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Barazanji, N., Hamilton, P. J., Icenhour, A., Simon, R., Bednarska, O., Tapper, S., . . . Walter, S. (2022). Irritable bowel syndrome in women: Association between decreased insular subregion volumes and gastrointestinal symptoms. NeuroImage: Clinical, 35, Article ID 103128.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Irritable bowel syndrome in women: Association between decreased insular subregion volumes and gastrointestinal symptoms
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2022 (English)In: NeuroImage: Clinical, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 35, article id 103128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by disturbed interactions between the gut and the brain with depression as a common comorbidity. In both IBS and depression, structural brain alterations of the insular cortices, key structures for pain processing and interoception, have been demonstrated but the specificity of these findings remains unclear. We compared the gray matter volume (GMV) of insular cortex (IC) subregions in IBS women and healthy controls (HC) and examined relations to gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and glutamate + glutamine (Glx) concentrations. We further analyzed GMV of IC subregions in women with major depression (MDD) compared to HC and addressed possible differences between depression, IBS, IBS with depression and HC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-189228 (URN)10.1016/j.nicl.2022.103128 (DOI)000888481300004 ()S2213158222001930 (Scopus ID)
Note

AFA insurance (Dnr: 140407) to SW, ALF, County Council of Ostergötland to SW, Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (‘SeeingOrgan Function’) to PL, Sweden.

Available from: 2022-10-13 Created: 2022-10-13 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Takamiya, A., Dols, A., Emsell, L., Abbott, C., Yrondi, A., Mas, C. S., . . . Kishimoto, T. (2022). Neural Substrates of Psychotic Depression: Findings From the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 48(2), 514-523
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neural Substrates of Psychotic Depression: Findings From the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration
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2022 (English)In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, ISSN 0586-7614, E-ISSN 1745-1701, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 514-523Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Psychotic major depression (PMD) is hypothesized to be a distinct clinical entity from nonpsychotic major depression (NPMD). However, neurobiological evidence supporting this notion is scarce. The aim of this study is to identify gray matter volume (GMV) differences between PMD and NPMD and their longitudinal change following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from 8 independent sites in the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) database (n = 108; 56 PMD and 52 NPMD; mean age 71.7 in PMD and 70.2 in NPMD) were analyzed. All participants underwent MRI before and after ECT. First, cross-sectional whole-brain voxel-wise GMV comparisons between PMD and NPMD were conducted at both time points. Second, in a flexible factorial model, a main effect of time and a group-by-time interaction were examined to identify longitudinal effects of ECT on GMV and longitudinal differential effects of ECT between PMD and NPMD, respectively. Compared with NPMD, PMD showed lower GMV in the prefrontal, temporal and parietal cortex before ECT; PMD showed lower GMV in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) after ECT. Although there was a significant main effect of time on GMV in several brain regions in both PMD and NPMD, there was no significant group-by-time interaction. Lower GMV in the MPFC was consistently identified in PMD, suggesting this may be a trait-like neural substrate of PMD. Longitudinal effect of ECT on GMV may not explain superior ECT response in PMD, and further investigation is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
Keywords
psychosis; depression; magnetic resonance imaging; gray matter volume; medial prefrontal cortex
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-183602 (URN)10.1093/schbul/sbab122 (DOI)000763977300001 ()34624103 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Keio University Medical Science Fund [99-095-0007]; AMED [JP20dm0307102h0003]; Research Foundation Flanders (FWO) grantFWO [G0C0319N]; KU Leuven Fund [C24/18/095]; Sequoia Fund for Research on Ageing and Mental Health; National Institute of HealthUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA [MH125126, MH111826]; Carlos III Health InstituteInstituto de Salud Carlos III [CD20/00189]; Lundbeck FoundationLundbeckfonden; Western Norway Regional Health Authority [911986, 912238]

Available from: 2022-03-18 Created: 2022-03-18 Last updated: 2023-03-10Bibliographically approved
Paul, E., Schwieler, L., Erhardt, S., Boda, S., Trepci, A., Kämpe, R., . . . Samuelsson, M. (2022). Peripheral and central kynurenine pathway abnormalities in major depression. Brain, behavior, and immunity, 101, 136-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peripheral and central kynurenine pathway abnormalities in major depression
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2022 (English)In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 101, p. 136-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Considerable data relate major depressive disorder (MDD) with aberrant immune system functioning. Pro inflammatory cytokines facilitate metabolism of tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway (KP) putatively resulting in reduced neuroprotective and increased neurotoxic KP metabolites in MDD, in addition to modulating metabolic and immune function. This central nervous system hypothesis has, however, only been tested in the periphery. Here, we measured KP-metabolite levels in both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of depressed patients (n = 63/36 respectively) and healthy controls (n = 48/33). Further, we assessed the relation between KP abnormalities and brain-structure volumes, as well as body mass index (BMI), an index of metabolic disturbance associated with atypical depression. Plasma levels of picolinic acid (PIC), the kynurenic/quinolinic acid ratio (KYNA/QUIN), and PIC/QUIN were lower in MDD, but QUIN levels were increased. In the CSF, we found lower PIC in MDD. Confirming previous work, MDD patients had lower hippocampal, and amygdalar volumes. Hippocampal and amygdalar volumes were correlated positively with plasma KYNA/QUIN ratio in MDD patients. BMI was increased in the MDD group relative to the control group. Moreover, BMI was inversely correlated with plasma and CSF PIC and PIC/QUIN, and positively correlated with plasma QUIN levels in MDD. Our results partially confirm previous peripheral KP findings and extend them to the CSF in MDD. We present the novel finding that abnormalities in KP metabolites are related to metabolic disturbances in depression, but the relation between KP metabolites and depression-associated brain atrophy might not be as direct as previously hypothesized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press Inc - Elsevier Science, 2022
Keywords
Major depressive disorder; Kynurenine pathway; Inflammation; Central nervous system; Brain volumetry; Structural magnetic resonance imaging; Cerebrospinal fluid
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-183765 (URN)10.1016/j.bbi.2022.01.002 (DOI)000761260700005 ()34999196 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Johnson & Johnson Innovation; Swedish Medical Research CouncilSwedish Medical Research Council (SMRC)European Commission [2017-00875, 2013-07434, 2019-01138]; ALF Grants, Region Ostergotland; National Institutes of HealthUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA [R01 CA193522, R01 NS073939]; MD Anderson Cancer Support Grant [P30 CA016672]

Available from: 2022-03-24 Created: 2022-03-24 Last updated: 2023-10-13
Botvinik-Nezer, R., Holzmeister, F., Camerer, C. F., Dreber, A., Huber, J., Johannesson, M., . . . Schonberg, T. (2020). Variability in the analysis of a single neuroimaging dataset by many teams. Nature, 582, 84-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Variability in the analysis of a single neuroimaging dataset by many teams
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2020 (English)In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 582, p. 84-88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Data analysis workflows in many scientific domains have become increasingly complex and flexible. Here we assess the effect of this flexibility on the results of functional magnetic resonance imaging by asking 70 independent teams to analyse the same dataset, testing the same 9 ex-ante hypotheses(1). The flexibility of analytical approaches is exemplified by the fact that no two teams chose identical workflows to analyse the data. This flexibility resulted in sizeable variation in the results of hypothesis tests, even for teams whose statistical maps were highly correlated at intermediate stages of the analysis pipeline. Variation in reported results was related to several aspects of analysis methodology. Notably, a meta-analytical approach that aggregated information across teams yielded a significant consensus in activated regions. Furthermore, prediction markets of researchers in the field revealed an overestimation of the likelihood of significant findings, even by researchers with direct knowledge of the dataset(2-5). Our findings show that analytical flexibility can have substantial effects on scientific conclusions, and identify factors that may be related to variability in the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging. The results emphasize the importance of validating and sharing complex analysis workflows, and demonstrate the need for performing and reporting multiple analyses of the same data. Potential approaches that could be used to mitigate issues related to analytical variability are discussed. The results obtained by seventy different teams analysing the same functional magnetic resonance imaging dataset show substantial variation, highlighting the influence of analytical choices and the importance of sharing workflows publicly and performing multiple analyses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2020
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-166165 (URN)10.1038/s41586-020-2314-9 (DOI)000535225300001 ()32483374 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85085279867 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Austrian Science FundAustrian Science Fund (FWF) [P29362-G27]; Israel Science FoundationIsrael Science Foundation [ISF 2004/15]; Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences [NHS14-1719:1]; National Institutes of Health (NIH)United States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA [R24MH117179]; Austrian Science Fund (FWF)Austrian Science Fund (FWF) [SFB F63, P 32686]; Research Foundation Flanders (FWO)FWO; European UnionEuropean Union (EU) [665501]; University of Basel Research Fund; Research Foundation FlandersFWO [12T2517N]; Marie Skodowska-Curie Actions under COFUND [665501]; Obra Social La CaixaLa Caixa Foundation; Vienna Science and Technology Fund [WWTF VRG13-007]; National Natural Science Foundation of ChinaNational Natural Science Foundation of China [71801110, 71971199, 71602175, 71942004]; MOE (Ministry of Education in China) Project of Humanities and Social Sciences [18YJC630268]; China Postdoctoral Science FoundationChina Postdoctoral Science Foundation [2018M633270]; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) under Germanys Excellence Strategy Science of Intelligence (EXC 2002/1)German Research Foundation (DFG) [390523135]; Brain Canada; Health Canada; NIHUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA [NIH-NIBIB P41 EB019936, NIH-NIMH R01 MH083320, NIH RF1 MH120021, R01 DA041353]; National Institute Of Mental Health of the NIH [R01MH096906]; Canada First Research Excellence Fund; European Unions Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme [785907]; Max Planck SocietyMax Planck SocietyFoundation CELLEX; Dutch foundation LSH-TKI [LSHM16053-SGF]; NSFNational Science Foundation (NSF) [1631325]; T32 Predoctoral Fellowship from the NIHUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA; Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftGerman Research Foundation (DFG) [CRC1193]; Australian National Imaging Facility; National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) capability; VIDI from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research [452-17-013]; Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council; NIH IRPUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA [ZICMH002888, ZICMH002960]; Tianqiao and Chrissy Center for Social and Decision Neuroscience Center Leadership Chair; Belgian Excellence of Science program (EOS) from the FNRS-Belgium [30991544]; EraNET Neuron [R4195]; Ministry of Education of Humanities and Social Science [16YJC630103]; Wellcome TrustWellcome Trust [100309/Z/12/Z]

Available from: 2020-06-09 Created: 2020-06-09 Last updated: 2021-05-05Bibliographically approved
Perini, I., Gustafsson, P. A., Hamilton, P. J., Kämpe, R., Mayo, L. M., Heilig, M. & Zetterqvist, M. (2019). Brain-based Classification of Negative Social Bias in Adolescents With Nonsuicidal Self-injury: Findings From Simulated Online Social Interaction.. eClinicalMedicine, 13, 81-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brain-based Classification of Negative Social Bias in Adolescents With Nonsuicidal Self-injury: Findings From Simulated Online Social Interaction.
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2019 (English)In: eClinicalMedicine, E-ISSN 2589-5370, Vol. 13, p. 81-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Interpersonal stress and perceived rejection have been clinically observed as common triggers of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), with self-injury behavior regulating both affective and social experiences. We investigated whether the subjective interpretation of social interaction in a simulated online environment might be biased in the NSSI group, and the brain mechanisms underlying the experience.

Methods: Thirty female adolescent patients with NSSI and thirty female age-matched controls were investigated in this case-control study. In our novel task that simulates interaction on current social media platforms, participants indicated whether they liked or disliked pictures of other players during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan. Participants also viewed positive and negative feedback directed toward them by others. The task also assessed the subjective effects of the social interaction. Finally, subjects underwent a separate facial electromyography session, which measured facial expressions processing.

Outcomes: Behaviorally, the NSSI group showed a negative bias in processing social feedback from others. A multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) identified brain regions that robustly classified NSSI subjects and controls. Regions in which mutual activity contributed to the classification included dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, a region implicated in mood control. In the NSSI group, multi-voxel classification scores correlated with behavioral sensitivity to negative feedback from others. Results remained significant after controlling for medication, symptoms of depression, and symptoms of borderline personality disorder.

Interpretation: This study identified behavioral and neural signatures of adolescents with NSSI during social interaction in a simulated social media environment. These findings highlight the importance of understanding social information processing in this clinical population and can potentially advance treatment approaches.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
NSSI, Social interaction, fMRI, mvpa
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163911 (URN)10.1016/j.eclinm.2019.06.016 (DOI)31517265 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068441191 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-26 Created: 2020-02-26 Last updated: 2023-07-13Bibliographically approved
Paul, E. R., Farmer, M., Kämpe, R., Cremers, H. R. & Hamilton, P. J. (2019). Functional Connectivity Between Extrastriate Body Area and Default Mode Network Predicts Depersonalization Symptoms in Major Depression: Findings From an A Priori Specified Multinetwork Comparison. Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, 4(7), 627-635
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional Connectivity Between Extrastriate Body Area and Default Mode Network Predicts Depersonalization Symptoms in Major Depression: Findings From an A Priori Specified Multinetwork Comparison
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2019 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, ISSN 2451-9022, Vol. 4, no 7, p. 627-635Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Depersonalization/derealization disorder is a dissociative disorder characterized by feelings of unreality and detachment from the self and surroundings. Depersonalization/derealization disorder is classified as a primary disorder, but depersonalization symptoms are frequently observed in mood and anxiety disorders. In the context of major depressive disorder (MDD), depersonalization symptoms are associated with greater depressive severity as indexed by treatment resistance, inpatient visits, and duration of depressive episodes. In the current investigation, we tested four network-based, neural-functional hypotheses of depersonalization in MDD. These hypotheses were framed in terms of functional relationships between 1) extrastriate body area and default mode network (DMN); 2) hippocampus and DMN; 3) medial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum; and 4) posterior and anterior insular cortex.

Methods

We conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging during resting state on 28 female patients with MDD and 27 control subjects with no history of a psychiatric disorder. Functional connectivity between seed and target regions as specified by our network-level hypotheses was computed and correlated with scores on the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale. We used a conservative, unbiased bootstrapping procedure to test the significance of neural-behavioral correlations observed under each of the four models tested.

Results

Of the four neural-functional models of depersonalization symptoms tested, only the model proposing that reduced connectivity between the extrastriate body area and DMN predicts higher levels of depersonalization symptoms in MDD was confirmed.

Conclusions

Our results indicate that depersonalization/derealization disorder symptoms in patients with depression are related to reduced functional connectivity between brain regions that are proposed to support processing of body-related (extrastriate body area) and autobiographical (DMN) information.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Default mode network; Depersonalization/derealization disorder; Extrastriate body area; Functional connectivity; Major depressive disorder
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162355 (URN)10.1016/j.bpsc.2019.03.007 (DOI)000494424200006 ()31103548 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065575555 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Warren Foundation; Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council; Region Ostergotland

Available from: 2019-11-28 Created: 2019-11-28 Last updated: 2023-10-13Bibliographically approved
Strauss, T., Rottstaedt, F., Sailer, U., Schellong, J., Hamilton, P. J., Raue, C., . . . Croy, I. (2019). Touch aversion in patients with interpersonal traumatization. Depression and anxiety (Print), 36(7), 635-646
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Touch aversion in patients with interpersonal traumatization
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2019 (English)In: Depression and anxiety (Print), ISSN 1091-4269, E-ISSN 1520-6394, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 635-646Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Interpersonal touch is a key aspect of human interaction and a usually very comforting experience. For patients suffering from posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD) caused by interpersonal traumatization, such touch is affectively ambiguous. Methods In two studies, we investigated the experience and neural processing of various types of interpersonal and impersonal touch in patients as compared with healthy controls. Results Patients strongly disliked show, interpersonal skin-to-skin stroking, while controls appreciated this kind of touch. No group differences were observed for ratings of impersonal touch. Similarly, the neural activation differed between groups for interpersonal, but not for impersonal touch. The interpersonal touch aversion in patients was accompanied by enhanced blood-oxygen-level-dependent response in the superior temporal gyrus and by a pronounced reduction of response in the hippocampus. This reduction was significantly correlated to symptoms of negative alterations and arousal within the patients. Conclusion We interpret the hippocampal suppression as an attempt to control traumatic memories, evoked by interpersonal touch. This mechanism may maintain the aversion of interpersonal touch in patients with interpersonal trauma-related PTSD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
fMRI; hippocampus; PTSD; superior temporal; touch
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159065 (URN)10.1002/da.22914 (DOI)000474304700007 ()31209965 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Graduate Academy of TU Dresden - German Academic Exchange Service

Available from: 2019-07-22 Created: 2019-07-22 Last updated: 2019-07-22
Sacchet, M. D., Levy, B. J., Hamilton, P. J., Maksimovskiy, A., Hertel, P. T., Joormann, J., . . . Gotlib, I. H. (2017). Cognitive and neural consequences of memory suppression in major depressive disorder. Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience, 17(1), 77-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive and neural consequences of memory suppression in major depressive disorder
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2017 (English)In: Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience, ISSN 1530-7026, E-ISSN 1531-135X, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 77-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Negative biases in cognition have been documented consistently in major depressive disorder (MDD), including difficulties in the ability to control the processing of negative material. Although negative information-processing biases have been studied using both behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms, relatively little research has been conducted examining the difficulties of depressed persons with inhibiting the retrieval of negative information from long-term memory. In this study, we used the think/no-think paradigm and functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the cognitive and neural consequences of memory suppression in individuals diagnosed with depression and in healthy controls. The participants showed typical behavioral forgetting effects, but contrary to our hypotheses, there were no differences between the depressed and nondepressed participants or between neutral and negative memories. Relative to controls, depressed individuals exhibited greater activity in right middle frontal gyrus during memory suppression, regardless of the valence of the suppressed stimuli, and differential activity in the amygdala and hippocampus during memory suppression involving negatively valenced stimuli. These findings indicate that depressed individuals are characterized by neural anomalies during the suppression of long-term memories, increasing our understanding of the brain bases of negative cognitive biases in MDD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2017
Keywords
Major depressive disorder (MDD); Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI); Memory suppression; Think/No-Think (TNT); Cognitive neuroscience; Negative valence
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-135721 (URN)10.3758/s13415-016-0464-x (DOI)000393772800004 ()27649971 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|NSF [0801700, DGE-1147470]; NIMH [T32 MH020016, R01-MH59259]; UK Medical Research Council [MC-A060-5PR00]

Available from: 2017-03-17 Created: 2017-03-17 Last updated: 2018-04-19
Chau, D. T., Fogelman, P., Nordanskog, P., Drevets, W. C. & Hamilton, P. J. (2017). Distinct Neural-Functional Effects of Treatments With Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Electroconvulsive Therapy, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Their Relations to Regional Brain Function in Major Depression: A Meta-analysis. Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, 2(4), 318-326
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distinct Neural-Functional Effects of Treatments With Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Electroconvulsive Therapy, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Their Relations to Regional Brain Function in Major Depression: A Meta-analysis
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2017 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, ISSN 2451-9030, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 318-326Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Functional neuroimaging studies have examined the neural substrates of treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Low sample size and methodological heterogeneity, however, undermine the generalizability of findings from individual studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to identify reliable neural changes resulting from different modes of treatment for MDD and compared them with each other and with reliable neural functional abnormalities observed in depressed versus control samples.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Electroconvulsive therapy; Major depressive disorder; Meta-analysis; Positron emission tomography; Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors; Transcranial magnetic stimulation
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146140 (URN)10.1016/j.bpsc.2017.01.003 (DOI)000493946200006 ()29560920 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-29 Created: 2018-03-29 Last updated: 2020-01-20
Bergamino, M., Farmer, M., Yeh, H.-W., Paul, E. & Hamilton, P. J. (2017). Statistical differences in the white matter tracts in subjects with depression by using different skeletonized voxel-wise analysis approaches and DTI fitting procedures. Brain Research, 1669, 131-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Statistical differences in the white matter tracts in subjects with depression by using different skeletonized voxel-wise analysis approaches and DTI fitting procedures
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2017 (English)In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1669, p. 131-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most significant contributors to the global burden of illness. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a procedure that has been used in several studies to characterize abnormalities in white matter (WM) microstructural integrity in MDD. These studies, however, have provided divergent findings, potentially due to the large variety of methodological alternatives available in conducting DTI research. In order to determine the importance of different approaches to coregistration of DTI-derived metrics to a standard space, we compared results from two different skeletonized voxel-wise analysis approaches: the standard TBBS pipeline and the Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs) approach incorporating a symmetric image normalization (SyN) algorithm and a group-wise template (ANTs TBSS). We also assessed effects of applying twelve different fitting procedures for the diffusion tensor. For our dataset, lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial diffusivity (AD) in depressed subjects compared with healthy controls were found for both methods and for all fitting procedures. No group differences were found for radial and mean diffusivity indices. Importantly, for the AD metric, the normalization methods and fitting procedures showed reliable differences, both in the volume and in the number of significant between-groups difference clusters detected. Additionally, a significant voxel-based correlation, in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, between AD and self-reported stress was found only for one of the normalization procedure (ANTs TBSS). In conclusion, the sensitivity to detect group-level effects on DTI metrics might depend on the DTI normalization and/or tensor fitting procedures used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
ANTs; DTI fitting algorithms; Diffusion tensor imaging; Major depressive disorder; TBSS
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146289 (URN)10.1016/j.brainres.2017.06.013 (DOI)000406729700016 ()28629742 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-07 Created: 2018-04-07 Last updated: 2022-05-02
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7982-4659

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