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  • 1.
    Björnström, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmgren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Loverock, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindroth, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rho and Rho Kinase are involved in the signal transduction cascade caused by propofolManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Propofol is known to interact with the γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor, however, activating the receptor alone is not sufficient for producing anaesthesia. Propofol tyresine phosphorylates the GABAA receptor and reorganises the actin cytoskeleton, eausing ring structures and rnembrane ruffles. Propofol, but not GABA, the endogenous tigand for the GABAA receptor, tyresine phosphorylates actin, both in the membrane and cytoskeletal fractions of the neuron.

    Aim: How does propofol cause the actin reorganisation and is this a specific effect of propofol? Is the small membrane associated G-protein rho involved in the signal cascade towards the actin reorganisation?

    Methods: Westem blotting (WB) was used to visualize tyresine phosphorylated immunoprecipitated proteins and changes in actin between the different cellularcompartments after inhibition with rho (C3 exotoxin) and rho kinase (ROK) (HA-1077) inhibitors. Fluoreseenee mireoscopy after rhodamine-phalloidin labelling of actin was used to calculate the number of actin ring structures caused by propofol or GABA, in same experiments combined with pre-incubation with C3 exotoxin, HA- 1077 or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Herbimycin A. Propofol-stimulated cells were studied with confocal microscopy.

    Results: Propofol eaused an increased tyresine phosphorylation, that was reduced by C3 exotoxin, of a 160 kDa protein after two minutes stimulation. The 160 kDa protein is still unidentified. The actin ring structures caused by propofol was shown with confocal microscopy to go almost through the entire cell. The amount of rings were reduced by C3 exatoxin as well as HA-1077. Furthermore, w hen a tyrosine kinase bioeker was used no ring structures were formed. However, GABA did not produce any ring structures. When the actin content of the cellular campartments were analysed, C3 exatoxin treated cells showed an increased amount of actin in the cytoskeletal fraction, simultaneausly with a decrease in both the membrane and the cytosol fractions. The ROK bioeker on ly eaused a reduction of actin in the cytosol/membrane fractions, but no increase was observed in the cytoskeleton.

    Conclusion: Propofol, but not GABA, eauses actin ring structures in neurons. Propofol uses the rho and rho kinase pathway to reorganize the actin cytoskeleton into ring structures, which is also dependent on a tyresine klnase. Propofol also eauses an unidentified rho dependent 160 kDa protein to be tyresine phosphorylated. The activation eaused by propofol of rho and rho kinase causes actin to be moved from the cytoskeleton to the cell membrane and cytosol. This reorganisation of actin might influence the GABAA receptor by keeping it open, thus allowing the cell to be hyperpolarized for longer time, and consequently maintain anaesthesia.

  • 2.
    Björnström, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Turina, Dean
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology .
    Loverock, A.
    Department of Anaesthesiology Linköping University.
    Lundgren, S.
    Department of Anaesthesiology Linköping University.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine .
    Lindroth, Margaretha
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology .
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Characterisation of the signal transduction cascade caused by propofol in rat neurons: From the GABAA receptor to the cytoskeleton2008In: Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, ISSN 0867-5910, E-ISSN 1899-1505, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 617-632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The anaesthetic propofol interacts with the GABAA receptor, but its cellular signalling pathways are not fully understood. Propofol causes reorganisation of the actin cytoskeleton into ring structures in neurons. Is this reorganisation a specific effect of propofol as apposed to GABA, and which cellular pathways are involved? We used fluorescence-marked actin in cultured rat neurons to evaluate the percentage of actin rings caused by propofol or GABA in combination with rho, rho kinase (ROK), PI3-kinase or tyrosine kinase inhibitors, with or without the presence of extracellular calcium. Confocal microscopy was performed on propofol-stimulated cells and changes in actin between cellular compartments were studied with Western blot. Propofol (3 μg·ml-1), but not GABA (5 μM), caused transcellular actin ring formation, that was dependent on influx of extracellular calcium and blocked by rho, ROK, PI3-kinase or tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Propofol uses rho/ROK to translocate actin from the cytoskeleton to the membrane and its actin ring formation is dependent on an interaction site close to the GABA site on the GABAA receptor. GABA does not cause actin rings, implying that this is a specific effect of propofol.

  • 3.
    Jennersjö, Pär E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Circadian blood pressure variation in patients with type 2 diabetes - relationship to macro- and microvascular subclinical organ damage2011In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 167-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To explore the association between nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipper status and macro- and microvascular organ damage in type 2 diabetes.

    Methods

    Cross-sectional data from 663 patients with type 2 diabetes, aged 55–66 years, were analysed. Nurses measured office BP and ambulatory BP during 24 h. Individuals with ≥10% difference in nocturnal systolic blood pressure (SBP) relative to daytime values were defined as dippers. Non-dippers were defined as <10% nocturnal decrease in SBP. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated and microalbuminuria was measured by albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR). Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries.

    Results

    We identified 433 dippers and 230 subjects with a nocturnal non-dipping pattern. Nocturnal SBP dipping was independently of office SBP associated with decreased PWV (p = 0.008), lower ACR (p = 0.001) and NT-proBNP (p = 0.001) and increased GFR (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions

    We conclude that diurnal BP variation provides further information about early macro- and microvascular subclinical organ damage that goes beyond standardized office BP measurements in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 4.
    Jennersjö, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Björne, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A prospective observational study of all-cause mortality in relation to serum 25-OH vitamin D-3 and parathyroid hormone levels in patients with type 2 diabetes2015In: Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome, ISSN 1758-5996, E-ISSN 1758-5996, Vol. 7, no 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Low levels of vitamin D have been related to increased mortality and morbidity in several non-diabetic studies. We aimed to prospectively study relationships between serum 25-OH vitamin D-3 (vitamin D) and of serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) to total mortality in type 2 diabetes. We also aimed to compare the levels of these potential risk-factors in patients with and without diabetes. Methods: The main study design was prospective and observational. We used baseline data from 472 men and 245 women who participated in the "Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes-a Prospective study in Primary care" study. Patients were 55-66 years old at recruitment, and an age-matched non-diabetic sample of 129 individuals constituted controls for the baseline data. Carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation-tonometry and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) with ultrasound. Patients with diabetes were followed for all-cause mortality using the national Swedish Cause of Death Registry. Results: Levels of vitamin D were lower in patients with diabetes than in controls, also after correction for age and obesity, while PTH levels did not differ. Nine women and 24 men died during 6 years of median follow up of the final cohort (n = 698). Vitamin D levels were negatively related to all-cause mortality in men independently of age, PTH, HbA1c, waist circumference, 24-h systolic ambulatory-blood pressure (ABP) and serum-apoB (p = 0.049). This finding was also statistically significant when PWV and IMT were added to the analyses (p = 0.028) and was not affected statistically when medications were also included in the regression-analysis (p = 0.01). In the women with type 2 diabetes, levels of PTH were positively related with all-cause mortality in the corresponding calculations (p = 0.016 without PWV and IMT, p = 0.006 with PWV and IMT, p = 0.045 when also adding medications to the analysis), while levels of vitamin D was without statistical significance (p greater than 0.9). Conclusions: Serum vitamin D in men and serum PTH in women give prognostic information in terms of total-mortality that are independent of regular risk factors in addition to levels of ABP, IMT and PWV.

  • 5.
    Nystrom, Fredrik H.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Letter: Supine Systolic Blood Pressure and 1-Year Mortality in Patients With Acute Chest Pain Reply2010In: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), ISSN 0098-7484, E-ISSN 1538-3598, Vol. 304, no 1, p. 40-41Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 6.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredriksson, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE AT ADMISSION TO THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT FOR CHEST PAIN CONFERS A LOW LONG-TERM TOTAL MORTALITY in JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, vol 28, issue , pp E269-E2692010In: JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, Lippincott Williams andamp;amp; Wilkins; 1999 , 2010, Vol. 28, p. E269-E269Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 7.
    Spångeus, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Toe brachial index in middle aged patients with diabetes mellitus type 2: Not just a peripheral issue2013In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 100, no 2, p. 195-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore risk factors for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) as well as the association between toe blood pressure and subclinical and clinical central vascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Method

    Toe brachial index (TBI) was cross-sectionally analyzed in 742 middle-aged (54–66 years) patients with type 2 diabetes as well as non-diabetic controls and related to other vascular measures (e.g. carotid intima media thickness (IMT), presence of carotid plaque, central arterial stiffness and left ventricular mass index) and previous cardiovascular events.

    Results

    A TBI ≤ 0.7 was seen in 22% of the patients but only one patient had severe TBI reduction (TBI ≤ 0.3). The corresponding figures in the controls were 13% and 0%, respectively. Mean TBI was significantly lower in patients with type 2 diabetes than in controls (0.81 ± 0.14 vs. 0.87 ± 0.15, p < 0.001). In patients with diabetes, a lower TBI was associated with increased central arterial stiffness (p < 0.001), IMT (p < 0.001) and carotid plaque (p < 0.001) as well as with decreasing glomerular filtration rate (p < 0.001). Lower TBI was found in patients with previous macrovascular ischemic events. Furthermore, TBI was negatively correlated with age (p < 0.001), diabetes duration (p < 0.001) and HbA1c (p = 0.01).

    Conclusion

    PAD, assessed with TBI, is common in a Swedish middle-aged diabetes type 2 cohort, affecting about one-fifth. As ankle pressure may be confounded by falsely high values in patients with diabetes due to media calcification we conclude that information about TBI may improve the risk evaluation regarding arteriosclerotic disease in both small and large vessels in type 2 diabetes.

  • 8.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nystrom, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Association between admission supine systolic blood pressure and 1-year mortality in patients admitted to the intensive care unit for acute chest pain.2010In: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), ISSN 0098-7484, E-ISSN 1538-3598, Vol. 303, no 12, p. 1167-1172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: High resting blood pressure (BP) is among the best studied and established risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about the relationship between BP under acute stress, such as in acute chest pain, and subsequent mortality. OBJECTIVE: To study long-term mortality related to supine BP in patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) for acute chest pain. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Data from the RIKS-HIA (Registry of Information and Knowledge About Swedish Heart Intensive Care Admissions) was used to analyze the mortality in relation to supine admission systolic BP in 119,151 participants who were treated at the ICU for the symptom of chest pain from 1997 through 2007. Results from this prospective cohort study were presented according to systolic BP quartiles: Q1, less than 128 mm Hg; Q2, from 128 to 144 mm Hg; Q3, from 145 to 162 mm Hg; and Q4, at or above 163 mm Hg. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Total mortality. RESULTS: Mean (SD) follow-up time was 2.47 (1.5) years (range, 1-10 years). One-year mortality rate by Cox proportional hazard model (adjusted for age, sex, smoking, diastolic BP, use of antihypertensive medication at admission and discharge, and use of lipid-lowering and antiplatelet medication at discharge) showed that participants in Q4 had the best prognosis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-0.80, Q4 compared with Q2; corresponding risks for Q1 were HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.39-1.52, and for Q3, HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.79-0.87). Patients in Q4 had a 21.7% lower absolute risk compared with Q2, patients in Q3 had a 15.2% lower risk than in Q2, and patients in Q1 had a 40.3% higher risk for mortality than in Q2. The worse prognosis in Q2 compared with Q4 was independent of body mass index and previous diagnoses and similar when analysis was restricted to patients with a final diagnosis of angina or myocardial infarction (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.71-0.80, Q4 compared with Q2). CONCLUSION: Among patients admitted to the ICU for chest pain, there is an inverse association between admission supine systolic BP and 1-year mortality rate.

  • 9.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Acute, ambulatory and central blood pressure measurements in diabetes2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In patients with diabetes, high blood pressure is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The aim of this thesis was to explore the associations between blood pressure levels measured with different techniques and during different circumstances, and the degree of cardiovascular organ damage and subsequent prognosis in patients with diabetes.

    Methods: We analysed baseline data from patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in the observational cohort study CARDIPP (Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes – a Prospective study in Primary care), and longitudinal data from patients registered in the Swedish national quality registry RIKS-HIA (Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive care Admissions). Patients in CARDIPP underwent nurse-recorded, 24-hour ambulatory and non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Patients in RIKS-HIA had their systolic blood pressure measured upon hospitalisation for acute chest pain.

    Results: In CARDIPP, nearly one in three patients with office normotension (<130/80 mmHg) were hypertensive during the night (≥120/70 mmHg). This phenomenon, masked nocturnal hypertension, was significantly associated with increased arterial stiffness and increased central blood pressure. Furthermore, nearly one in five CARDIPP patients with office normotension had high central pulse pressure (≥50 mmHg), and there was a significant association between high central pulse pressure and increased carotid intima-media thickness and increased arterial stiffness. Among CARDIPP patients who used at least one antihypertensive drug, those who used beta blockers had significantly higher central pulse pressure than those who used other antihypertensive drugs, but there were no significant between-group differences concerning office or ambulatory pulse pressures. In CARDIPP patients with or without antihypertensive treatment, ambulatory systolic blood pressure levels were significantly associated with left ventricular mass, independently of central systolic blood pressure levels. When RIKS-HIA patients, admitted to hospital for chest pain, were stratified in quartiles according to admission systolic blood pressure levels, the risk for all-cause one-year mortality was significantly lower in patients with admission systolic blood pressure in the highest quartile (≥163 mmHg) than in patients with admission systolic blood pressure in the reference quartile (128-144 mmHg). This finding remained unaltered when the analysis was restricted to include only patients with previously known diabetes.

    Conclusions: In patients with type 2 diabetes, ambulatory or central blood pressure measurements identified patients with residual risk factors despite excellent office blood pressure control or despite ongoing antihypertensive treatment. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure predicted left ventricular mass independently of central systolic blood pressure. In patients with previously known diabetes who were hospitalised for acute chest pain, there was an inverse relationship between systolic blood pressure measured at admission and the risk for one-year all-cause mortality.

    List of papers
    1. Masked nocturnal hypertension - a novel marker of risk in type 2 diabetes.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Masked nocturnal hypertension - a novel marker of risk in type 2 diabetes.
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 1258-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of masked nocturnal hypertension (MNHT) and its impact on arterial stiffness and central blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Middle-aged patients (n = 414) with type 2 diabetes underwent clinic and ambulatory BP measurements and applanation tonometry. RESULTS: MNHT (clinic BP < 130/80 mmHg and night-time BP > or = 120/70 mmHg) was found in 7.2% of patients (n = 30). Compared with patients with both clinical and nocturnal normotension (n = 70), patients with MNHT had higher aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) (10.2 +/- 1.8 m/s vs 9.4 +/- 1.7 m/s; p = 0.03) and higher central BP (117.6 +/- 13.9/74.0 +/- 9.1 mmHg vs 110.4 +/- 16.4/69.7 +/- 9.6 mmHg, p = 0.04). In patients with clinical normotension, night-time systolic BP correlated significantly with PWV. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Thirty per cent of patients with clinical normotension had nocturnal hypertension. This was accompanied by increased arterial stiffness and higher central BP. We conclude that in clinically normotensive patients with type 2 diabetes, ambulatory BP measurement may help clinicians to identify patients with increased cardiovascular risk.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18981 (URN)10.1007/s00125-009-1369-9 (DOI)19396423 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-06-07 Created: 2009-06-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Association between admission supine systolic blood pressure and 1-year mortality in patients admitted to the intensive care unit for acute chest pain.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between admission supine systolic blood pressure and 1-year mortality in patients admitted to the intensive care unit for acute chest pain.
    2010 (English)In: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), ISSN 0098-7484, E-ISSN 1538-3598, Vol. 303, no 12, p. 1167-1172Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: High resting blood pressure (BP) is among the best studied and established risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about the relationship between BP under acute stress, such as in acute chest pain, and subsequent mortality. OBJECTIVE: To study long-term mortality related to supine BP in patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) for acute chest pain. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Data from the RIKS-HIA (Registry of Information and Knowledge About Swedish Heart Intensive Care Admissions) was used to analyze the mortality in relation to supine admission systolic BP in 119,151 participants who were treated at the ICU for the symptom of chest pain from 1997 through 2007. Results from this prospective cohort study were presented according to systolic BP quartiles: Q1, less than 128 mm Hg; Q2, from 128 to 144 mm Hg; Q3, from 145 to 162 mm Hg; and Q4, at or above 163 mm Hg. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Total mortality. RESULTS: Mean (SD) follow-up time was 2.47 (1.5) years (range, 1-10 years). One-year mortality rate by Cox proportional hazard model (adjusted for age, sex, smoking, diastolic BP, use of antihypertensive medication at admission and discharge, and use of lipid-lowering and antiplatelet medication at discharge) showed that participants in Q4 had the best prognosis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-0.80, Q4 compared with Q2; corresponding risks for Q1 were HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.39-1.52, and for Q3, HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.79-0.87). Patients in Q4 had a 21.7% lower absolute risk compared with Q2, patients in Q3 had a 15.2% lower risk than in Q2, and patients in Q1 had a 40.3% higher risk for mortality than in Q2. The worse prognosis in Q2 compared with Q4 was independent of body mass index and previous diagnoses and similar when analysis was restricted to patients with a final diagnosis of angina or myocardial infarction (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.71-0.80, Q4 compared with Q2). CONCLUSION: Among patients admitted to the ICU for chest pain, there is an inverse association between admission supine systolic BP and 1-year mortality rate.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58765 (URN)10.1001/jama.2010.314 (DOI)20332402 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-08-26 Created: 2010-08-26 Last updated: 2017-12-12
    3. ß-blocker Treatment is Associated with High Augmentation Index and with High Aortic, but not Brachial, Pulse Pressure in Type 2 Diabetes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>ß-blocker Treatment is Associated with High Augmentation Index and with High Aortic, but not Brachial, Pulse Pressure in Type 2 Diabetes
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: The journal of clinical metabolism and diabetes, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 55-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To explore the associations between ß-blocker treatment and clinic, ambulatory, and central pulse pressure (PP) and central augmentation index (AIx), and left ventricular mass index (LVMI), respectively, in patients with type 2 diabetes.Methods: In 124 middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated in primary care and used at least one antihypertensive drug, we measured clinic PP (mean value of three nurse-recorded measurements in the sitting position) and ambulatory PP (24-hour ambulatory measurements with the Spacelab 90217 measurement device). Central PP was measured non-invasively, using applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor), which also yielded values of AIx. LVMI was determined echocardiographically in all patients.Results: Patients whose antihypertensive drug regimen included a ß-blocker (n=67) had significantly higher central PP compared with patients whose antihypertensive drug regimen did not include a ß-blocker (ß-blocker: 49.6±12.2 mmHg, no ß-blocker: 45.1±10.2 mmHg; p=0.03) despite having similar clinic PP (ß-blocker: 60.4±16.3 mmHg, no ß-blocker: 58.9±13.1 mmHg; p=0.59) and similar ambulatory PP (ß-blocker: 55.2±9.1 mmHg, no ß-blocker: 54.8±10.6 mmHg; p=0.40). Patients treated with ß-blockers also had significantly higher AIx (ß-blocker: 30.7±8.4%, no ß-blocker: 25.8±8.8%; p<0.01) and higher LVMI (ß-blocker: 129.5±29.7 g/m2, no ß-blocker: 117.4±27.4 g/m2; p=0.02) compared with patients who were not treated with ß-blockers.Conclusions: In our cohort, ß-blocker use was associated with high central but not brachial PP and with high central AIx and high LVMI. Non-invasive measurement of central hemodynamic parameters may improve the evaluation of antihypertensive treatment efficacy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66160 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-03-04 Created: 2011-03-04 Last updated: 2017-03-27Bibliographically approved
    4. Central pulse pressure elevation is common in patients with type 2 diabetes and office normotension, and is associated with markers of atherosclerosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Central pulse pressure elevation is common in patients with type 2 diabetes and office normotension, and is associated with markers of atherosclerosis
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of elevated central pulsepressure (CPP) in patients with type 2 diabetes and office normotension, and to investigatewhether elevated CPP was associated with markers of atherosclerosis in these patients. Wedetermined office and central blood pressure, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and aorticpulse wave velocity (PWV) in 167 patients with type 2 diabetes and office normotension(<130/80 mmHg). Patients with office normotension and CPP ≥50 mmHg (n=32) hadsignificantly higher carotid IMT (0.76±0.2 mm vs 0.71±0.1 mm, p=0.041) and aortic PWV(11.0±2.5 m/s vs 9.5±1.8 m/s, p<0.01) than patients with office normotension and CPP <50mmHg (n=135). We conclude that almost one in five patients with type 2 diabetes and officenormotension had elevated CPP, and that this was associated with markers of both structuraland functional atherosclerosis.

    Keywords
    Type 2 diabetes, central pulse pressure, hypertension, pulse wave velocity
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76136 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-03-28 Created: 2012-03-28 Last updated: 2017-03-27Bibliographically approved
    5. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure predicts left ventricular mass in type 2 diabetes, independently of central systolic blood pressure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ambulatory systolic blood pressure predicts left ventricular mass in type 2 diabetes, independently of central systolic blood pressure
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Blood Pressure Monitoring, ISSN 1359-5237, E-ISSN 1473-5725, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 139-144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Both ambulatory and central blood pressures have been reported to correlate more closely than office blood pressure with left ventricular mass index (LVMI). The aim of this study was to test whether ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP) predicts LVMI independently of central SBP in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Methods: We determined office, ambulatory and central blood pressures and performed echocardiography in 460 patients with type 2 diabetes, who participated in the CARDIPP (Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes – a Prospective study in Primary care) study (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT 01049737).

    Results: In separate multivariable regression models, both 24-hour ambulatory SBP, ambulatory day-time SBP, and ambulatory night-time SBP were significantly associated with LVMI, independently of central SBP, age, sex, BMI, ambulatory 24-hour heart rate, duration of known diabetes and presence or absence of any antihypertensive medications (r = 0.19, 0.17 and 0.18, respectively, P <0.01). All ambulatory SBP parameters, but not central SBP, were significantly associated with LVMI independently of office SBP.

    Conclusions: Ambulatory SBP predicted LVMI independently of central SBP in patients with type 2 diabetes. The use of ambulatory blood pressure measurements may be encouraged as a tool for refined risk stratification of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2012
    Keywords
    ambulatory blood pressure, central blood pressure, hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, target organ damage, type 2 diabetes
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76137 (URN)10.1097/MBP.0b013e328355fdfb (DOI)000306330300001 ()
    Available from: 2012-03-28 Created: 2012-03-28 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
  • 10.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Editorial Material: Diuretics and Cerebrovascular Outcomes-Beyond Traditional Endpoints in JOURNAL OF CLINICAL HYPERTENSION, vol 17, issue 4, pp 273-2742015In: The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, ISSN 1524-6175, E-ISSN 1751-7176, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 273-274Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 11.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nystrom, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Masked nocturnal hypertension is associated with decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate according to serum cystatin C levels in type 2 diabetes2010In: Diabetes 2010; 59 suppl 1: A246-47, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Nystrom, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Masked nocturnal hypertension - a novel marker of risk in type 2 diabetes.2009In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 1258-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of masked nocturnal hypertension (MNHT) and its impact on arterial stiffness and central blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Middle-aged patients (n = 414) with type 2 diabetes underwent clinic and ambulatory BP measurements and applanation tonometry. RESULTS: MNHT (clinic BP < 130/80 mmHg and night-time BP > or = 120/70 mmHg) was found in 7.2% of patients (n = 30). Compared with patients with both clinical and nocturnal normotension (n = 70), patients with MNHT had higher aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) (10.2 +/- 1.8 m/s vs 9.4 +/- 1.7 m/s; p = 0.03) and higher central BP (117.6 +/- 13.9/74.0 +/- 9.1 mmHg vs 110.4 +/- 16.4/69.7 +/- 9.6 mmHg, p = 0.04). In patients with clinical normotension, night-time systolic BP correlated significantly with PWV. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Thirty per cent of patients with clinical normotension had nocturnal hypertension. This was accompanied by increased arterial stiffness and higher central BP. We conclude that in clinically normotensive patients with type 2 diabetes, ambulatory BP measurement may help clinicians to identify patients with increased cardiovascular risk.

  • 13.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Central pulse pressure elevation is common in patients with type 2 diabetes and office normotension, and is associated with markers of atherosclerosisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of elevated central pulsepressure (CPP) in patients with type 2 diabetes and office normotension, and to investigatewhether elevated CPP was associated with markers of atherosclerosis in these patients. Wedetermined office and central blood pressure, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and aorticpulse wave velocity (PWV) in 167 patients with type 2 diabetes and office normotension(<130/80 mmHg). Patients with office normotension and CPP ≥50 mmHg (n=32) hadsignificantly higher carotid IMT (0.76±0.2 mm vs 0.71±0.1 mm, p=0.041) and aortic PWV(11.0±2.5 m/s vs 9.5±1.8 m/s, p<0.01) than patients with office normotension and CPP <50mmHg (n=135). We conclude that almost one in five patients with type 2 diabetes and officenormotension had elevated CPP, and that this was associated with markers of both structuraland functional atherosclerosis.

  • 14.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    MASKED NOCTURNAL HYPERTENSION IN TYPE 2 DIABETES - A NEW MARKER OF RISK2009In: in JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, vol 27, 2009, Vol. 27, p. S169-S169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    ß-blocker Treatment is Associated with High Augmentation Index and with High Aortic, but not Brachial, Pulse Pressure in Type 2 Diabetes2010In: The journal of clinical metabolism and diabetes, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 55-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To explore the associations between ß-blocker treatment and clinic, ambulatory, and central pulse pressure (PP) and central augmentation index (AIx), and left ventricular mass index (LVMI), respectively, in patients with type 2 diabetes.Methods: In 124 middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated in primary care and used at least one antihypertensive drug, we measured clinic PP (mean value of three nurse-recorded measurements in the sitting position) and ambulatory PP (24-hour ambulatory measurements with the Spacelab 90217 measurement device). Central PP was measured non-invasively, using applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor), which also yielded values of AIx. LVMI was determined echocardiographically in all patients.Results: Patients whose antihypertensive drug regimen included a ß-blocker (n=67) had significantly higher central PP compared with patients whose antihypertensive drug regimen did not include a ß-blocker (ß-blocker: 49.6±12.2 mmHg, no ß-blocker: 45.1±10.2 mmHg; p=0.03) despite having similar clinic PP (ß-blocker: 60.4±16.3 mmHg, no ß-blocker: 58.9±13.1 mmHg; p=0.59) and similar ambulatory PP (ß-blocker: 55.2±9.1 mmHg, no ß-blocker: 54.8±10.6 mmHg; p=0.40). Patients treated with ß-blockers also had significantly higher AIx (ß-blocker: 30.7±8.4%, no ß-blocker: 25.8±8.8%; p<0.01) and higher LVMI (ß-blocker: 129.5±29.7 g/m2, no ß-blocker: 117.4±27.4 g/m2; p=0.02) compared with patients who were not treated with ß-blockers.Conclusions: In our cohort, ß-blocker use was associated with high central but not brachial PP and with high central AIx and high LVMI. Non-invasive measurement of central hemodynamic parameters may improve the evaluation of antihypertensive treatment efficacy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 16.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland.
    Arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes correlates with both ambulatory and central blood pressure but not with glycemic control2007In: 17th meeting on Hypertension,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland.
    Correlations between left ventricular mass and conventional, ambulatory and central blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes.2007In: 17th meeting on Hypertension,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ambulatory systolic blood pressure predicts left ventricular mass in type 2 diabetes, independently of central systolic blood pressure2012In: Blood Pressure Monitoring, ISSN 1359-5237, E-ISSN 1473-5725, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 139-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Both ambulatory and central blood pressures have been reported to correlate more closely than office blood pressure with left ventricular mass index (LVMI). The aim of this study was to test whether ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP) predicts LVMI independently of central SBP in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Methods: We determined office, ambulatory and central blood pressures and performed echocardiography in 460 patients with type 2 diabetes, who participated in the CARDIPP (Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes – a Prospective study in Primary care) study (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT 01049737).

    Results: In separate multivariable regression models, both 24-hour ambulatory SBP, ambulatory day-time SBP, and ambulatory night-time SBP were significantly associated with LVMI, independently of central SBP, age, sex, BMI, ambulatory 24-hour heart rate, duration of known diabetes and presence or absence of any antihypertensive medications (r = 0.19, 0.17 and 0.18, respectively, P <0.01). All ambulatory SBP parameters, but not central SBP, were significantly associated with LVMI independently of office SBP.

    Conclusions: Ambulatory SBP predicted LVMI independently of central SBP in patients with type 2 diabetes. The use of ambulatory blood pressure measurements may be encouraged as a tool for refined risk stratification of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 19.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Nystrom, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Treatment with beta-blockers is associated with high aortic but not brachial blood pressure and with cardiac hypertrophy in men with type 2 diabetes2008In: Journal of Hypertension, 2008, p. S29-S29Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Diastolic orthostatic hypertension and cardiovascular prognosis in type 2 diabetes: a prospective cohort study2016In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 15, no 83, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In patients with type 2 diabetes, the prognostic impact of an orthostatic rise in blood pressure is not known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the prognostic implications of the diastolic orthostatic blood pressure response in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. We also evaluated associations between different orthostatic blood pressure responses and markers of subclinical cardiovascular organ damage.

    METHODS: Office blood pressures were measured in the sitting and in the standing position in 749 patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in the CARDIPP study (Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes-a Prospective study in Primary care). Diastolic orthostatic hypertension was defined as a rise of diastolic blood pressure ≥10 mmHg and diastolic orthostatic hypotension was defined as a drop of diastolic blood pressure ≥10 mmHg. Recruitment took place between the years 2005-2008, and patients were followed until any of the primary outcome events (cardiovascular death or hospitalization for either myocardial infarction or stroke) occurred or until December 31st, 2014. Measurements of aortic pulse wave velocity and of carotid intima-media thickness were performed at base-line.

    RESULTS: Diastolic orthostatic hypertension was found in 140 patients (18.7 %) and was associated with significantly lower risk of cardiovascular events (crude hazard ratio compared with patients with normal systolic and diastolic orthostatic blood pressure response: 0.450, 95 % C.I. 0.206-0.987, P = 0.046). Diastolic orthostatic hypotension was found in 31 patients (4.1 %) and was associated with higher values for aortic pulse wave velocity and carotid intima-media thickness, compared with patients with normal systolic and diastolic orthostatic blood pressure response.

    CONCLUSIONS: Diastolic orthostatic hypertension is common in patients with type 2 diabetes, and may be a novel marker for decreased cardiovascular risk in these patients.

  • 21.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Sandberg, Klas
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Kleist, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    The exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise in the sub-acute phase after stroke is not affected by aerobic exercise.2018In: The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, ISSN 1524-6175, E-ISSN 1751-7176, Journal of Clinical Hypertension, Vol. 20, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of an exaggerated exercise blood pressure (BP) response is unknown in patients with subacute stroke, and it is not known whether an aerobic exercise program modulates this response. The authors randomized 53 patients (27 women) with subacute stroke to 12 weeks of twice-weekly aerobic exercise (n = 29) or to usual care without scheduled physical exercise (n = 24). At baseline, 66% of the patients exhibited an exaggerated exercise BP response (peak systolic BP ≥210 mm Hg in men and ≥190 mm Hg in women) during a symptom-limited ergometer exercise test. At follow-up, patients who had been randomized to the exercise program achieved higher peak work rate, but peak systolic BP remained unaltered. Among patients with a recent stroke, it was common to have an exaggerated systolic BP response during exercise. This response was not altered by participation in a 12-week program of aerobic exercise.

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