & Policy (SCPHRP); Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Two tales of cardiovascular risks-middle-aged women living in Sweden and Scotland: a cross-sectional comparative study2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 8, article id e016527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To compare cardiovascular risk factors as well as rates of cardiovascular diseases in middle-aged women from urban areas in Scotland and Sweden.

    DESIGN: Comparative cross-sectional study.

    SETTING: Data from the general population in urban areas of Scotland and the general population in two major Swedish cities in southeast Sweden, south of Stockholm.

    PARTICIPANTS: Comparable data of middle-aged women (40-65 years) from the Scottish Health Survey (n=6250) and the Swedish QWIN study (n=741) were merged together into a new dataset (n=6991 participants).

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: We compared middle-aged women in urban areas in Sweden and Scotland regarding risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), CVD diagnosis, anthropometrics, psychological distress and lifestyle.

    RESULTS: In almost all measurements, there were significant differences between the countries, favouring the Swedish women. Scottish women demonstrated a higher frequency of alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity, low vegetable consumption, a sedentary lifestyle and also more psychological distress. For doctor-diagnosed coronary heart disease, there were also significant differences, with a higher prevalence among the Scottish women.

    CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the first studies that clearly shows that Scottish middle-aged women are particularly affected by a worse profile of CVD risks. The profound differences in CVD risk and outcome frequency in the two populations are likely to have arisen from differences in the two groups of women's social, cultural, political and economic environments.

1 - 29 of 29
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