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  • 1.
    Abbott, Tom E. F.
    et al.
    Queen Mary Univ London, England.
    Pearse, Rupert M.
    Queen Mary Univ London, England.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications in the hypoxaemic patient - gathering the evidence for noninvasive respiratory support2020In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 263-264Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Lidocaine infusion has a 25% opioid-sparing effect on background pain after burns: A prospective, randomised, double-blind, controlled trial2020In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 465-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The pain of a burn mainly results from the inflammatory cascade that is induced by the injured tissue, and is classified as background, breakthrough, procedural and postoperative pain. High doses of opioids are usually needed to treat background pain, so its management includes a combination of types of analgesia to reduce the side effects. Lidocaine given intravenously has been shown in two small, uncontrolled studies to have an appreciable effect on pain after burns.

    Objectives

    In this prospective double-blind controlled trial we aimed to examine and quantify the opioid-sparing effect of a continuous infusion of lidocaine for the treatment of background pain during the early period after a burn.

    Methods

    Adult patients injured with burns of >10 total body surface area burned (TBSA%) and treated with a morphine based patient-controlled analgesia device (PCA) were randomised to have either lidocaine infusion starting with a bolus dose (1 mg lidocaine/kg) followed by continuous infusion (180 mg lidocaine/hour) or a placebo infusion, for seven consecutive days. Total daily consumption of opioids (mg) and amount of pain (visual analogue score, VAS) were recorded.

    Results

    We included 19 patients, 10 of whom were given a lidocaine infusion. There were no differences between groups in VAS, TBSA%, time of enrolment to the study since the initial burn, or duration of hospital stay. The opioid consumption in the lidocaine group declined by roughly 25% during the period of the study.

    Conclusion

    An intravenous infusion of lidocaine was safe and had an opioid-sparing effect when treating background pain in burns.

  • 3.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Surg Dept, Plast Surg Unit, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department Suez, Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Evaluation of Glandular Liposculpture as a Single Treatment for Grades I and II Gynaecomastia2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 1222-1230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Gynaecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, of which the psychological burden on the patient can be considerable, with the increased risk of disorders such as depression, anxiety, and social phobia. Minimal scarring can be achieved by liposuction alone, though it is known to have a limited effect on the dense glandular and fibroconnective tissues. We know of few studies published on “liposuction alone”, so we designed this study to evaluate the outcome of combining liposuction with glandular liposculpturing through two axillary incisions as a single treatment for the management of grades I and II gynaecomastia.

    Methods

    We made a retrospective analysis of 18 patients with grade I or II gynaecomastia who were operated on by combined liposuction and glandular liposculpturing using a fat disruptor cannula, without glandular excision, during the period 2014–2016. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Breast Evaluation Questionnaire (BEQ), which is a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very dissatisfied; 2 = dissatisfied; 3 = neither; 4 = satisfied; 5 = very satisfied). The post-operative aesthetic appearance of the chest was evaluated by five independent observers on a scale from 1 to 5 (5 = considerable improvement).

    Results

    The patient mean (SD) overall satisfaction score was 4.7 (0.7), in which 92% of the responders were “satisfied” to “very satisfied”. The mean (SD) BEQ for all questions answered increased from 2.1 (0.2) “dissatisfied” preoperatively to 4.1 (0.2) “satisfied” post-operatively. The observers’ mean (SD) rate for the improvement in the shape of the front chest wall was 4.1 (0.7). No haematomas were recorded, one patient developed a wound infection, and two patients complained of remnants of tissue. The median (IQR) body mass index was 27.4 (26.7–29.4), 11 patients had gynaecomastia grade I, and 7 patients grade II. The median (IQR) volume of aspirated fat was 700 ml (650–800), operating time was 67 (65–75) minutes, 14 patients had general anaesthesia, and hospital charges were US$ 538 (481–594).

    Conclusions

    Combined liposuction and liposculpturing using the fat disruptor cannula resulted in satisfied patients and acceptable outcomes according to the observers’ ratings. It could be a useful alternative with an outcome that corresponds to that of more expensive methods.

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  • 4.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vieweg, Rosa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Irschik, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Development of delirium: Association with old age, severe burns, and intensive care2020In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 797-803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Delirium is defined as a disturbance of attention and awareness that develops over a short period of time, is a change from the baseline, and typically fluctuates over time. Burn care involves a high prevalence of known risk factors for delirium such as sedation, inflammation, and prolonged stay in hospital. Our aim was to explore the extent of delirium and the impact of factors associated with it for adult patients who have been admitted to hospital with burns. Methods In this retrospective study, all adult patients who had been admitted with burns during a four-year period were studied, including both those who were treated with intensive care and intermediate care only (no intensive care). Daily records of the assessment of delirium using the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale (Nu-DESC) were analysed together with age, sex, the percentage of total body surface area burned, operations, and numbers of wound care procedures under anaesthesia, concentrations of plasma C-reactive protein, and other clinical variables. Logistic regression was used to analyse factors that were associated with delirium and its effect on mortality, and linear regression was used to analyse its effect on the duration of hospital stay. Results Fifty-one patients (19%) of the total 262 showed signs of delirium (Nu-DESC score of 2 or more) at least once during their stay in hospital. Signs of delirium were recorded in 42/89 patients (47%) who received intensive care, and in 9/173 (5%) who had intermediate care. Independent factors for delirium in the multivariable regression were: age over 74 years; number of operations and wound care procedures under anaesthesia; and the provision of intensive care (area under the curve 0.940, 95% CI 0.899–0.981). Duration of hospital stay, adjusted for age and burn size, was 13.2 (95% CI 7.4–18.9, p < 0.001) days longer in the group who had delirium. We found no independent effects of delirium on mortality. Conclusion We found a strong association between delirium and older age, provision ofr intensive care, and number of interventions under anaesthesia. A further 5% of patients who did not receive intensive care also showed signs of delirium, which is a finding that deserves to be thoroughly investigated in the future.

  • 5.
    Adamopoulos, Stamatis
    et al.
    Onassis Cardiac Surg Ctr, Greece.
    Bonios, Michael
    Onassis Cardiac Surg Ctr, Greece.
    Ben Gal, Tuvia
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Gustafsson, Finn
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Abdelhamid, Magdy
    Cairo Univ, Egypt.
    Adamo, Marianna
    Univ Brescia, Italy.
    Bayes-Genis, Antonio
    Hlth Sci Res Inst Germans Trias i Pujol, Spain; Inst Salud Carlos III, Spain; Germans Trias i Pujol Univ Hosp, Spain.
    Boehm, Michael
    Saarland Univ, Germany.
    Chioncel, Ovidiu
    Emergency Inst Cardiovasc Dis Prof CC Iliescu, Romania; Univ Med & Pharm Carol Davila, Romania.
    Cohen-Solal, Alain
    Hosp Lariboisiere, France.
    Damman, Kevin
    Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Di Nora, Concetta
    Univ Trieste, Italy.
    Hashmani, Shahrukh
    Cleveland Clin Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates.
    Hill, Loreena
    Queens Univ, North Ireland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jankowska, Ewa
    Wroclaw Med Univ, Poland.
    Lopatin, Yury
    Volgograd State Med Univ, Russia.
    Masetti, Marco
    IRCCS Azienda Osped Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Mehra, Mandeep R.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, MA USA; Harvard Med Sch, MA USA.
    Milicic, Davor
    Univ Zagreb, Croatia; Univ Hosp Ctr Zagreb, Croatia.
    Moura, Brenda
    Univ Porto, Portugal.
    Mullens, Wilfried
    Ziekenhuis Oost Limburg, Belgium.
    Nalbantgil, Sanem
    Ege Univ, Turkiye.
    Panagiotou, Chrysoula
    Onassis Cardiac Surg Ctr, Greece.
    Piepoli, Massimo
    IRCCS Policlin San Donato, Italy; Univ Milan, Italy.
    Rakisheva, Amina
    Sci Res Inst Cardiol & Internal Med, Kazakhstan.
    Ristic, Arsen
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Rivinius, Rasmus
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Germany; German Ctr Cardiovasc Res DZHK, Germany.
    Savarese, Gianluigi
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Thum, Thomas
    Hannover Med Sch, Germany; Hannover Med Sch, Germany.
    Tocchetti, Carlo Gabriele
    Univ Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Tops, Laurens F.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Van Laake, Linda W.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Volterrani, Maurizio
    IRCCS San Raffaele, Italy.
    Seferovic, Petar
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Coats, Andrew
    Heart Res Inst, Australia.
    Metra, Marco
    Univ Brescia, Italy.
    Rosano, Giuseppe
    St Georges Hosp NHS Trust London, England.
    Right heart failure with left ventricular assist devices: Preoperative, perioperative and postoperative management strategies. A clinical consensus statement of the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the ESC2024In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Right heart failure (RHF) following implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a common and potentially serious condition with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations with an unfavourable effect on patient outcomes. Clinical scores that predict the occurrence of right ventricular (RV) failure have included multiple clinical, biochemical, imaging and haemodynamic parameters. However, unless the right ventricle is overtly dysfunctional with end-organ involvement, prediction of RHF post-LVAD implantation is, in most cases, difficult and inaccurate. For these reasons optimization of RV function in every patient is a reasonable practice aiming at preparing the right ventricle for a new and challenging haemodynamic environment after LVAD implantation. To this end, the institution of diuretics, inotropes and even temporary mechanical circulatory support may improve RV function, thereby preparing it for a better adaptation post-LVAD implantation. Furthermore, meticulous management of patients during the perioperative and immediate postoperative period should facilitate identification of RV failure refractory to medication. When RHF occurs late during chronic LVAD support, this is associated with worse long-term outcomes. Careful monitoring of RV function and characterization of the origination deficit should therefore continue throughout the patient's entire follow-up. Despite the useful information provided by the echocardiogram with respect to RV function, right heart catheterization frequently offers additional support for the assessment and optimization of RV function in LVAD-supported patients. In any patient candidate for LVAD therapy, evaluation and treatment of RV function and failure should be assessed in a multidimensional and multidisciplinary manner.

  • 6.
    Alkaissi, Aidah
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Postoperative Symptoms After Gynaecological Surgery: How They Are Influenced by Prophylactic Antiemetics Sensory Stimulation (P6-Acupressure)2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Symptoms after surgery and anaesthesia influence the patient´s ability to resume daily activities. If postoperative symptoms are controlled rehabilitation may be accelerated. The aims of this dissertation were to identify disturbing symptoms reported by patients after gynaecological surgery, to investigate what effect prohylactic treatment with antiemetics has on these symptoms and whether or not sensory simulation of the P6-acupressure has an effect on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and motion sickness.

    Methods: Total 1138 women participated in three clinical trials (Studies I, II, III) and one experimental study (Study IV). A questionnaire investigating postoperative symptoms was constructed and validated. The questionnaire was used in a prospective, consecutive, doubleblind, randomised, multicentre, and controlled study to identify incidence, and intensity of postoperative symptoms and the effect of common antiemetics (droperidol and granisetron) (Study III). The patients were followed for 24 h. In two studies (I, II) P6-acupressure was compared (prospective, double-blind, ransomised, controlled) with placebo acupressure and a reference group where the effect on PONV was followed over 24 h. The effect of P6-acupressure and placebo acupressure on motion sickness induced by a nauseogenic motion challenge was studied (Study III).

    Results: A high incidence and severity of postoperative symptoms were found after gynaecological surgery in a group with a high risk (>30%) for PONV. Sixty-four per cent (107/165) of the patients experienced disturbing symptoms after surgery and 46 % (76/165) scored their symptoms as moderate to very severe. Fourty-eight per cent (79/165) had two or more symptoms. A higher incidence of symptoms were reported in the groups with prophylactic treatment, granisetron 74% (123/165) and droperidol 80% (133/165) compared to the control group 41% (69/165) (P <0.05). The relative risk reduction for PONV with granisetron or droperidol prophylaxis is 27% respective 22%. The relative risk increase for headache is 63% after granisetron, and 44% for difficulty with accommodation after droperidol. Less PONV was seen after P6-acupressure, 33% (44/135) compared to reference group 46% (63/136) (p = 0.019), number needed to treat (NNT) was 7 [95% confidence interval (CI) 4- 6]. When comparing laparoscopic and vaginal surgery (subgroup analysis) the main effect was in the vaginal group (day-case surgery), 36% (27/75) in the reference group to 27% (23/86) in the placebo group and to 20% (17/84) in the P6-acupressure group, (P = 0.017), NNT for the vaginal group was 6 [95% CI 3-18]. P6-acupressure increased time to nausea after a laboratory motion challenge and reduced the total number of symptoms reported (p <0.009).

    Conclusions: There is no clinical efficacy in the form of reduced postoperative symptoms after prophylactic antiemetics (droperidol and granisetron) in females with a high risk (>30%) for PONV undergoing gynaecological surgery. P6-acupressure reduces the incidence of PONV after gynaecological surgery in females with a high (>30%) risk for PONV. The effect seems to be most prominent after vaginal surgery. P6-acupressure increased tolerance to experimental nausogenic stimuli and reduced the total number of symptoms reported in females with a history of motion sickness.

    List of papers
    1. Effect and placebo effect of acupressure (P6) on nausea and vomiting after outpatientgynaecological surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect and placebo effect of acupressure (P6) on nausea and vomiting after outpatientgynaecological surgery
    1999 (English)In: Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 270-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Acupuncture and acupressure have previously been reported to possess antiemetic effect. We wanted to investigate the "true" and placebo effect of acupressure in prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty women undergoing outpatient minor gynaecological surgery were entered into a double-blind and randomised study. One group received acupressure with bilateral stimulation of P6 (A), a second group received bilateral placebo stimulation (P) and a third group received no acupressure wrist band and served as a reference group (R). PONV was evaluated as number of patients with complete response (no PONV), nausea only or vomiting. In addition, the need for rescue antiemetic medication and nausea after 24 h was registered. RESULTS: Complete response was obtained in 11, 11 and 9 patients in groups, A, P and R, respectively. Nine, 7 and 6 patients had nausea before discharge home, and 1, 1 and 8 patients were nauseated (8 vs 1 patient: P < 0.05) 24 h after operation in A, P and R groups, respectively. When compared to placebo acupressure (2 patients vomited and 5 needed rescue), significantly (P < 0.05) fewer needed rescue antiemetic medication after acupressure at P6 (no vomiting or rescue medication). When compared to the observation group (5 vomited and 4 needed rescue antiemetics), significantly fewer vomited after acupressure (P < 0.05) CONCLUSION: In patients undergoing brief gynaecological surgery, placebo effect of acupressure decreased nausea after 24 h but vomiting and need of rescue antiemetics was reduced only by acupressure with the correct P6 point stimulation.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13648 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-08-17
    2. P6 acupressure may relieve nausea and vomiting after gynecological surgery: an effectiveness study in 410 women
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>P6 acupressure may relieve nausea and vomiting after gynecological surgery: an effectiveness study in 410 women
    Show others...
    2002 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, ISSN 0832-610X, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 1034-1039Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of sensory stimulation of the P6 point on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) after gynecological surgery in the everyday clinical setting (effectiveness study).

    Methods: Four hundred and ten women undergoing general anesthesia for elective gynecological surgery were included in a prospective, consecutive, randomized, multicentre, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial with a reference group. One group was given bilateral P6 acupressure (n = 135), a second group similar pressure on bilateral non-acupressure points (n = 139), and a third group (n = 136) served as reference group. Nausea (scale 0–6), vomiting, pain, and satisfaction with the treatment were recorded. Primary outcome was complete response, i.e., no nausea, vomiting or rescue medication for 24 hr. Results were analyzed by applying logistic regression with indicators of treatments, type of operation and risk score for PONV as explanatory variables.

    Results: Complete response was more frequent in the P6 acupressure group than in the reference group (P = 0.0194) Conversely, the incidence of PONV was 46% in the reference group, 38% after pressure on a non-acupoint and 33% after P6 acupressure. The decrease from 46% to 33% was statistically significant. When considering vaginal cases separately, the decrease in PONV was from 36% to 20% (P = 0.0168). The corresponding decrease from 59% to 55% in the laparoscopic surgery group was not statistically significant.

    Conclusion: P6 acupressure is a non-invasive method that may have a place as prophylactic antiemetic therapy during gynecological surgery.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13649 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-08-17
    3. Disturbing postoperative symptoms are not reduced by prophylactic antiemetric treatment in patients at high risk for post-operative nausea and vomiting
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disturbing postoperative symptoms are not reduced by prophylactic antiemetric treatment in patients at high risk for post-operative nausea and vomiting
    Show others...
    2004 (English)In: Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 761-71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To give prophylactics or timely treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is the question. We compared the intensity and number of disturbing post-operative symptoms (i.e. pain, PONV, headache, fatigue, etc.) after prophylactic antiemetic treatment in a group of patients with >30% risk for post-operative vomiting. METHODS: Four hundred and ninety-five patients, from three hospitals, planned for gynaecological surgery were randomized double blind. They were given granisetron 3 mg, droperidol 1.25 mg or no prophylactic antiemetic. Post-operative symptoms were followed for 24 h using a questionnaire. Symptoms were analyzed both according to their intensity and in a dichotomous fashion. RESULTS: The intensity of different symptoms differed depending on whether droperidol, granisetron or no antiemetic had been given (P = 0.005) but the overall incidence of moderate to very severe symptoms was similar in all groups. No group fared better in general. The total number of symptoms was higher in the groups given prophylactic treatment (P < 0.05). The relative risk reduction for PONV with granisetron or droperidol prophylaxis was 27%[95% confidence interval (CI) 8-43] and 22% (2-38), respectively. The NNT (number needed to treat) for granisetron (0-24 h) was 7 and for droperidol 8. The NNH (number needed to harm) (0-24 h) for headache and visual disturbances was 6 and 13 (NS) for granisteron and, 50 (NS) and 6 for droperidol. CONCLUSION: The intensity of symptoms or the total number of disturbing symptoms did not decrease after prophylactic antiemetic treatment in a group of patients, but the profile of disturbing symptoms changed. The relevance of post-operative symptoms in terms of patients' well-being needs to be addressed.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13650 (URN)10.1111/j.0001-5172.2004.00403.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-10-14
    4. P6 acupressure increases tolerance to nausogenic motion stimulation in women with high risk for PONV
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>P6 acupressure increases tolerance to nausogenic motion stimulation in women with high risk for PONV
    2005 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, ISSN 1496-8975, Vol. 52, p. 703-709Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In a previous study we noticed that P6 acupressure decreased postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) more markedly after discharge. As motion sickness susceptibility is increased by, for example, opioids we hypothesized that P6 acu-pressure decreased PONV by decreasing motion sickness susceptibility. We studied time to nausea by a laboratory motion challenge in a group of volunteers, during P6 and placebo acupressure.

    Methods: 60 women with high and low susceptibilities for motion sickness participated in a randomized and double-blind study with an active P6 acupressure, placebo acupressure, and a control group (n = 20 in each group). The risk score for PONV was over 50%. The motion challenge was by eccentric rotation in a chair, blindfolded and with chin to chest movements of the head. The challenge was stopped when women reported moderate nausea. Symptoms were recorded.

    Results: Mean time to moderate nausea was longer in the P6 acu-pressure group compared to the control group. P6 acupressure = 352 (259–445), mean (95% confidence interval) in seconds, control = 151 (121–181) and placebo acupressure = 280 (161–340); (P = 0.006). No difference was found between P6 and placebo acupressure or placebo acupressure and control groups. Previous severity of motion sickness did not influence time to nausea (P = 0.107). The cumulative number of symptoms differed between the three groups (P < 0.05). Fewer symptoms were reported in the P6 acupressure compared to the control group P < 0.009. Overall, P6 acupressure was only marginally more effective than placebo acupressure on the forearms.

    Conclusion: In females with a history of motion sickness P6 acu-pressure increased tolerance to experimental nauseogenic stimuli, and reduced the total number of symptoms reported.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13651 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-08-17
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  • 7.
    Andersson, E
    et al.
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rackauskaite, D
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Csajbók, L
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öst, M
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nellgård, B
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A prospective outcome study observing patients with severe traumatic brain injury over 10-15 years2017In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 502-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) can be divided into primary and secondary injuries. Intensive care protocols focus on preventing secondary injuries. This prospective cohort study was initiated to investigate outcome, including mortality, in patients treated according to the Lund Concept after a sTBI covering 10-15 years post-trauma.

    METHODS: Patients were included during 2000-2004 when admitted to the neurointensive care unit, Sahlgrenska University Hospital. Inclusion criteria were: Glasgow coma scale score of ≤8, need for artificial ventilation and intracranial monitoring. Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was used to evaluate outcome both at 1-year and 10-15 years post-trauma.

    RESULTS: Ninety-five patients, (27 female and 68 male), were initially included. Both improvement and deterioration were noted between 1- and 10-15 years post-injury. Mortality rate (34/95) was higher in the studied population vs. a matched Swedish population, (Standard mortality rate (SMR) 9.5; P < 0.0001). When dividing the cohort into Good (GOS 4-5) and Poor (GOS 2-3) outcome at 1-year, only patients with Poor outcome had a higher mortality rate than the matched population (SMR 7.3; P < 0.0001). Further, good outcome (high GOS) at 1-year was associated with high GOS 10-15 years post-trauma (P < 0.0001). Finally, a majority of patients demonstrated symptoms of mental fatigue.

    CONCLUSION: This indicates that patients with severe traumatic brain injury with Good outcome at 1-year have similar survival probability as a matched Swedish population and that high Glasgow outcome scale at 1-year is related to good long-term outcome. Our results further emphasise the advantage of the Lund concept.

  • 8.
    Aneman, Anders
    et al.
    Liverpool Hosp, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia; Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Wilander, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Hallands Hosp, Sweden.
    Zoerner, Frank
    Liverpool Hosp, Australia.
    Lipcsey, Miklos
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Vasopressor Responsiveness Beyond Arterial Pressure: A Conceptual Systematic Review Using Venous Return Physiology2021In: Shock, ISSN 1073-2322, E-ISSN 1540-0514, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 352-359Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We performed a systematic review to investigate the effects of vasopressor-induced hemodynamic changes in adults with shock. We applied a physiological approach using the interacting domains of intravascular volume, heart pump performance, and vascular resistance to structure the interpretation of responses to vasopressors. We hypothesized that incorporating changes in determinants of cardiac output and vascular resistance better reflect the vasopressor responsiveness beyond mean arterial pressure alone. We identified 28 studies including 678 subjects in Pubmed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases. All studies demonstrated significant increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systemic vascular resistance during vasopressor infusion. The calculated mean systemic filling pressure analogue increased (16 +/- 3.3 mmHg to 18 +/- 3.4 mmHg; P = 0.02) by vasopressors with variable effects on central venous pressure and the pump efficiency of the heart leading to heterogenous changes in cardiac output. Changes in the pressure gradient for venous return and cardiac output, scaled by the change in MAP, were positively correlated (r (2) = 0.88, P &lt; 0.001). Changes in the mean systemic filling pressure analogue and heart pump efficiency were negatively correlated (r (2) = 0.57, P &lt; 0.001) while no correlation was found between changes in MAP and heart pump efficiency. We conclude that hemodynamic changes induced by vasopressor therapy are inadequately represented by the change in MAP alone despite its common use as a clinical endpoint. The more comprehensive analysis applied in this review illustrates how vasopressor administration may be optimized.

  • 9.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Interleukin-8 is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid following high-voltage electrical injury with late-onset paraplegia suggesting neuronal damage at the microlevel as causative factor2010In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 36, no 3, p. e7-e9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patient, a 31-year-old male, sustained an electric burn injury (16 kV, AC/DC) while working with electric power lines. He was acutely admitted to a national burn center in Southeast Sweden, where burns equalling 29% of the total body surface area were noted. The burns were located at the front of the abdomen, upper arms bilaterally, and the left hip region, and the lesions were estimated to be mainly of the dermal type, what was believed initially to be caused mainly by an electric flash. There were no obvious entry or exit sites of the electric current. However, myoglobin in plasma was elevated as a sign of muscular degradation, suggesting that at least some current had passed through the tissues. According to the paramedic report there was an episode of a few minutes of unconsciousness immediately after the injury, but the patient was fully awake and alert on admission. There was no concomitant trauma.

  • 10.
    Arlien-Soborg, Mai C.
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Dal, Jakob
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark; Steno Diabet Ctr North Jutland, Denmark.
    Heck, Ansgar
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Stochholm, Kirstine
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Husted, Eigil
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Feltoft, Claus Larsen
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp Herlev & Gentofte, Denmark.
    Rasmussen, ase Krogh
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Andreassen, Mikkel
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Klose, Marianne Christina
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Torben Leo
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Andersen, Marianne Skovsager
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Christensen, Louise Lehmann
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Krogh, Jesper
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Jarlov, Anne
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Bollerslev, Jens
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Nermoen, Ingrid
    Akershus Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Oksnes, Marianne
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Dahlqvist, Per
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Norrlands Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Norrlands Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Berinder, Katarina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hoybye, Charlotte
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Petersson, Maria
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Akerman, Anna-karin
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Engstrom, Britt Eden
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Johannsson, Gudmundur
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ragnarsson, Oskar
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Olsson, Daniel
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Sigurjonsdottir, Helga agusta
    Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Iceland; Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Fougner, Stine Lyngvi
    Trondheim Reg & Univ Hosp, Norway; Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Norway.
    Matikainen, Niina
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Vehkavaara, Satu
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Metso, Saara
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Jaatinen, Pia
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Haemalainen, Paeivi
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Rintamaki, Reeta
    Kuopio Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Yliaska, Iina
    Oulu Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Immonen, Heidi
    Turku Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Makimattila, Sari
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Cederberg-Tamminen, Henna
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Viukari, Marianna
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Nevalainen, Pasi
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Nuutila, Pirjo
    Turku Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Schalin-Jantti, Camilla
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Burman, Pia
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Jorgensen, Jens Otto Lunde
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Acromegaly management in the Nordic countries: A Delphi consensus survey2024In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveAcromegaly is associated with increased morbidity and mortality if left untreated. The therapeutic options include surgery, medical treatment, and radiotherapy. Several guidelines and recommendations on treatment algorithms and follow-up exist. However, not all recommendations are strictly evidence-based. To evaluate consensus on the treatment and follow-up of patients with acromegaly in the Nordic countries.MethodsA Delphi process was used to map the landscape of acromegaly management in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Iceland. An expert panel developed 37 statements on the treatment and follow-up of patients with acromegaly. Dedicated endocrinologists (n = 47) from the Nordic countries were invited to rate their extent of agreement with the statements, using a Likert-type scale (1-7). Consensus was defined as &gt;= 80% of panelists rating their agreement as &gt;= 5 or &lt;= 3 on the Likert-type scale.ResultsConsensus was reached in 41% (15/37) of the statements. Panelists agreed that pituitary surgery remains first line treatment. There was general agreement to recommend first-generation somatostatin analog (SSA) treatment after failed surgery and to consider repeat surgery. In addition, there was agreement to recommend combination therapy with first-generation SSA and pegvisomant as second- or third-line treatment. In more than 50% of the statements, consensus was not achieved. Considerable disagreement existed regarding pegvisomant monotherapy, and treatment with pasireotide and dopamine agonists.ConclusionThis consensus exploration study on the management of patients with acromegaly in the Nordic countries revealed a relatively large degree of disagreement among experts, which mirrors the complexity of the disease and the shortage of evidence-based data.

  • 11.
    Aslam, Tayyba N.
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Klitgaard, Thomas L.
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Ahlstedt, Christian A. O.
    Karolinska Univ, Sweden.
    Andersen, Finn H.
    Alesund Hosp, Norway.
    Chew, Michelle S
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Collet, Marie O.
    Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
    Cronhjort, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Estrup, Stine
    Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
    Fossum, Ole K.
    Akershus Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Frisvold, Shirin K.
    Univ Hosp North Norway, Norway.
    Gillmann, Hans-Joerg
    Hannover Med Sch, Germany.
    Granholm, Anders
    Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
    Gundem, Trine M.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Hauss, Kristin
    Sykehuset Telemark, Norway.
    Hollenberg, Jacob
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Condori, Maria E. Huanca
    Helse Fonna, Norway.
    Hästbacka, Johanna
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Johnstad, Bror A.
    Sykehuset Innlandet Hamar, Norway.
    Keus, Eric
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Netherlands.
    Kjaer, Maj-Brit N.
    Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
    Klepstad, Pal
    St Olavs Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Krag, Mette
    Holbaek Cent Hosp, Denmark.
    Kvåle, Reidar
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Malbrain, Manu L. N. G.
    Med Univ Lublin, Poland.
    Meyhoff, Christian S.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp Bispebjerg & Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Morgan, Matt
    Royal Perth Hosp, Australia.
    Moller, Anders
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp Bispebjerg & Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Pfortmueller, Carmen A.
    Bern Univ Hosp, Switzerland.
    Poulsen, Lone M.
    Zealand Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Robertson, Andrew C.
    Baerum Hosp, Norway.
    Schefold, Joerg C.
    Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Schjorring, Olav L.
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Siegemund, Martin
    Univ Hosp Basel, Switzerland.
    Sigurdsson, Martin I.
    Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Iceland.
    Sjövall, Fredrik
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Strand, Kristian
    Stavanger Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Stueber, Thomas
    Hannover Med Sch, Germany.
    Szczeklik, Wojciech
    Jagiellonian Univ Med Coll, Poland.
    Wahlin, Rebecka R.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wangberg, Helge L.
    Volda Hosp, Norway.
    Wian, Karl-Andre
    Vestfold Hosp Trust, Norway.
    Wichmann, Sine
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp North Zealand, Denmark.
    Hofso, Kristin
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Moller, Morten H.
    Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
    Perner, Anders
    Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
    Rasmussen, Bodil S.
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Laake, Jon H.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    SVALBARD Investigators,
    A survey of preferences for respiratory support in the intensive care unit for patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure2023In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 67, no 10, p. 1383-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundWhen caring for mechanically ventilated adults with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), clinicians are faced with an uncertain choice between ventilator modes allowing for spontaneous breaths or ventilation fully controlled by the ventilator. The preferences of clinicians managing such patients, and what motivates their choice of ventilator mode, are largely unknown. To better understand how clinicians preferences may impact the choice of ventilatory support for patients with AHRF, we issued a survey to an international network of intensive care unit (ICU) researchers.MethodsWe distributed an online survey with 32 broadly similar and interlinked questions on how clinicians prioritise spontaneous or controlled ventilation in invasively ventilated patients with AHRF of different severity, and which factors determine their choice.ResultsThe survey was distributed to 1337 recipients in 12 countries. Of these, 415 (31%) completed the survey either fully (52%) or partially (48%). Most respondents were identified as medical specialists (87%) or physicians in training (11%). Modes allowing for spontaneous ventilation were considered preferable in mild AHRF, with controlled ventilation considered as progressively more important in moderate and severe AHRF. Among respondents there was strong support (90%) for a randomised clinical trial comparing spontaneous with controlled ventilation in patients with moderate AHRF.ConclusionsThe responses from this international survey suggest that there is clinical equipoise for the preferred ventilator mode in patients with AHRF of moderate severity. We found strong support for a randomised trial comparing modes of ventilation in patients with moderate AHRF.

  • 12.
    Azman, Josip
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Rijeka University Hospital, Croatia; Rijeka University Hospital, Croatia.
    Stopar Pintaric, Tatjana
    University of Medical Centre Ljubljana, Slovenia; University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Cvetko, Erika
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Vlassakov, Kamen
    Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Ultrasound-Guided Glossopharyngeal Nerve Block A Cadaver and a Volunteer Sonoanatomy Study2017In: Regional anesthesia and pain medicine, ISSN 1098-7339, E-ISSN 1532-8651, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 252-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: Glossopharyngeal nerve (GPN) blocks are usually performed by topical, intraoral, or peristyloid approaches, which carry significant complication risks due to the proximity of important neurovascular structures. This study presents a proof of concept for a new ultrasound (US)-guided technique, which would block the GPN distally, in the parapharyngeal space, away from the immediate vicinity of high-risk collateral structures. Methods: Five cadaver heads were dissected, and the location of theGPN was explored bilaterally. In 40 healthy volunteers (20 men and 20 women; median age, 35.5 years [range, 24-69 years]) parapharyngeal sonograms were obtained, saved, and analyzed. To assess the technical feasibility of a distal GPN block in the parapharyngeal space, unilateral US-guided dye injections were performed in 3 fresh cadavers, followed by dissections. Results: The GPN was consistently identified between the stylopharyngeal and middle pharyngeal constrictor muscles in all cadaver specimens. The median distance between the GPN and the ipsilateral greater horn of the hyoid bone was 2.4 cm (range, 2.3-2.7 cm) on the right and 2.6 cm (range, 2.3-2.9 cm) on the left. The mean skin-to pharyngealwall distances in the volunteers were 2.03 (SD, 0.41) cm on the right and 2.02 (SD, 0.45) cm on the left. The mean hyoid bone-to-pharyngeal wall distances were 2.04 (SD, 0.35) cm (right) and 2.07 (SD, 0.35) cm (left). The fresh cadaver dissections demonstrated dye deposition adjacent to theGPNin the parapharyngeal space in all specimens. Conclusions: Based on our anatomical results in cadavers and healthy volunteers, we submit that successful and safe blockade of the distal GPN at the pharyngealwall level is technically feasible under US guidance.

  • 13.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Goal-directed fluid therapy during major abdominal surgery2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Both hypo- and hypervolemia increase the risk for postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery. Fluid needs vary amongst patients depending on differences in preoperative dehydration, intraoperative physiology and surgical characteristics. Goal-directed fluid therapy (GDFT) aims to target the right amount of fluid administration in each patient by evaluating the effect of fluid boluses on haemodynamic parameters such as stroke volume. It has been shown to reduce postoperative morbidity and is generally recommended for high-risk surgery. The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate whether more simple devices for GDFT result in clinical benefit, thus facilitating the application of GDFT in more patients.

    Aim: To compare performance and clinical benefit of pleth variability index (PVI), a noninvasive, easy-to-use device for GDFT, with the reference method of oesophageal Doppler; to evaluate methods for measuring preoperative dehydration and its effect on fluid handling by the body; and to confirm the expected clinical benefits of GDFT in patients undergoing oesophageal resection, a high risk procedure.

    Methods: In Studies I-III 150 patients scheduled for open abdominal surgery of at least 2 hrs were randomised to GDFT with either PVI or oesophageal Doppler. In the first half of the cohort, both monitors were connected to compare intraoperative performance. In 30 patients preoperative dehydration was analysed. In study IV 64 patients undergoing oesophageal resection were randomised to GDFT using pulse contour analysis or standard treatment.

    Results: The concordance between PVI and oesophageal Doppler for indicating the need for and effect of a fluid bolus was low, and both had only limited capacity to predict the effect of a fluid bolus. Both methods resulted in comparable amounts of fluid being administered and similar clinical outcome. Preoperative dehydration was limited but did impact on fluid handling. Patients receiving GDFT during oesophageal resection received more fluid and more dobutamine compared to controls, but this did not result in any clinical benefit.

    Conclusions: There are methodological issues as well as uncertainties about the clinical benefit of GDFT. We cannot recommend a strict application of any GDFT strategy, but suggest that its components should be incorporated in a more encompassing assessment of a patient’s fluid needs. The measurement, impact and treatment of preoperative dehydration need to be further clarified.

    List of papers
    1. Agreement between Pleth Variability Index and oesophageal Doppler to predict fluid responsiveness
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agreement between Pleth Variability Index and oesophageal Doppler to predict fluid responsiveness
    2016 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Optimisation of stroke volume using oesophageal Doppler is an established technique to guide intraoperative fluid therapy. The method has practical limitations and therefore alternative indices of fluid responsiveness, such as ventilator-induced variation in the pulse oximetric signal (Pleth Variability Index (PVI)) could be considered. We hypothesised that both methods predict fluid responsiveness in a similar way. Methods: Seventy-five patients scheduled for open major abdominal surgery were randomised to fluid optimisation using fluid bolus algorithms based on either PVI (n = 35) or Doppler (n = 39). All patients were monitored with both methods; the non-guiding method was blind. Primary endpoint was the concordance between the methods to predict fluid responsiveness. We also analysed the ability of each method to predict a stroke volume increase &gt;= 10% after a fluid bolus, as well as the accumulated intraoperative bolus fluid volume. Results: PVI indicated a need for fluid in one-third of the situations when Doppler did so, Cohens kappa = 0.03. A fluid bolus indicated by the PVI algorithm increased stroke volume by &gt;= 10% in half the situations. The same was found for the Doppler algorithm. The mean total bolus volume given was 878 ml when the fluid management was governed by PVI compared to 826 ml with Doppler (P = 0.71). Conclusion: PVI-and Doppler-based stroke volume optimisations agreed poorly, which did not affect the amount of fluid administered. None of the algorithms showed a good ability to predict fluid responsiveness. Our results do not support the fluid responsiveness concept.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
    National Category
    Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124622 (URN)10.1111/aas.12632 (DOI)000368139700006 ()26373826 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Linkoping University Hospital; County Council of Ostergotland

    Available from: 2016-02-09 Created: 2016-02-08 Last updated: 2024-01-10
    2. Dehydration and fluid volume kinetics before major open abdominal surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dehydration and fluid volume kinetics before major open abdominal surgery
    2014 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 58, no 10, p. 1258-1266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Assessment of dehydration in the preoperative setting is of potential clinical value. The present study uses urine analysis and plasma volume kinetics, which have both been validated against induced changes in body water in volunteers, to study the incidence and severity of dehydration before open abdominal surgery begins. Methods: Thirty patients (mean age 64 years) had their urine analysed before major elective open abdominal surgery for colour, specific weight, osmolality and creatinine. The results were scored and the mean taken to represent a dehydration index. Thereafter, the patients received an infusion of 5ml/kg of Ringers acetate intravenously for over 15min. Blood was sampled for 70min and the blood haemoglobin concentration used to estimate the plasma volume kinetics. Results: Distribution of fluid occurred more slowly (Pless than0.01) and the elimination half-life was twice as long (median 40min, not significant) in the 11 patients (37%) diagnosed to be moderately dehydrated as compared with euhydrated patients. The dehydration index indicated that the fluid deficit in these patients corresponded to 2.5% of the body weight, whereas the deficit in the others was 1%. In contrast, the 11 patients who later developed postoperative nausea and vomiting had a very short elimination half-life, only 9min (median, Pless than0.01). These patients were usually euhydrated but had microalbuminuria (Pless than0.03) and higher natriuresis (Pless than0.01). Conclusions: The degree of dehydration before major surgery was modest as evidenced both by urine sampling and volume kinetic analysis.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112464 (URN)10.1111/aas.12416 (DOI)000343826500010 ()25307711 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland [LiO-314271, LiO-357621]

    Available from: 2014-11-28 Created: 2014-11-28 Last updated: 2024-01-10Bibliographically approved
    3. Pleth variability index or stroke volume optimization during open abdominal surgery: a randomized controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pleth variability index or stroke volume optimization during open abdominal surgery: a randomized controlled trial
    2018 (English)In: BMC Anesthesiology, ISSN 1471-2253, E-ISSN 1471-2253, Vol. 18, article id 115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The impact of Goal Directed Fluid Therapy (GDFT) based on the non-invasive Pleth Variability Index (PVI) on clinical outcome after abdominal surgery has only sparingly been explored. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of intraoperative GDFT guided by PVI to a control group using esophageal Doppler on the incidence of complications and length of hospital stay after major abdominal surgery. We hypothesized that there would be no difference between the groups. Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial in a Swedish university hospital between November 2011 and January 2015; 150 patients scheduled for open abdominal surgery lasting 2 h or more were included. Exclusion criteria included hepatic resection or severe cardiac arrhythmia. The patients were randomized 1: 1 to either the intervention group or the control group. The intervention group received intraoperative GDFT by administering fluid boluses of 3 ml/kg tetrastarch aiming at a PVI value below 10%, while GDFT in the control group aimed for optimization of stroke volume as assessed with esophageal Doppler. Blinded observers assessed complications until postoperative day 30 using pre-defined definitions, as well as length of hospital stay. Results: One hundred and-fifty patients were randomized and 146 patients were available for the final data analysis. Median duration of surgery was 3 h. A total of 64 complications occurred in the PVI group (N = 74) and 70 in the Doppler group (N = 72) (p = 0.93). Median (IQR) length of stay was 8.0 (8.0) days in the PVI group and 8.0 (9.5) in the Doppler group (P = 0.57). Conclusions: No difference in clinical outcome, as defined by number of postoperative complications, and length of hospital stay, was found when goal directed fluid therapy was applied using PVI as an alternative to esophageal Doppler. PVI appears to be an acceptable alternative to esophageal Doppler for goal directed fluid therapy during major open abdominal surgery.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BMC, 2018
    Keywords
    Doppler ultrasonography; Fluid therapy; Laparotomy; Photoplethysmography; Stroke volume; Complications
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150857 (URN)10.1186/s12871-018-0579-4 (DOI)000442038200002 ()30121072 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital Linkoping, Sweden; Region Ostergotland

    Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2024-01-10
    4. Goal-directed therapy during transthoracic oesophageal resection does not improve outcome: Randomised controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Goal-directed therapy during transthoracic oesophageal resection does not improve outcome: Randomised controlled trial
    2019 (English)In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Goal-directed therapy (GDT) is expected to be of highest benefit in high-risk surgery. Therefore, GDT is recommended during oesophageal resection, which carries a high risk of postoperative complications.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that GDT during oesophageal resection improves outcome compared with standard care.

    DESIGN: A randomised controlled study.

    SETTING: Two Swedish university hospitals, between October 2011 and October 2015.

    PATIENTS: Sixty-four patients scheduled for elective transthoracic oesophageal resection were randomised. Exclusion criteria included colonic interposition and significant aortic or mitral valve insufficiency.

    INTERVENTION: A three-step GDT protocol included stroke volume optimisation using colloid boluses as assessed by pulse-contour analysis, dobutamine infusion if cardiac index was below 2.5 l min m and norepinephrine infusion if mean arterial blood pressure was below 65 mmHg.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The incidence of complications per patient at 5 and 30 days postoperatively as assessed using a predefined list.

    RESULTS: Fifty-nine patients were available for analysis. Patients in the intervention group received more colloid fluid (2190 ± 875 vs. 1596 ± 759 ml, P < 0.01) and dobutamine more frequently (27/30 vs. 9/29, P < 0.01). The median [interquartile range, IQR] incidence of complications per patient 5 days after surgery was 2 [0 to 3] in the intervention group and 1 [0 to 2] in the control group (P = 0.10), and after 30 days 4 [2 to 6] in the intervention group and 2 [1 to 4] in the control group (P = 0.10).

    CONCLUSION: Goal-directed therapy during oesophageal resection did not result in a reduction of the incidence of postoperative complications.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01416077.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156264 (URN)10.1097/EJA.0000000000000908 (DOI)000462763800010 ()30431499 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059795456 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Linkoping Medical Society

    Available from: 2019-04-10 Created: 2019-04-10 Last updated: 2024-01-10Bibliographically approved
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  • 14.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Hahn, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Södertälje Hosp, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Pleth variability index or stroke volume optimization during open abdominal surgery: a randomized controlled trial2018In: BMC Anesthesiology, ISSN 1471-2253, E-ISSN 1471-2253, Vol. 18, article id 115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The impact of Goal Directed Fluid Therapy (GDFT) based on the non-invasive Pleth Variability Index (PVI) on clinical outcome after abdominal surgery has only sparingly been explored. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of intraoperative GDFT guided by PVI to a control group using esophageal Doppler on the incidence of complications and length of hospital stay after major abdominal surgery. We hypothesized that there would be no difference between the groups. Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial in a Swedish university hospital between November 2011 and January 2015; 150 patients scheduled for open abdominal surgery lasting 2 h or more were included. Exclusion criteria included hepatic resection or severe cardiac arrhythmia. The patients were randomized 1: 1 to either the intervention group or the control group. The intervention group received intraoperative GDFT by administering fluid boluses of 3 ml/kg tetrastarch aiming at a PVI value below 10%, while GDFT in the control group aimed for optimization of stroke volume as assessed with esophageal Doppler. Blinded observers assessed complications until postoperative day 30 using pre-defined definitions, as well as length of hospital stay. Results: One hundred and-fifty patients were randomized and 146 patients were available for the final data analysis. Median duration of surgery was 3 h. A total of 64 complications occurred in the PVI group (N = 74) and 70 in the Doppler group (N = 72) (p = 0.93). Median (IQR) length of stay was 8.0 (8.0) days in the PVI group and 8.0 (9.5) in the Doppler group (P = 0.57). Conclusions: No difference in clinical outcome, as defined by number of postoperative complications, and length of hospital stay, was found when goal directed fluid therapy was applied using PVI as an alternative to esophageal Doppler. PVI appears to be an acceptable alternative to esophageal Doppler for goal directed fluid therapy during major open abdominal surgery.

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  • 15.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Halldestam, Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Goal-directed therapy during transthoracic oesophageal resection does not improve outcome: Randomised controlled trial2019In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Goal-directed therapy (GDT) is expected to be of highest benefit in high-risk surgery. Therefore, GDT is recommended during oesophageal resection, which carries a high risk of postoperative complications.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that GDT during oesophageal resection improves outcome compared with standard care.

    DESIGN: A randomised controlled study.

    SETTING: Two Swedish university hospitals, between October 2011 and October 2015.

    PATIENTS: Sixty-four patients scheduled for elective transthoracic oesophageal resection were randomised. Exclusion criteria included colonic interposition and significant aortic or mitral valve insufficiency.

    INTERVENTION: A three-step GDT protocol included stroke volume optimisation using colloid boluses as assessed by pulse-contour analysis, dobutamine infusion if cardiac index was below 2.5 l min m and norepinephrine infusion if mean arterial blood pressure was below 65 mmHg.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The incidence of complications per patient at 5 and 30 days postoperatively as assessed using a predefined list.

    RESULTS: Fifty-nine patients were available for analysis. Patients in the intervention group received more colloid fluid (2190 ± 875 vs. 1596 ± 759 ml, P < 0.01) and dobutamine more frequently (27/30 vs. 9/29, P < 0.01). The median [interquartile range, IQR] incidence of complications per patient 5 days after surgery was 2 [0 to 3] in the intervention group and 1 [0 to 2] in the control group (P = 0.10), and after 30 days 4 [2 to 6] in the intervention group and 2 [1 to 4] in the control group (P = 0.10).

    CONCLUSION: Goal-directed therapy during oesophageal resection did not result in a reduction of the incidence of postoperative complications.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01416077.

  • 16.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Werner-Möller, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Clinical Use of Lactate Measurements: Comment2021In: Anesthesiology, ISSN 0003-3022, E-ISSN 1528-1175, Vol. 135, no 4, p. 766-766Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cardiovascular response to hyperoxemia, hemodilution and burns: a clinical and experimental study2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decades less invasive monitoring and analytical tools have been developed for the evaluation of myocardial mechanics in clinical praxis. In critical care, these are longed-for complements to pulmonary artery catheter monitoring, additionally offering previously inaccessible information. This work is aimed, during fluid-replacement and oxygen therapy, to determine the physiological interface of ventricular and vascular mechanical properties, which result in the transfer of blood from the heart to appropriate circulatory beds. In prospective clinical studies we investigated previously cardiovascular healthy adults during hyperoxemia, and during preoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution or early fluid resuscitation of severe burn victims. Echocardiography was used in all studies, transthoracic for healthy volunteers and transesophageal for patients. For vascular parameters and for control purposes pulmonary artery Swan-Ganz catheter, calibrated external pulse recordings, whole body impedance cardiography, and transpulmonel thermodilution method were applied.

    We detected no significant change in blood pressure or heart rate, the two most often used parameters for patient monitoring. During preoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution a reduction of hemoglobin to 80 g/l did not compromise systolic or diastolic myocardial function. Cardiac volumes and flow increased with a concomitant fall in systemic vascular resistance while oxygen delivery seemed maintained. Supplemental oxygen therapy resulted in a linear dose-response between arterial oxygen and cardiovascular parameters, suggesting a direct vascular effect. Cardiac flow decreased and vascular resistance increased from hyperoxemia, and a decrease of venous return implied extracardial blood-pooling. Severe burns result in hypovolemic shock if not properly treated. The commonly used Parkland fluid replacement strategy, with urinary output and mean arterial pressure as endpoints, has recently been questioned. Applying this strategy, only transient early central hypovolemia was recorded, while dimensional preload, global left ventricular systolic function and oxygen delivery or consumption remained within normal ranges during the first 36 hours after accident. Signs of restrictive left ventricular diastolic function were detected in all patients and regional unstable systolic dysfunction was recognized in every other patient, and was consistent with myocardial marker leakage. Severe burns thereby cause myocardial stiffness and systolic regional dysfunction, which may not be prevented only by central normovolemia and adequate oxygenation.

    List of papers
    1. Transesophageal echocardiographic hemodynamic monitoring during preoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transesophageal echocardiographic hemodynamic monitoring during preoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution
    2000 (English)In: Anesthesiology, ISSN 0003-3022, Vol. 92, no 5, p. 1250-1256Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Preoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution may compromise oxygen transport. The aims of our study were to describe the hemodynamic effects of normovolemic hemodilution and to determine its effect on systolic and diastolic cardiac function by multiplane transesophageal echocardiography.

    Methods: In eight anesthetized patients (aged 13-51 yr) without heart disease, hemoglobin was reduced in steps from 123 ± 8 (mean ± SD) to 98 ± 3 and to 79 ± 5 g/l. Hemodynamic measurements (intravascular pressures, thermodilution cardiac output, and echocardiographic recordings) were obtained during a stabilization period and at each level of hemodilution. Left ventricular wall motion was monitored continuously, and Doppler variables, annular motion, and changes in ejection fractional area were analyzed off-line.

    Results: During hemodilution, cardiac output by thermodilution increased by 16 ± 7% and 26 ± 10%, corresponding well to the increase in cardiac output as measured by Doppler (difference, 0.32 ± 1.2 l/min). Systemic vascular resistance fell 16 ± 14% and 23 ± 9% and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure increased slightly (2 ± 2 mmHg), whereas other pressures, heart rate, wall motion, and diastolic Doppler variables remained unchanged. Ejection fractional area change increased from 44 ± 7% to 54 ± 10% and 60 ± 9% as a result of reduced end-systolic and increased end-diastolic left ventricular areas.

    Conclusions: A reduction in hemoglobin to 80 g/l during acute normovolemic hemodilution does not normally compromise systolic or diastolic myocardial function as determined by transesophageal echocardiography. Preload, left ventricular ejection fraction, and cardiac output increase with a concomitant fall in systemic vascular resistance.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12898 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-01-28 Created: 2008-01-28 Last updated: 2018-01-25
    2. Human cardiovascular dose-response to supplemental oxygen
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human cardiovascular dose-response to supplemental oxygen
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 191, no 1, p. 15-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the central and peripheral cardiovascular adaptation and its coupling during increasing levels of hyperoxaemia. We hypothesized a dose-related effect of hyperoxaemia on left ventricular performance and the vascular properties of the arterial tree.

    Methods: Oscillometrically calibrated arterial subclavian pulse trace data were combined with echocardiographic recordings to obtain non-invasive estimates of left ventricular volumes, aortic root pressure and flow data. For complementary vascular parameters and control purposes whole-body impedance cardiography was applied. In nine (seven males) supine, resting healthy volunteers, aged 23–48 years, data was collected after 15 min of air breathing and at increasing transcutaneous oxygen tensions (20, 40 and 60 kPa), accomplished by a two group, random order and blinded hyperoxemic protocol.

    Results: Left ventricular stroke volume [86 ± 13 to 75 ± 9 mL (mean ± SD)] and end-diastolic area (19.3 ± 4.4 to 16.8 ± 4.3 cm2) declined (P < 0.05), and showed a linear, negative dose–response relationship to increasing arterial oxygen levels in a regression model. Peripheral resistance and characteristic impedance increased in a similar manner. Heart rate, left ventricular fractional area change, end-systolic area, mean arterial pressure, arterial compliance or carbon dioxide levels did not change.

    Conclusion: There is a linear dose–response relationship between arterial oxygen and cardiovascular parameters when the systemic oxygen tension increases above normal. A direct effect of supplemental oxygen on the vessels may therefore not be excluded. Proximal aortic and peripheral resistance increases from hyperoxaemia, but a decrease of venous return implies extra cardiac blood-pooling and compensatory relaxation of the capacitance vessels.

    Keywords
    arterial compliance, end-diastolic area, hyperoxaemia, hyperoxia, normocapnia, stroke volume, vascular resistance
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12899 (URN)10.1111/j.1748-1716.2007.01710.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-01-28 Created: 2008-01-28 Last updated: 2021-12-28
    3. Hemodynamic Changes During Resuscitation After Burns Using the Parkland Formula
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hemodynamic Changes During Resuscitation After Burns Using the Parkland Formula
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Trauma, ISSN 0022-5282, E-ISSN 1529-8809, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Parkland formula (2-4 mL/kg/burned area of total body surface area %) with urine output and mean arterial pressure (MAP) as endpoints; for the fluid resuscitation in burns is recommended all over the world. There has recently been a discussion on whether central circulatory endpoints should be used instead, and also whether volumes of fluid should be larger. Despite this, there are few central hemodynamic data available in the literature about the results when the formula is used correctly.

    Methods: Ten burned patients, admitted to our unit early, and with a burned area of >20% of total body sur-face area were investigated at 12, 24, and 36 hours after injury. Using transesophageal echocardiography, pulmonary artery catheterization, and transpulmonary thermodilution to monitor them, we evaluated the cardiovascular coupling when urinary output and MAP were used as endpoints.

    Results: Oxygen transport variables, heart rate, MAP, and left ventricular fractional area, did not change significantly during fluid resuscitation. Left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic area and global end-diastolic volume index increased from subnormal values at 12 hours to normal ranges at 24 hours after the burn. Extravascular lung intrathoracal blood volume ratio was increased 12 hours after the burn.

    Conclusions: Preload variables, global systolic function, and oxygen transport recorded simultaneously by three separate methods showed no need to increase the total fluid volume within 36 hours of a major burn. Early (12 hours) signs of central circulatory hypovolemia, however, support more rapid infusion of fluid at the beginning of treatment.

    Keywords
    Cardiovascular coupling, Echocardiography, Hemodynamic monitoring, Fractional area change, Global end-diastolic volume
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17146 (URN)10.1097/TA.0b013e318165c822 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-03-07 Created: 2009-03-07 Last updated: 2021-12-28
    4. Cardiac dysfunction after burns
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiac dysfunction after burns
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 603-609Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Using transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) we investigated the occurrence, and the association of possible abnormalities of motion of the regional wall of the heart (WMA) or diastolic dysfunction with raised troponin concentrations, or both during fluid resuscitation in patients with severe burns.

    Patients and methods

    Ten consecutive adults (aged 36–89 years, two women) with burns exceeding 20% total burned body surface area who needed mechanical ventilation were studied. Their mean Baux index was 92.7, and they were resuscitated according to the Parkland formula. Thirty series of TEE examinations and simultaneous laboratory tests for myocyte damage were done 12, 24, and 36 h after the burn.

    Results

    Half (n = 5) the patients had varying grades of leakage of the marker that correlated with changeable WMA at 12, 24 and 36 h after the burn (p ≤ 0.001, 0.044 and 0.02, respectively). No patient had WMA and normal concentrations of biomarkers or vice versa. The mitral deceleration time was short, but left ventricular filling velocity increased together with stroke volume.

    Conclusion

    Acute myocardial damage recorded by both echocardiography and leakage of troponin was common, and there was a close correlation between them. This is true also when global systolic function is not deteriorated. The mitral flow Doppler pattern suggested restrictive left ventricular diastolic function.

    Keywords
    Diastolic and regional systolic dysfunction; Echocardiography; Myocardial injury; Fluid resuscitation in burns; Myocardial infarction; Troponin
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12901 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2007.11.013 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-01-28 Created: 2008-01-28 Last updated: 2021-12-28
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  • 18.
    Bergek, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Zdolsek, Joachim H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Hahn, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Research Unit, Södertälje Hospital, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Non-invasive blood haemoglobin and plethysmographic variability index during brachial plexus block2015In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 114, no 5, p. 812-817Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Plethysmographic measurement of haemoglobin concentration (SpHb  ), pleth variability index (PVI), and perfusion index (PI) with the Radical-7 apparatus is growing in popularity. Previous studies have indicated that SpHb  has poor precision, particularly when PI is low. We wanted to study the effects of a sympathetic block on these measurements.

    Methods Twenty patients underwent hand surgery under brachial plexus block with one Radical-7 applied to each arm. Measurements were taken up to 20 min after the block had been initiated. Venous blood samples were also drawn from the non-blocked arm.

    Results During the last 10 min of the study, SpHb  had increased by 8.6%. The PVI decreased by 54%, and PI increased by 188% in the blocked arm (median values). All these changes were statistically significant. In the non-blocked arm, these parameters did not change significantly.

    Conclusions Brachial plexus block significantly altered SpHb  , PVI, and PI, which indicates that regional nervous control of the arm greatly affects plethysmographic measurements obtained by the Radical-7. After the brachial plexus block, SpHb  increased and PVI decreased.

  • 19.
    Bergenzaun, Lill
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ohlin, Hans
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    During, Joachim
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Willenheimer, Ronnie
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Chew, Michelle S.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    High-sensitive cardiac Troponin T is superior to echocardiography in predicting 1-year mortality in patients with SIRS and shock in intensive care2012In: BMC Anesthesiology, ISSN 1471-2253, E-ISSN 1471-2253, Vol. 12, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well documented in the critically ill. We assessed 1-year mortality in relation to cardiac biomarkers and LV function parameters by echocardiography in patients with shock. Methods: A prospective, observational, cohort study of 49 patients. B-natriuretic peptide (BNP), high-sensitive troponin T (hsTNT) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were assessed within 12 h of study inclusion. LV systolic function was measured by ejection fraction (LVEF), mean atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPDm), peak systolic tissue Doppler velocity imaging (TDIs) and velocity time integral in the LV outflow tract (LVOT VTI). LV diastolic function was evaluated by transmitral pulsed Doppler (E, A, E/A, E-deceleration time), tissue Doppler indices (e, a, E/e) and left atrial volume (La volume). APACHE II (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation) and SOFA (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment) scores were calculated. Results: hsTNT was significantly higher in non-survivors than in survivors (60 [17.0-99.5] vs 168 [89.8-358] ng/l, p = 0.003). Other univariate predictors of mortality were APACHE II (p = 0.009), E/e (p = 0.023), SOFA (p = 0.024) and age (p = 0.031). Survivors and non-survivors did not differ regarding BNP (p = 0.26) or any LV systolic function parameter (LVEF p = 0.87, AVPDm p = 0.087, TDIs p = 0.93, LVOT VTI p = 0.18). Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified hsTNT (p = 0.010) as the only independent predictor of 1-year mortality; adjusted odds ratio 2.0 (95% CI 1.2-3.5). Conclusions: hsTNT was the only independent predictor of 1-year mortality in patients with shock. Neither BNP nor echocardiographic parameters had an independent prognostic value. Further studies are needed to establish the clinical significance of elevated hsTNT in patients in shock.

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  • 20.
    Bergkvist, Max
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine in Linköping.
    Bergstrand, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Droog Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Assessment of oxygenation with polarized light spectroscopy enables new means for detecting vascular events in the skin2020In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 130, article id 104000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Impaired oxygenation in the skin may occur in disease states and after reconstructive surgery. We used tissue viability imaging (TiVi) to measure changes in oxygenation and deoxygenation of haemoglobin in an in vitro model and in the dermal microcirculation of healthy individuals. Materials and methods: Oxygenation was measured in human whole blood with different levels of oxygenation. In healthy subjects, changes in red blood cell concentration (C-RBC,(TiVi)), oxygenation (Delta C-OH,(TiVi)) and deoxygenation (Delta C-DOH,(TiVi)) of haemoglobin were measured during and after arterial and venous occlusion using TiVi and were compared with measurements from the enhanced perfusion and oxygen saturation system (EPOS). Results: During arterial occlusion, C-RBC,(TiVi) remained unchanged while Delta C-OH,(TiVi) decreased to -44.2 (10.4) AU (p = 0.04), as compared to baseline. After release, C-RBC,C-TiVi increased to 39.2 (18.8) AU (p &lt; 0.001), Delta C-OH,C-TiVi increased to 38.5. During venous occlusion, C-RBC,C-TiVi increased to 28.9 (11.2) AU (p &lt; 0.001), Delta C-OH,C-TiVi decreased to -52.2 (46.1) AU (p &lt; 0.001) compared to baseline after 5 min of venous occlusion. There was a significant correlation between the TiVi Oxygen Mapper and EPOS, for arterial (r = 0.92, p &lt; 0.001) and venous occlusion (r = 0.87, p &lt; 0.001), respectively. Conclusion: This study shows that TiVi can measure trends in oxygenation and deoxygenation of haemoglobin during arterial and venous stasis in healthy individuals.

  • 21.
    Bergström, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Lipcsey, Miklos
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Yang, Bei
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Elander, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping. Nykopings Lasarett, Sweden.
    Acetaminophen Attenuates Pulmonary Vascular Resistance and Pulmonary Arterial Pressure and Inhibits Cardiovascular Collapse in a Porcine Model of Endotoxemia2023In: Shock, ISSN 1073-2322, E-ISSN 1540-0514, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 442-448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is often used in critically ill patients with fever and pain; however, little is known about the effects of acetaminophen on cardiovascular function during systemic inflammation. Here, we investigated the effect of acetaminophen on changes in the systemic and pulmonary circulation induced by endotoxin (0.5 mu g/kg per hour) in anesthetized pigs. Endotoxin infusion led to a rapid increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance index. Acetaminophen delayed and attenuated this increase. Furthermore, acetaminophen reduced tachycardia and decreased stroke volume, accompanied by systemic inflammation, without affecting inflammatory parameters such as white blood cell count and TNF-alpha in blood. As a proof of concept, we injected a high dose of endotoxin (100 mu g), which induced rapid cardiovascular collapse in pigs. Pigs treated with acetaminophen survived with no obvious hemodynamic instability during the 50-min observation period. In conclusion, acetaminophen attenuates the effects of endotoxin on pulmonary circulation in anesthetized pigs. This may play a role in severe systemic inflammation.

  • 22.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sachs, Chatharina
    Scandinavian College of Osteopathy, Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Hyltander, Anders
    Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Department of Surgery, Östra Sjukhuset, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fagevik Olsén, Monika
    Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital; Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Osteopathic intervention for chronic pain, remaining thoracic stiffness and breathing impairment after thoracoabdominal oesophagus resection: A single subject design study2013In: International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, ISSN 1746-0689, E-ISSN 1878-0164, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 68-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Thoracic surgery can cause negative effects such as chronic pain, impaired thorax movement and/or impaired breathing. There are indications that manual therapies, such as osteopathy, may be beneficial for these conditions.

    Objective

    To investigate effects of osteopathic intervention on chronic pain and remaining limitations to thoracic range of motion and breathing in patients who had undergone thoracoabdominal resection of the oesophagus.

    Design

    In a single-subject research design (Aa-B-Ab), 8 participants with chronic postoperative thoracic pain, stiffness and/or breathing impairment after standardized oesophagus resection were given 10 sessions of osteopathic treatment of 45 min. Expiratory vital capacity, thorax mobility, pain experience, and subjective perception of treatment were measured on three occasions during each phase. The two-standard deviation band method was used to indicate significant change.

    Results

    A significantly increased range of motion in the thorax was observed in thoracic excursion and in lateral flexion. A positive change in pain was also noted. The results in expiratory vital capacity were contradictory. The participants were generally positive toward the treatment given.

    Conclusion

    Osteopathic intervention may affect thoracic impairment and pain among people with chronic pain and impaired thoracic range of motion after thoracoabdominal resection of the oesophagus

  • 23.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Lund, Irene
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Anér, Staffan
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phantom phenomena – Their perceived qualities and consequences from the patient’s perspective2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 134-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: The curious phenomenon phantom limbs early became the object of research, and its underlying mechanisms have been discussed over the years. The complex nature of phantom phenom- ena makes interpretation of the results ambiguous, regarding both prevalence and the accompanying suffering. There is a lack of knowledge about how amputees experience the meaning and consequences of phantom phenomena. The present aim, therefore, was to investigate how individuals, in an interview situation, described the qualities of possible perceived phantom phenomena, and how their experience affected their lives one month after the amputation/mastectomy.

    Methods: Twenty-eight women and men who had undergone a limb amputation or mastectomy were interviewed. The focused, narrative-oriented interviews were transcribed verbatim and the scripts were analysed with content analysis.Results: One month after the amputation the informants described and related their phantom pain and phantom sensations in sensory-discriminative, motivational-affective and cognitive-evaluative dimen- sions. The phantom sensations were experienced mainly as more agonizing than the phantom pain.

    Despite both the high intensity of and the high annoyance at the phantom pain and phantom sensations, a majority felt that the phantom phenomena were not a hindrance in their attempts to recapture ordinary life. But when the hindrance was evaluated as high, the annoyance was evaluated as the highest possible for both phenomena or for the phantom sensations alone, never for phantom pain alone. The interviewees’ reported attitudes of hindrance were also described and estimated in the light of their sociocultural circumstances. Thus, other preceding and/or co-existent pain conditions as well as factors such as pre- operative information, the respondents’ views on pain treatment, and their knowledge and understanding of phantom phenomena were mentioned and related to the pain-producing situation.

    Two-thirds of the interviewees had received post-surgical information and for some, the phenomena were well-known from earlier experience. A majority applied some version of the medical explanation model, irrespective of age or level of education. However neither information nor medical explanation, or both, sufficed for them to understand their own phantom phenomena. Thus, differences between the concepts explanation and understanding seemed significant for the annoyance related to the phantom phenomena.

    Regarding background data: (i) the majority of the interviewees had had pre-amputation pain prob- lems; (ii) the breast-cancer phantoms differed in several ways; (iii) there were some age and gender differences in the descriptions of hindrance.Conclusions and implications: These findings highlight the importance of observing the individual approach to the phenomena as a process of evaluation and selection. In addition, experience and under- standing of the phantoms also have sociocultural aspects. There follows the need for individualized communication and information from the clinician, and for incorporating a socioscientific and meaning- centred approach in future studies. The present insights could also be of value in other iatrogenic pain conditions. 

  • 24.
    Björnström-Karlsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Turina, Dean
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strid, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Orexin A Inhibits Propofol-Induced Neurite Retraction by a Phospholipase D/Protein Kinase C-epsilon-Dependent Mechanism in Neurons2014In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, p. e0097129-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The intravenous anaesthetic propofol retracts neurites and reverses the transport of vesicles in rat cortical neurons. Orexin A (OA) is an endogenous neuropeptide regulating wakefulness and may counterbalance anaesthesia. We aim to investigate if OA interacts with anaesthetics by inhibition of the propofol-induced neurite retraction. Methods: In primary cortical cell cultures from newborn rats brains, live cell light microscopy was used to measure neurite retraction after propofol (2 mu M) treatment with or without OA (10 nM) application. The intracellular signalling involved was tested using a protein kinase C (PKC) activator [phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)] and inhibitors of Rho-kinase (HA-1077), phospholipase D (PLD) [5-fluoro-2-indolyl des-chlorohalopemide (FIPI)], PKC (staurosporine), and a PKC epsilon translocation inhibitor peptide. Changes in PKC epsilon Ser(729) phosphorylation were detected with Western blot. Results: The neurite retraction induced by propofol is blocked by Rho-kinase and PMA. OA blocks neurite retraction induced by propofol, and this inhibitory effect could be prevented by FIPI, staurosporine and PKC epsilon translocation inhibitor peptide. OA increases via PLD and propofol decreases PKC epsilon Ser(729) phosphorylation, a crucial step in the activation of PKC epsilon. Conclusions: Rho-kinase is essential for propofol-induced neurite retraction in cortical neuronal cells. Activation of PKC inhibits neurite retraction caused by propofol. OA blocks propofol-induced neurite retraction by a PLD/PKC epsilon-mediated pathway, and PKC epsilon maybe the key enzyme where the wakefulness and anaesthesia signal pathways converge.

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  • 25.
    Blixt Johansson, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Åhman, Rasmus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    de Geer, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Blomqwist, Lill
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Åström, Meriam
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Andersson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Left ventricular longitudinal wall fractional shortening accurately predicts longitudinal strain in critically ill patients with septic shock2021In: Annals of Intensive Care, E-ISSN 2110-5820, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Left ventricular longitudinal strain (LVLS) may be a sensitive indicator of left ventricular (LV) systolic function in patients with sepsis, but is dependent on high image quality and analysis software. Mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE) and the novel left ventricular longitudinal wall fractional shortening (LV-LWFS) are bedside echocardiographic indicators of LV systolic function that are less dependent on image quality. Both are sparsely investigated in the critically ill population, and may potentially be used as surrogates for LVLS. We assessed if LVLS may be predicted by LV-LWFS and MAPSE in patients with septic shock. We also assessed the repeatability and inter-rater agreement of LVLS, LV-LWFS and MAPSE measurements. Results 122 TTE studies from 3 echocardiographic data repositories of patients admitted to ICU with septic shock were retrospectively assessed, of which 73 were suitable for LVLS analysis using speckle tracking. The correlations between LVLS vs. LV-LWFS and LVLS vs. MAPSE were 0.89 (p &lt; 0.001) and 0.81 (p &lt; 0.001) with mean squared errors of 5.8% and 9.1%, respectively. Using the generated regression equation, LV-LWFS predicted LVLS with a high degree of accuracy and precision, with bias and limits of agreement of -0.044 +/- 4.7% and mean squared prediction error of 5.8%. Interobserver repeatability was good, with high intraclass correlation coefficients (0.96-0.97), small bias and tight limits of agreement (&lt;= 4.1% for all analyses) between observers for all measurements. Conclusions LV-LWFS may be used to estimate LVLS in patients with septic shock. MAPSE also performed well, but was slightly inferior compared to LV-LWFS in estimating LVLS. Feasibility of MAPSE and LV-LWFS was excellent, as was interobserver repeatability.

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  • 26.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Oliv, Emelie
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Värnamo Hospital, Värnamo, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology.
    Influence of Regional Analgesia on Self-Reported Quality of Sleep After Gynecological Abdominal Surgery: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Trial2024In: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada, ISSN 1701-2163, Vol. 46, no 1, article id 102228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To determine whether intrathecal morphine (ITM) analgesia in abdominal surgery for presumed gynecological malignancy was associated with better self-reported sleep quality postoperatively compared with epidural analgesia (EDA), and to evaluate risk factors for bad sleep quality. Methods: A secondary analysis of a randomized open controlled trial, comparing ITM and EDA as postoperative analgesia in 80 women undergoing laparotomy under general anaesthesia in an enhanced recovery after surgery framework. A total of 38 women allocated to ITM and 39 to EDA completed the study. The Swedish Postoperative Symptoms Questionnaire assessed symptoms and sleep quality during the first postoperative week. Multiple logistic regression models evaluated risk factors. The results are presented as adjusted odds ratios with 95% CIs. Results: The sleep quality night-by-night did not differ significantly between the women who had ITM or EDA. Risk factors for bad sleep quality for night 1 were age (0.91; 0.84–0.99), operation time (1.02; 1.00–1.03), and opioid consumption (0.96; 0.91–0.99). For night 2, regular use of hypnotics preoperatively (15.81; 1.52–164.27) and opioid consumption (1.07; 1.00–1.14) were independent risk factors for bad sleep. After the second night, no risk factors were disclosed. Conclusions: ITM and EDA did not appear to affect the sleep quality postoperatively differently in women undergoing laparotomy for presumed gynecological malignancy. Risk factors for self-reported bad sleep quality varied during the first 3 days after surgery. Younger age, longer operation time, and preoperative use of hypnotics were associated with bad sleep quality, whereas the effect of opioid consumption on sleep quality varied depending on the time since surgery. These findings merit further studies. © 2023 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada

  • 27.
    Brill, Jason B.
    et al.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Brenner, Megan
    Univ Calif Riverside, CA 92521 USA.
    Duchesne, Juan
    Dept Surg Tulane, LA USA.
    Roberts, Derek
    Dept Surg Tulane, LA USA.
    Ferrada, Paula
    VCU Surgery Trauma, Critical Care and Emergency Surgery, Richmond, Virginia.
    Horer, Tal
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Orebro, Sweden.
    Kauvar, David
    San Antonio Mil Med Ctr, TX USA.
    Khan, Mansoor
    Royal Ctr Def Med, England.
    Kirkpatrick, Andrew
    Univ Calgary, Canada; Foothills Med Ctr, Canada; Canadian Forces Hlth Serv, Canada.
    Ordonez, Carlos
    Univ Valle, Colombia.
    Perreira, Bruno
    Univ Estadual Campinas, Brazil.
    Pirouzram, Artai
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Cotton, Bryan A.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    The Role of TEG and ROTEM in Damage Control Resuscitation2021In: Shock, ISSN 1073-2322, E-ISSN 1540-0514, Vol. 56, no 1S, p. 52-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trauma-induced coagulopathy is associated with very high mortality, and hemorrhage remains the leading preventable cause of death after injury. Directed methods to combat coagulopathy and attain hemostasis are needed. The available literature regarding viscoelastic testing, including thrombelastography (TEG) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM), was reviewed to provide clinically relevant guidance for emergency resuscitation. These tests predict massive transfusion and developing coagulopathy earlier than conventional coagulation testing, within 15 min using rapid testing. They can guide resuscitation after trauma, as well. TEG and ROTEM direct early transfusion of fresh frozen plasma when clinical gestalt has not activated a massive transfusion protocol. Reaction time and clotting time via these tests can also detect clinically significant levels of direct oral anticoagulants. Slowed clot kinetics suggest the need for transfusion of fibrinogen via concentrates or cryoprecipitate. Lowered clot strength can be corrected with platelets and fibrinogen. Finally, viscoelastic tests identify fibrinolysis, a finding associated with significantly increased mortality yet one that no conventional coagulation test can reliably detect. Using these parameters, guided resuscitation begins within minutes of a patients arrival. A growing body of evidence suggests this approach may improve survival while reducing volumes of blood products transfused.

  • 28.
    Bruno, Raphael Romano
    et al.
    Heinrich Heine Univ Duesseldorf, Germany.
    Wernly, Bernhard
    Paracelsus Med Private Univ, Austria; Paracelsus Med Univ, Austria.
    Bagshaw, Sean M.
    Univ Alberta, Canada; Alberta Hlth Serv, Canada.
    van den Boogaard, Mark
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Darvall, Jai N.
    Royal Melbourne Hosp, Australia.
    de Geer, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Miguelena, Pablo Ruiz de Gopegui
    Hosp Univ Miguel Servet, Spain.
    Heyland, Daren K.
    Queens Univ, Canada.
    Hewitt, David
    Glasgow Royal Infirm Intens Care Unit, Scotland.
    Hope, Aluko A.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, OR USA.
    Langlais, Emilie
    Univ Rennes 1, France.
    Le Maguet, Pascale
    CHU Rennes, France; CH Quimper, France.
    Montgomery, Carmel L.
    Univ Alberta, Canada; Alberta Hlth Serv, Canada.
    Papageorgiou, Dimitrios
    Univ West Attica UWA Athens, Greece.
    Seguin, Philippe
    Univ Rennes 1, France.
    Geense, Wytske W.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Silva-Obregon, J. Alberto
    Hosp Univ Guadalajara, Spain.
    Wolff, Georg
    Heinrich Heine Univ Duesseldorf, Germany.
    Polzin, Amin
    Heinrich Heine Univ Duesseldorf, Germany.
    Dannenberg, Lisa
    Heinrich Heine Univ Duesseldorf, Germany.
    Kelm, Malte
    Heinrich Heine Univ Duesseldorf, Germany; Univ Hosp Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Flaatten, Hans
    Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Beil, Michael
    Hebrew Univ Jerusalem, Israel.
    Franz, Marcus
    Friedrich Schiller Univ, Germany.
    Sviri, Sigal
    Hebrew Univ Jerusalem, Israel.
    Leaver, Susannah
    St Georges Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Guidet, Bertrand
    UPMC Univ Paris 06, France; Hop St Antoine, France.
    Boumendil, Ariane
    UPMC Univ Paris 06, France; Hop St Antoine, France.
    Jung, Christian
    Heinrich Heine Univ Duesseldorf, Germany.
    The Clinical Frailty Scale for mortality prediction of old acutely admitted intensive care patients: a meta-analysis of individual patient-level data2023In: Annals of Intensive Care, E-ISSN 2110-5820, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This large-scale analysis pools individual data about the Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) to predict outcome in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods A systematic search identified all clinical trials that used the CFS in the ICU (PubMed searched until 24th June 2020). All patients who were electively admitted were excluded. The primary outcome was ICU mortality. Regression models were estimated on the complete data set, and for missing data, multiple imputations were utilised. Cox models were adjusted for age, sex, and illness acuity score (SOFA, SAPS II or APACHE II). Results 12 studies from 30 countries with anonymised individualised patient data were included (n = 23,989 patients). In the univariate analysis for all patients, being frail (CFS &gt;= 5) was associated with an increased risk of ICU mortality, but not after adjustment. In older patients (&gt;= 65 years) there was an independent association with ICU mortality both in the complete case analysis (HR 1.34 (95% CI 1.25-1.44), p &lt; 0.0001) and in the multiple imputation analysis (HR 1.35 (95% CI 1.26-1.45), p &lt; 0.0001, adjusted for SOFA). In older patients, being vulnerable (CFS 4) alone did not significantly differ from being frail. After adjustment, a CFS of 4-5, 6, and &gt;= 7 was associated with a significantly worse outcome compared to CFS of 1-3. Conclusions Being frail is associated with a significantly increased risk for ICU mortality in older patients, while being vulnerable alone did not significantly differ. New Frailty categories might reflect its "continuum" better and predict ICU outcome more accurately.

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  • 29.
    Buse, Giovanna Lurati
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Pinto, Bernardo Bollen
    Geneva Univ Hosp HUG, Switzerland.
    Abelha, Fernando
    Ctr Hosp Univ Sao Joao, Portugal; Univ Porto, Portugal.
    Abbott, Tom E. F.
    Queen Mary Univ London, England.
    Ackland, Gareth
    Queen Mary Univ London, England; Barts Hlth NHS Trust, England.
    Afshari, Arash
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    De Hert, Stefan
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Fellahi, Jean-Luc
    Hop Univ Louis Pradel, France.
    Giossi, Laure
    Geneva Univ Hosp HUG, Switzerland.
    Kavsak, Peter
    McMaster Univ, Canada.
    Longrois, Dan
    Univ Paris, France.
    MPembele, Rene
    Univ Hosp Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Nucaro, Anthony
    Univ Hosp Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Popova, Ekaterine
    Inst Invest Biomed St Pau IIB ST PAU, Spain; Ctr Cochrane Iberoamer, Spain.
    Puelacher, Christian
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Richards, Toby
    Univ Western Australia, Australia; UCL, England.
    Roth, Sebastian
    Univ Hosp Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Sheka, Mootii
    Geneva Univ Hosp HUG, Switzerland.
    Szczeklik, Wojciech
    Jagiellonian Univ Med Coll, Poland.
    van Waes, Judith
    Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Walder, Bernhard
    Geneva Univ Hosp HUG, Switzerland.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    ESAIC focused guideline for the use of cardiac biomarkers in perioperative risk evaluation2023In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 40, no 12, p. 888-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUNDIn recent years, there has been increasing focus on the use of cardiac biomarkers in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery.AIMSThe aim of this focused guideline was to provide updated guidance regarding the pre-, post- and combined pre-and postoperative use of cardiac troponin and B-type natriuretic peptides in adult patients undergoing noncardiac surgery.METHODSThe guidelines were prepared using Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. This included the definition of critical outcomes, a systematic literature search, appraisal of certainty of evidence, evaluation of biomarker measurement in terms of the balance of desirable and undesirable effects including clinical outcomes, resource use, health inequality, stakeholder acceptance, and implementation. The panel differentiated between three different scopes of applications: cardiac biomarkers as prognostic factors, as tools for risk prediction, and for biomarker-enhanced management strategies.RESULTSIn a modified Delphi process, the task force defined 12 critical outcomes. The systematic literature search resulted in over 25,000 hits, of which 115 full-text articles formed the body of evidence for recommendations. The evidence appraisal indicated heterogeneity in the certainty of evidence across critical outcomes. Further, there was relevant gradient in the certainty of evidence across the three scopes of application. Recommendations were issued and if this was not possible due to limited evidence, clinical practice statements were produced.CONCLUSIONThe ESAIC focused guidelines provide guidance on the perioperative use of cardiac troponin and B-type natriuretic peptides in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, for three different scopes of application.

  • 30.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Dags att folkbilda om smärta2016In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 10 AprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gender differences in dispensed analgesics in Sweden during 2006-2015 - an observational, nationwide, whole-population study2018In: International Journal of Women's Health, E-ISSN 1179-1411, Vol. 10, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A potentially illuminating way of looking at gender differences in health and disease is to study differences in drug utilization. The aim of this study was to describe gender differences in dispensed analgesics (including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]) in Sweden during 2006-2015.

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  • 32.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Lättläst översikt om smärta2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, article id 112:DSUTArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Långvariga smärttillstånd får ny klassifikation i ICD-11 Chronic pain as a disease: [Chronic pain as a disease: An overview of pain diagnoses in ICD-11]2023In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 120Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain is a symptom that can be associated with dangerous diseases such as cancer. Hence, to avoid delay in diagnosis of an underlying serious condition, it is important to be thorough when assessing pain. However, all pains are not symptoms of an underlying disease. Instead, many chronic pain conditions can be viewed as diseases in their own right. Indeed, sometimes the pain is the disease - such is for instance the case for fibromyalgia, painless fibromyalgia being a contradiction in terms. The new classification of chronic pain conditions according to the eleventh version of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) is presented and discussed. It is argued that the classification makes pain medicine visible as an academic discipline; that it may contribute to a legitimization process in which the suffering of pain patients is recognized semantically and taxonomically; and that it opens up new research possibilities in the chronic pain field.

  • 34.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Synliggör den osynliga smärtan2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    The Cerebrospinal Fluid in Severe Pain Conditions: Clinical, Pharmacological and Proteomic Aspects2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The treatment of both cancer pain and non-cancer chronic pain is still suboptimal. The overall aim of this PhD thesis was to conduct translational pain research at the interface between clinical pain medicine and the field of human proteomics, using the practice of intrathecal analgesia at our institution as a starting point. Hence, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is at the centre of the present dissertation, both as a target for infusing analgesics (Papers I and II – clinical and pharmacological aspects) and as an important biofluid for human biomarker studies (Papers III and IV – proteomic aspects). In Paper I, 28 cases of intrathecal analgesia in cancer patients were prospectively followed. Movement-evoked breakthrough pain remained a major clinical problem throughout the study month despite otherwise successful intrathecal analgesia (defined as good control of spontaneous resting pain paralleled by a marked decrease of concomitant systemic opioid doses). This study therefore illustrates the importance of considering not only spontaneous resting pain but also movement-evoked breakthrough pain.

    In Paper II, an expert-based algorithm for trialing the intrathecal analgesic ziconotide by bolus injections was evaluated in an open-label study of 23 patients with chronic neuropathic pain. We found few responders (13%) according to the strict criteria of the algorithm, but ziconotide bolus injection trialing seems feasible. The predictive power of ziconotide bolus trialing remains unclear, and the pharmacological profile of ziconotide (with very slow tissue penetration due to high hydrophilicity) calls the rationale for ziconotide bolus trialing into question.

    In Paper III, we found low levels of beta-endorphin in the CSF of chronic neuropathic pain patients (n=15) compared to healthy controls (n=19). We speculate that this might indicate dysfunctional top-down control of nociception. Substance P levels in the CSF did not differ by univariate statistics. In Paper IV, the CSF proteome of 11 patients with chronic neuropathic pain and 11 healthy controls was exploratively studied, combining gel-based proteomics with multivariate data analysis. After eliminating four proteins associated with age, 32 proteins were found to highly discriminate between groups. Among these, the seven proteins having the highest discriminatory power between patients and controls were: one isoform of angiotensinogen, two isoforms of alpha-1-antitrypsin, three isoforms of haptoglobin, and one isoform of pigment epithelium-derived factor.

    In conclusion, this PhD thesis demonstrates the fruitfulness of studying the CSF, both as a target for infusing analgesics and as a potential mirror of the neurobiological processes involved in pathological pain conditions. The thesis points to the need for more research into the mechanisms of different pain conditions, in order to hopefully achieve the vision of mechanism-based pain diagnoses.

    List of papers
    1. Movement-evoked breakthrough cancer pain despite intrathecal analgesia: a prospective series
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Movement-evoked breakthrough cancer pain despite intrathecal analgesia: a prospective series
    2011 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 55, no 9, p. 1139-1146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intrathecal analgesia (ITA) is a valuable treatment option for intractable cancer-related pain. However, the issue of movement-evoked breakthrough pain (BTP) has not been specifically investigated in the ITA setting. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of ITA on spontaneous resting pain intensity (SRPI), doses of non-ITA opioids, and specifically on movement-evoked pain intensity (MEPI). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: We prospectively studied 28 consecutive patients who graded SRPI and MEPI on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS) at the time of ITA procedure, after 1 week, and after 1 month. Mild pain was defined as NRS andlt;= 3 and severe pain as NRS andgt;= 7. Concomitant doses of opioids were registered. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: After 1 week, no patient had severe SRPI compared with 31% before ITA, and the proportion of patients with mild SRPI had increased from 27% to 76%. Meanwhile, the median daily dose of non-ITA opioids decreased from 575 to 120 mg of oral morphine equivalents. The effect on SRPI and on doses of non-ITA opioids remained essentially unchanged during the study month, but the proportion of patients having severe MEPI did not change significantly: 44% still had severe MEPI after 1 week and 40% after 1 month. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Movement-evoked BTP was a major clinical problem throughout the study month despite otherwise successful ITA. Improving the quality of life of patients with intractable cancer-related pain should include developing strategies to better deal with movement-evoked BTP.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2011
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-71376 (URN)10.1111/j.1399-6576.2011.02510.x (DOI)000295102500015 ()
    Available from: 2011-10-14 Created: 2011-10-14 Last updated: 2017-12-08
    2. Ziconotide Trialing by Intrathecal Bolus Injections: An Open-Label Non-Randomized Clinical Trial in Postoperative/Posttraumatic Neuropathic Pain Patients Refractory to Conventional Treatment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ziconotide Trialing by Intrathecal Bolus Injections: An Open-Label Non-Randomized Clinical Trial in Postoperative/Posttraumatic Neuropathic Pain Patients Refractory to Conventional Treatment
    2015 (English)In: Neuromodulation, ISSN 1094-7159, E-ISSN 1525-1403, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 404-413Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this open-label, non-randomized, clinical trial was to evaluate the feasibility of trialing ziconotide by intrathecal bolus injections. Material and Methods: Twenty-three patients, who had peripheral neuropathic pain refractory to pharmacological treatment and were under consideration for Spinal Cord Stimulation, received up to three ziconotide bolus injections according to a comprehensive algorithm. After a first injection of 2.5g, the patients progressed in the algorithm depending on the presence or absence of pain reduction and significant adverse events. A patient was considered a "responder" if experiencing pain reduction and no significant adverse event on two consecutive occasions at the same dosage. Results: We found a low proportion of responders (13%). However 30% of patients experienced greater than= 30% pain reduction on a least one injection, yielding a number needed to treat of similar to 3 for clinically significant pain relief. Pain intensity changed significantly over time (0-6h) (p = 0.047) after a mean ziconotide dose of 2.75 mu g. Adverse events were as expected, and no serious adverse event occurred. We did not find any statistical association between response to Spinal Cord Stimulation and response to ziconotide. Conclusions: Ziconotide bolus injection trialing seems feasible, but the proportion of responders in the present study was low. Adverse events were as expected, and no serious adverse event occurred. The predictive power of ziconotide bolus trialing remains unclear, and the pharmacological profile of ziconotide (slow tissue penetration due to high hydrophilicity) calls the rationale for bolus trialing into question.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley, 2015
    Keywords
    Bolus; intrathecal; spinal; trialing; ziconotide
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120352 (URN)10.1111/ner.12293 (DOI)000357388400010 ()25879804 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland; Swedish Research Council

    Available from: 2015-07-31 Created: 2015-07-31 Last updated: 2021-01-26
    3. Do low levels of Beta-endorphin in the cerebrospinal fluid indicate defective top-down inhibition in patients with chronic neuropathic pain? A cross-sectional, comparative study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do low levels of Beta-endorphin in the cerebrospinal fluid indicate defective top-down inhibition in patients with chronic neuropathic pain? A cross-sectional, comparative study
    2014 (English)In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), ISSN 1526-2375, E-ISSN 1526-4637, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 111-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Pain medicine still lacks mechanism-specific biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment, and defective top-down modulation is an important factor in the pathophysiology of chronic pain conditions. Using modern analytical tools and advanced multivariate statistical analysis, the aim of this study was to revisit two classical potential biomarkers of pro- and anti-nociception in humans (substance P and beta-endorphin), focusing particularly on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

    Design

    Cross-sectional, comparative, observational study.

    Subjects

    Patients with chronic, post-traumatic and/or post-surgical, neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatment (N = 15) and healthy controls (N = 19) were included.

    Methods

    Samples were taken from CSF and blood, and levels of substance P and beta-endorphin were investigated using a Luminex technology kit.

    Results

    We found low levels of beta-endorphin in the CSF of neuropathic pain patients (66 ± 11 pcg/mL) compared with healthy controls (115 ± 14 pcg/mL) (P = 0.017). Substance P levels in the CSF did not differ (20 ± 2 pcg/mL, 26 ± 2, P = 0.08). However, our multivariate data analysis showed that belonging to the patient group was associated with low levels of both substances in the CSF. A higher correlation between the levels of beta-endorphin and substance P in CSF was found in healthy controls than in patients (rs = 0.725, P < 0.001 vs rs = 0.574, P = 0.032).

    Conclusions

    Patients with chronic neuropathic pain due to trauma or surgery had low levels of beta-endorphin in the CSF. We speculate that this could indicate a defective top-down modulation of pain in chronic neuropathic pain. Our results also illustrate the importance of taking a system-wide, multivariate approach when searching for biomarkers.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
    Keywords
    Beta-Endorphin; Biomarker; Cerebrospinal Fluid; Neuropathic; Pain; Substance P
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104231 (URN)10.1111/pme.12248 (DOI)000329756400011 ()
    Available from: 2014-02-12 Created: 2014-02-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Multivariate proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain and healthy controls: a hypothesis-generating pilot study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multivariate proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain and healthy controls: a hypothesis-generating pilot study
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Pain Research, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 8, p. 321-333Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Pain medicine lacks objective biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment. Combining two-dimensional gel proteomics with multivariate data analysis by projection, we exploratively analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid of eleven patients with severe peripheral neuropathic pain due to trauma and/or surgery refractory to conventional treatment and eleven healthy controls. Using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, we identified a panel of 36 proteins highly discriminating between the two groups. Due to a possible confounding effect of age, a new model with age as outcome variable was computed for patients (n=11), and four out of 36 protein spots were excluded due to a probable influence of age. Of the 32 remaining proteins, the following seven had the highest discriminatory power between the two groups: an isoform of angiotensinogen (upregulated in patients), two isoforms of alpha-1-antitrypsin (downregulated in patients), three isoforms of haptoglobin (upregulated in patients), and one isoform of pigment epithelium-derived factor (downregulated in patients). It has recently been hypothesized that the renin–angiotensin system may play a role in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, and a clinical trial of an angiotensin II receptor antagonist was recently published. It is noteworthy that when searching for neuropathic pain biomarkers with a purely explorative methodology, it was indeed a renin–angiotensin system protein that had the highest discriminatory power between patients and controls in the present study. The results from this hypothesis-generating pilot study have to be confirmed in larger, hypothesis-driven studies with age-matched controls, but the present study illustrates the fruitfulness of combining proteomics with multivariate data analysis in hypothesis-generating pain biomarker studies in humans.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Dovepress, 2015
    Keywords
    Cerebrospinal fluid, multivariate data analysis, neuropathic pain, proteomics
    National Category
    Nursing Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121493 (URN)10.2147/JPR.S82970 (DOI)000364718500002 ()26170714 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council; Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research [2010-0913]; County Council of Ostergotland (Sinnescentrum); Halsofonden foundation

    Available from: 2015-09-22 Created: 2015-09-22 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
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  • 36.
    Bäckström, Denise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Alvinius, Aida
    Swedish Def Univ, Sweden.
    Physicians' challenges when working in the prehospital environment - a qualitative study using grounded theory2024In: International Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1865-1372, E-ISSN 1865-1380, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIn the rapid development in prehospital medicine the awareness of the many challenges in prehospital care is important as it highlights which areas need improvement and where special attention during education and training should be focused. The purpose of this study is to identify challenges that physicians face when working in the prehospital environment. The research question is thus; what challenges do physicians face when working in prehospital care?MethodThis is a qualitative study with an inductive approach and is based on individual interviews. The interviews were analyzed using the Classic Grounded Theory (GT) method as an approach. The interviews were conducted as semi-structured interviews via the digital platform Zoom during winter / early spring 2022.ResultsChallenges for prehospital physicians can be understood as a process that involves a balancing act between different factors linked to the extreme environment in which they operate. This environment creates unique challenges not usually encountered in routine hospital practice, which results in trade-offs that they would not otherwise be faced with. Their individual situation needs to be balanced against organizational conditions, which means, among other things, that their medical decisions must be made based on limited information as a result of the constraints that exist in the prehospital environment. They must, both as individuals and as part of a team, manoeuvre in time and space for decision-making and practical tasks. This theory of balancing different entities is based on four themes; thus the theory is the relation between the four themes: leadership, environment, emotion management and organization.ConclusionsWith the help of previous studies and what we have found, it is reasonable to review what training is needed before starting to work prehospital as a physician. This should include components of the themes we have described: organization, environment, leadership and emotional management.

  • 37.
    Cecconi, M
    et al.
    1Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, St George’s Hospital and St George’s University of London, London, UK,.
    Hochrieser, H
    Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems .
    Chew, Michelle
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care and Institute of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Grocott, M
    Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK, .
    Hoeft, A
    Department of Anaesthesiology, University of Bonn,Bonn, Germany, .
    Hoste, A
    Intensive Care Unit, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Jammer, I
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen 5021, Norway .
    Posch, M
    Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, .
    Metnitz, P
    Clinical Department of General Anaesthesiology, Emergency- and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, LKH - University Hospital of Graz, Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Pelosi, P
    9Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, IRCCS San Martino IST, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy .
    Moreno, R
    Hospital de São José, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, EPE, UCINC, Lisbon, Portugal .
    Pearse, R M
    Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK, .
    Vincent, J L
    Department of Intensive Care, Erasme Hospital Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium .
    Rhodes, A
    Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, St George’s Hospital and St George’s University of London, London, UK.
    Preoperative abnormalities in serum sodium concentrations are associated with higher in-hospital mortality in patients undergoing major surgery.2016In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 116, no 1, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal serum sodium concentrations are common in patients presenting for surgery. It remains unclear whether these abnormalities are independent risk factors for postoperative mortality.

    METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of the European Surgical Outcome Study (EuSOS) that provided data describing 46 539 patients undergoing inpatient non-cardiac surgery. Patients were included in this study if they had a recorded value of preoperative serum sodium within the 28 days immediately before surgery. Data describing preoperative risk factors and serum sodium concentrations were analysed to investigate the relationship with in-hospital mortality using univariate and multivariate logistic regression techniques.

    RESULTS: Of 35 816 (77.0%) patients from the EuSOS database, 21 943 (61.3%) had normal values of serum sodium (138-142 mmol litre(-1)) before surgery, 8538 (23.8%) had hyponatraemia (serum sodium ≤137 mmol litre(-1)) and 5335 (14.9%) had hypernatraemia (serum sodium ≥143 mmol litre(-1)). After adjustment for potential confounding factors, moderate to severe hypernatraemia (serum sodium concentration ≥150 mmol litre(-1)) was independently associated with mortality [odds ratio 3.4 (95% confidence interval 2.0-6.0), P<0.0001]. Hyponatraemia was not associated with mortality.

    CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative abnormalities in serum sodium concentrations are common, and hypernatraemia is associated with increased mortality after surgery. Abnormalities of serum sodium concentration may be an important biomarker of perioperative risk resulting from co-morbid disease.

  • 38.
    Chen, Ke-Ling
    et al.
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Lv, Zhao-Ying
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Hong-Wei
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yong
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Long, Fei-Wu
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Bin
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Peng, Zhi-Hai
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Zong-Guang
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Li, Yuan
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Effects of Tocilizumab on Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis and Associated Acute Lung Injury2016In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 44, no 8, p. E664-E677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the therapeutic effects of tocilizumab, an antibody against interleukin-6 receptor, on experimental severe acute pancreatitis and associated acute lung injury. The optimal dose of tocilizumab and the activation of interleukin-6 inflammatory signaling were also investigated. Design: Randomized experiment. Setting: Research laboratory at a university hospital. Subject: Experimental severe acute pancreatitis in rats. Interventions: Severe acute pancreatitis was induced by retrograde injection of sodium taurocholate (50 mg/kg) into the biliopancreatic duct. In dose-study, rats were administered with different doses of tocilizumab (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 mg/kg) through the tail vein after severe acute pancreatitis induction. In safety-study, rats without severe acute pancreatitis induction were treated with high doses of tocilizumab (8, 16, 32, and 64 mg/kg). Serum and tissue samples of rats in time-study were collected for biomolecular and histologic evaluations at different time points (2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 hr). Measurements and Main Results: 1) Under the administration of tocilizumab, histopathological scores of pancreas and lung were decreased, and severity parameters related to severe acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury, including serum amylase, C-reactive protein, lung surfactant protein level, and myeloperoxidase activity, were all significant alleviated in rat models. 2) Dose-study demonstrated that 2 mg/kg tocilizumab was the optimal treatment dose. 3) Basing on multi-organ pathologic evaluation, physiological and biochemical data, no adverse effect and toxicity of tocilizumab were observed in safety-study. 4) Pancreatic nuclear factor-kappa B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 were deactivated, and the serum chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 was down-regulated after tocilizumab administration. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated tocilizumab, as a marketed drug commonly used for immune-mediated diseases, was safe and effective for the treatment of experimental severe acute pancreatitis and associated acute lung injury. Our findings provide experimental evidences for potential clinical application of tocilizumab in severe acute pancreatitis and associated complications.

  • 39.
    Chew, Michelle
    Operations- och intensivvårdskliniken, Hallands sjukhus, Halmstad.
    Snabb behandling vid septisk chock räddar liv: Även om "early goal-directed therapy"-protokoll inte ger effekt i nya studier2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, no 112, p. 1-2, article id DFUCArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Chew, Michelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Aissaoui, Nadia
    Hop Univ Paris, France; Univ Paris Cite, France.
    Balik, Martin
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Echocardiography in shock2023In: Current Opinion in Critical Care, ISSN 1070-5295, E-ISSN 1531-7072, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 252-258Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of reviewThe aim of this study was to illustrate the varying roles of echocardiography in all phases of shock ranging from a rapid, diagnostic tool at the bedside, to a tool for monitoring the adequacy and effects of shock treatment and finally for identification of patients suitable for de-escalation of therapy.Recent findingsEchocardiography has become an indispensable tool for establishing diagnosis in patients with shock. It is also important for assessing the adequacy of treatment such as fluid resuscitation, vasopressors and inotropes by providing integrated information on cardiac contractility and systemic flow conditions, particularly when used in conjunction with other methods of advanced haemodynamic monitoring. Apart from a traditional, diagnostic role, it may be used as an advanced, albeit intermittent, monitoring tool. Examples include the assessment of heart-lung interactions in mechanically ventilated patients, fluid responsiveness, vasopressor adequacy, preload dependence in ventilator-induced pulmonary oedema and indications for and monitoring during extracorporeal life support. Emerging studies also illustrate the role of echocardiography in de-escalation of shock treatment.This study provides the reader with a structured review on the uses of echocardiography in all phases of shock treatment.

  • 41.
    Chew, Michelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Blixt Johansson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology.
    Åhman, Rasmus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Engerström, Lars
    Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Berggren, Ritva Kiiski
    Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Tegnell, Anders
    Department of Public Health Reporting, Public Health Agency of Sweden, Sweden.
    Mcintyre, Sarah
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    National outcomes and characteristics of patients admitted to Swedish intensive care units for COVID-19 A registry-based cohort study2021In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 335-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Mortality among patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) with COVID-19 is unclear due to variable follow-up periods. Few nationwide data are available to compare risk factors, treatment and outcomes of COVID-19 patients after ICU admission. OBJECTIVE To evaluate baseline characteristics, treatments and 30-day outcomes of patients admitted to Swedish ICUs with COVID-19. DESIGN Registry-based cohort study with prospective data collection. SETTING Admissions to Swedish ICUs from 6 March to 6 May 2020 with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 disease. PARTICIPANTS Adult patients admitted to Swedish ICUs. EXPOSURES Baseline characteristics, intensive care treatments and organ failures. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality. A multivariable model was used to determine the independent association between potential predictor variables and death. RESULTS We identified 1563 patients with complete 30-day follow-up. The 30-day all-cause mortality was 26.7%. Median age was 61 [52 to 69], Simplified Acute Physiology Score III (SAPS III) was 53 [46 to 59] and 62.5% had at least one comorbidity. Median PaO2/FiO(2) on admission was 97.5 [75.0 to 140.6] mmHg, 74.7% suffered from moderate-to-severe acute respiratory failure. Age, male sex [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.5 (1.1 to 2.2)], SAPS III score [aOR 1.3 (1.2 to 1.4)], severe respiratory failure [aOR 3.0 (2.0 to 4.7)], specific COVID-19 pharmacotherapy [aOR 1.4 (1.0 to 1.9)] and continuous renal replacement therapy [aOR 2.1 (1.5 to 3.0)] were associated with increased mortality. Except for chronic lung disease, the presence of comorbidities was not independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSIONS Thirty-day mortality rate in COVID-19 patients admitted to Swedish ICUs is generally lower than previously reported despite a severe degree of hypoxaemia on admission. Mortality was driven by age, baseline disease severity, the presence and degree of organ failure, rather than pre-existing comorbidities.

  • 42.
    Chew, Michelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Kattainen, Salla
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland; Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Haase, Nicolai
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Buanes, Eirik A.
    Helse Bergen Hlth Trust, Norway.
    Kristinsdottir, Linda B.
    Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Iceland.
    Hofso, Kristin
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Lovisenberg Diaconal Univ Coll, Norway.
    Laake, Jon Henrik
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Kvale, Reidar
    Helse Bergen HF, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Hastbacka, Johanna
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland; Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Reinikainen, Matti
    Univ Eastern Finland, Finland; Kuopio Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Bendel, Stepani
    Univ Eastern Finland, Finland; Kuopio Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Varpula, Tero
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland; Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Varmland Cty Council, Sweden.
    Perner, Anders
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Flaatten, Hans K.
    Helse Bergen HF, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Sigurdsson, Martin I
    Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Iceland; Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    A descriptive study of the surge response and outcomes of ICU patients with COVID-19 during first wave in Nordic countries2022In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We sought to provide a description of surge response strategies and characteristics, clinical management and outcomes of patients with severe COVID-19 in the intensive care unit (ICU) during the first wave of the pandemic in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. Methods Representatives from the national ICU registries for each of the five countries provided clinical data and a description of the strategies to allocate ICU resources and increase the ICU capacity during the pandemic. All adult patients admitted to the ICU for COVID-19 disease during the first wave of COVID-19 were included. The clinical characteristics, ICU management and outcomes of individual countries were described with descriptive statistics. Results Most countries more than doubled their ICU capacity during the pandemic. For patients positive for SARS-CoV-2, the ratio of requiring ICU admission for COVID-19 varied substantially (1.6%-6.7%). Apart from age (proportion of patients aged 65 years or over between 29% and 62%), baseline characteristics, chronic comorbidity burden and acute presentations of COVID-19 disease were similar among the five countries. While utilization of invasive mechanical ventilation was high (59%-85%) in all countries, the proportion of patients receiving renal replacement therapy (7%-26%) and various experimental therapies for COVID-19 disease varied substantially (e.g. use of hydroxychloroquine 0%-85%). Crude ICU mortality ranged from 11% to 33%. Conclusion There was substantial variability in the critical care response in Nordic ICUs to the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic, including usage of experimental medications. While ICU mortality was low in all countries, the observed variability warrants further attention.

  • 43.
    Chew, Michelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Rehn, Marius
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Norwegian Air Ambulance Fdn, Norway; Univ Stavanger, Norway.
    Olkkola, Klaus T.
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Sverrisson, Kristinn Orn
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Iceland.
    Yli-Hankala, Arvi
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Finland; Univ Tampere, Finland.
    Moller, Morten Hylander
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Clinical practice guideline on prevention of rhabdomyolysis induced acute kidney injury: Endorsement by the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine2019In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 63, no 10, p. 1280-1281Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine Clinical Practice Committee endorses the recent DASAIM/DSIT guideline for prevention of rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury. However, we emphasize the low quality of evidence with only weak recommendations for all interventions, highlighting that further research is very likely to have an important impact on the confidence in the estimate of effect and is likely to change the estimates.

  • 44.
    Chew, Michelle S
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology.
    Sedation and analgesia2022In: The Very Old Critically Ill Patients / [ed] Hans Flaatten, Bertrand Guidet, Hélène Vallet, Cham: Springer, 2022, p. 319-333Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this chapter is to obtain an understanding of the interaction between pain, sedation, and delirium. Specifically, the reader should be able to identify the unique challenges for their management taking into account that the very old are a particularly vulnerable group with often conflicting treatment priorities. This chapter will discuss implications for short- and long-term ICU outcomes including mortality, time on mechanical ventilation, and increased ICU and hospital lengths of stay, as well long-term cognitive impairment. Finally, the reader should be able to formulate a plan for sedation, pain, and delirium management for the very old ICU patient using ABCDEF principles.

  • 45.
    Chew, Michelle S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Longrois, Dan
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Hôpital Bichat–Claude-Bernard, CHU de Paris, France.
    Bruder, Nicolas
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, CHU Timone, Aix-Marseille University, France.
    Comments: Occupational exposure and risk of transmission of SARS-CoV2 among European anaesthetists (vol. 38, Issue 12, page 1293-1295)2021In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 1272-1273Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Chew, Michelle S
    et al.
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Hallands sjukhus Halmstad.
    Mangelus, Claes
    From the Swedish Perioperative Register, Uppsala Clinical Research Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Enlund, Gunnar
    From the Swedish Perioperative Register, Uppsala Clinical Research Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Spetz, Peter
    From the Swedish Perioperative Register, Uppsala Clinical Research Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lyckner, Sara
    From the Swedish Perioperative Register, Uppsala Clinical Research Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Surgery was successful--but how did it go for the patient? Experiences from and hopes for the Swedish Perioperative Register.2015In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 453-454Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Chew, Michelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Saugel, Bernd
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany; Outcomes Res Consortium, OH USA.
    Lurati-Buse, Giovanna
    Univ Hosp Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Perioperative troponin surveillance in major noncardiac surgery: a narrative review2023In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 130, no 1, p. 21-28Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myocardial injury is now an acknowledged complication in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. Heterogeneity in the definitions of myocardial injury contributes to difficulty in evaluating the value of cardiac troponins (cTns) measurement in perioperative care. Pre-, post-, and peri-operatively increased cTns are encompassed by the umbrella term myocardial injury and are likely to reflect different pathophysiological mechanisms. Increased cTns are independently associated with cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular complications, poor short-term and long-term cardiovascular outcomes, and increased mortality. Preoperative measurement of cTns aids preoperative risk stratification beyond the Revised Cardiac Risk Index. Systematic measurement detects acute perioperative increases and allows early identification of acute myocardial injury. Common definitions and standards for reporting are a prerequisite for designing impactful future trials and perioperative management strategies.

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  • 48.
    Chew, Michelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Walder, Bernhard
    Geneva Univ Hosp, Switzerland; Geneva Perioperat Basic Translat & Clin Res Grp, Switzerland.
    Improving peri-operative outcome: Time once more to update protocols2020In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 625-628Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 49.
    Dankiewicz, Josef
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Cronberg, Tobias
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lilja, Gisela
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Jakobsen, Janus C.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Levin, Helena
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ullen, Susann
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rylander, Christian
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wise, Matt P.
    Univ Hosp Wales, Wales.
    Oddo, Mauro
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Switzerland; Lausanne Univ Hosp, Switzerland; Univ Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Cariou, Alain
    Descartes Univ Paris, France; Cochin Univ Hosp, France.
    Belohlavek, Jan
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Hovdenes, Jan
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Saxena, Manoj
    South Western Sydney Local Hlth Dist, Australia; South Western Sydney Local Hlth Dist, Australia.
    Kirkegaard, Hans
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Young, Paul J.
    Wellington Hosp, New Zealand.
    Pelosi, Paolo
    Univ Genoa, Italy; Univ Genoa, Italy.
    Storm, Christian
    Charite, Germany.
    Taccone, Fabio S.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Joannidis, Michael
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Callaway, Clifton
    Univ Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Eastwood, Glenn M.
    Monash Univ, Australia.
    Morgan, Matt P. G.
    Univ Hosp Wales, Wales.
    Nordberg, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nichol, Alistair D.
    Monash Univ, Australia; Monash Univ, Australia; Univ Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Hollenberg, Jacob
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Thomas, Matthew
    Bristol Royal Infirm & Gen Hosp, England.
    Bewley, Jeremy
    Bristol Royal Infirm & Gen Hosp, England.
    Sweet, Katie
    Bristol Royal Infirm & Gen Hosp, England.
    Grejs, Anders M.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Christensen, Steffen
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Haenggi, Matthias
    Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Levis, Anja
    Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Lundin, Andreas
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    During, Joachim
    Skane Univ Hosp Malmo, Sweden.
    Schmidbauer, Simon
    Skane Univ Hosp Malmo, Sweden.
    Keeble, Thomas R.
    Essex Cardiothorac Ctr, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Karamasis, Grigoris V.
    Essex Cardiothorac Ctr, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Schrag, Claudia
    Kantonsspital St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Faessler, Edith
    Kantonsspital St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Smid, Ondrej
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Otahal, Michal
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Maggiorini, Marco
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Wendel Garcia, Pedro D.
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Jaubert, Paul
    Descartes Univ Paris, France; Cochin Univ Hosp, France.
    Cole, Jade M.
    Univ Hosp Wales, Wales.
    Solar, Miroslav
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic; Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Borgquist, Ola
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Leithner, Christoph
    Charite, Germany.
    Abed-Maillard, Samia
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Switzerland; Lausanne Univ Hosp, Switzerland; Univ Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Navarra, Leanlove
    Wellington Hosp, New Zealand.
    Annborn, Martin
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Unden, Johan
    Hallands Hosp, Sweden.
    Brunetti, Iole
    Univ Genoa, Italy.
    Awad, Akil
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    McGuigan, Peter
    Royal Victoria Hosp, North Ireland.
    Bjorkholt Olsen, Roy
    Sorlandet Hosp, Norway.
    Cassina, Tiziano
    Inst Cardioctr Ticino, Switzerland.
    Vignon, Philippe
    Dupuytren Teaching Hosp, France.
    Langeland, Halvor
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Norway; Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Norway.
    Lange, Theis
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Friberg, Hans
    Skane Univ Hosp Malmo, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Niklas
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden; Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Hypothermia versus Normothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest2021In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 384, no 24, p. 2283-2294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypothermia or Normothermia after Cardiac Arrest This trial randomly assigned patients with coma after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to undergo targeted hypothermia at 33 degrees C or normothermia with treatment of fever. At 6 months, there were no significant between-group differences regarding death or functional outcomes. Background Targeted temperature management is recommended for patients after cardiac arrest, but the supporting evidence is of low certainty. Methods In an open-label trial with blinded assessment of outcomes, we randomly assigned 1900 adults with coma who had had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac or unknown cause to undergo targeted hypothermia at 33 degrees C, followed by controlled rewarming, or targeted normothermia with early treatment of fever (body temperature, &gt;= 37.8 degrees C). The primary outcome was death from any cause at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included functional outcome at 6 months as assessed with the modified Rankin scale. Prespecified subgroups were defined according to sex, age, initial cardiac rhythm, time to return of spontaneous circulation, and presence or absence of shock on admission. Prespecified adverse events were pneumonia, sepsis, bleeding, arrhythmia resulting in hemodynamic compromise, and skin complications related to the temperature management device. Results A total of 1850 patients were evaluated for the primary outcome. At 6 months, 465 of 925 patients (50%) in the hypothermia group had died, as compared with 446 of 925 (48%) in the normothermia group (relative risk with hypothermia, 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94 to 1.14; P=0.37). Of the 1747 patients in whom the functional outcome was assessed, 488 of 881 (55%) in the hypothermia group had moderately severe disability or worse (modified Rankin scale score &gt;= 4), as compared with 479 of 866 (55%) in the normothermia group (relative risk with hypothermia, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.09). Outcomes were consistent in the prespecified subgroups. Arrhythmia resulting in hemodynamic compromise was more common in the hypothermia group than in the normothermia group (24% vs. 17%, P&lt;0.001). The incidence of other adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusions In patients with coma after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, targeted hypothermia did not lead to a lower incidence of death by 6 months than targeted normothermia. (Funded by the Swedish Research Council and others; TTM2 ClinicalTrials.gov number, .)

  • 50.
    De Backer, Daniel
    et al.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Aissaoui, Nadia
    Univ Paris, France; INSERM, France.
    Cecconi, Maurizio
    Humanitas Clin & Res Ctr IRCCS, Italy; Humanitas Univ, Italy.
    Chew, Michelle S
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Denault, Andre
    Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Hajjar, Ludhmila
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Hernandez, Glenn
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Chile, Chile.
    Messina, Antonio
    Humanitas Clin & Res Ctr IRCCS, Italy; Humanitas Univ, Italy.
    Myatra, Sheila Nainan
    Tata Mem Hosp, India.
    Ostermann, Marlies
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Pinsky, Michael R.
    Univ Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Teboul, Jean-Louis
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Vignon, Philippe
    Dupuytren Teaching Hosp, France; Dupuytren Teaching Hosp, France.
    Vincent, Jean-Louis
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Monnet, Xavier
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    How can assessing hemodynamics help to assess volume status?2022In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 48, p. 11482-1494Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In critically ill patients, fluid infusion is aimed at increasing cardiac output and tissue perfusion. However, it may contribute to fluid overload which may be harmful. Thus, volume status, risks and potential efficacy of fluid administration and/or removal should be carefully evaluated, and monitoring techniques help for this purpose. Central venous pressure is a marker of right ventricular preload. Very low values indicate hypovolemia, while extremely high values suggest fluid harmfulness. The pulmonary artery catheter enables a comprehensive assessment of the hemodynamic profile and is particularly useful for indicating the risk of pulmonary oedema through the pulmonary artery occlusion pressure. Besides cardiac output and preload, transpulmonary thermodilution measures extravascular lung water, which reflects the extent of lung flooding and assesses the risk of fluid infusion. Echocardiography estimates the volume status through intravascular volumes and pressures. Finally, lung ultrasound estimates lung edema. Guided by these variables, the decision to infuse fluid should first consider specific triggers, such as signs of tissue hypoperfusion. Second, benefits and risks of fluid infusion should be weighted. Thereafter, fluid responsiveness should be assessed. Monitoring techniques help for this purpose, especially by providing real time and precise measurements of cardiac output. When decided, fluid resuscitation should be performed through fluid challenges, the effects of which should be assessed through critical endpoints including cardiac output. This comprehensive evaluation of the risk, benefits and efficacy of fluid infusion helps to individualize fluid management, which should be preferred over a fixed restrictive or liberal strategy.

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