liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Taller the Ladder, the Tougher the Climb?: Essays on the Impact of Income Inequality on Intergenerational Mobility
Linköping University, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2023 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The study of income inequality has a rich history within economics and various social sciences. More recently, a growing body of literature has examined intergenerational income mobility to understand not only equality of opportunities but also whether the labor market allocation successfully utilizes the potential abilities from all social strata. This dissertation explores the intricate relationship between income inequality and intergenerational mobility through three distinct research articles.

If we envision the income distribution as a ladder, income inequality can be likened to the relative distance between the ladder’s rungs, where greater inequality corresponds to a more stretched-out ladder. Income mobility, on the other hand, is a much more multifaceted concept. The most common way of measuring it is relative mobility, which tries to quantify the mobility between the rungs of the ladder, where an upward jump for one born poor necessarily implies a downward shift for one born richer.

Article 1 studies how relative mobility is affected by income inequality across regions within Sweden. If there are substantial income differences across regions within countries that persist across generations, this will contribute to a more stretched-out ladder, potentially making mobility more difficult. The study demonstrates that these regional income disparities persist across generations, resulting in decreased income mobility. The article then proceeds to examine whether migration patterns between richer and poorer regions mitigate or exacerbate this effect.

In contrast to relative mobility, absolute mobility measures if children end up being better off in the standard of living compared to their parents, regardless of whether they manage to climb to a higher rung on the ladder compared to their parents. Article 2 delves into examining the trend in absolute income mobility for Sweden, measured as the percentage of children earning more than their parents. The novel decomposition method reveals that Sweden has a high level of absolute mobility mainly due to the low level of income inequality.

Article 3 explores the potential of public education to mitigate inequities by examining the causal effects of a 1989 Swedish teacher strike that caused school closures. The article reveals that the strike had both negative short-run effects, measured as student results, and long-run effects, measured as earnings, and the effects were larger for individuals from low-income backgrounds.

In summary, this dissertation provides both empirical and methodological contributions to the intricate relationship between inequality and mobility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2023. , p. 29
Series
Linköping Studies in Arts and Sciences, ISSN 0282-9800 ; 871
Keywords [en]
Inequality, Intergenerational Income Mobility, Social Mobility, Economics of Education
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-199797DOI: 10.3384/9789180754736ISBN: 9789180754729 (print)ISBN: 9789180754736 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-199797DiVA, id: diva2:1821618
Public defence
2024-01-10, K1, Kåkenhus, Campus Norrköping, Norrköping, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

Funding agencies: Handelsbanken Research Foundations and Torsten Söderbergs Stiftelse

Available from: 2023-12-20 Created: 2023-12-20 Last updated: 2023-12-20Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Absolute income mobility and the effect of parent generation inequality: An extended decomposition approach
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Absolute income mobility and the effect of parent generation inequality: An extended decomposition approach
2023 (English)In: European Economic Review, ISSN 0014-2921, E-ISSN 1873-572X, Vol. 152, article id 104359Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We use full-population data to study trends in intergenerational absolute income mobility, measured as the ratio of children earning more than their parents, for 11 Swedish cohorts born 1972–1983. Absolute mobility during this period increases from 72% to 84% for men and from 76% to 86% for women—higher figures than in most other countries studied. To explain these results, we outline a novel decomposition strategy that accounts for cohort variation in parent-generation income inequality. All else equal, if income inequality is higher in the parent generation, more economic growth is required to achieve any given level of absolute mobility. We discuss implications for comparative research in intergenerational income mobility.

Keywords
Economic history, Absolute mobility, Income decomposition, Intergenerational income mobility, Social mobility
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-199796 (URN)10.1016/j.euroecorev.2022.104359 (DOI)
Available from: 2023-12-20 Created: 2023-12-20 Last updated: 2023-12-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(531 kB)208 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 531 kBChecksum SHA-512
2e3b96a1a89b288ba27038cebeedb26d3bd2f189733e13f261a6b46fb5595f77967e67082ecdc0e867024fd611b82df064b4e42b8792478f4c59a6654a1aa743
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf
Order online >>

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records

Liss, Erik

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Liss, Erik
By organisation
The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IASFaculty of Arts and Sciences
Economics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 208 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 1568 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf