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  • 1.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group.
    Nygard, Stefan
    IDA MDI.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Wentzel, Jonatan
    IDA MDI.
    Greta & Torsten: Två personas för äldre användare av hälsans nya verktyg2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hälsans nya verktyg är en satsning på tillväxt i östgötaregionen, där planen är att successivt närma sig den växande världsmarknaden inom hälsa och vård. Fokuserade områden är sport och idrott, personlig hälsa, distribuerad vård och egenvård. Som ett led i tillväxtsatsningen identifieras intressanta marknads- och kundsegment, och för dessa segment gäller det att lära känna målgruppen som kommer att använda och beröras av olika tjänster och produkter. Ett sätt att åstadkomma detta är att ta fram personor och scenarios som kan användas som ett led i designarbetet.

  • 2.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Prototyping a Service Design Curriculum: Integrating Current Research in Teaching2011In: Touchpoint, ISSN 1868-6052, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 52-55Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Service Design Research: Which direction do we want it to take? (workshop)2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Service Design Research: Yesterday, today and tomorrow2010In: This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases / [ed] Stickdorn, M & Schneider, J, Amsterdam: BIS Publishers , 2010, 1, p. 308-315Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How to design and market services to create outstanding customer experiences

    Service design thinking is the designing and marketing of services that improve the customer experience, and the interactions between the service providers and the customers. If you have two coffee shops right next to each other, and each sell the exact same coffee at the exact same price, service design is what makes you walk into one and not the other. Maybe one plays music and the other doesn't. Maybe one takes credit cards and the other is cash only. Maybe you like the layout of one over the other, or one has more comfortable seating. Maybe the staff at one is friendlier, or draws fun shapes on the top of their lattes. All of these nuances relate to service design.

    "This Is Service Design Thinking" combines the knowledge of twenty-three international authors and even more online contributors from the global service design community and is divided into three sections: Basics: outlines service design thinking along five basic principlesTools: describing a variety of tools and methods used in Service Design ThinkingCases: vivid examples for the introduced fundamentals with real-life case studies from 5 companies that did inspiring projects within the field of Service Design

    At the end, a one-page "Customer Journey Canvas" is included, which can be used to quickly sketch any service on a single sheet of paper--capturing different stakeholder concerns: e.g. customers, front-line staff and management.

  • 5.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Benefits of External Representations in Service Design: a Distributed Cognition Perspective2014In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 331-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A defining characteristic of service design is the use of external representations, which support designers in making intangible aspects of services accessible and shareable. Both current and future states are externally represented, using different service design techniques, for the purposes of articulating insights, learning, communicating, collaborating, and maintaining empathy for customers. The purposes of, and techniques for, making external representations were compared with benefits of using external representations to think, suggested by the theory of distributed cognition. The analysis indicated that the service design techniques could be divided into two groups; definite and ongoing. The analysis also revealed that none of the included techniques explicitly supported designers in making multiple simultaneous representations of services. The research contributes knowledge about how the externalisations relate to benefits of making external representations, and about how to choose and use different service design techniques based on theories of distributed and situated cognition.

  • 6.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    External Representations in Service Design: A Distributed Cognition Perspective2013In: EAD 2013: Crafting the Future, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2013, Vol. 10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A defining characteristic of service design is the use of external representations which support the design process at various stages. Representations support designers in making intangible aspects of services accessible and shareable, making external representations especially important in service design. External representations are used both to represent current and future states, for the purposes of articulating insights, learning, communicating, collaborating, and maintaining empathy for customers. Many techniques are available that support designers in making representations of services. A comparison was made between the purposes for, and techniques used, in making external representations for service design with theories from cognitive science about benefits of using external representations to think. A pattern emerged during the analysis, indicating that the service design techniques could be divided into two groups, one of interactive techniques and one group of static techniques. Interactive techniques allow designers to interact with a dynamically changing representation, while static representations are unaffected by actions. The analysis also revealed that none of the included techniques explicitly support designers in making multiple simultaneous representations of services. The research contributes knowledge about how purposes for visualising and prototyping are related to general benefits of making external representations. It also provides insights about how to choose and use different service design techniques based on theories of distributed and situated cognition.

  • 7.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Investigating Prototyping Practices of Service Designers from a Service Logic Perspective2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The view of the nature of services has changed with the introduction of the service dominant logic. An important part of the logic is that services create value-in-use for customers. Customer-focused disciplines such as many design disciplines have a history of working with prototyping to understand the value-in-use. The service design discipline has a similar approach to the development of services. Based on previous research a framework of perspectives on service prototyping is presented which can be used to understand the prototyping approach utilised by designers. Then, using four of the suggested foundational premises of the service dominant logic this paper examines some of the ways prototyping can support the understanding and development of value propositions. The analysis shows that prototypes and the development and testing of them with customers and users can be seen as a tool for making sure that the value propositions offered by the companies are right, as well as exploring the customer’s role as a co-creator of value. The prototyping framework can be used to practically manifest the service-dominant logic in the development of service prototypes.

  • 8.
    Dimanche, Frédéric
    et al.
    SKEMA Business School.
    Keup, Mady
    SKEMA Business School.
    Prayag, Girish
    SKEMA Business School.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    What is service design2012In: Service Design and Tourism: Case studies of applied research projects on mobile ethnography for tourism destinations / [ed] Marc Stickdorn, Birgit Frischhut, Norderstedt: Books on Demand , 2012, p. 10-21Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism becomes more and more transparent through social media and tourism review websites. Nowadays, it’s the individual guest’s experience that makes or breaks the success of a tourism product. Thus, the focus in tourism shifts from mere marketing communications to meaningful experiences. Service design thinking can provide an in-depth and holistic understanding of customers required to co-create meaningful experiences with guests.The book provides an introduction into service design and tourism and presents seven case studies of European tourism destinations, which used the app myServiceFellow as a mobile ethnography research tool to gain genuine customer insights. The book reports lessons learned of these case studies, gives managerial implications and an outlook on future research fields for service design in tourism.

  • 9.
    Misic, Vanja
    et al.
    Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Rössner, Minka
    Sedes Research.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    SDnext: Moving towards the creation of a PhD network in service design (workshop)2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Communicating through Visualizations: Service Designers on Visualizing User Research2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    New Grounds, New Challenges?: Exploring Stakeholder Research in Service Design (doctoral consortium)2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Service Design Mini-dictionary2012In: Service Design and Tourism: Case studies of applied research projects on mobile ethnography for tourism destinations / [ed] Marc Stickdorn, Birgit Frischhut, Norderstedt: Books on Demand , 2012, p. 132-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of design has changed completely during the past. Previously, design was seen as a profession that operates in specialist areas such as graphic design, product design, and fashion design; during the last 10 years it changed its scope from ‘Design Centred Design’ to ‘User Centred Design’. As such, and building on the service-dominant logic and services marketing, service design goes beyond designing artefacts and is argued to be no longer limited to the design of tangible products only, but also designs complex and interactive service processes and ecosystems. These developments lead to the emergence of ‘service design’, a multidisciplinary and systematic approach, which can cope with the functionality and complexity of services by visualizing their systems and processes as well as by placing the client at the heart of the process.

  • 13.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stakeholder Engagement for Service Design: How service designers identify and communicate insights2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Service design is a field emerging from the new-found interest in services as a design material by practitioners and academics of the human-centred design tradition. As such, the field can build on the knowledge from previous work in design as well as in service research. Introducing a new design material may however also introduce new challenges to practice. The research presented in this thesis investigates how the design research phase of the human-centred design process is affected by making services a design material.

     

    How users, staff and other stakeholders are involved in service design projects was studied in four studies. Two studies focused on getting a holistic view of how service designers engage stakeholders in their design research. The methods used for these two studies were interviews in one case and participatory observation in the other. The two remaining studies focused on specific aspects of the stakeholder engagement process. One compared how designers and anthropologists approach ethnography, whereas the second investigated the communicative qualities of service design visualisations.

     

    It is argued that service design is a stakeholder-centred design discipline. The tools used in service design are to a large extent borrowed from other qualitative research traditions, but design-specific tools do exist. The information gathered with the tools for stakeholder engagement is then transformed into insights through analysis and synthesis. These insights are visualised to provide easily accessible representations of service situations.

     

    The final section of the thesis identifies challenges ahead for service design practice, based on the findings of the thesis and based on existing theoretical frameworks for the discipline.

  • 14.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Understanding Visualisation Practices: A distributed cognition perspective2012In: Service Design with Theory: Discussions on Change, Value and Methods / [ed] Satu Miettinen & Anu Valtonen, Vantaa, Finland: Lapland University Press , 2012, 1, p. 197-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The book presents discussions and debates from three distinct areas of service design research: societal change, value co-creation and development of service design. User participation can change society, and service design can contribute to this change. The service design approach provides tools for engaging the citizen and policy design. Service design plays a role in value co-creation and innovation processes. This role is more strategic than it is merely operative. Service design is establishing itself as a discipline. This debate includes a strong multi-disciplinary approach and the research and development of service design methods. The book includes chapters from top service design authors (Daniela Sangiorgi, Stefan Holmlid, Andy Polaine, Nicola Morelli etc.) and interesting case studies (Arne Van Oosterom and Tim Schuurman from Designthinkers and Erik Widmark and Emma Johansson from Transformator etc.) from design consultancies and researchers.

  • 15.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Visualisations in Service Design2010Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Service design is a relatively new field which has its roots in the design field, but utilises knowledge from other disciplines focusing on services as well. The service design field can be described as a maturing field. However, much which is considered knowledge in the field is still based on anecdotes rather than research. One such area is visualisations of insights gained throughout the service design process. The goal of this thesis is to provide a scientific base for discussions on visualisations by describing the current use of visualisations and exploring what visualisations communicate. This is done through two different studies.

    The first study consists of a series of interviews with practicing service designers. The results show that all interviewees visualise their insights gained throughout the service design process. Further analysis found that there are three main lines of arguments used by the interviewees in regard to why they visualise; as a tool to find insights in the material, to keep empathy with users of the service and to communicate the insights to outside stakeholders.

    The second study analysed six visualisation types from actual service design projects by service design consultancies. Four different frameworks were used to analyse what visualisations did, and did not, communicate. Two of the frameworks were based on research in service design; the three reasons to visualise as stated in the interviews in study 1 and a framework for service design visualisations. The two frameworks were adapted from other service disciplines; what differentiates services from goods (the IHIP-framework), and a framework focusing on service as the base for all transactions (Service Dominant Logic). It is found that the visualisation types in general are strong in communicating the design aspects of services, but that they have problems in representing all aspects of service as identified in the service literature.

    The thesis provides an academic basis on the use of visualisations in service design. It is concluded that it seems like the service design community currently sees services as being not-goods, a line of thought other service disciplines have discarded the last ten years and replaced with a view of services as the basis for all transactions. The analysis highlights areas where there is a need to improve the visualisations to more accurately represent services.

  • 16.
    Segelström, Fabian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Visualizations of Qualitative Research Material: Insights from the Service Design2010In: Frontiers 2010, 2010, Vol. 19Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As qualitative research methods have become more prominent within the development of services, the nature of the data available to service developers have changed. This leads to new forms of representing the data. Taking the intangible nature of (most) services into account, it should not be a surprise that various ways of visualizing the experience of the service in regard have become important tools to service developers.A community which has a long tradition of working with various visualizations is the design community. As service has become a focus for the design community, with the growth of service design and experience design, the tradition of visualizing has been brought along. This has lead to a number of new approaches to the visualization of services.The first part of the presentation will give an overview of how visualizations are used within the service design community based on recent research (Segelström, 2009; Segelström & Holmlid, 2009; Diana, Pacenti, & Tassi, 2009). It is concluded that visualizations are used as a communication tool by the designers. Different types of visualizations can provide various types of communication; to stakeholders, within the design team and to keep insights alive. Furthermore, various approaches to how to represent the intangible services are highlighted.The second part of the presentation will present the most common visualization techniques, focusing on what could be included in the toolbox of all interested in developing new services, not just service designers:- Blueprinting, as pioneered by Shostack (1982) within services marketing, is widely used within the service design community. Examples are given of how it has been appropriated for design purposes, based on Wreiner et al (2009).- Customer journeys focus on the customer’s experiences throughout the service system.- Narratives are a family of visualization techniques that tell the story of a service delivery.- Personas are representations of different customer segments which are used to make the segments more vivid (Cooper, 1999).

  • 17.
    Segelström, Fabian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Visualizations of Qualitative Research Material: Insights from the Service Design Community2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Segelström, Fabian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Usify.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ethnography by design: On goals and mediating artefacts2014In: Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, ISSN 1474-0222, E-ISSN 1741-265X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 134-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design ethnography is the appropriation of ethnography for the purposes of informing design. This paper investigates the effects of these appropriations, through a comparative study of how designers and anthropologists approach the same field site and by a review of new techniques introduced by designers to do ethnography. The techniques reviewed all apply artefacts to mediate the ethnographic process. Conducting ethnography through artefacts can be done in a number of ways and three ways are discussed here, including techniques which remove the researcher from the context of study. The implications for design ethnography of the comparative study and the introductions of artefacts to facilitate ethnographic work are discussed. The implications focus on potential methodological pitfalls of the ‘designification’ of ethnography as design ethnography matures.

  • 19.
    Segelström, Fabian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gamla Linköping christmas market in early 19th century environment in Linköping/Sweden2012In: Service Design and Tourism: Case studies of applied research projects on mobile ethnography for tourism destinations / [ed] Marc Stickdorn, Birgit Frischhut, Norderstedt: Books on Demand , 2012, p. 72-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of design has changed completely during the past. Previously, design was seen as a profession that operates in specialist areas such as graphic design, product design, and fashion design; during the last 10 years it changed its scope from ‘Design Centred Design’ to ‘User Centred Design’. As such, and building on the service-dominant logic and services marketing, service design goes beyond designing artefacts and is argued to be no longer limited to the design of tangible products only, but also designs complex and interactive service processes and ecosystems. These developments lead to the emergence of ‘service design’, a multidisciplinary and systematic approach, which can cope with the functionality and complexity of services by visualizing their systems and processes as well as by placing the client at the heart of the process.

  • 20.
    Segelström, Fabian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    One Case, Three Ethnographic Styles: Exploring different ethnographic approaches to the same broad brief2012In: EPIC 2012 Proceedings, American Anthropological Association , 2012, Vol. 2012, no 1, p. 48-62Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a research project aimed at suggesting improvements at an annual advent fair three different ethnographic research approaches were used; Social Anthropology, Interaction Design and Mobile Ethnography. The paper focuses on how the three different approaches on ethnography affected choices in the research process, the outcomes of the research and how the outcomes were presented. It is found that the different motivations for doing ethnography between the three approaches make their outcomes differ in a clear way. These differences make the three ethnographic approaches suitable for achieving different research outcomes.

  • 21.
    Segelström, Fabian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Online services and cultural diversity: Applying Hofstede's framework to predict potential issues2009In: Quality in Services, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Segelström, Fabian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Service Design Visualisations meet Service Theory: Strengths, weaknesses and perspectives2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the analysis of service design visualisations performed with a service science perspective. Two perspectives on services emerging from service marketing and management were used as the basis of the analysis; IHIP (intangibility-heterogeneity-inseparability-perishability) and Service Dominant Logic (SD Logic). In total 17 visualisations were collected for analysis, all of them having been developed in live, commissioned service design projects run by service design consultancies. The visualisations were sorted into six different visualisation categories, and conclusions on their character were drawn on the category level. Two judges appraised all visualisations individually before a joint appraisal of the categories was made. The appraisals were made by answering questions representing traits of IHIP and service dominant logic respectively

    .

    It was found that the service visualisations were slightly better at representing the IHIP traits than those of service dominant logic. Moreover, it was found that there were large differences between the various techniques in how good they were at representing service traits, with customer journeys and storyboards standing out as being the best at representing a variety of traits strongly. Not surprisingly the results show that traits which align with the traditional values of user-centred design - such as customer orientation – is where the visualisations as a group fare the best. Finally it is found that personas diverge in an outlier fashion from the other visualisation techniques due to their focus on representing idealised customers rather than the service.

  • 23.
    Segelström, Fabian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Visualization as tools for research: Service designers on visualizations2009In: Nordic Design Conference, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service design is a relatively new design field not explored in research as extensively as other design disciplines. One of the distinguishing practices is the extensive use of visualization techniques in early stages of the design process. This paper explores what service designers say about how and when visualizations are used in the user research phase of service design projects. Data was collected through 14 interviews with practicing service designers. It was found that all of the interviewees use visualization techniques in their work process, and that these are used extensively in the research phase of service design projects. Visualizations are used in the research phase as tools for translating raw data into insights and as a way to communicate insights. We conclude that service designers use visualization techniques to interpret user research, and that they highlight characteristics of a service-dominant logic.

  • 24.
    Segelström, Fabian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Alm, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Back to the Roots: A Case for a New Ideal for Ethnographic Research for Design.2009In: IASDR: Rigor and Relevance in Design, Seoul, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Segelström, Fabian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Howard, Jeff
    Howard Design.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Designing for Service Recovery (workshop)2010Other (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Segelström, Fabian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Raijmakers, Bas
    STBY.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thinking and Doing Ethnography in Service Design2009In: IASDR: Rigor and Relevance in Design, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Wreiner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Arnell, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gonzàlez, Natalia
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Segelström, Fabian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDI - Interaction and Service Design Research Group. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Exploring Service Blueprints for Multiple Actors: A Case Study of Car Parking Services2009In: First Nordic Conference on Service Design: Oslo, Norway, 23-26 november 2009, Linköping University Electronic Press , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service blueprints are usually included in listings of standard methods within service design. Still; little research has been conducted on service blueprints. The case study at hand explores how blueprints can be applied in a situation with three key actors; all with different motives and wishes. The case study is within the domain of car parking; a service which at a first glance may seem simple; but is rather complex when scrutinized. Three ways of blueprinting the situation are presented and discussed in the paper. Finally issues which arose from the blueprinting process are discussed in regard to implications for people creating blueprints.

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