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  • 1.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The housing situation of older people – Issues of investigations2017In: Book of abstracts, 2017, p. 51-51Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The housing situation of older people has been on the Swedish political agenda for some time. An increasing ageing population implies a demand for housing in correspodence to their needs. Assisted living facilities decreased with 30 000 places between 2002 and 2016, as a result, the majority of older people age in a dwelling in the ordinary housing market. In 2008 and 2015 respectively two government investigations on older people’s housing were presented. The investigations focused on the need for housing to bridge the gap between ordinary housing and assisted living facilities and issues of affordability and social community but also the lack of accessible housing in particular geographic areas. This paper aims to investigate the origins of the two investigations and relate them to changes in the housing market affecting older people, arguing that the strong emphasis on ageing in place has shifted the responsibility of having a good place to live from general welfare to older individuals themselves.

  • 2.
    Alm Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Länsstyrelsen i Jönköping, Sverige.
    Boström, Anita
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper, Karlstads universitet, Sverige.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för naturvetenskap och biomedicin, Sverige.
    Lundgren, Charlie
    Länsstyrelsen Västerbotten, Sverige.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine.
    Simmons, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Att möta våldsutsatta äldre personer2022In: Äldre personers utsatthet för våld i nära relationer: Interprofessionella perspektiv / [ed] Lena Östlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB , 2022, p. 183-220Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Eva K.
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Patterns of changing residential preferences during late adulthood2019In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1752-1781, article id PII S0144686X18000259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research on residential mobility has demonstrated a tendency for the young old of the 55+ population to prefer peripheral locations, whereas older age groups choose central locations. Here, we present survey results indicating that such late-adulthood differences in preferences are supported by age-related shifts corresponding to differences in housing preferences expressed by individuals in peripheral as well as central locations in Sweden. A sample of 2,400 individuals aged 55 years and over was asked to select the seven most important characteristics of a dwelling from a list of 21 alternatives (Survey of Housing Intentions among the ELDerly in Sweden (SHIELD), 2013). The preferences expressed were used as dependent variables in logistic regressions to determine to what extent the housing preferences of older people are linked to age, gender, socio-economic status and type of geographical area. The results demonstrated a close link between neighbourhood characteristics and housing preferences. Owning the dwelling, having a garden and access to nature were stressed as important by individuals living in non-metropolitan middle-class areas and in suburban elite areas. The youngest cohort expressed similar preferences. Older age groups instead stressed the importance of an elevator, single-storey housing and a good design for independent living; preferences that have similarities to those expressed by individuals living in large cities and smaller urban centres where such housing is more readily available.

  • 4.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sverige.
    Broling, Lillemor
    Primary Health Care, Kalmar County Council, Sverige.
    Enhanced participation, safety and security for older people and their carers with health supportive e-services2015In: Presented at the 6th International Carers Conference - Care and caring: future proofing the new demographics, Gothenburg, Sweden, September 3-6, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sverige.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sverige.
    Dissemination event Sweden2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sverige.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sverige.
    Online support for carers2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Poli, Arianna
    Italian National Institute of Health and Science on Aging (INRCA), Italy; Linköping University, Sweden.
    Salzmann, Benjamin
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Döhner, Hanneli
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Efthymiou, Areti
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Anhörigstöd via internet: InformCare2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Kalmar.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Online support for carers: using a social forum and social network as a means of developing the role of informal caregiving2015In: Presented at the 6th International Carers Conference - Care and caring: future proofing the new demographics, Gothenburg, Sweden, September 3-6, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    The INNOVAGE-Eurocarers platform and current ICT-based services for informal carers of older people in Sweden2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Different support services for family carersare available in Sweden through information andcommunication technologies (ICTs) since late 1990s, likeACTION, My Joice, IPPI, ‘The Gap’, and Carer Sweden’son-line ‘Carer’s Book’. The INNOVAGE-Eurocarersplatform aimed to complement the offer of web services tocarers through the provision of a new tailored package.

    Methods: The Swedish pilot test enrolled around 50carers through contacts with professionals working withcarers in different municipalities. They could access thefollowing web-based services: information resources;individual support via e-mail and private messages; groupsupport via social network and forum. Periodical writingactivities were asked to active users in the forum,alternating expressive writing (EW) and time management(TM) writing tasks. Periodical reminders were sent in orderto increase user involvement.

    Results: Users were predominantly older, female carers,of which two thirds were over 65 years old. The webplatform was perceived as a flexible tool, potentiallyaccessible at any time, which gave users the possibility toexploit their experience as carers with others in similarsituations. This peer exchange seemed to improve selfempowerment,sense of solidarity and mutual learning.However, usage of the web platform was limited due to thelow level of digital skills of some carers.

    Conclusions: Although results confirmed usefulness andappropriateness of implemented web services, it isfundamental to address the issue of usability andaccessibility in order to ensure a wider accessibility. Anoption might be to offer initial digital skill training andcontinuous technical support for computer novices.

  • 10.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    The INNOVAGE-Eurocarers platform and current ICT-based services for informal carers of older people in Sweden2015In: Irish Ageing Studies Review, ISSN 1649-9972, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 88-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Different support services for family carers are available in Sweden through information and communication technologies (ICTs) since late 1990s, like ACTION, My Joice, IPPI, ‘The Gap’, and Carer Sweden’s online ‘Carer’s Book’. The INNOVAGE-Eurocarers platform aimed to complement the offer of web services to carers through the provision of a new tailored package.

    Methods: The Swedish pilot test enrolled around 50 carers through contacts with professionals working with carers in different municipalities. They could access the following web-based services: information resources; individual support via e-mail and private messages; group support via social network and forum. Periodical writing activities were asked to active users in the forum, alternating expressive writing (EW) and time management (TM) writing tasks. Periodical reminders were sent in order to increase user involvement.

    Results: Users were predominantly older, female carers, of which two thirds were over 65 years old. The web platform was perceived as a flexible tool, potentially accessible at any time, which gave users the possibility to exploit their experience as carers with others in similar situations. This peer exchange seemed to improve self empowerment, sense of solidarity and mutual learning. However, usage of the web platform was limited due to the low level of digital skills of some carers.

    Conclusions: Although results confirmed usefulness and appropriateness of implemented web services, it is fundamental to address the issue of usability and accessibility in order to ensure a wider accessibility. An option might be to offer initial digital skill training and continuous technical support for computer novices.

  • 11.
    Antelius, Eleonor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kiwi, Mahin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Frankly, None of Us Know What Dementia Is: Dementia Caregiving Among Iranian Immigrants Living in Sweden2015In: Care Management Journals, ISSN 1521-0987, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 79-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In quite a short amount of time, Sweden has gone from being a relatively homogeneous society to a multicultural one, with a rapid expansion of immigrants having culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds growing old in Sweden. This is particularly interesting in relation to studying age-related dementia diseases. Research shows that not only do CALD persons with dementia diseases tend to mix languages, have difficulties with separation of languages, or revert to speaking only their native tongue as the disease progresses, but they also show tendencies to experience that they live in the cultural environment in which they were brought up, rather than in the current Swedish one. In this article, we explore findings in relation to one such CALD group in Sweden, Iranians. The article is empirically driven and based on data gathered in 2 separate settings with specific ethnocultural profiles, offering dementia care with Middle Eastern, Arab, and/or Persian profile. Observations were carried out in combination with semistructured in-depth interviews (n = 66). By using a combination of content and ethnographic analysis, 4 main findings related to ethnocultural dementia care were elucidated. These include (a) a wider recognition of people from different CALD backgrounds possibly having different perceptions of what dementia is, (b) a possibility that such ascribed meaning of dementia has a bearing on health maintenance and health-seeking behavior as well as the inclination to use formal services or not, (c) choosing to use formal service in the forms of ethnoculturally profiled dementia care facility seems to relate to being able to “live up to ideals of Iranian culture,” and (d) “culture,” however ambiguous and hotly debated a concept it is, appears to be a relevant aspect of people's lives, an aspect that is both acquired as well as ascribed to oneself and to others. As such, we argue that culture needs to be further addressed in relation to dementia care in multicultural societies because ascribing culture boxes people in as well as out. In addition, ethnocultural contextualization of dementia care needs to be understood in relation to this because it affects the care provided.

  • 12.
    Askman, Sanna
    et al.
    Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, Malmo, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Maddison, Ralph
    Deakin Univ, Australia.
    Nourse, Rebecca
    Deakin Univ, Australia.
    Feasibility and Acceptability of Wearable Cameras to Assess Self-care in People With Heart Failure: Pilot Study2023In: JMIR Formative Research, E-ISSN 2561-326X, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) is a common chronic condition that affects over 26 million people worldwide. It is a progressive and debilitating disease with a broad symptom profile, intermittently marked by periods of acute decompensation. People with HF generally do not self-manage their condition well (eg, monitoring symptoms, taking medications regularly, physical activity, etc). A better understanding of self-care activities and what factors may indicate deterioration is warranted.Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of using wearable cameras to assess self-care activities in people with HF. The study objectives were to (1) explore whether changes in self-care activities could be identified prior to hospitalization and (2) determine the acceptability of wearable cameras to people with HF.Methods: A total of 30 people recently diagnosed with HF wore a camera for a maximum of 30 days; the camera took a photo every 30 seconds in the forward-facing direction. At the end of the study, all 30 participants were presented with 8 statements of acceptability, scored on a 5-point Likert scale. To determine whether camera images could identify changes in self-care activities and lifestyle risk factors before hospitalization, we analyzed images from participants (n=8) who were hospitalized during the 30-day study period. Images from the period immediately prior to hospitalization and a comparison were selected for each participant. Images were manually coded according to 9 different event categories relating to self-care and lifestyle risk factors, and events were compared between the 2 periods.Results: The participants reported high acceptability for wearing the cameras, as most strongly agreed or agreed that they were comfortable to wear (28/30, 93%) and easy to use (30/30, 100%). The results of the camera image analysis showed that participants undertook fewer activities of daily living (P=.008) and were more sedentary (P=.02) prior to being hospitalized, compared to a period nonadjacent to hospitalization.Conclusions: Adults with HF were accepting of using a wearable camera for periods within a 30-day time frame. Wearable cameras were a feasible approach for providing data on selected self-care activities and lifestyle risk factors for HF and offer the potential to be a valuable tool for improving our understanding of self-care.

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  • 13.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Efthymiou, Areti
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Poli, Arianna
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Andréasson, Frida
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Salzmann, Benjamin
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA).
    Döhner, Hanneli
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Goodwin, Frank
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    A multilingual web platform supporting informal carers in 27 EU member states2015In: Broader, bigger, better: AAL solutions for Europe. Proceedings of the 6th AAL Forum 2014 / [ed] Adrian Curaj & Ioana Trif, Bucharest: UEFISCDI , 2015, p. 169-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Informal care is a hot topic in research and policy agendas at European and national level, since it greatly contributes to the sustainability and efficiency of national health care systems. A specific intervention – part of the wider INNOVAGE project funded by FP7 – was planned for developing and testing a new multilingual web platform for informal carers of dependent older people in the EU-27. Preliminary results of the pilot study, conducted in Italy, Germany and Sweden will be discussed. The final platform will be accessible in all official languages of the EU-27 and publicly available in spring 2015.

  • 14.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Andréasson, Frida
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Poli, Arianna
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Salzmann, Benjamin
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Efthymiou, Areti
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    How web-based services can support family carers of older people: New ways to promote social inclusion and quality of life2015In: Irish Ageing Studies Review, ISSN 1649-9972, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 87-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family carers can be negatively influenced by their situation, in terms of stress, social isolation, economic constraints and other difficulties. Web-based services addressing carers’ needs represent an efficient support. The goal of the INNOVAGE work package 3(WP3) study was to develop and test a new multilingual web platform for supporting family carers of older people, to be implemented in 27 European countries.

    Methods: A review of good practices and a consultation with stakeholders were conducted for identifying most appropriate types of services to be developed and tested. The prototype of web platform included information resources and interactive services for both peer and professional support. A convenient, overall sample of around 130 family carers was enrolled in three countries (Italy, Germany and Sweden) and could access services for 12-17 weeks. Data were collected through questionnaires and focus groups concerning impact onquality of life, social support, self-perception of carer’s role, as well as usability, usefulness and appropriateness of services.

    Results: Active users were generally satisfied with support (information, advice, counselling) provided by moderators (social workers or psychologists) and peers. Usability and appropriateness were confirmed, although some refinements were suggested and users with low digital skills often needed technical support. A portion of the sample remained inactive even if stimulation strategies were adopted.

    Conclusions: The pilot study confirmed the INNOVAGE Eurocarers web platform is a useful tool for family carers. Some challenges still exist for implementation in relation to digital skills required and users’ preferences on services at country level.

  • 15.
    Baudin, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sundstrom, A.
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Lindner, H.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Informal carers' experiences in everyday life and the use of digital assistive technology for time management in persons with dementia or mild cognitive impairment2024In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Digital assistive technology (DAT) may support time management in people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI), but research on DAT for time management is limited. We aimed to explore how everyday could be supported by DAT for time management in persons with dementia or MCI from informal carers' perspectives. This study focused on a DAT device for time management called MEMOplanner (MMP).Method Using a mixed-methods design, we utilized the Time-Proxy (c) questionnaire and a study-specific interview guide to investigate the perspectives of informal carers (n = 8) regarding the use of MMP by individuals with dementia or MCI.Result The MMP was helpful in keeping track of time and activity. It helped to maintain an active lifestyle and facilitated communication. However, the MMP did not reduce the need for assistance from the informal carers, and it took time to learn the different functions of the device. Further research into employing a more extensive array of DAT for time management or other areas to assist individuals with dementia will yield valuable insights into enhancing and sustaining a higher quality of life despite cognitive decline.

  • 16.
    Bielsten, Therese
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    A review of couple-centred interventions in dementia: Exploring the what and why - Part A2019In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 18, no 7-8, p. 2436-2449Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Symptoms of dementia bring about challenges to couples relationships. Relationship-focused support has been highlighted to be of significant importance for sustained relationship quality and to reduce the negative impact of dementia on the dyadic relationship. This review aimed to explore the what and why of interventions aimed at couples where one partner has a diagnosis of dementia and in which the couple jointly participate. Method Searches were performed in Academic Search Premier, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science from January 2000 to August 2017. Results Six studies were included. Objectives for the person with dementia was related to cognitive function and for the care partner the objectives were related to well-being. The majority of the outcomes were mirrored by the objectives and focused on cognitive function for people with dementia and depression and relationship quality for care partners. Our findings indicate that people with dementia should be included in the assessment of the relationship in order to gain an overall picture of relationship dynamics and to increase tailored support in couple-centred interventions. Conclusions The findings of this review indicate that joint interventions for people with dementia and care partners are lacking a genuine dyadic approach where both partners views of their relationship are valued. In order to identify targets for support and to use the appropriate outcome measures, the quality of the relationship should be recognised and taken into account. Moreover, there is a lack of a salutogenic approach in couple-centred interventions in which couples strengths and resources can be identified and supported.

  • 17. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Bielsten, Therése
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    “Doing things together”: Towards a health promoting approach to couples’ relationships and everyday life in dementia2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most people with dementia live in their own homes, often together with their partners, who become informal caregivers. Relationship quality and sense of couplehood can be threatened as a result of the transition from a mutually interdependent relationship to a caregiver-care-receiver relationship. This, in turn, may lead to many negative consequences for both partners. Support provided for couples is often divided into different types for the person with dementia and for the partner without dementia and lacks couple-based support that targets the relationship, resources and the couple’s everyday life together.

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis is to explore couple-centred interventions in dementia and to develop and test a salutogenic, resource-oriented and couple-based intervention among couples in which one partner has dementia living at home.

    Methods and findings: This thesis comprises three parts: The first part Exploring involves two linked reviews, one narrative review (study I A) and one scoping review (study I B) that aim to identify and describe what previous couple-centred interventions comprised and why they were conducted. The results of the reviews revealed a knowledge gap in and a need for easily accessible support that targets couple relationships, resources and everyday life. The second part Developing (study II) refers to the development of an easily accessible resource-oriented couple-management intervention. The first step was to identify priority topics for such an intervention through a co-researcher process with couples living with dementia. This included a comprehensive literature review, interviews with couples in which one partner has dementia, and consultation meetings with expert groups of people with dementia and partners in both Sweden and the UK. The co-researcher process and the expert meetings informed four main themes with corresponding sub-themes that couples with dementia considered as important to their wellbeing in their everyday lives: (1) Home and Neighbourhood, (2) Meaningful Activities and Relationships, (3) Approach and Empowerment, and (4) Couplehood. The themes were further developed and integrated into the multimedia application DemPower, which was developed for the delivery of the intervention. The third part Testing and Evaluating describes a feasibility study (study III) in which the DemPower application was tested for feasibility and acceptability among couples in Sweden and the UK. The results of the feasibility study indicated that the DemPower intervention was feasible and acceptable among couples in which one partner has dementia living at home. The testing and evaluating part also comprise a qualitative study (study IV) that explores the experiences of engaging with DemPower together as a couple living with dementia in Sweden. The findings resulted in the three themes: (1) Growth of the relationship, (2) We are not alone, and (3) Positive approach, which the couples appreciated and associated with the resource-oriented and salutogenic approach of DemPower. The overall findings of the thesis are presented in a concluding synthesis at the end of the thesis. The concluding synthesis, focused on “Meaningfulness”, “Empowering health promotion”, “Normalization” and “Transitions and couplehood”, represents the core findings of this thesis.

    What this thesis adds: This thesis contributes to research, healthcare and the public by highlighting the need for a salutogenic approach toward couples living with dementia. The DemPower application, with its focus on couples’ relationships, resource-orientation and everyday life, has proven feasibility and acceptability and has meaningfully addressed a gap in the literature and in practice. As researchers, healthcare professionals and the public, we need to support couples where one partner has dementia to continue to live as normal life as possible. This can best be achieved by focusing on what couples can do, by inclusion and by valuing them as the experts within dementia research and of their life experiences.

    List of papers
    1. A review of couple-centred interventions in dementia: Exploring the what and why - Part A
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A review of couple-centred interventions in dementia: Exploring the what and why - Part A
    2019 (English)In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 18, no 7-8, p. 2436-2449Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Symptoms of dementia bring about challenges to couples relationships. Relationship-focused support has been highlighted to be of significant importance for sustained relationship quality and to reduce the negative impact of dementia on the dyadic relationship. This review aimed to explore the what and why of interventions aimed at couples where one partner has a diagnosis of dementia and in which the couple jointly participate. Method Searches were performed in Academic Search Premier, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science from January 2000 to August 2017. Results Six studies were included. Objectives for the person with dementia was related to cognitive function and for the care partner the objectives were related to well-being. The majority of the outcomes were mirrored by the objectives and focused on cognitive function for people with dementia and depression and relationship quality for care partners. Our findings indicate that people with dementia should be included in the assessment of the relationship in order to gain an overall picture of relationship dynamics and to increase tailored support in couple-centred interventions. Conclusions The findings of this review indicate that joint interventions for people with dementia and care partners are lacking a genuine dyadic approach where both partners views of their relationship are valued. In order to identify targets for support and to use the appropriate outcome measures, the quality of the relationship should be recognised and taken into account. Moreover, there is a lack of a salutogenic approach in couple-centred interventions in which couples strengths and resources can be identified and supported.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2019
    Keywords
    caregiver; dementia; mild cognitive impairment; review; spouses
    National Category
    Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160998 (URN)10.1177/1471301217737652 (DOI)000485953300002 ()29096533 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2019-10-31 Created: 2019-10-31 Last updated: 2020-03-13
    2. Living Life and Doing Things Together: Collaborative Research With Couples Where One Partner Has a Diagnosis of Dementia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living Life and Doing Things Together: Collaborative Research With Couples Where One Partner Has a Diagnosis of Dementia
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    2018 (English)In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 1719-1734Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to identify relevant content for a self-management guide by using the outcomes of previous research in combination with knowledge and experiences from couples where one partner has a diagnosis of dementia. The study was carried out in three phases: (a) literature search of previous research related to well-being and couplehood in dementia; (b) interviews with couples with dementia based on the findings of the literature search; and (c) further authentication of the findings within expert groups of people with dementia and carers. For analysis of data, we used a hybrid approach of thematic analysis with combined deductive and inductive approaches. The findings of this study indicated that the four main themes Home and Neighborhood, Meaningful Activities and Relationships, Approach and Empowerment, and Couplehood with related subthemes could be appropriate targets for a self-management guide for couples where one partner has a diagnosis of dementia.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2018
    Keywords
    couples; collaborative research; dementia; salutogenesis; self-management; Sweden; thematic analysis; UK
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151196 (URN)10.1177/1049732318786944 (DOI)000442412400004 ()30033851 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2020-03-13
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  • 18.
    Bistrom, M.
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Jons, D.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engdahl, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ctr Mol Med, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, R.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ctr Mol Med, Sweden.
    Huang, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ctr Mol Med, Sweden.
    Brenner, N.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Germany.
    Butt, J.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Germany.
    Alonso-Magdalena, L.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, M.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Neurologiska kliniken i Linköping.
    Bender, N.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Germany.
    Waterboer, T.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Germany.
    Granasen, G.
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Olsson, T.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ctr Mol Med, Sweden.
    Kockum, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ctr Mol Med, Sweden.
    Andersen, O.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fogdell-Hahn, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ctr Mol Med, Sweden.
    Sundstrom, Peter
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Epstein-Barr virus infection after adolescence and human herpesvirus 6A as risk factors for multiple sclerosis2021In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 579-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose Infections with human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) have been linked to multiple sclerosis (MS) development. For EBV, late infection has been proposed as a risk factor, but serological support is lacking. The objective of this study was to investigate how age affects the EBV and HHV-6A associated risks of developing MS. Methods In this nested case-control study, Swedish biobanks were accessed to find pre-symptomatically collected blood samples from 670 individuals who later developed relapsing MS and 670 matched controls. A bead-based multiplex assay was used to determine serological response against EBV and HHV-6A. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results Seropositivity against EBV exhibited a pattern where associations switched from a decreased risk of developing MS in the group below 20 years of age to an increased risk amongst individuals aged 20-29 and 30-39 years (p for trend 0.020). The age of transition was estimated to be 18.8 years. In contrast, HHV-6A was associated with increased MS risk in all age groups (total cohort odds ratio 2.1, 95% confidence interval 1.6-2.7). Conclusions This study suggests EBV infection after adolescence and age independent HHV-6A infection as risk factors for MS.

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  • 19.
    Bjalkebring, Par
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henning, Georg
    German Ctr Gerontol, Germany.
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Decis Res, OR USA.
    Dickert, Stephan
    Queen Mary Univ London, England; Univ Klagenfurt, Austria.
    Brehmer, Yvonne
    Tilburg Univ, Netherlands.
    Buratti, Sandra
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hansson, Isabelle
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Boo
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Helping Out or Helping Yourself?: Volunteering and Life Satisfaction Across the Retirement Transition2021In: Psychology and Aging, ISSN 0882-7974, E-ISSN 1939-1498, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 119-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that volunteering leads to increases in well-being, particularly in older and retiring adults, and that volunteering could be used as a public health intervention to increase well-being. However, the causal relationship has been questioned. We investigated the association between voluntary work and life satisfaction in a bivariate dual-change score model, using 4 years of longitudinal data from 1,123 participants from the Health, Aging and Retirement Transitions in Sweden (HEARTS) study. Both the frequency of volunteering and the level of life satisfaction increased across the retirement transition. However, baseline life satisfaction and volunteering were only marginally associated. Further, the coupling parameters suggest that higher levels of volunteering were followed by decreases in life satisfaction and that higher levels of life satisfaction were followed by increases in volunteering. These findings suggest that increasing levels of volunteering might not be a fruitful strategy for improving life satisfaction for all older adults-if people engage too much in voluntary work, it might even be detrimental for their life satisfaction. More research is needed to better understand when and for whom increased levels of volunteering might have positive effects on life satisfaction.

  • 20.
    Bjalkebring, Par
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Oregon, OR 97403 USA.
    Dickert, Stephan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Vienna University of Econ and Business, Austria.
    Slovic, Paul
    University of Oregon, OR 97403 USA.
    Greater Emotional Gain from Giving in Older Adults: Age-Related Positivity Bias in Charitable Giving2016In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older adults have been shown to avoid negative and prefer positive information to a higher extent than younger adults. This positivity bias influences their information processing as well as decision-making. We investigate age-related positivity bias in charitable giving in two studies. In Study 1 we examine motivational factors in monetary donations, while Study 2 focuses on the emotional effect of actual monetary donations. In Study 1, participants (n = 353, age range 20-74 years) were asked to rate their affect toward a person in need and then state how much money they would be willing to donate to help this person. In Study 2, participants (n = 108, age range 19-89) were asked to rate their affect toward a donation made a few days prior. Regression analysis was used to investigate whether or not the positivity bias influences the relationship between affect and donations. In Study 1, we found that older adults felt more sympathy and compassion and were less motivated by negative affect when compared to younger adults, who were motivated by both negative and positive affect. In Study 2, we found that the level of positive emotional reactions from monetary donations was higher in older participants compared to younger participants. We find support for an age-related positivity bias in charitable giving. This is true for motivation to make a future donation, as well as affective thinking about a previous donation. We conclude that older adults draw more positive affect from both the planning and outcome of monetary donations and hence benefit more from engaging in monetary charity than their younger counterparts.

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  • 21.
    Bjork, Maria
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Hellstrom, Amanda
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Sandlund, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Acad Primary Hlth Care Ctr, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Lind, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Western Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Members of, Jonkoping Univ JU Sleep Well Res Grp
    Validation of two brief instruments (the SURE and CollaboRATE) to measure shared decision-making in patients with restless legs syndrome2023In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological disorder characterised by an urge to move arms and legs, usually associated with discomfort, pain, motor restlessness, and sleep disturbance. An individually adapted treatment is needed but difficult to optimise, which makes shared decision-making (SDM) important. However, brief validated instruments on how patients with RLS perceive their involvement in treatment decisions are lacking. Therefore, the aim was to validate two instruments, SURE (Sure of myself, Understand information, Risk-benefit ratio, Encouragement, i.e., to assess decisional conflict) and CollaboRATE (brief patient survey focused on SDM, i.e., to assess SDM), in patients with RLS. A cross-sectional design, including 788 participants with RLS (65% females, mean [SD] age 70.8 [11.4] years) from a national patient organisation for RLS, was used. A postal survey was sent out to collect data regarding weight, height, comorbidities, demographics, and RLS-related treatment data. The following instruments were included: the SURE, CollaboRATE, Restless Legs Syndrome-6 Scale, and eHealth Literacy Scale. Confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch models were used to assess the validity and reliability of the SURE and CollaboRATE. Measurement invariance, unidimensionality, and differential item functioning (DIF) across age, gender, and medication groups were assessed. The SURE and CollaboRATE were both identified as unidimensional instruments with satisfactory internal consistency. No DIF across age and gender was identified, while significant DIF was observed for both the SURE and CollaboRATE regarding medication use categories. However, both the SURE and CollaboRATE are potential instruments to be used in research, but also as reflection tools by healthcare professionals, patients, and students to explore and assess SDM, and support its development in clinical care.

  • 22.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andreassen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Using an interactive digital calendar with mobile phone reminders by senior people - a focus group study2019In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundNew technologies such as mobile/smartphones have the potential to help senior people perform everyday activities. However, senior people may find it difficult using mobile/smartphones, especially the digital calendar and short text message features. Therefore, senior people might need user-friendly, flexible, and interactive digital calendars that provide them with active reminders about their everyday activities. This study focuses on community dwelling seniors experiences learning and using RemindMe, an interactive digital calendar with active reminders, as part of customizing an intervention appropriate for senior people with cognitive impairments.MethodsFour focus groups were conducted with 20 community dwelling seniors (11 men and 9 women) who all had used RemindMe for six weeks. The focus groups were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using content analysis.ResultsFor participants in this study, using a calendar was an essential part of their everyday lives, but only a few had experiences using a digital calendar. Although the participants described RemindMe as easy to use, they had a difficult time incorporating RemindMe into their daily routines. In part, these difficulties were the result of the participants needing to change their mobile/smartphone routines. Some participants felt that using an interactive digital calendar was a sign of modernity allowing them to take part in the society at large, but others felt that their inability to use the technology was due to their age, dependence, and loss of function. Participants found that receiving active reminders through short text messages followed by actively acknowledging the reminder helped them perform more everyday life activities. This feature gave them a higher sense of independence and control.ConclusionsCommunity dwelling seniors found that RemindMe was easy to learn and to use, although they also found it challenging to integrate into their everyday lives. For senior people to make the effort to develop new routines for mobile/smartphone use, a prerequisite for using a digital calendar, they need to be motivated and believe that the technology will make their lives better.

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  • 23.
    Bolstad, Courtney J.
    et al.
    Mississippi State Univ, MS USA; South Texas Vet Hlth Care Syst, TX 78229 USA.
    Holzinger, Brigitte
    Inst Consciousness & Dream Res, Austria; Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Scarpelli, Serena
    Univ Rome, Italy.
    De Gennaro, Luigi
    Univ Rome, Italy; IRCCS Fdn Santa Lucia, Italy.
    Yordanova, Juliana
    Bulgarian Acad Sci, Bulgaria.
    Koumanova, Silvia
    Bulgarian Acad Sci, Bulgaria.
    Mota-Rolim, Sergio
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Bjorvatn, Bjorn
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Chan, Ngan Yin
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Chung, Frances
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Dauvilliers, Yves
    Univ Montpellier, France.
    Espie, Colin A.
    Univ Oxford, England; Univ Oxford, England.
    Inoue, Yuichi
    Tokyo Med Univ, Japan.
    Korman, Maria
    Ariel Univ, Israel.
    Koscec Bjelajac, Adrijana
    Inst Med Res & Occupat Hlth, Croatia.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Matsui, Kentaro
    Natl Ctr Hosp, Japan.
    Merikanto, Ilona
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Orton Orthopaed Hosp, Finland.
    Morin, Charles M.
    Laval Univ, Canada; Ctr Rech CERVO, Canada.
    Partinen, Markku
    Terveystalo Healthcare, Finland; Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Penzel, Thomas
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Plazzi, Giuseppe
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy; IRCCS Ist Sci Neurol Bologna, Italy.
    Reis, Catia
    Univ Catolica Portuguesa, Portugal; Univ Lisbon, Portugal.
    Ross, Biserka
    Inst Med Res & Occupat Hlth, Croatia.
    Wing, Yun Kwok
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Nadorff, Michael R.
    Mississippi State Univ, MS USA; Baylor Coll Med, TX USA.
    Nightmare frequency is a risk factor for suicidal ideation during the COVID-19 pandemic2024In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association between nightmare frequency (NMF) and suicidal ideation (SI) is well known, yet the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on this relation is inconsistent. This study aimed to investigate changes in NMF, SI, and their association during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected in 16 countries using a harmonised questionnaire. The sample included 9328 individuals (4848 women; age M[SD] = 46.85 [17.75] years), and 17.60% reported previous COVID-19. Overall, SI was significantly 2% lower during the pandemic vs. before, and this was consistent across genders and ages. Most countries/regions demonstrated decreases in SI during this pandemic, with Austria (-9.57%), Sweden (-6.18%), and Bulgaria (-5.14%) exhibiting significant declines in SI, but Italy (1.45%) and Portugal (2.45%) demonstrated non-significant increases. Suicidal ideation was more common in participants with long-COVID (21.10%) vs. short-COVID (12.40%), though SI did not vary by COVID-19 history. Nightmare frequency increased by 4.50% during the pandemic and was significantly higher in those with previous COVID-19 (14.50% vs. 10.70%), during infection (23.00% vs. 8.10%), and in those with long-COVID (18.00% vs. 8.50%). The relation between NMF and SI was not significantly stronger during the pandemic than prior (rs = 0.18 vs. 0.14; z = 2.80). Frequent nightmares during the pandemic increased the likelihood of reporting SI (OR = 1.57, 95% CI 1.20-2.05), while frequent dream recall during the pandemic served a protective effect (OR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.59-0.94). These findings have important implications for identifying those at risk of suicide and may offer a potential pathway for suicide prevention.

  • 24.
    Bonander, Carl
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Anton
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bjork, Jonas
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Engstrom, Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Sundstrom, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ekholmen.
    Bergstrom, Goran
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Stromberg, Ulf
    Reg Halland, Sweden.
    The value of combining individual and small area sociodemographic data for assessing and handling selective participation in cohort studies: Evidence from the Swedish CardioPulmonary bioImage Study2022In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 17, no 3, article id e0265088Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To study the value of combining individual- and neighborhood-level sociodemographic data to predict study participation and assess the effects of baseline selection on the distribution of metabolic risk factors and lifestyle factors in the Swedish CardioPulmonary bioImage Study (SCAPIS). Methods We linked sociodemographic register data to SCAPIS participants (n = 30,154, ages: 50-64 years) and a random sample of the studys target population (n = 59,909). We assessed the classification ability of participation models based on individual-level data, neighborhood-level data, and combinations of both. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were used to examine how reweighting the sample to match the population affected the averages of 32 cardiopulmonary risk factors at baseline. Absolute SMDs > 0.10 were considered meaningful. Results Combining both individual-level and neighborhood-level data gave rise to a model with better classification ability (AUC: 71.3%) than models with only individual-level (AUC: 66.9%) or neighborhood-level data (AUC: 65.5%). We observed a greater change in the distribution of risk factors when we reweighted the participants using both individual and area data. The only meaningful change was related to the (self-reported) frequency of alcohol consumption, which appears to be higher in the SCAPIS sample than in the population. The remaining risk factors did not change meaningfully. Conclusions Both individual- and neighborhood-level characteristics are informative in assessing study selection effects. Future analyses of cardiopulmonary outcomes in the SCAPIS cohort can benefit from our study, though the average impact of selection on risk factor distributions at baseline appears small.

  • 25.
    Boström, Anita
    et al.
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper, Karlstads universitet, Sverige.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för naturvetenskap och biomedicin, Sverige.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Institutionen för omvårdnad, Umeå universitet, Sverige.
    Simmons, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Siverskog, Anna
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete, Sverige.
    Åkerlund, Nina
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete, Sverige.
    Förekomsten av våld i nära relationer bland äldre personer2022In: Äldre personers utsatthet för våld i nära relationer: Interprofessionella perspektiv / [ed] Lena Östlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB , 2022, p. 31-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Brorsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Cutchin, Malcolm P.
    Wayne State Univ, MI 48202 USA.
    Nygard, Louise
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    How accessible are grocery shops for people with dementia? A qualitative study using photo documentation and focus group interviews2020In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 1872-1888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background People with dementia who live in ordinary housing need to perform activities outside the home such as visiting friends, talking walks and doing grocery shopping. This article identifies and examines characteristics that may influence accessibility in the space of a grocery shop as perceived by people with dementia. Methods This is a qualitative study with a grounded theory approach. The data collection was done with two different methods. It started with photo documentation and continued with focus group interviews in combination with photo elicitation. Data from both photo documentation and focus groups were analysed according to a grounded theory approach. Results The categories "illogical arrangement", "overload of products, information and people", "visual illusions" and "intrusive auditory stimuli" showed characteristics in the grocery shop that influenced how accessible and usable the informants experienced a shop to be. Furthermore, personal capacities in relation to the specific characteristics of the grocery shop space had an influence on how accessible and usable the informants experienced the grocery shop to be. Capacities to find, stay focused and concentrated, meet stress, remember, interpret and discriminate sensory impressions through hearing and sight came to the fore as important. Conclusions Characteristics of both the shop and the person need to be taken into account when supporting people with dementia in grocery shopping.

  • 27.
    Bäcklund, Nils
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Brattsand, Göran
    Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Israelsson, Marlen
    Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ragnarsson, Oskar
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Endocrinology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Burman, Pia
    Department of Endocrinology, Skåne University Hospital, University of Lund, Malmö, Sweden.
    Edén Engström, Britt
    Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and Mineral Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Høybye, Charlotte
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Patient Area Endocrinology and Nephrology, Inflammation and Infection Theme, Karolinska Institute and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berinder, Katarina
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Patient Area Endocrinology and Nephrology, Inflammation and Infection Theme, Karolinska Institute and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, Per
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Reference intervals of salivary cortisol and cortisone and their diagnostic accuracy in Cushings syndrome2020In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 182, no 6, p. 569-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge of diagnosing Cushings syndrome (CS) calls for high precision biochemical screening. This study aimed to establish robust reference intervals for, and compare the diagnostic accuracy of, salivary cortisol and cortisone in late-night samples and after a low-dose (1 mg) dexamethasone suppression test (DST).

  • 28.
    Carlsson, Katarina Steen
    et al.
    Swedish Inst Hlth Econ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Winding, Bent
    Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB, Sweden.
    Astermark, Jan
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Baghaei, Fariba
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brodin, Elisabeth
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Funding, Eva
    Rigshosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holmström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Osterholm, Klaus
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Bergenstrale, Sofia
    Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB, Sweden.
    Lethagen, Stefan
    Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB, Sweden.
    High use of pain, depression, and anxiety drugs in hemophilia: more than 3000 people with hemophilia in an 11-year Nordic registry study2023In: RESEARCH AND PRACTICE IN THROMBOSIS AND HAEMOSTASIS, ISSN 2475-0379, Vol. 7, no 2, article id e100061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pain is a common feature of hemophilia, but prevalence of depression and anxiety is less studied. Registry data on prescription drugs can provide an objective measure of the magnitude of these complications.Objectives: To identify treatment patterns of prescribed pain, antidepressant, and antianxiety medications compared with those of matched controls in 4 Nordic countries.Methods: The MIND study (NCT03276130) analyzed longitudinal individual-level national data during 2007-2017. People with hemophilia (PwH) were identified from National Health Data Registers by diagnosis or factor replacement treatment and compared with population controls. Three subgroups were defined by the use of factor concentrates and sex (moderate-to-high factor consumption (factor VIII [FVIII] use of =40 IU/kg/week or FIX use of =10 IU/kg/week), low factor consumption, and women including carriers).Results: Data of 3246 PwH, representing 30,184 person-years, were analyzed. PwH (including children and adults) used more pain, depression, and anxiety medications compared with controls. This was most accentuated in the moderate-to-high factor consumption group and notably also observed in men with low factor consumption and women including carriers, usually representing a milder phenotype. A higher opioid use was observed across all age groups: 4-to 6-fold higher in the moderate-to-high factor consumption group and 2-to 4-fold higher in the low factor consumption group.Conclusion: The consistent higher use of pain, depression, and anxiety medications among PwH compared with population controls, regardless of age, sex, or factor consumption, in broad national data suggests a need for improved bleed protection and hemophilia care for all severities including mild hemophilia.

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  • 29.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sverker, Annette M.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Finding the right care path: Experiences of participation in care by older persons with complex health problems: A Focused Primary Care Intervention2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Despite evidence that older persons want to be involved in care, little is known about how older people with complex health problems living at home experience participation in care provided by different stakeholders. This study investigates the experiences of participation in care by older people, following their involvement in a proactive intervention based on a new health care model called Focused Primary Care. Material and methods: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 older persons in five municipalities in Sweden. All the interviewees had participated in the intervention. Results: The older persons highlighted opportunities and limitations for participation on a personal level i.e. conditions for being involved in direct care and in relation to independence. Experiences of participation on an organisational level were reported to a lesser degree. In order to keep care contacts together and improve participation, a coordinating person (called “the spider in the net”) was requested who could safeguard the staff’s relationship with the older person. Conclusions: Primary care should to a greater extent involve older persons more directly in the planning and execution of care. There is considerable potential for developing the health and primary care sector to better target the needs of older persons with complex health problems, and to enhance their participation and independence. Interventions, like the one followed in this project, can play a critical role in realising the needs of older persons, where providing participation in care is recognised as a significant goal to assist them in navigating the care system. 

  • 30.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Fällman, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Relations between Concurrent Longitudinal Changes in Cognition, Depressive Symptoms, Self-Rated Health and Everyday Function in Normally Aging Octogenarians2016In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 8, p. e0160742-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ability to predict and prevent incipient functional decline in older adults may help prolong independence. Cognition is related to everyday function and easily administered, sensitive cognitive tests may help identify at-risk individuals. Factors like depressive symptoms and self-rated health are also associated with functional ability and may be as important as cognition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between concurrent longitudinal changes in cognition, depression, self-rated health and everyday function in a well-defined cohort of healthy 85 year olds that were followed-up at the age of 90 in the Elderly in Linkoping Screening Assessment 85 study. Regression analyses were used to determine if cognitive decline as assessed by global (the Mini-Mental State Examination) and domain specific (the Cognitive Assessment Battery, CAB) cognitive tests predicted functional decline in the context of changes in depressive symptoms and self-rated health. Results showed deterioration in most variables and as many as 83% of these community-dwelling elders experienced functional difficulties at the age of 90. Slowing-down of processing speed as assessed by the Symbol Digits Modality Test (included in the CAB) accounted for 14% of the variance in functional decline. Worsening self-rated health accounted for an additional 6%, but no other variables reached significance. These results are discussed with an eye to possible preventive interventions that may prolong independence for the steadily growing number of normally aging old-old citizens.

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  • 31.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    van den Hurk, Wobbie
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Mindmore AB, Sweden.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Montreal Cognitive Assessment: Normative Data for Cognitively Healthy Swedish 80-to 94-Year-Olds2022In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 87, no 3, p. 1335-1344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is sensitive to cognitive impairment; however, it is also sensitive to demographic and socio-cultural factors. This necessitates reliable sub-population norms, but these are often lacking for older adults. Objective: To present demographically adjusted regression-based MoCA norms for cognitively healthy Swedish older adults. Methods: A pseudo-random sample of community-dwelling 80- to 94-year-olds, stratified by age and gender, was invited to the study. Initial telephone interviews and medical records searches (n = 218) were conducted to screen for cognitive impairment. N= 181 eligible participants were administered a protocol including the Swedish version of the MoCA and assessments of global cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE) and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, PHQ-9). Individuals scoring in the range of possible cognitive impairment on the MMSE or more than mild depression on the PHQ-9 were excluded (n = 23); three discontinued the test-session. Results: Norms were derived from the remaining n = 158. They were evenly distributed by gender, on average 85 years old, and with a mean education of 11 years. MoCA scores were independently influenced by age and education, together explaining 17.2% of the total variance. Higher age and lower education were associated with lower performance and 46% performed below the original cut-off (< 26/30). Conclusion: The negative impact of increasing age on MoCA performance continues linearly into the nineties in normal aging. Demographic factors should be considered when interpreting MoCA performance and a tool for computing demographically corrected standard scores is provided.

  • 32.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    van den Hurk, Wobbie
    Mindmore AB, Sweden.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Rehn, Inger
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    A quick test of cognitive speed (AQT): regression-based norms for cognitively healthy 80 to 94-year olds2022In: Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, ISSN 1382-5585, E-ISSN 1744-4128, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 820-839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Slowed processing speed is part of normal aging but also a symptom of many diseases, including dementia. A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed (AQT) consists of three conditions: color naming (AQT1), form naming (AQT2) and dual color-form naming (AQT3) and offers a user-friendly assessment of processing speed that is used internationally to identify cognitive impairment in elderly patients. Appropriate age-norms have however been lacking. This study provides regression-based norms derived from a Swedish sample of 158 cognitively healthy 80 to 94-year olds. The results show age effects in all three conditions, a non-linear education effect in AQT1, and age by gender interactions in AQT2 and AQT3: men performed worse with increasing age, but women remained on a par. However, irrespective of age and gender, AQT2 and AQT3 mean raw and predicted scores were slower than the hitherto recommended cutoff criteria for suspected cognitive impairment.

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  • 33.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term predictors of loneliness in old age: results of a 20-year national study2018In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 190-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The understanding of social phenomena is enhanced if individuals can be studied over longer periods. Regarding loneliness in old age, there is a general lack of longitudinal research. The aim of this study was to examine whether there is an association between loneliness in old age and social engagement 20 years earlier, as stated by life course theory and the convoy model.

    METHOD: Data from the nationally representative Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (2002 and 2011 data collection waves) and the Swedish Level of Living Survey (1981 and 1991 data collection waves) were used. The sample included 823 individuals with an average age of 62.2 years at baseline and 82.4 years at follow-up.

    RESULTS: Each form of social engagement in old age was significantly associated with the same form of social engagement 20 years earlier. Close forms of social engagement were associated with loneliness in old age; as were more distant forms of social engagement, but only when they were considered solely in old age.

    CONCLUSION: Patterns of social engagement in old age were established at least 20 years earlier and close forms of social engagement are long-term predictors of loneliness, although current social engagement tended to be more influential on loneliness. The study underlines the importance of interventions targeted at close relationships that can provide social support in old age.

  • 34.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Kathleen, Pichora-Fuller
    University of Toronto, Department of Psychology.
    Dupuis, Kate
    Baycrest Health Sciences, Rotman Research Institute.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Modeling the effect of early ageing and hearing loss on cognition and participation in social leisure activities2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are well-known age-related declines in hearing, cognition and social participation. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that hearing loss is associated with both cognitive decline and increased risk for social isolation and that engagement in social leisure activities is related to cognitive decline. However, it is unclear how the three concepts and age relate to each other. In the current study, behavioral measures of hearing and memory were examined in relation to self-reported participation in social leisure activities. Data from two different samples were analyzed with structural equation modeling. The first consisted of 297 adults from Umeå, Sweden, who participated in the Betula longitudinal study. The second consisted of 273 older adults who volunteered for lab-based research on aging in Toronto, Canada. Structural equation modeling yielded two models with similar statistical properties for both samples. The first model suggests that age contributes to both hearing and memory performance, hearing contributes to memory performance, and memory (but not hearing) contributes to participation in social leisure activities. The second model also suggests that age contributes to hearing and memory performance and that hearing contributes to memory performance, but that age also contributes to participation in social leisure activities, which in turn contributes to memory performance. The models were confirmed in both samples, indicating robustness in the findings, especially since the samples differed on background variables such as years of education and marital status. Few participants in both samples were candidates for hearing aids, but most of those who were candidates used them. This suggests that even early stages of hearing loss can increase demands on cognitive processing that may deter participation in social leisure activities.

  • 35.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    University of Toronto, Department of Psychology .
    Dupuis, Kate
    Baycrest Health Sciences, Rotman Research Institute.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Modeling the effect of early age-related hearing loss on cognition and participation in social leisure activities2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are well-known age-related declines in hearing, cognition and social participation. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that hearing loss is associated with both cognitive decline and increased risk for social isolation and that engagement in social leisure activities is related to cognitive decline. However, it is unclear how the three concepts and age relate to each other. In the current study, behavioral measures of hearing and memory were examined in relation to self-reported participation in social leisure activities. Data from two different samples were analyzed with structural equation modeling. The first consisted of 297 adults from Umeå, Sweden, who participated in the Betula longitudinal study. The second consisted of 273 older adults who volunteered for lab-based research on aging in Toronto, Canada. Structural equation modeling yielded two models with similar statistical properties for both samples. The first model suggests that age contributes to both hearing and memory performance, hearing contributes to memory performance, and memory (but not hearing) contributes to participation in social leisure activities. The second model also suggests that age contributes to hearing and memory performance and that hearing contributes to memory performance, but that age also contributes to participation in social leisure activities, which in turn contributes to memory performance. The models were confirmed in both samples, indicating robustness in the findings, especially since the samples differed on background variables such as years of education and marital status. Few participants in both samples were candidates for hearing aids, but most of those who were candidates used them. This suggests that even early stages of hearing loss can increase demands on cognitive processing that may deter participation in social leisure activities.

  • 36.
    Delahunty, Fionn
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden; NUI Galway, Ireland.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Arcan, Mihael
    NUI Galway, Ireland.
    Passive Diagnosis incorporating the PHQ-4 for Depression and Anxiety2019In: SOCIAL MEDIA MINING FOR HEALTH APPLICATIONS (#SMM4H) WORKSHOP & SHARED TASK, ASSOC COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS-ACL , 2019, p. 40-46Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression and anxiety are the two most prevalent mental health disorders worldwide, impacting the lives of millions of people each year. In this work, we develop and evaluate a multilabel, multidimensional deep neural network designed to predict PHQ-4 scores based on individuals written text. Our system outperforms random baseline metrics and provides a novel approach to how we can predict psychometric scores from written text. Additionally, we explore how this architecture can be applied to analyse social media data.

  • 37.
    Derbring, Sandra
    et al.
    DART Centre for AAC and AT, Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nordström, Melissa Barbos
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Svenningsson, Jenny-Ann
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Laakso, Katja
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden,.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ingebrand, Elias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Buchholz, Margret
    DART Centre for AAC and AT, Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Correction: Effects of a digital reminiscing intervention on people with dementia and their care-givers and relatives - CORRIGENDUM (Oct, 10.1017/S0144686X21001446, 2021)2023In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 43, p. 2748-2749Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 38.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Pain Catastrophizing in Older Adults with Chronic Pain: The Mediator Effect of Mood Using a Path Analysis Approach2020In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 9, no 7, article id 2073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive models of pain propose that catastrophic thinking is negatively associated with chronic pain. However, pain catastrophizing is a complex phenomenon requiring a multivariate examination. This study estimates the effects of mood variables (anxiety and depression) on pain catastrophizing in older adults with chronic pain. A postal survey addressing pain aspects was sent to 6611 people &gt;= 65 years old living in south-eastern Sweden. Pain catastrophizing was measured using the pain catastrophizing scale. Anxiety and depression were assessed using two subscales of the general well-being schedule. Data were analysed using a path analysis approach. A total of 2790 respondents (76.2 +/- 7.4 years old) reported chronic pain (&gt;= three months). The mediation model accounted for 16.3% of anxiety, 17.1% of depression, and 30.9% of pain catastrophizing variances. Pain intensity, insomnia, number of comorbidities, and lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, and weight) significantly affected both pain catastrophizing and mood. Anxiety (standardized path coefficient (b(std)) = 0.324,p&lt; 0.001) in comparison to depression (b(std)= 0.125,p&lt; 0.001) had a greater effect on pain catastrophizing. Mood mediated the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain-related factors accounting for lifestyle and sociodemographic factors.

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  • 39.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Association of insomnia severity with well-being, quality of life and health care costs: A cross-sectional study in older adults with chronic pain (PainS65+)2018In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 414-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInsomnia is one of the most common complaints in chronic pain. This study aimed to evaluate the association of insomnia with well-being, quality of life and health care costs. MethodsThe sample included 2790 older individuals (median age=76; interquartile range [IQR]=70-82) with chronic pain. The participants completed a postal survey assessing basic demographic data, pain intensity and frequency, height, weight, comorbidities, general well-being, quality of life and the insomnia severity index (ISI). Data on health care costs were calculated as costs per year (Euro prices) and measured in terms of outpatient and inpatient care, pain drugs, total drugs and total health care costs. ResultsThe overall fraction of clinical insomnia was 24.6% (moderate clinical insomnia: 21.9% [95% CI: 18.8-23.3]; severe clinical insomnia: 2.7% [95% CI: 1.6-3.2]). Persons who reported clinical insomnia were more likely to experience pain more frequently with higher pain intensity compared to those reported no clinically significant insomnia. Mean total health care costs were Euro 8469 (95% CI: Euro4029-Euro14,271) for persons with severe insomnia compared with Euro 4345 (95% CI: Euro4033-Euro4694) for persons with no clinically significant insomnia. An association between severe insomnia, well-being, quality of life, outpatient care, total drugs costs and total health care costs remained after controlling for age, sex, pain intensity, frequency, body mass index and comorbidities using linear regression models. ConclusionsOur results determine an independent association of insomnia with low health-related quality of life and increased health care costs in older adults with chronic pain. SignificanceThe concurrence and the severity of insomnia among older adults with chronic pain were associated with decreased well-being and quality of life, and increased health care costs to society.

  • 40. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Symptom burden among people with chronic disease2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Chronic diseases tend to increase with old age. Older people with chronic disease are commonly suffering from conditions which produce a multiplicity of symptoms and a decreased health-related quality of life. Nurses have a responsibility to prevent, ease or delay a negative outcome through symptom management, or assist in achieving an acceptable level of symptom relief.

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to describe different aspects of symptom burden from the perspective of community-dwelling people with chronic disease.

    Methods: This thesis is based upon four papers that used both quantitative and qualitative data to describe different aspects of symptom burden, experienced by people with chronic diseases. Paper (I) is a cross-sectional study with 91 participants diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Papers (II and IV) are based upon secondary outcome data from a randomized controlled trial with 382 community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity. Paper (II) is a cross-sectional study and Paper (IV) has a descriptive and an explorative design reporting on the trajectory of symptom prevalence and symptom burden. Paper (III) is a qualitative study with participants from the AGe-FIT.

    Results: Among people diagnosed with COPD the most prevalent symptoms with the highest symptom burden scores were shortness of breath, dry mouth, cough, sleep problems, and lack of energy, with just a few differences between participants with moderate and severe airflow limitation (I). For older people with multimorbidity, pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence and burden. Other highly prevalent symptoms were lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score (II). The symptoms experienced by the older people were persistent and the symptom burden remained high over time (IV). The experience of living with a high symptom burden was described as an endless struggle. The analysis revealed an overall theme, “To adjust and endure” and three sub-themes, “to feel inadequate and limited”, “to feel dependent”, and “to feel dejected” (III).

    Conclusions: The results of this thesis indicate the importance of early symptom identification. People with chronic diseases have an unmet need for optimized treatment that focuses on the total symptom burden, and not only disease specific symptoms. A large proportion of older people with multimorbidity suffer a high and persistent symptom burden, and the prevalence and trajectory of pain are high. Older people sometimes think their high age is the reason they experience a diversity of symptoms, and they do not always communicate these to their health-care provider.

    List of papers
    1. Symptom burden in stable COPD patients with moderate or severe airflow limitation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptom burden in stable COPD patients with moderate or severe airflow limitation
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    2014 (English)In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To describe a multidimensional symptom profile in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and determine whether symptom experience differed between patients with moderate or severe airflow limitations.

    BACKGROUND:

    Patients with severe airflow limitation experience numerous symptoms, but little is known regarding patients with moderate airflow limitation.

    METHODS:

    A multidimensional symptom profile (Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale) was assessed in 42 outpatients with moderate and 49 with severe airflow limitations.

    RESULTS:

    The mean number of symptoms in the total sample was 7.9 (±4.3) with no difference between patients with moderate and severe airflow limitations. The most prevalent symptoms with the highest MSAS symptom burden scores were shortness of breath, dry mouth, cough, sleep problems, and lack of energy in both groups.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Patients with moderate or severe airflow limitations experience multiple symptoms with high severity and distress. An assessment of their multidimensional symptom profile might contribute to better symptom management.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; Symptom assessment; Symptom experience; Respiratory nursing
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109384 (URN)10.1016/j.hrtlng.2014.04.004 (DOI)000338972500022 ()24856227 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-08-15 Created: 2014-08-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study
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    2015 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, the population is ageing and lives with several chronic diseases for decades. A high symptom burden is associated with a high use of healthcare, admissions to nursing homes, and reduced quality of life. The aims of this study were to describe the multidimensional symptom profile and symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity, and to describe factors related to symptom burden. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 378 community-dwelling people greater than= 75 years, who had been hospitalized greater than= 3 times during the previous year, had greater than= 3 diagnoses in their medical records. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used to assess the prevalence, frequency, severity, distress and symptom burden of 31 symptoms. A multiple linear regression was performed to identify factors related to total symptom burden. Results: The mean number of symptoms per participant was 8.5 (4.6), and the mean total symptom burden score was 0.62 (0.41). Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence, frequency, severity and distress. Half of the study group reported the prevalence of lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score. Conclusion: The older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity in this study suffered from a high symptom burden with a high prevalence of pain. Persons with poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diseases of the digestive system are at risk of a higher total symptom burden and might need age-specific standardized guidelines for appropriate management.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2015
    Keywords
    Chronic disease; Older people; Symptom assessment
    National Category
    Sociology Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114010 (URN)10.1186/1471-2318-15-1 (DOI)000347569800001 ()25559550 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Faculty of Health sciences, Linkoping University; county council of Ostergotland; Signe and Olof Wallenius trust fund; Solstickan; Swedish Association of Geriatric Medicine; Mundipharma

    Available from: 2015-02-06 Created: 2015-02-05 Last updated: 2024-07-04
    3. To adjust and endure: a qualitative study of symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>To adjust and endure: a qualitative study of symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 322-327Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Context Older people with multimorbidity are vulnerable and often suffer from conditions that produce a multiplicity of symptoms and a reduced health-related quality of life. Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the experience of living with a high symptom burden from the perspective of older community-dwelling people with multi-morbidity.

    Method A qualitative descriptive design with semi-structured interviews, including 20 community-dwelling older people with multi-morbidity and a high symptom burden. The participants were 79-€“89 years old with a mean of 12 symptoms per person. Data were analyzed using content analyses.

    Results The experience of living with a high symptom burden revealed the overall theme, “To adjust and endure” and three sub-themes. The first sub-theme was "To feel inadequate and limited". Participants reported that they no longer had the capacity or the ability to manage, and they felt limited and isolated from friends or family. The second sub-theme was "To feel dependent". This was a new and inconvenient experience; the burden they put on others caused a feeling of guilt. The final sub-theme was "To feel dejected". The strength to manage and control their conditions was gone; the only thing left to do was to sit or lie down and wait for it all to pass.

    Conclusion This study highlights the importance of a holistic approach when taking care of older people with multi-morbidity. This approach should employ a broad symptom assessment to reveal diseases and conditions that are possible to treat or improve.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2015
    Keywords
    Multimorbidity, Older people, Symptom burden, Content analysis
    National Category
    Nursing Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122740 (URN)10.1016/j.apnr.2015.03.008 (DOI)000366148700012 ()
    Available from: 2015-11-19 Created: 2015-11-19 Last updated: 2021-04-12Bibliographically approved
    4. Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, secondary outcome from the RCT AGe-FIT study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, secondary outcome from the RCT AGe-FIT study
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2773-2783Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to follow the symptom trajectory of community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity and to explore the effect on symptom burden from an ambulatory geriatric care unit, based on comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    Background

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity suffer from a high symptom burden with a wide range of co-occurring symptoms often resulting to decreased health-related quality of life. There is a need to move from a single-disease model and address the complexity of older people living with multimorbidity.

    Design

    Secondary outcome data from the randomized controlled Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT).

    Methods

    Symptom trajectory of 31 symptoms was assessed with the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Data from 247 participants were assessments at baseline, 12 and 24 months, 2011–2013. Participants in the intervention group received care from an ambulatory geriatric care unit based on comprehensive geriatric assessment in addition to usual care.

    Results

    Symptom prevalence and symptom burden were high and stayed high over time. Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence and burden. Over the 2-year period 68–81% of the participants reported pain. Other highly prevalent and persistent symptoms were dry mouth, lack of energy and numbness/tingling in the hands/feet, affecting 38–59% of participants. No differences were found between the intervention and control group regarding prevalence, burden or trajectory of symptoms.

    Conclusions

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity had a persistent high burden of symptoms. Receiving advanced interdisciplinary care at an ambulatory geriatric unit did not significantly reduce the prevalence or the burden of symptoms.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2016
    Keywords
    Registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757 Keywords Symptom management, Community Care, Older people, Quality of care
    National Category
    Nursing Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122741 (URN)10.1111/jan.13032 (DOI)000386079500019 ()27222059 (PubMedID)
    Note

    At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

    At the time for thesis presentation publication was named: Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, data from the RCT AGe-FIT study

    Available from: 2015-11-19 Created: 2015-11-19 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
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  • 41.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Theander, Kersti
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Research and Education, Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden; Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Departmentof Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm,Sweden .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, secondary outcome from the RCT AGe-FIT study2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2773-2783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to follow the symptom trajectory of community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity and to explore the effect on symptom burden from an ambulatory geriatric care unit, based on comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    Background

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity suffer from a high symptom burden with a wide range of co-occurring symptoms often resulting to decreased health-related quality of life. There is a need to move from a single-disease model and address the complexity of older people living with multimorbidity.

    Design

    Secondary outcome data from the randomized controlled Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT).

    Methods

    Symptom trajectory of 31 symptoms was assessed with the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Data from 247 participants were assessments at baseline, 12 and 24 months, 2011–2013. Participants in the intervention group received care from an ambulatory geriatric care unit based on comprehensive geriatric assessment in addition to usual care.

    Results

    Symptom prevalence and symptom burden were high and stayed high over time. Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence and burden. Over the 2-year period 68–81% of the participants reported pain. Other highly prevalent and persistent symptoms were dry mouth, lack of energy and numbness/tingling in the hands/feet, affecting 38–59% of participants. No differences were found between the intervention and control group regarding prevalence, burden or trajectory of symptoms.

    Conclusions

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity had a persistent high burden of symptoms. Receiving advanced interdisciplinary care at an ambulatory geriatric unit did not significantly reduce the prevalence or the burden of symptoms.

  • 42.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Iingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    To adjust and endure: a qualitative study of symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity2015In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 322-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context Older people with multimorbidity are vulnerable and often suffer from conditions that produce a multiplicity of symptoms and a reduced health-related quality of life. Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the experience of living with a high symptom burden from the perspective of older community-dwelling people with multi-morbidity.

    Method A qualitative descriptive design with semi-structured interviews, including 20 community-dwelling older people with multi-morbidity and a high symptom burden. The participants were 79-€“89 years old with a mean of 12 symptoms per person. Data were analyzed using content analyses.

    Results The experience of living with a high symptom burden revealed the overall theme, “To adjust and endure” and three sub-themes. The first sub-theme was "To feel inadequate and limited". Participants reported that they no longer had the capacity or the ability to manage, and they felt limited and isolated from friends or family. The second sub-theme was "To feel dependent". This was a new and inconvenient experience; the burden they put on others caused a feeling of guilt. The final sub-theme was "To feel dejected". The strength to manage and control their conditions was gone; the only thing left to do was to sit or lie down and wait for it all to pass.

    Conclusion This study highlights the importance of a holistic approach when taking care of older people with multi-morbidity. This approach should employ a broad symptom assessment to reveal diseases and conditions that are possible to treat or improve.

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    fulltext
  • 43.
    Efthymiou, Areti
    et al.
    Athens Association of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders, Greece.
    Vlachogiann, Aggeliki
    Athens Association of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders, Greece.
    Nika, Aspasia
    Athens Association of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders, Greece.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Poli, Arianna
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Salzmann, Benjamin
    Wir pflegen, Germany.
    Andréasson, Frida
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA), Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA),Sweden.
    Doehner, Hanneli
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Web services for Greek informal carers2015In: Hellenic Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 1790-5427, Vol. 18, no 52, p. 51-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The INNOVAGE project is dedicated to developing, surveying and cataloguing, social innovations for older people. Four new innovations will be developed and tested: a) social innovation for user – driven housing of older people, b) a web-platform for informal carers of older people, c) social intervention for improving obesity in old age, d) social innovation for activation of people with dementia living in long term care institutions. Italian National Institute of Health and Science on Aging (INRCA) (www.inrca.it) and Eurocarers Association (www.eurocarers.org) are the partners responsible for developing and implementing a multilingual web platform for informal carers in 27 EU Member States. An innovAge carers associations network has been established based on the Eurocarers organisations network. National organizations, members of INNOVAGE network, are responsible for developing national information and disseminating the web platform at national level. Athens Association of Alzheimer‘s Disease and Related Disorders is an official member of the INNOVAGE network and participates in the development of the Greek version of the INNOVAGE web platform. The platform will provide to end-users services such as: national information on care and support services, legal and financial information, information about the most common impairments of older people, strategies and information about coping with caregiving. Interactive services, social network, forum, chat, video conferencing tools will be also available. The Greek version of the web platform will be available in May 2015.

  • 44.
    Ekström, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    Ferm, Ulrika
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Digital communication support and Alzheimer’s disease2017In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 711-731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Communication is one of the areas where people with dementia and their caregivers experience most challenges. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of possibilities and pitfalls of using personalized communication applications installed on tablet computers to support communication for people with dementia and their conversational partners. The study is based on video recordings of a woman, 52 years old, with Alzheimer’s disease interacting with her husband in their home. The couple was recorded interacting with and without a tablet computer including a personalized communication application. The results from the present study reveal both significant possibilities and potential difficulties in introducing a digital communication device to people with dementia and their conversational partners. For the woman in the present study, the amount of interactive actions and the number of communicative actions seem to increase with the use of the communication application. The results also indicate that problems associated with dementia are foregrounded in interaction where the tablet computer is used.

  • 45.
    Ekström, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samarbete och delaktighet2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström, Lars-Christer Hydén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, p. 55-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Eriksson, Iréne
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Aronsson, Kerstin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Jönköping University.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University.
    Jonsson, Margareta
    County Council of Jönköping.
    Wärnberg Gerdin, Elisabeth
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    The meaning of oral health-related quality of life for elderly persons with dementia2009In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 212-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Studies of oral health developments increasingly include self-reported assessments of how oral health affects quality of life (QoL), referred to as “oral health-related QoL”. People with dementia are often excluded in studies of oral health-related QoL and thus our aim in this study was to explore this area in elderly persons with dementia. Material and methods. Eighteen elderly individuals (aged between 78 and 94 years) with dementia of varying degrees of severity were interviewed with the aid of an interview guide; pictures and objects were used as stimulus material (triggers). The material was analyzed using grounded theory as point of departure, and a professional assessment of the oral health of the participants was used as reference. Results. Four categories were identified: the ability to chew and eat, independence, oral problems, and teeth are important. These factors are largely consistent with those that have emerged in earlier studies of the elderly, but in some cases less pronounced in persons with dementia. Conclusion. The use of triggers is a positive way to communicate oral health-related QoL among persons suffering from dementia, although the material used in this study needs further evaluation and development.

  • 47.
    Esmaeili, Mahdieh
    et al.
    Univ Social Welf & Rehabil Sci USWR, Iran.
    Nejati, Vahid
    Shahid Beheshti Univ, Iran; Shahid Beheshti Univ, Iran.
    Shati, Mohsen
    Iran Univ Med Sci IUMS, Iran.
    Vatan, Reza Fadaei
    Univ Social Welf & Rehabil Sci USWR, Iran.
    Chehrehnegar, Negin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Foroughan, Mahshid
    Univ Social Welf & Rehabil Sci USWR, Iran.
    Attentional network changes in subjective cognitive decline2022In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 847-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) is known as the intermediate stage between normal cognitive aging and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Although elderly with SCD usually perform close to normal in standardized tests, the detailed function of attention networks in this group has not been studied yet. Aims The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of attention networks, as a possible indicator of cognitive disorder, in older individuals with subjective memory complaint and MCI. Method The attention network test (ANT) was used to examine and compare the performance of three attention networks of alerting, orientation, and executive control in 17 elderly with SCD, 30 multiple domain amnestic MCI subjects, and 15 healthy controls. Results Although the orienting network had almost the same performance in all groups (p = 0.25), the performance of alerting (p = 0.01) and executive control networks (p = 0.02) were significantly different among the three groups: the SCD group performed poorly in both networks compared with the controls and did not differ significantly from the MCI group (p &gt;= 0.05). However, controlling for general age-related slowing abolished the group difference in executive control index. More importantly, our results showed that alerting network that was affected in SCD group had high sensitivity in differentiating this group from controls (0.94%). Conclusion Our data suggest that despite normal performance in neuropsychological tests, the SCD elderly may face significant degrees of attention processing problems, especially in maintaining alerting to external stimuli which might be helpful in diagnosing individuals at risk and designing proper attention-based interventions.

  • 48.
    Fart, Frida
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Tingö, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Engelheart, Stina
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Carl Marten
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Brummer, Robert J.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Schoultz, Ida
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Gut Health and Its Association with Wellbeing and Nutrient Intake in Community-Dwelling Older Adults2022In: Gastroenterology Insights, ISSN 2036-7414, E-ISSN 2036-7422, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 349-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of the increasing number of community-dwelling older adults will need increased healthcare in the future. By characterising gut health and its association with wellbeing and nutrient intake in this population, we aim to recognise areas along the gut-brain axis through which the health of community-dwelling older adults might be promoted. In this cross-sectional observational study, validated questionnaires were used to assess gut health, nutrient intake, and wellbeing in 241 community-dwelling older adults (&gt;= 65 years old). In total, 65% of the participants experienced at least one gastrointestinal symptom, of which females had more abdominal pain and constipation, while the oldest old (i.e., &gt;= 80 years old) had more diarrhoea. Increased gastrointestinal symptoms correlated with more stress, anxiety, depression, and a decreased quality of life, in addition to dyspepsia which correlated with a lower E% of protein. Most of the participants did not reach the recommended intake for protein, fibre and polyunsaturated fats. Males had a lower intake of protein (E%) and fibre (g/MJ) than females, and the oldest old had a lower E% of protein than younger older adults. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that gastrointestinal symptoms are common, and most of the study participants had an imbalanced macronutrient intake, which could be a target for future possible dietary interventions to improve overall health.

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  • 49.
    Fernandez de Gamarra-Oca, L.
    et al.
    Univ Deusto, Spain.
    Kvanta, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Brostrom, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Nosko, D.
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Eklof, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ojeda, N.
    Univ Deusto, Spain.
    Zubiaurre-Elorza, L.
    Univ Deusto, Spain.
    Padilla, N.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ådén, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hippocampal volumes and cognitive performance in children born extremely preterm with and without low-grade intraventricular haemorrhage2023In: Brain Structure and Function, ISSN 1863-2653, E-ISSN 1863-2661, Vol. 228, p. 1191-1200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children born extremely preterm, especially those with intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), are at increased risk of adverse cognitive outcomes during childhood. The present study aimed to explore the effects of IVH (grades I-II) on hippocampal volumes, and their correlates with cognitive performance. The sample consisted of 94 participants, including 54 children born extremely preterm (19 with IVH, grades I-II), and 40 children born at term. All participants underwent a magnetic resonance imaging study at the age of 10 (M-age = 10.20 years; SDage = 0.78), and 74 of them (45 extremely preterm and 29 full-term) carried out a cognitive assessment at 12 years old. Children born extremely preterm had lower scores in cognitive performance compared to their full-term peers. Significant positive partial correlations were observed between global bilateral hippocampus, left CA-field, and left subiculum volumes with processing speed in the full-term group, while no significant correlations were found in the extremely preterm group. Moderation analyses in the extremely preterm sample revealed that low-grade IVH moderated the relationship between right hippocampal volume and full-IQ (F((4,40) = )5.42, p = 0.001, R-2 = 0.35). Having greater right hippocampal volume had a protective effect on full-IQ in those children born extremely preterm with low-grade IVH.

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  • 50.
    Fjalldal, S.
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Follin, C.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Svärd, Daniel
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rylander, L.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gabery, S.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Petersen, A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    van Westen, D.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sundgren, P. C.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bjorkman-Burtscher, I. M.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Latt, J.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Johanson, A.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Erfurth, E. M.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Microstructural white matter alterations and hippocampal volumes are associated with cognitive deficits in craniopharyngioma2018In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 178, no 6, p. 577-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Patients with craniopharyngioma (CP) and hypothalamic lesions (HL) have cognitive deficits. Which neural pathways are affected is unknown. Objective: To determine whether there is a relationship between microstructural white matter (WM) alterations detected with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and cognition in adults with childhood-onset CP. Design: A cross-sectional study with a median follow-up time of 22 (6-49) years after operation. Setting: The South Medical Region of Sweden (2.5 million inhabitants). Participants: Included were 41 patients (24 women, amp;gt;= 17 years) surgically treated for childhood-onset CP between 1958-2010 and 32 controls with similar age and gender distributions. HI was found in 23 patients. Main outcome measures: Subjects performed cognitive tests and magnetic resonance imaging, and images were analyzed using DTI of uncinate fasciculus, fornix, cingulum, hippocampus and hypothalamus as well as hippocampal volumetry. Results: Right uncinate fasciculus was significantly altered (P amp;lt;= 0.01) Microstructural WM alterations in left ventral cingulum were significantly associated with worse performance in visual episodic memory, explaining approximately 50% of the variation. Alterations in dorsal cingulum were associated with worse performance in immediate, delayed recall and recognition, explaining 26-38% of the variation, and with visuospatial ability and executive function, explaining 19-29%. Patients who had smaller hippocampal volume had worse general knowledge (P = 0.028), and microstructural WM alterations in hippocampus were associated with a decline in general knowledge and episodic visual memory. Conclusions: A structure to function relationship is suggested between microstructural WM alterations in cingulum and in hippocampus with cognitive deficits in CP.

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