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  • 1.
    Abarkan, Myriam
    et al.
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Pirog, Antoine
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Mafilaza, Donnie
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Pathak, Gaurav
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. MOC, France.
    NKaoua, Gilles
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Puginier, Emilie
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    OConnor, Rodney
    MOC, France.
    Raoux, Matthieu
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Donahue, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. MOC, France.
    Renaud, Sylvie
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Lang, Jochen
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Vertical Organic Electrochemical Transistors and Electronics for Low Amplitude Micro-Organ Signals2022In: Advanced Science, E-ISSN 2198-3844, Vol. 9, no 8, article id 2105211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical signals are fundamental to key biological events such as brain activity, heartbeat, or vital hormone secretion. Their capture and analysis provide insight into cell or organ physiology and a number of bioelectronic medical devices aim to improve signal acquisition. Organic electrochemical transistors (OECT) have proven their capacity to capture neuronal and cardiac signals with high fidelity and amplification. Vertical PEDOT:PSS-based OECTs (vOECTs) further enhance signal amplification and device density but have not been characterized in biological applications. An electronic board with individually tuneable transistor biases overcomes fabrication induced heterogeneity in device metrics and allows quantitative biological experiments. Careful exploration of vOECT electric parameters defines voltage biases compatible with reliable transistor function in biological experiments and provides useful maximal transconductance values without influencing cellular signal generation or propagation. This permits successful application in monitoring micro-organs of prime importance in diabetes, the endocrine pancreatic islets, which are known for their far smaller signal amplitudes as compared to neurons or heart cells. Moreover, vOECTs capture their single-cell action potentials and multicellular slow potentials reflecting micro-organ organizations as well as their modulation by the physiological stimulator glucose. This opens the possibility to use OECTs in new biomedical fields well beyond their classical applications.

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  • 2.
    Abdollahi Sani, Negar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mirbel, Deborah
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brochon, Cyril
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Cloutet, Eric
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Hadziioannou, Georges
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A ferroelectric polymer introduces addressability in electrophoretic display cells2019In: FLEXIBLE AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS, ISSN 2058-8585, Vol. 4, no 3, article id 035004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades, tremendous efforts have been carried out to develop flexible electronics for a vast array of applications. Among all different applications investigated in this area, flexible displays have gained significant attention, being a vital part of large-area devices, portable systems and electronic labels etc electrophoretic (EP) ink displays have outstanding properties such as a superior optical switch contrast and low power consumption, besides being compatible with flexible electronics. However, the EP ink technology requires an active matrix-addressing scheme to enable exclusive addressing of individual pixels. EP ink pixels cannot be incorporated in low cost and easily manufactured passive matrix circuits due to the lack of threshold voltage and nonlinearity, necessities to provide addressability. Here, we suggest a simple method to introduce nonlinearity and threshold voltage in EP ink display cells in order to make them passively addressable. Our method exploits the nonlinearity of an organic ferroelectric capacitor that introduces passive addressability in display cells. The organic ferroelectric material poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) is here chosen because of its simple manufacturing protocol and good polarizability. We demonstrate that a nonlinear EP cell with bistable states can be produced by depositing a P(VDF-TrFE) film on the bottom electrode of the display cell. The P(VDF-TrFE) capacitor and the EP ink cell are separately characterized in order to match the surface charge at their respective interfaces and to achieve and optimize bistable operation of display pixels.

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  • 3.
    Abdullaeva, Oliya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sahalianov, Ihor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Silverå Ejneby, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jakesova, Marie
    Brno Univ Technol, Czech Republic.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liin, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Glowacki, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Brno Univ Technol, Czech Republic.
    Faradaic Pixels for Precise Hydrogen Peroxide Delivery to Control M-Type Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels2022In: Advanced Science, E-ISSN 2198-3844, Vol. 9, no 3, article id 2103132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    H2O2 plays a significant role in a range of physiological processes where it performs vital tasks in redox signaling. The sensitivity of many biological pathways to H2O2 opens up a unique direction in the development of bioelectronics devices to control levels of reactive-oxygen species (ROS). Here a microfabricated ROS modulation device that relies on controlled faradaic reactions is presented. A concentric pixel arrangement of a peroxide-evolving cathode surrounded by an anode ring which decomposes the peroxide, resulting in localized peroxide delivery is reported. The conducting polymer (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), is exploited as the cathode. PEDOT selectively catalyzes the oxygen reduction reaction resulting in the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Using electrochemical and optical assays, combined with modeling, the performance of the devices is benchmarked. The concentric pixels generate tunable gradients of peroxide and oxygen concentrations. The faradaic devices are prototyped by modulating human H2O2-sensitive Kv7.2/7.3 (M-type) channels expressed in a single-cell model (Xenopus laevis oocytes). The Kv7 ion channel family is responsible for regulating neuronal excitability in the heart, brain, and smooth muscles, making it an ideal platform for faradaic ROS stimulation. The results demonstrate the potential of PEDOT to act as an H2O2 delivery system, paving the way to ROS-based organic bioelectronics.

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  • 4. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Abrahamsson, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Synthetic Functionalities for Ion and Electron Conductive Polymers: Applications in Organic Electronics and Biological Interfaces2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the search for understanding and communicating with all biological systems, in humans, animals, plants, and even microorganisms, we find a common language of all communicating via electrons, ions and molecules. Since the discovery of organic electronics, the ability to bridge the gap and communicate be-tween modern technology and biology has emerged. Organic chemistry pro-vides us with tools for understanding and a material platform of polymer electronics for communication. Such insights give us not only the ability to observe fundamental phenomenon but to actively design and construct materials with chemical functionalities towards better interfaces and applications. Organic electronic materials and devices have found their way to be implemented in the field of medicine for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, but also in water purification and to help tackle the monumental task in creating the next generation of sustainable energy production and storage. Ultimately it’s safe to say that organic electronics are not going to replace our traditional technology based on inorganic materials but rather the two fields can find a way to complement each other for various purposes and applications. Compared to conventional silicon based technology, production of carbon-based organic electronic polymer materials are extremely cheap and devices can even be made flexible and soft with great compatibility towards biology.  

    The main focus of this thesis has been developing and synthesizing new types of organic electronic and ionic conductive polymeric materials. Rational chemical design and modifications of the materials have been utilized to introduce specific functionalities to the materials. The functionalities serving the purpose to facilitate ion and electron conductive charge transport for organic electronics and with biological interface implementation of the polymer materials. 

    Multi-functional ionic conductive hyperbranched polyglycerol polyelectrolytes (dendrolytes) were developed comprising both ionically charged groups and cross-linkable groups. The hyperbranched polyglycerol core structure of the material possesses a hydrophilic solvating platform for both ions and maintenance of solvent molecules, while being a biocompatible structure. Coupled with the peripheral charged ionic functionalities of the polymer, the dendrolyte materials are highly ionic conductive and selective towards cationic and anionic charged atoms and large molecules when implemented as ion-exchange membranes. Homogenous ion-exchange membrane casting has been achieved by the implementation of cross-linkable functionalities in the dendrolytes, utilizing robust click-chemistry for efficient micro and macro fabrication processing of the ion-ex-change membranes for organic electronic devices. The ion-exchange membrane material was implemented in electrophoretic drug delivery devices (organic electronic ion pumps), which are used for delivery of ions and neurotransmitters with spatiotemporal resolution and are able to communicate and be used for therapeutic drug delivery purposes in biological interfaces. The dendrolyte materials were also able to form free-standing membranes, making it possible for implementation in fuel cell and desalination purposes. 

    Trimeric conjugated thiophene pre-polymer structures were also developed in the thesis and synthesized for the purpose of implementation of the material in vivo to form electrically conductive polymer structures, and in such manner to be able to create electrodes and ultimately to connect with the central nervous system. The conjugated pre-polymers being both water soluble and enzymatically polymerizable serve as a platform to realize such a concept. Also, modifying the trimeric structure with cross-linkable functionality created the capability to form better interfaces and stability towards biological environments.   

    List of papers
    1. Formation of Monolithic Ion-Selective Transport Media Based on "Click" Cross-Linked Hyperbranched Polyglycerol
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Formation of Monolithic Ion-Selective Transport Media Based on "Click" Cross-Linked Hyperbranched Polyglycerol
    Show others...
    2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Chemistry, E-ISSN 2296-2646, Vol. 7, article id 484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the emerging field of organic bioelectronics, conducting polymers and ion-selective membranes are combined to form resistors, diodes, transistors, and circuits that transport and process both electronic and ionic signals. Such bioelectronics concepts have been explored in delivery devices that translate electronic addressing signals into the transport and dispensing of small charged biomolecules at high specificity and spatiotemporal resolution. Manufacturing such "iontronic" devices generally involves classical thin film processing of polyelectrolyte layers and insulators followed by application of electrolytes. This approach makes miniaturization and integration difficult, simply because the ion selective polyelectrolytes swell after completing the manufacturing. To advance such bioelectronics/iontronics and to enable applications where relatively larger molecules can be delivered, it is important to develop a versatile material system in which the charge/size selectivity can be easily tailormade at the same time enabling easy manufacturing of complex and miniaturized structures. Here, we report a one-pot synthesis approach with minimal amount of organic solvent to achieve cationic hyperbranched polyglycerol films for iontronics applications. The hyperbranched structure allows for tunable pre multi-functionalization, which combines available unsaturated groups used in crosslinking along with ionic groups for electrolytic properties, to achieve a one-step process when applied in devices for monolithic membrane gel formation with selective electrophoretic transport of molecules.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2019
    Keywords
    hyperbranched polyglycerol; polyelectrolyte; multi-functionalization; thiol-ene; cross-linking; ion-selective; electrophoretic transport
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159146 (URN)10.3389/fchem.2019.00484 (DOI)000474717900001 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Advanced Functional Materials at Linkoping University; Onnesjo Foundation; Knut and AliceWallenberg Foundation

    Available from: 2019-07-30 Created: 2019-07-30 Last updated: 2024-01-10
    2. Capillary-Fiber Based Electrophoretic Delivery Device
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Capillary-Fiber Based Electrophoretic Delivery Device
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    2019 (English)In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 11, no 15, p. 14200-14207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Organic electronic ion pumps (OEIPs) are versatile tools for electrophoretic delivery of substances with high spatiotemporal resolution. To date, OEIPs and similar iontronic components have been fabricated using thin-film techniques and often rely on laborious, multistep photolithographic processes. OEIPs have been demonstrated in a variety of in vitro and in vivo settings for controlling biological systems, but the thin-film form factor and limited repertoire of polyelectrolyte materials and device fabrication techniques unnecessarily constrain the possibilities for miniaturization and extremely localized substance delivery, e.g., the greater range of pharmaceutical compounds, on the scale of a single cell. Here, we demonstrate an entirely new OEIP form factor based on capillary fibers that include hyperbranched polyglycerols (dPGs) as the selective electrophoretic membrane. The dPGs enable electrophoretic channels with a high concentration of fixed charges and well-controlled cross-linking and can be realized using a simple one-pot fluidic manufacturing protocol. Selective electrophoretic transport of cations and anions of various sizes is demonstrated, including large substances that are difficult to transport with other OEIP technologies. We present a method for tailoring and characterizing the electrophoretic channels fixed charge concentration in the operational state. Subsequently, we compare the experimental performance of these capillary OEIPs to a computational model and explain unexpected features in the ionic current for the transport and delivery of larger, lower-mobility ionic compounds. From this model, we are able to elucidate several operational and design principles relevant to miniaturized electrophoretic drug delivery technologies in general. Overall, the compactness of the capillary OEIP enables electrophoretic delivery devices with probelike geometries, suitable for a variety of ionic compounds, paving the way for less-invasive implantation into biological systems and for healthcare applications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2019
    Keywords
    electrophoresis; polyelectrolyte; iontronics; hyperbranched polymer; bioelectronics; substance delivery
    National Category
    Other Physics Topics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157207 (URN)10.1021/acsami.8b022680 (DOI)000465189000042 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Advanced Functional Materials at Linkoping University (Faculty Grant SFO-Mat-LiU) [2009-00971]; Onnesjo Foundation; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation

    Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2024-01-10
    3. Investigating the role of polymer size on ionic conductivity in free-standing hyperbranched polyelectrolyte membranes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating the role of polymer size on ionic conductivity in free-standing hyperbranched polyelectrolyte membranes
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    2021 (English)In: Polymer, ISSN 0032-3861, E-ISSN 1873-2291, Vol. 223, article id 123664Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer-based ion exchange membranes (IEMs) are utilized for many applications such as in water desalination, energy storage, fuel cells and in electrophoretic drug delivery devices, exemplified by the organic electronic ion pump (OEIP). The bulk of current research is primarily focused on finding highly conductive and stable IEM materials. Even though great progress has been made, a lack of fundamental understanding of how specific polymer properties affect ionic transport capabilities still remains. This leads to uncertainty in how to proceed with synthetic approaches for designing better IEM materials. In this study, an investigation of the structure-property relationship between polymer size and ionic conductivity was performed by comparing a series of membranes, based on ionically charged hyperbranched polyglycerol of different polymer sizes. Observing an increase in ionic conductivity associated with increasing polymer size and greater electrolyte exclusion, indi-cating an ionic transportation phenomenon not exclusively based on membrane electrolyte uptake. These findings further our understanding of ion transport phenomena in semi-permeable membranes and indicate a strong starting point for future design and synthesis of IEM polymers to achieve broader capabilities for a variety of ion transport-based applications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2021
    Keywords
    Ion-exchange membrane; Polymer size dependant ionic conductivity; Hyperbranched polyelectrolyte; Multi-functionalization; Click cross-linking
    National Category
    Polymer Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-175830 (URN)10.1016/j.polymer.2021.123664 (DOI)000643930300006 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swiss Society for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, SSB + RM; Swedish Foundation for Strategic ResearchSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research; Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research CouncilEuropean Commission; European UnionEuropean Commission [834677]

    Available from: 2021-05-26 Created: 2021-05-26 Last updated: 2023-12-28
    4. Seamless integration of bioelectronic interface in an animal model via in vivo polymerization of conjugated oligomers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seamless integration of bioelectronic interface in an animal model via in vivo polymerization of conjugated oligomers
    Show others...
    2022 (English)In: Bioactive Materials, ISSN 2452-199X, Vol. 10, p. 107-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Leveraging the biocatalytic machinery of living organisms for fabricating functional bioelectronic interfaces, in vivo, defines a new class of micro-biohybrids enabling the seamless integration of technology with living biological systems. Previously, we have demonstrated the in vivo polymerization of conjugated oligomers forming conductors within the structures of plants. Here, we expand this concept by reporting that Hydra, an invertebrate animal, polymerizes the conjugated oligomer ETE-S both within cells that expresses peroxidase activity and within the adhesive material that is secreted to promote underwater surface adhesion. The resulting conjugated polymer forms electronically conducting and electrochemically active μm-sized domains, which are inter-connected resulting in percolative conduction pathways extending beyond 100 μm, that are fully integrated within the Hydra tissue and the secreted mucus. Furthermore, the introduction and in vivo polymerization of ETE-S can be used as a biochemical marker to follow the dynamics of Hydra budding (reproduction) and regeneration. This work paves the way for well-defined self-organized electronics in animal tissue to modulate biological functions and in vivo biofabrication of hybrid functional materials and devices.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2022
    Keywords
    polymerization, Bioelectronics interfaces, Conjugated oligomers, Model organism
    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-181716 (URN)10.1016/j.bioactmat.2021.08.025 (DOI)000743377900002 ()34901533 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: European Unions Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme [800926]; Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research CouncilEuropean Commission [VR-2017-04910]; Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationKnut & Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF)Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research; European Research Council (ERC)European Research Council (ERC)European Commission [834677]; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Advanced Functional Materials at Linkoping University (Faculty Grant SFO-Mat-LiU) [2009-00971]; MultiPark - A Strategic Research Area at Lund University; MIURMinistry of Education, Universities and Research (MIUR) [SHARID - ARS01-01270]

    Available from: 2021-12-07 Created: 2021-12-07 Last updated: 2022-10-12Bibliographically approved
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  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Poxson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sandberg, Mats
    RISE Acreo AB, Sweden.
    Simon, Daniel T
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Formation of Monolithic Ion-Selective Transport Media Based on "Click" Cross-Linked Hyperbranched Polyglycerol2019In: Frontiers in Chemistry, E-ISSN 2296-2646, Vol. 7, article id 484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the emerging field of organic bioelectronics, conducting polymers and ion-selective membranes are combined to form resistors, diodes, transistors, and circuits that transport and process both electronic and ionic signals. Such bioelectronics concepts have been explored in delivery devices that translate electronic addressing signals into the transport and dispensing of small charged biomolecules at high specificity and spatiotemporal resolution. Manufacturing such "iontronic" devices generally involves classical thin film processing of polyelectrolyte layers and insulators followed by application of electrolytes. This approach makes miniaturization and integration difficult, simply because the ion selective polyelectrolytes swell after completing the manufacturing. To advance such bioelectronics/iontronics and to enable applications where relatively larger molecules can be delivered, it is important to develop a versatile material system in which the charge/size selectivity can be easily tailormade at the same time enabling easy manufacturing of complex and miniaturized structures. Here, we report a one-pot synthesis approach with minimal amount of organic solvent to achieve cationic hyperbranched polyglycerol films for iontronics applications. The hyperbranched structure allows for tunable pre multi-functionalization, which combines available unsaturated groups used in crosslinking along with ionic groups for electrolytic properties, to achieve a one-step process when applied in devices for monolithic membrane gel formation with selective electrophoretic transport of molecules.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Seitanidou, Maria S
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Roy, Arghyamalya
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petsagkourakis, Ioannis
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Moro, Nathalie
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Empa, Switzerland.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Investigating the role of polymer size on ionic conductivity in free-standing hyperbranched polyelectrolyte membranes2021In: Polymer, ISSN 0032-3861, E-ISSN 1873-2291, Vol. 223, article id 123664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer-based ion exchange membranes (IEMs) are utilized for many applications such as in water desalination, energy storage, fuel cells and in electrophoretic drug delivery devices, exemplified by the organic electronic ion pump (OEIP). The bulk of current research is primarily focused on finding highly conductive and stable IEM materials. Even though great progress has been made, a lack of fundamental understanding of how specific polymer properties affect ionic transport capabilities still remains. This leads to uncertainty in how to proceed with synthetic approaches for designing better IEM materials. In this study, an investigation of the structure-property relationship between polymer size and ionic conductivity was performed by comparing a series of membranes, based on ionically charged hyperbranched polyglycerol of different polymer sizes. Observing an increase in ionic conductivity associated with increasing polymer size and greater electrolyte exclusion, indi-cating an ionic transportation phenomenon not exclusively based on membrane electrolyte uptake. These findings further our understanding of ion transport phenomena in semi-permeable membranes and indicate a strong starting point for future design and synthesis of IEM polymers to achieve broader capabilities for a variety of ion transport-based applications.

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 7.
    Adam, Rania Elhadi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alnoor, Hatim
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics.
    Synthesis of Mg-doped ZnO NPs via a chemical low-temperature method and investigation of the efficient photocatalytic activity for the degradation of dyes under solar light2020In: Solid State Sciences, ISSN 1293-2558, E-ISSN 1873-3085, Vol. 99, article id 106053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Doped semiconductors nanostructures (NSs) have shown great interest as a potential for green and efficient photocatalysis activities. Magnesium (Mg)-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) has been synthesized by a one-step chemical low temperature (60 °C) co-precipitation method without further calcination and their photocatalytic performance for photodegradation of Methylene blue (MB) dye under the illumination of solar light is investigated. The crystal structure of the synthesized NPs is examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD data indicates a slight shift towards higher 2θ angle in Mg-doped samples as compared to the pure ZnO NPs which suggest the incorporation of Mg2+ into ZnO crystal lattice. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–Vis spectrophotometer and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy, were used to study electronics, and optical properties, respectively. The XPS analysis confirms the substitution of the Zn2+ by the Mg2+ into the ZnO crystal lattice in agreement with the XRD data. The photocatalytic activities showed a significant enhancement of the Mg-doped ZnO NPs in comparison with pure ZnO NPs. Hole/radical scavengers were used to reveal the mechanism of the photodegradation. It was found that the addition of the Mg to the ZnO lattices increases the absorption of the hydroxyl ions at the surface of the NPs and hence acts as a trap site leading to decrease the electron-hole pair and consequently enhancing the photodegradation.

  • 8.
    Adranno, Brando
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Renier, Olivier
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Bousrez, Guillaume
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Paterlini, Veronica
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Baryshnikov, Glib
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Smetana, Volodymyr
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Tang, Shi
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    agren, Hans
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Metlen, Andreas
    Queens Univ Belfast, North Ireland.
    Edman, Ludvig
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Anja-Verena, Mudring
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Rogers, Robin D.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Queens Univ Belfast, North Ireland; Univ Alabama, AL 35487 USA.
    The 8-Hydroxyquinolinium Cation as a Lead Structure for Efficient Color-Tunable Ionic Small Molecule Emitting Materials2023In: ADVANCED PHOTONICS RESEARCH, ISSN 2699-9293, Vol. 4, no 3, article id 2200279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Albeit tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum (Alq(3)) and its derivatives are prominent emitter materials for organic lighting devices, and the optical transitions occur among ligand-centered states, the use of metal-free 8-hydroxyquinoline is impractical as it suffers from strong nonradiative quenching, mainly through fast proton transfer. Herein, it is shown that the problem of rapid proton exchange and vibration quenching of light emission can be overcome not only by complexation, but also by organization of the 8-hydroxyquinolinium cations into a solid rigid network with appropriate counter-anions (here bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide). The resulting structure is stiffened by secondary bonding interactions such as pi-stacking and hydrogen bonds, which efficiently block rapid proton transfer quenching and reduce vibrational deactivation. Additionally, the optical properties are tuned through methyl substitution from deep blue (455 nm) to blue-green (488 nm). Time-dependent density functional theory (TDFT) calculations reveal the emission to occur from which an unexpectedly long-lived S-1 level, unusual for organic fluorophores. All compounds show comparable, even superior photoluminescence compared to Alq(3) and related materials, both as solids and thin films with quantum yields (QYs) up to 40-50%. In addition, all compounds show appreciable thermal stability with decomposition temperatures above 310 degrees C.

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  • 9.
    Ahmed, Fareed
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ding, Penghui
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ail, Ujwala
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Warczak, Magdalena
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Grimoldi, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Håkansson, Karl M. O.
    RISE Bioeconomy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gueskine, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Manufacturing Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene) Electrocatalytic Sheets for Large-Scale H2O2 Production2022In: Advanced Sustainable Systems, E-ISSN 2366-7486, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 2100316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Producing thick films of conducting polymers by a low-cost manufacturing technique would enable new applications. However, removing huge solvent volume from diluted suspension or dispersion (1-3 wt%) in which conducting polymers are typically obtained is a true manufacturing challenge. In this work, a procedure is proposed to quickly remove water from the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) suspension. The PEDOT:PSS suspension is first flocculated with 1 m H2SO4 transforming PEDOT nanoparticles (approximate to 50-500 nm) into soft microparticles. A filtration process inspired by pulp dewatering in a paper machine on a wire mesh with apertures dimension between 60 mu m and 0.5 mm leads to thick free-standing films (approximate to 0.5 mm). Wire mesh clogging that hinders dewatering (known as dead-end filtration) is overcome by adding to the flocculated PEDOT: PSS dispersion carbon fibers that aggregate and form efficient water channels. Moreover, this enables fast formation of thick layers under simple atmospheric pressure filtration, thus making the process truly scalable. Thick freestanding PEDOT films thus obtained are used as electrocatalysts for efficient reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide, a promising green chemical and fuel. The inhomogeneity of the films does not affect their electrochemical function.

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  • 10.
    Ail, Ujwala
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Backe, Jakob
    Ligna Energy AB, Kallvindsgatan 5, S-60240 Norrkoping, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lignin Functionalized with Catechol for Large-Scale Organic Electrodes in Bio-Based Batteries2023In: ADVANCED ENERGY AND SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH, ISSN 2699-9412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin, obtained as a waste product in huge quantities from the large-scale cellulose processing industries, holds a great potential to be used as sustainable electrode material for large-scale electroactive energy storage systems. The fixed number of redox-active phenolic groups present within the lignin structure limits the electrochemical performance and the total energy storage capacity of the lignin-based electrodes. Herein, the way to enhance the charge storage capacity of lignin by incorporating additional small catechol molecules into the lignin structure is demonstrated. The catechol derivatives are covalently attached to the lignin via aromatic electrophilic substitution reaction. The increased phenolic groups in all functionalized lignin derivatives notably increase the values of capacitance compared to pristine lignin. Further, solvent fractionation of lignin followed by functionalization using catechol boosts three times the charge capacity of lignin electrode. Herein, a scalable, cost-effective method to enhance the electrochemical performance of lignin electrodes via incorporation of small redox active moieties into the lignin structure is demonstrated. Solvent fractionation of lignin followed by functionalization using catechol increases the charge storage capacity of the lignin-carbon composite electrode by a factor of 3 reaching record high charge capacity above 100 mAh g-1.

  • 11.
    Ail, Ujwala
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Jakob
    Ligna Energy AB, Sweden.
    Jansson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Buyanova, Irina A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wu, Zhixing
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Björk, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Optimization of Non-Pyrolyzed Lignin Electrodes for Sustainable Batteries2023In: ADVANCED SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS, ISSN 2366-7486, Vol. 7, no 2, article id 2200396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin, a byproduct from the pulp industry, is one of the redox active biopolymers being investigated as a component in the electrodes for sustainable energy storage applications. Due to its insulating nature, it needs to be combined with a conductor such as carbon or conducting polymer for efficient charge storage. Here, the lignin/carbon composite electrodes manufactured via mechanical milling (ball milling) are reported. The composite formation, correlation between performance and morphology is studied by comparison with manual mixing and jet milling. Superior charge storage capacity with approximate to 70% of the total contribution from the Faradaic process involving the redox functionality of lignin is observed in a mechanically milled composite. In comparison, manual mix shows only approximate to 30% from the lignin storage participation while the rest is due to the electric double layer at the carbon-electrolyte interface. The significant participation of lignin in the ball milled composite is attributed to the homogeneous, intimate mixing of the carbon and the lignin leading the electronic carrier transported in the carbon phase to reach most of the redox group of lignin. A maximum capacity of 49 mAh g(-1) is obtained at charge/discharge rate of 0.25 A g(-1) for the sample milled for 60 min.

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  • 12.
    Ail, Ujwala
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Jakob
    Ligna Energy AB, Sweden.
    Khan, Zia
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effect of Sulfonation Level on Lignin/Carbon Composite Electrodes for Large-Scale Organic Batteries2020In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 8, no 49, p. 17933-17944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The key figure-of-merit for materials in stationary energy storage applications, such as large-scale energy storage for buildings and grids, is the cost per kilo per electrochemical cycle, rather than the energy density. In this regard, forest-based biopolymers such as lignin, are attractive, as they are abundant on Earth. Here, we explored lignin as an electroactive battery material, able to store two electrons per hydroquinone aromatic ring, with the targeted operation in aqueous electrolytes. The impact of the sulfonation level of lignin on the performance of its composite electrode with carbon was investigated by considering three lignin derivatives: lignosulfonate (LS), partially desulfonated lignosulfonate (DSLS), and fully desulfonated lignin (KL, lignin produced by the kraft process). Partial desulfonation helped in better stability of the composite in aqueous media, simultaneously favoring its water processability. In this way, a route to promote ionic conductivity within the lignin/carbon composite electrodes was developed, facilitating the access to the entire bulk of the volumetric electrodes. Electrochemical performance of DSLS/C showed highly dominant Faradaic contribution (66%) towards the total capacity, indicating an efficient mixed ionic-electronic transport within the lignin-carbon phase, displaying a capacity of 38 mAh/g at 0.25 A/g and 69% of capacity retention after 2200 cycles at a rate of 1 A/g.

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  • 13.
    Ait-Mammar, Walid
    et al.
    Univ Paris Diderot, France.
    Zrig, Samia
    Univ Paris Diderot, France.
    Bridonneau, Nathalie
    Univ Paris Diderot, France.
    Noel, Vincent
    Univ Paris Diderot, France.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Piro, Benoit
    Univ Paris Diderot, France.
    Mattana, Giorgio
    Univ Paris Diderot, France.
    All-Inkjet-Printed Humidity Sensors for the Detection of Relative Humidity in Air and Soil-Towards the Direct Fabrication on Plant Leaves2020In: MRS Advances, E-ISSN 2059-8521, Vol. 5, no 18-19, p. 965-973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate the fabrication, by exclusive means of inkjet-printing, of capacitive relative humidity sensors on flexible, plastic substrate. These sensors can be successfully used for the measurement of relative-humidity in both air and common soil. We also show that the same technique may be used for the fabrication of the same type of sensors on the surface of the leaves of El AE gnus Ebbingei (silverberry).Our results demonstrate the suitability of leaves as substrate for printed electronics and pave the way to the next generation of sensors to be used in fields such as agriculture and flower farming.

  • 14.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khan, Ziyauddin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Riera-Galindo, Sergi
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lienemann, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petsagkourakis, Ioannis
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Braun, Slawomir
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Doped Conjugated Polymer Enclosing a Redox Polymer: Wiring Polyquinones with Poly(3,4‐Ethylenedioxythiophene)2020In: Advanced Energy and Sustainability Research, E-ISSN 2699-9412, Vol. 1, no 2, article id 2000027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mass implementation of renewable energies is limited by the absence of efficient and affordable technology to store electrical energy. Thus, the development of new materials is needed to improve the performance of actual devices such as batteries or supercapacitors. Herein, the facile consecutive chemically oxidative polymerization of poly(1-amino-5-chloroanthraquinone) (PACA) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT) resulting in a water dispersible material PACA-PEDOT is shown. The water-based slurry made of PACA-PEDOT nanoparticles can be processed as film coated in ambient atmosphere, a critical feature for scaling up the electrode manufacturing. The novel redox polymer electrode is a nanocomposite that withstands rapid charging (16 A g−1) and delivers high power (5000 W kg−1). At lower current density its storage capacity is high (198 mAh g−1) and displays improved cycling stability (60% after 5000 cycles). Its great electrochemical performance results from the combination of the redox reversibility of the quinone groups in PACA that allows a high amount of charge storage via Faradaic reactions and the high electronic conductivity of PEDOT to access to the redox-active sites. These promising results demonstrate the potential of PACA-PEDOT to make easily organic electrodes from a water-coating process, without toxic metals, and operating in non-flammable aqueous electrolyte for large scale pseudocapacitors. 

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  • 15.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mecerreyes, David
    Univ Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Enhancing Energy Storage Devices with Biomacromolecules in Hybrid Electrodes2019In: Biotechnology Journal, ISSN 1860-6768, E-ISSN 1860-7314, Vol. 14, no 12, article id 1900062Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of energy storage devices with higher energy and power outputs, and long cycling stability is urgently required in the pursuit of the expanding challenges of electrical energy storage. The utilization of biologically renewable redox compounds holds a great potential in designing sustainable energy storage systems and contributes in reducing the dependence on fossil fuels for energy materials. Quinones are the principal redox centers in natural organic materials and play a key role as charge storage electrode materials because of their abundance, multiple forms and integration into the materials flow through the biosphere. Electrical energy storage devices and systems can be significantly improved by the combination of scalable quinone-based biomaterials with good electronic conductors. This review uses recent examples to show how biopolymers are providing new directions in the development of renewable biohybrid electrodes for energy storage devices.

  • 16.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rebis, Tomasz
    Poznan Univ Tech, Poland.
    Ever Aguirre, Luis
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Scalable Asymmetric Supercapacitors Based on Hybrid Organic/Biopolymer Electrodes2017In: ADVANCED SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS, ISSN 2366-7486, Vol. 1, no 8, article id 1700054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A trihybrid bioelectrode composed of lignin, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), and poly(aminoanthraquinone) (PAAQ) is prepared by a two-step galvanostatic electropolymerization, and characterized for supercapacitor applications. Using PEDOT/Lignin as a base layer, followed by the consecutive deposition of PAAQ, the hybrid electrode PEDOT/Lignin/PAAQ shows a high specific capacitance of 418 F g(-1) with small self-discharge. This trihybrid electrode material can be assembled into symmetric and asymmetric super-capacitors. The asymmetric supercapacitor uses PEDOT + Lignin/PAAQ as positive electrode and PEDOT/PAAQ as negative electrode, and exhibits superior electrochemical performance due to the synergistic effect of the two electrodes, which leads to a specific capacitance of 74 F g(-1). It can be reversibly cycled in the voltage range of 0-0.7 V. More than 80% capacitance is retained after 10 000 cycles. These remarkable features reveal the exciting potential of a full organic energy storage device with long cycle life.

  • 17.
    Alkarsifi, Riva
    et al.
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Avalos-Quiroz, Yatzil Alejandra
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Perkhun, Pavlo
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bharwal, Anil Kumar
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Ruiz, Carmen M.
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Duche, David
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Simon, Jean-Jacques
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Videlot-Ackermann, Christine
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Margeat, Olivier
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Ackermann, Joerg
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Organic-inorganic doped nickel oxide nanocrystals for hole transport layers in inverted polymer solar cells with color tuning2021In: Materials Chemistry Frontiers, E-ISSN 2052-1537, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 418-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer solar cells using non-fullerene acceptors are nowadays amongst the most promising approaches for next generation photovoltaic applications. However, there are still remaining challenges related to large-scale fully solution-processing of high efficiency solar cells as high efficiencies are obtained only for very small areas using hole transport layers based on evaporated molybdenum oxide. Solution-processable hole transport materials compatible with non-fullerene acceptor materials are still scarce and thus considered as one of the major challenges nowadays. In this work, we present copper-doped nickel oxide nanocrystals that form highly stable inks in alcohol-based solutions. This allows processing of efficient hole transport layers in both regular and inverted device structures of polymer solar cells. As the initial work function of these ionic doped materials is too low for efficient hole extraction, doping the nanocrystals with an organic electron acceptor, namely 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquino dimethane (F4-TCNQ), was additionally applied to make the work function more suitable for hole extraction. The resulting hybrid hole transport layers were first studied in polymer solar cells based on fullerene acceptors using regular device structures yielding 7.4% efficiency identical to that of reference cells based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS). For inverted device structures, the hybrid hole transport layers were processed on top of blends based on the non-fullerene acceptor IT-4F and PBDB-T-2F donor. The corresponding solar cells showed promising efficiencies up to 7.9% while the reference devices using PEDOT:PSS showed inferior performances. We further show that the hybrid hole transport layer can be used to tune the color of the polymer solar cells using optical spacer effects.

  • 18.
    Alsufyani, Maryam
    et al.
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia.
    Hallani, Rawad K.
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia.
    Wang, Suhao
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Xiao, Mingfei
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Ji, Xudong
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Paulsen, Bryan D.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Xu, Kai
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bristow, Helen
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Chen, Hu
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia.
    Chen, Xingxing
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia.
    Sirringhaus, Henning
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia.
    Rivnay, Jonathan
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    McCulloch, Iain
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia; Univ Oxford, England.
    The effect of aromatic ring size in electron deficient semiconducting polymers for n-type organic thermoelectrics2020In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 8, no 43, p. 15150-15157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    N-type semiconducting polymers have been recently utilized in thermoelectric devices, however they have typically exhibited low electrical conductivities and poor device stability, in contrast to p-type semiconductors, which have been much higher performing. This is due in particular to the n-type semiconductors low doping efficiency, and poor charge carrier mobility. Strategies to enhance the thermoelectric performance of n-type materials include optimizing the electron affinity (EA) with respect to the dopant to improve the doping process and increasing the charge carrier mobility through enhanced molecular packing. Here, we report the design, synthesis and characterization of fused electron-deficient n-type copolymers incorporating the electron withdrawing lactone unit along the backbone. The polymers were synthesized using metal-free aldol condensation conditions to explore the effect of enlarging the central phenyl ring to a naphthalene ring, on the electrical conductivity. When n-doped with N-DMBI, electrical conductivities of up to 0.28 S cm(-1), Seebeck coefficients of -75 mu V K-1 and maximum Power factors of 0.16 mu W m(-1) K-2 were observed from the polymer with the largest electron affinity of -4.68 eV. Extending the aromatic ring reduced the electron affinity, due to reducing the density of electron withdrawing groups and subsequently the electrical conductivity reduced by almost two orders of magnitude.

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  • 19.
    Alsufyani, Maryam
    et al.
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Stoeckel, Marc-Antoine
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Xingxing
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia.
    Thorley, Karl
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40506 USA.
    Hallani, Rawad K.
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia.
    Puttisong, Yuttapoom
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ji, Xudong
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Meli, Dilara
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Paulsen, Bryan D.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Strzalka, Joseph
    Argonne Natl Lab, IL 60439 USA.
    Regeta, Khrystyna
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia.
    Combe, Craig
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia.
    Chen, Hu
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia.
    Tian, Junfu
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Rivnay, Jonathan
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA; Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    McCulloch, Iain
    Univ Oxford, England; King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol KAUST, Saudi Arabia.
    Lactone Backbone Density in Rigid Electron-Deficient Semiconducting Polymers Enabling High n-type Organic Thermoelectric Performance2022In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 61, no 7, article id e202113078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three lactone-based rigid semiconducting polymers were designed to overcome major limitations in the development of n-type organic thermoelectrics, namely electrical conductivity and air stability. Experimental and theoretical investigations demonstrated that increasing the lactone group density by increasing the benzene content from 0 % benzene (P-0), to 50 % (P-50), and 75 % (P-75) resulted in progressively larger electron affinities (up to 4.37 eV), suggesting a more favorable doping process, when employing (N-DMBI) as the dopant. Larger polaron delocalization was also evident, due to the more planarized conformation, which is proposed to lead to a lower hopping energy barrier. As a consequence, the electrical conductivity increased by three orders of magnitude, to achieve values of up to 12 S cm and Power factors of 13.2 mu Wm(-1) K-2 were thereby enabled. These findings present new insights into material design guidelines for the future development of air stable n-type organic thermoelectrics.

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  • 20.
    Alvi, Naveed Ul Hassan
    et al.
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Norrkoping, Sweden.
    Sepat, Neha
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sardar, Samim
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Ist Italiano Tecnol IIT, Italy.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Toward Photoactive Wallpapers Based on ZnO-Cellulose Nanocomposites2023In: Global Challenges, E-ISSN 2056-6646, Vol. 7, article id 2300034Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quest for eco-friendly materials with anticipated positive impact for sustainability is crucial to achieve the UN sustainable development goals. Classical strategies of composite materials can be applied on novel nanomaterials and green materials. Besides the actual technology and applications also processing and manufacturing methods should be further advanced to make entire technology concepts sustainable. Here, they show an efficient way to combine two low-cost materials, cellulose and zinc oxide (ZnO), to achieve novel functional and "green" materials via paper-making processes. While cellulose is the most abundant and cost-effective organic material extractable from nature. ZnO is cheap and known of its photocatalytic, antibacterial, and UV absorption properties. ZnO nanowires are grown directly onto cellulose fibers in water solutions and then dewatered in a process mimicking existing steps of large-scale papermaking technology. The ZnO NW paper exhibits excellent photo-conducting properties under simulated sunlight with good ON/OFF switching and long-term stability (90 minutes). It also acts as an efficient photocatalyst for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation (5.7 x 10(-9) m s(-1)) with an envision the possibility of using it in buildings to enable large surfaces to spontaneously produce H2O2 at its outer surface. Such technology promise for fast degradation of microorganisms to suppress the spreading of diseases.

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  • 21.
    Andersson, Ake
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Yatsyna, Vasyl
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Rijs, Anouk
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Zhaunerchyk, Vitali
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Indication of 310-Helix Structure in Gas-Phase Neutral Pentaalanine2023In: Journal of Physical Chemistry A, ISSN 1089-5639, E-ISSN 1520-5215, Vol. 127, no 4, p. 938-945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the gas-phase structure of the neutral pentaalanine peptide. The IR spectrum in the 340-1820 cm-1 frequency range is obtained by employing supersonic jet cooling, infrared multiphoton dissociation, and vacuum-ultraviolet action spectroscopy. Comparison with quantum chemical spectral calculations suggests that the molecule assumes multiple stable conformations, mainly of two structure types. In the most stable conformation theoretically found, the N-terminus forms a C5 ring and the backbone resembles that of an 310-helix with two beta-turns. Additionally, the conformational preferences of pentaalanine have been evaluated using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, showing that a nonzero simulation time step causes a systematic frequency shift.

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  • 22.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    et al.
    RISE Acreo, Sweden.
    Lassnig, Roman
    RISE Acreo, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Jan
    RISE Acreo, Sweden.
    Tu, Deyu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Keshmiri, Vahid
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Forchheimer, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gustafsson, Goran
    RISE Acreo, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    All-printed large-scale integrated circuits based on organic electrochemical transistors2019In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 5053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The communication outposts of the emerging Internet of Things are embodied by ordinary items, which desirably include all-printed flexible sensors, actuators, displays and akin organic electronic interface devices in combination with silicon-based digital signal processing and communication technologies. However, hybrid integration of smart electronic labels is partly hampered due to a lack of technology that (de)multiplex signals between silicon chips and printed electronic devices. Here, we report all-printed 4-to-7 decoders and seven-bit shift registers, including over 100 organic electrochemical transistors each, thus minimizing the number of terminals required to drive monolithically integrated all-printed electrochromic displays. These relatively advanced circuits are enabled by a reduction of the transistor footprint, an effort which includes several further developments of materials and screen printing processes. Our findings demonstrate that digital circuits based on organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) provide a unique bridge between all-printed organic electronics (OEs) and low-cost silicon chip technology for Internet of Things applications.

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  • 23.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    et al.
    RISE Acreo AB, Dept Printed Elect, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Westerberg, David
    RISE Acreo AB, Dept Printed Elect, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Tu, Deyu
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Marie
    RISE Acreo AB, Dept Printed Elect, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Åhlin, Jessica
    RISE Acreo AB, Dept Printed Elect, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Eveborn, Annelie
    RISE Acreo AB, Dept Printed Elect, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Lagerlöf, Axel
    RISE Acreo AB, Dept Printed Elect, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, David
    RISE Acreo AB, Dept Printed Elect, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Mats
    RISE Acreo AB, Dept Printed Elect, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Norberg, Petronella
    RISE Acreo AB, Dept Printed Elect, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Forchheimer, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. RISE SICS East, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    RISE Acreo AB, Dept Printed Elect, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Screen printed digital circuits based on vertical organic electrochemical transistors2017In: Flexible and Printed Electronics, ISSN 2058-8585, Vol. 2, no 4, article id 045008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vertical organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) have been manufactured solely using screen printing. The OECTs are based on PEDOT:PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly (styrene sulfonic acid)), which defines the active material for both the transistor channel and the gate electrode. The resulting vertical OECT devices and circuits exhibit low-voltage operation, relatively fast switching, small footprint and high manufacturing yield; the last three parameters are explained by the reliance of the transistor configuration on a robust structure in which the electrolyte vertically bridges the bottom channel and the top gate electrode. Two different architectures of the vertical OECT have been manufactured, characterized and evaluated in parallel throughout this report. In addition to the experimental work, SPICE models enabling simulations of standalone OECTs and OECT-based circuits have been developed. Our findings may pave the way for fully integrated, low-voltage operating and printed signal processing systems integrated with e.g. printed batteries, solar cells, sensors and communication interfaces. Such technology can then serve a low-cost base technology for the internet of things, smart packaging and home diagnostics applications.

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  • 24.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    et al.
    RISE Acreo, Department of Printed Electronics, Bredgatan 33, Norrköping, SE-602 21, Sweden.
    Zabihipour, Marzieh
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tu, Deyu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lassnig, Roman
    RISE Acreo, Department of Printed Electronics, Bredgatan 33, Norrköping, SE-602 21, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Jan
    RISE Acreo, Department of Printed Electronics, Bredgatan 33, Norrköping, SE-602 21, Sweden.
    Åhlin, Jessica
    RISE Acreo, Department of Printed Electronics, Bredgatan 33, Norrköping, SE-602 21, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Marie
    RISE Acreo, Department of Printed Electronics, Bredgatan 33, Norrköping, SE-602 21, Sweden.
    Westerberg, David
    RISE Acreo, Department of Printed Electronics, Bredgatan 33, Norrköping, SE-602 21, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    RISE Acreo, Department of Printed Electronics, Bredgatan 33, Norrköping, SE-602 21, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Forchheimer, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Monolithic integration of display driver circuits and displays manufactured by screen printing2020In: Flexible and Printed Electronics, ISSN 2058-8585, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 024001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we report all-screen printed display driver circuits, based on organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs), and their monolithic integration with organic electrochromic displays (OECDs). Both OECTs and OECDs operate at low voltages and have similar device architectures, and, notably, they rely on the very same electroactive material as well as on the same electrochemical switching mechanism. This then allows us to manufacture OECT-OECD circuits in a concurrent manufacturing process entirely based on screen printing methods. By taking advantage of the high current throughput capability of OECTs, we further demonstrate their ability to control the light emission in traditional light-emitting diodes (LEDs), where the actual LED addressing is achieved by an OECT-based decoder circuit. The possibility to monolithically integrate all-screen printed OECTs and OECDs on flexible plastic foils paves the way for distributed smart sensor labels and similar Internet of Things applications. 

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  • 25.
    Anusuyadevi, Prasaanth Ravi
    et al.
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Sweden.
    Shanker, Ravi
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cui, Yuxiao
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Sweden.
    Riazanova, Anastasia V
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Sweden.
    Järn, Mikael
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Svagan, Anna J.
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Sweden.
    Photoresponsive and Polarization-Sensitive Structural Colors from Cellulose/Liquid Crystal Nanophotonic Structures2021In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 33, no 36, article id 2101519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) possess the ability to form helical periodic structures that generate structural colors. Due to the helicity, such self-assembled cellulose structures preferentially reflect left-handed circularly polarized light of certain colors, while they remain transparent to right-handed circularly polarized light. This study shows that combination with a liquid crystal enables modulation of the optical response to obtain light reflection of both handedness but with reversed spectral profiles. As a result, the nanophotonic systems provide vibrant structural colors that are tunable via the incident light polarization. The results are attributed to the liquid crystal aligning on the CNC/glucose film, to form a birefringent layer that twists the incident light polarization before interaction with the chiral cellulose nanocomposite. Using a photoresponsive liquid crystal, this effect can further be turned off by exposure to UV light, which switches the nematic liquid crystal into a nonbirefringent isotropic phase. The study highlights the potential of hybrid cellulose systems to create self-assembled yet advanced photoresponsive and polarization-tunable nanophotonics.

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  • 26.
    Anusuyadevi, Prasaanth Ravi
    et al.
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Sweden; M S Ramaiah Inst Technol, India.
    Singha, Shuvra
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Sweden.
    Banerjee, Debashree
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Sweden.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S. S.
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Sweden.
    Svagan, Anna J. J.
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Sweden.
    Synthetic Plant Cuticle Coating as a Biomimetic Moisture Barrier Membrane for Structurally Colored Cellulose Films2023In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 2202112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photonic films based on cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are sustainable candidates for sensors, structurally colored radiative cooling, and iridescent coatings. Such CNC-based films possess a helicoidal nanoarchitecture, which gives selective reflection with the polarization of the incident light. However, due to the hygroscopic nature of CNCs, the structural colored material changes and may be irreversibly damaged at high relative humidity. Thus, moisture protection is essential in such settings. In this work, hygroscopic CNC-based films are protected with a bioinspired synthetic plant cuticle; a strategy already adopted by real plants. The protective cuticle layers altered the reflected colors to some extent, but more importantly, they significantly reduced the water vapor permeance by more than two orders of magnitude, from 2.1 x 10(7) (pristine CNC/GLU film) to 12.3 x 10(4) g mu m m(-2) day(-1) atm(-1) (protected CNC/GLU film). This expands significantly the time window of operation for CNC/GLU films at high relative humidity.

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  • 27.
    Apostolopoulou-Kalkavoura, Varvara
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Hu, Shiqian
    Univ Tokyo, Japan.
    Lavoine, Nathalie
    NC State Univ, NC 27695 USA.
    Garg, Mohit
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Munier, Pierre
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Shiomi, Junichiro
    Univ Tokyo, Japan.
    Bergstrom, Lennart
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Humidity-Dependent Thermal Boundary Conductance Controls Heat Transport of Super-Insulating Nanofibrillar Foams2021In: Matter, ISSN 2590-2393, E-ISSN 2590-2385, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanomaterial (CNM)-based foams and aerogels with thermal conductivities substantially below the value for air attract significant interest as super-insulating materials in energy-efficient green buildings. However, the moisture dependence of the thermal conductivity of hygroscopic CNM-based materials is poorly understood, and the importance of phonon scattering in nanofibrillar foams remains unexplored. Here, we show that the thermal conductivity perpendicular to the aligned nanofibrils in super-insulating icetemplated nanocellulose foams is lower for thinner fibrils and depends strongly on relative humidity (RH), with the lowest thermal conductivity (14 mW m(-1) K-1) attained at 35% RH. Molecular simulations show that the thermal boundary conductance is reduced by the moisture-uptake-controlled increase of the fibril-fibril separation distance and increased by the replacement of air with water in the foam walls. Controlling the heat transport of hygroscopic super-insulating nanofibrillar foams by moisture uptake and release is of potential interest in packaging and building applications.

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  • 28. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Arbring Sjöström, Theresia
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Organic Bioelectronics for Neurotransmitter Release at the Speed of Life2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The signaling dynamics in neuronal networks includes processes ranging from lifelong neuromodulation to direct synaptic neurotransmission. In chemical synapses, the time delay it takes to pass a signal from one neuron to the next lasts for less than a millisecond. At the post-synaptic neuron, further signaling is either up- or down-regulated, dependent on the specific neurotransmitter and receptor. While this up- and down-regulation of signals usually runs perfectly well and enables complex performance, even a minor dysfunction of this signaling system can cause major complications, in the shape of neurological disorders. The field of organic bioelectronics has the ability to interface neurons with high spatiotemporal recording and stimulation techniques. Local chemical stimulation, i.e. local release of neurotransmitters, enables the possibility of artificially altering the chemical environment in dysfunctional signaling pathways to regain or restore neural function. To successfully interface the biological nervous system with electronics, a range of demands must be met. Organic bioelectronic techniques and materials are capable of reaching the demands on the biological as well as the electronic side of the interface. These demands span from high performance biocompatible materials, to miniaturized and specific device architectures, and high dose control on demand within milliseconds.

    The content of this thesis is a continuation of the development of organic bioelectronic devices for neurotransmitter delivery. Organic materials are utilized to electrically control the dose of charged neurotransmitters by translating electric charge into controlled artificial release. The first part of the thesis, Papers 1 and 2, includes further development of the resistor-type release device called the organic electronic ion pump. This part includes material evaluation, microfluidic incorporation, and device design considerations. The aim for the second part of this thesis, Papers 3 and 4, is to enhance temporal performance, i.e. reduce the delay between electrical signal and neurotransmitter delivery to corresponding delay in biological neural signaling, while retaining tight dosage control. Diffusion of neurotransmitters between nerve cells is a slow process, but since it is restricted to short distances, the total time delay is short. In our organic bioelectronic devices, several orders of magnitude in speed can be gained by switching from lateral to vertical delivery geometries. This is realized by two different types of vertical diodes combined with a lateral preload and waste configuration. The vertical diode assembly was further expanded with a control electrode that enables individual addressing in each of several combined release sites. These integrated circuits allow for release of neurotransmitters with high on/off release ratios, approaching delivery times on par with biological neurotransmission.

    List of papers
    1. Cross-Linked Polyelectrolyte for Improved Selectivity and Processability of lontronic Systems
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-Linked Polyelectrolyte for Improved Selectivity and Processability of lontronic Systems
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    2017 (English)In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 36, p. 30247-30252Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    On-demand local release of biomolecules enables fine-tuned stimulation for the next generation of neuromodulation therapies. Such chemical stimulation is achievable using iontronic devices based on microfabricated, highly selective ion exchange membranes (IEMs). Current limitations in processability and performance of thin film LEMs hamper future developments of this technology. Here we address this limitation by developing a cationic IEM with excellent processability and ionic selectivity: poly(4-styrenesulfonic acidco-maleic acid) (PSS-co-MA) cross-linked with polyethylene glycol (PEG). This enables new design opportunities and provides enhanced compatibility with in vitro cell studies. PSSA-co-MA/PEG is shown to out-perform the cation selectivity of the previously used iontronic material.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2017
    Keywords
    ion exchange membranes; iontronics; organic bioelectronics; microfabrication; neurotransmitter release
    National Category
    Other Materials Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142182 (URN)10.1021/acsami.7b05949 (DOI)000411043600002 ()28831798 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (KAW) [2012.0302]; Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsradet) [621-2011-3517]; Swedish Innovation Office (VINNOVA) [2010-00507]; Onnesjo Foundation

    Available from: 2017-10-23 Created: 2017-10-23 Last updated: 2020-12-07
    2. Design and Operation of Hybrid Microfluidic Iontronic Probes for Regulated Drug Delivery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design and Operation of Hybrid Microfluidic Iontronic Probes for Regulated Drug Delivery
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    2021 (English)In: Advanced Materials Technologies, E-ISSN 2365-709X, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 2001006Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Highly controlled drug delivery devices play an increasingly important role in the development of new neuroengineering tools. Stringent - and sometimes contradicting - demands are placed on such devices, ranging from robustness in freestanding devices, to overall device miniaturization, while maintaining precise spatiotemporal control of delivery with high chemical specificity and high on/off ratio. Here, design principles of a hybrid microfluidic iontronic probe that uses flow for long-range pressure-driven transport in combination with an iontronic tip that provides electronically fine-tuned pressure-free delivery are explored. Employing a computational model, the effects of decoupling the drug reservoir by exchanging a large passive reservoir with a smaller microfluidic system are reported. The transition at the microfluidic-iontronic interface is found to require an expanded ion exchange membrane inlet in combination with a constant fluidic flow, to allow a broad range of device operation, including low source concentrations and high delivery currents. Complementary to these findings, the free-standing hybrid probe monitored in real time by an external sensor is demonstrated. From these computational and experimental results, key design principles for iontronic devices are outlined that seek to use the efficient transport enabled by microfluidics, and further, key observations of hybrid microfluidic iontronic probes are explained.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, 2021
    Keywords
    bioelectronics, drug delivery, iontronics, microfluidics, organic electronics
    National Category
    Medical Materials
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-172686 (URN)10.1002/admt.202001006 (DOI)000607538700001 ()
    Conference
    2021/01/18
    Funder
    Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationVinnovaSwedish Research CouncilEU, European Research Council, 2018
    Note

    Additional Funding agencies: FLAG‐ERA. Grant Number: JTC2017; EPIGRAPH. Grant Number: ANR‐17‐GRF2‐0001; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Advanced Functional Materials at Linköping University. Grant Number: 2009‐00971; A*MIDEX ION. Grant Number: 2IONXXID/REID/ID17HRU208

    Available from: 2021-01-18 Created: 2021-01-18 Last updated: 2024-01-10Bibliographically approved
    3. Chemical delivery array with millisecond neurotransmitter release
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chemical delivery array with millisecond neurotransmitter release
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    2016 (English)In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 2, no 11, article id e1601340Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Technologies that restore or augment dysfunctional neural signaling represent a promising route to deeper understanding and new therapies for neurological disorders. Because of the chemical specificity and subsecond signaling of the nervous system, these technologies should be able to release specific neurotransmitters at specific locations with millisecond resolution. We have previously demonstrated an organic electronic lateral electrophoresis technology capable of precise delivery of charged compounds, such as neurotransmitters. However, this technology, the organic electronic ion pump, has been limited to a single delivery point, or several simultaneously addressed outlets, with switch-on speeds of seconds. We report on a vertical neurotransmitter delivery device, configured as an array with individually controlled delivery points and a temporal resolution of 50 ms. This is achieved by supplementing lateral electrophoresis with a control electrode and an ion diode at each delivery point to allow addressing and limit leakage. By delivering local pulses of neurotransmitters with spatiotemporal dynamics approaching synaptic function, the high-speed delivery array promises unprecedented access to neural signaling and a path toward biochemically regulated neural prostheses.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Washington: American Association for the Advancement of Science (A A A S), 2016
    National Category
    Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics Computer Engineering Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Biomedical Laboratory Science/Technology Signal Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-133161 (URN)10.1126/sciadv.1601340 (DOI)000391267800033 ()27847873 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-12-12 Created: 2016-12-12 Last updated: 2020-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Miniaturized Ionic Polarization Diodes for Neurotransmitter Release at Synaptic Speeds
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Miniaturized Ionic Polarization Diodes for Neurotransmitter Release at Synaptic Speeds
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    2020 (English)In: Advanced Materials Technologies, E-ISSN 2365-709X, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 1900750Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Current neural interfaces rely on electrical stimulation pulses to affect neural tissue. The development of a chemical delivery technology, which can stimulate neural tissue with the bodys own set of signaling molecules, would provide a new level of sophistication in neural interfaces. Such technology should ideally provide highly local chemical delivery points that operate at synaptic speed, something that is yet to be accomplished. Here, the development of a miniaturized ionic polarization diode that exhibits many of the desirable properties for a chemical neural interface technology is reported. The ionic diode shows proper diode rectification and the current switches from off to on in 50 mu s at physiologically relevant electrolyte concentrations. A device model is developed to explain the characteristics of the ionic diode in more detail. In combination with experimental data, the model predicts that the ionic polarization diode has a delivery delay of 5 ms to reach physiologically relevant neurotransmitter concentrations at subcellular spatial resolution. The model further predicts that delays of amp;lt;1 ms can be reached by further miniaturization of the diode geometry. Altogether, the results show that ionic polarization diodes are a promising building block for the next generation of chemical neural interfaces.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY, 2020
    Keywords
    bioelectronics; controlled release; ion diodes; iontronics; neurotransmitters
    National Category
    Bioinformatics (Computational Biology)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162499 (URN)10.1002/admt.201900750 (DOI)000497801400001 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Foundation for Strategic ResearchSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundationKnut & Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Advanced Functional Materials at Linkoping University [2009-00971]

    Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2022-09-15
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  • 29.
    Arbring Sjöström, Theresia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ivanov, Anton I.
    INSERM, INS, Inst Neurosci Syst, Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France.
    Bernard, Christophe
    INSERM, INS, Inst Neurosci Syst, Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Poxson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel T
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Design and Operation of Hybrid Microfluidic Iontronic Probes for Regulated Drug Delivery2021In: Advanced Materials Technologies, E-ISSN 2365-709X, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 2001006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly controlled drug delivery devices play an increasingly important role in the development of new neuroengineering tools. Stringent - and sometimes contradicting - demands are placed on such devices, ranging from robustness in freestanding devices, to overall device miniaturization, while maintaining precise spatiotemporal control of delivery with high chemical specificity and high on/off ratio. Here, design principles of a hybrid microfluidic iontronic probe that uses flow for long-range pressure-driven transport in combination with an iontronic tip that provides electronically fine-tuned pressure-free delivery are explored. Employing a computational model, the effects of decoupling the drug reservoir by exchanging a large passive reservoir with a smaller microfluidic system are reported. The transition at the microfluidic-iontronic interface is found to require an expanded ion exchange membrane inlet in combination with a constant fluidic flow, to allow a broad range of device operation, including low source concentrations and high delivery currents. Complementary to these findings, the free-standing hybrid probe monitored in real time by an external sensor is demonstrated. From these computational and experimental results, key design principles for iontronic devices are outlined that seek to use the efficient transport enabled by microfluidics, and further, key observations of hybrid microfluidic iontronic probes are explained.

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  • 30.
    Arbring Sjöström, Theresia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Amanda
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Miniaturized Ionic Polarization Diodes for Neurotransmitter Release at Synaptic Speeds2020In: Advanced Materials Technologies, E-ISSN 2365-709X, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 1900750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current neural interfaces rely on electrical stimulation pulses to affect neural tissue. The development of a chemical delivery technology, which can stimulate neural tissue with the bodys own set of signaling molecules, would provide a new level of sophistication in neural interfaces. Such technology should ideally provide highly local chemical delivery points that operate at synaptic speed, something that is yet to be accomplished. Here, the development of a miniaturized ionic polarization diode that exhibits many of the desirable properties for a chemical neural interface technology is reported. The ionic diode shows proper diode rectification and the current switches from off to on in 50 mu s at physiologically relevant electrolyte concentrations. A device model is developed to explain the characteristics of the ionic diode in more detail. In combination with experimental data, the model predicts that the ionic polarization diode has a delivery delay of 5 ms to reach physiologically relevant neurotransmitter concentrations at subcellular spatial resolution. The model further predicts that delays of amp;lt;1 ms can be reached by further miniaturization of the diode geometry. Altogether, the results show that ionic polarization diodes are a promising building block for the next generation of chemical neural interfaces.

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  • 31.
    Argillander, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alarcon, Alvaro
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bao, Chunxiong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Nanjing Univ, Peoples R China.
    Kuang, Chaoyang
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics.
    Lima, Gustavo
    Univ Concepcion, Chile.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Xavier, Guilherme B.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Quantum random number generation based on a perovskite light emitting diode2023In: Communications Physics, E-ISSN 2399-3650, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    True random number generation is not thought to be possible using a classical approach but by instead exploiting quantum mechanics genuine randomness can be achieved. Here, the authors demonstrate a certified quantum random number generation using a metal-halide perovskite light emitting diode as a source of weak coherent polarisation states randomly producing an output of either 0 or 1. The recent development of perovskite light emitting diodes (PeLEDs) has the potential to revolutionize the fields of optical communication and lighting devices, due to their simplicity of fabrication and outstanding optical properties. Here we demonstrate that PeLEDs can also be used in the field of quantum technologies by implementing a highly-secure quantum random number generator (QRNG). Modern QRNGs that certify their privacy are posed to replace classical random number generators in applications such as encryption and gambling, and therefore need to be cheap, fast and with integration capabilities. Using a compact metal-halide PeLED source, we generate random numbers, which are certified to be secure against an eavesdropper, following the quantum measurement-device-independent scenario. The obtained generation rate of more than 10 Mbit s(-1), which is already comparable to commercial devices, shows that PeLEDs can work as high-quality light sources for quantum information tasks, thus opening up future applications in quantum technologies.

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  • 32.
    Arif, Muhammad
    et al.
    Changzhou Univ, Peoples R China.
    Mahsud, Ayaz
    Henan Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Ali, Amjad
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Liao, Shipeng
    Changzhou Univ, Peoples R China.
    Xia, Jiawei
    Changzhou Univ, Peoples R China.
    Xiao, Hai
    Tsinghua Univ, Peoples R China.
    Azam, Mohammad
    King Saud Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Muhmood, Tahir
    Nanjing Forestry Univ, Peoples R China.
    Lu, Zhansheng
    Henan Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Yinjuan
    Changzhou Univ, Peoples R China.
    Unraveling the synergy of interface engineering α-MnO2/Bi2WO6 heterostructures and defective active sites for superdurable photocatalysis: Mechanistic insights into charge separation/transfer2023In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 475, article id 146458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction of visible-light-driven hybrid heterostructure photocatalysts is of great significance for environmental remediation, although the utilization of strong visible-light response photocatalysts with high efficiency and stability remains a major challenge. Defect engineering is an excellent way to introduce metal cation vacancies in materials, thereby ensuing in highly enhanced catalytic performance. Inspired by this, we effectively constructed a built-in interface alpha-MnO2/Bi2WO6 heterostructure with abundant intimate interfaces and defective Mn3+/Mn4+ active sites for photocatalytic tetracycline hydrochloride (TC-HCl), hexavalent chromium Cr6+ reduction, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) inactivation. The experimental results, such as the active species test and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, indicated that the defective sites Mn3+/Mn4+, surface oxygen vacancies, and Bi(3+x)+ boosted the visible light absorption, and highly enhanced the photoinduced charge separation/transfer. Furthermore, experimental and DFT calculations reveal the high charge density at the built-in interface heterostructure and the Z-scheme charge transfer mechanism during the photocatalytic process. The results further reveal that O-2(-) and O-1(2) are the main reactive active species contributing to the photocatalytic reaction. The exceptional TC-HCl decomposition activity of the alpha-MnO2/Bi2WO6 heterostructure (97.56%, 2.31, and 2.04 times higher than bulk), enhanced reaction kinetics (K-app = 0.041 min(-1), 6.4, and 5.2 times higher than bulk), removal rate of 80.3%, Cr6+ reduction to Cr3+ (98.56%, K-app = 0.0599 min(-1)), and almost 100% bacterial inactivation compared to bulk alpha-MnO2 (42.22%) and Bi2WO6 (47.76%), were mainly due to the enhanced charge separation/transfer at the built-in interface and high charge density. This study opens new horizons for constructing Z-scheme MnO-based interface heterostructures with abundant defect sites for exceptional photocatalytic applications.

  • 33.
    Arja, Katriann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Paloncyova, Marketa
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden; Palacky Univ Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Norway.
    Norman, Patrick
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-Assembly of Chiro-Optical Materials from Nonchiral Oligothiophene-Porphyrin Derivatives and Random Coil Synthetic Peptides2023In: ChemPlusChem, E-ISSN 2192-6506, Vol. 88, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomimetic chiral optoelectronic materials can be utilized in electronic devices, biosensors and artificial enzymes. Herein, this work reports the chiro-optical properties and architectural arrangement of optoelectronic materials generated from self-assembly of initially nonchiral oligothiophene-porphyrin derivatives and random coil synthetic peptides. The photo-physical- and structural properties of the materials were assessed by absorption-, fluorescence- and circular dichroism spectroscopy, as well as dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and theoretical calculations. The materials display a three-dimensional ordered helical structure and optical activity that are observed due to an induced chirality of the optoelectronic element upon interaction with the peptide. Both these properties are influenced by the chemical composition of the oligothiophene-porphyrin derivative, as well as the peptide sequence. We foresee that our findings will aid in developing self-assembled optoelectronic materials with dynamic architectonical accuracies, as well as offer the possibility to generate the next generation of materials for a variety of bioelectronic applications.

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  • 34.
    Armada Moreira, Adam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bisesi, Ave
    Univ Minnesota, MN 55455 USA.
    Transgender Day of Visibility 2022: an interview with Adam Armada-Moreira and Ave Bisesi on trans experiences in STEM2022In: Communications Biology, E-ISSN 2399-3642, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 288Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This year at Communications Biology, we wanted to celebrate Transgender Day of Visibility by highlighting researchers at multiple career stages. In this Q&A, we asked early-career biologists about their own achievements, academic experiences, and how STEM can better support trans researchers.

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  • 35.
    Armada Moreira, Adam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cizauskas, Carrie
    Independent .
    Fleury, Gabriela
    Rainforest Trust, VA USA.
    Forslund, Sofia Kirke
    Charite, Germany.
    Guthman, Eartha Mae
    Princeton Univ, NJ 08544 USA.
    Hanafiah, Aflah
    Penn State Univ, PA 16802 USA.
    Hope, Jen M.
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Jayasinghe, Izzy
    Univ Sheffield, England.
    McSweeney, Danny
    Univ Massachusetts, MA 01003 USA.
    Young, Iris D.
    UC, CA USA.
    STEM Pride: Perspectives from transgender, nonbinary, and genderqueer scientists2021In: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, E-ISSN 1097-4172, Vol. 184, no 13, p. 3352-3355Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In celebration of Pride Month, we asked transgender, genderqueer, and nonbinary scientists to tell us about what fascinates them, their ambitions and achievements, and how their gender identities have shaped their experiences in STEM. We owe a special thanks to 500 Queer Scientists (https://500queerscientists.com/), whose network and efforts at increasing LGBTQ+ scientists visibility made this article possible.

  • 36.
    Armada Moreira, Adam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Diacci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Manan Dar, Abdul Manan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Benchmarking organic electrochemical transistors for plant electrophysiology2022In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 13, article id 916120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plants are able to sense and respond to a myriad of external stimuli, using different signal transduction pathways, including electrical signaling. The ability to monitor plant responses is essential not only for fundamental plant science, but also to gain knowledge on how to interface plants with technology. Still, the field of plant electrophysiology remains rather unexplored when compared to its animal counterpart. Indeed, most studies continue to rely on invasive techniques or on bulky inorganic electrodes that oftentimes are not ideal for stable integration with plant tissues. On the other hand, few studies have proposed novel approaches to monitor plant signals, based on non-invasive conformable electrodes or even organic transistors. Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) are particularly promising for electrophysiology as they are inherently amplification devices, they operate at low voltages, can be miniaturized, and be fabricated in flexible and conformable substrates. Thus, in this study, we characterize OECTs as viable tools to measure plant electrical signals, comparing them to the performance of the current standard, Ag/AgCl electrodes. For that, we focused on two widely studied plant signals: the Venus flytrap (VFT) action potentials elicited by mechanical stimulation of its sensitive trigger hairs, and the wound response of Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that OECTs are able to record these signals without distortion and with the same resolution as Ag/AgCl electrodes and that they offer a major advantage in terms of signal noise, which allow them to be used in field conditions. This work establishes these organic bioelectronic devices as non-invasive tools to monitor plant signaling that can provide insight into plant processes in their natural environment.

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  • 37.
    Armada Moreira, Adam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Int Sch Adv Studies, Italy.
    Manan Dar, Abdul Manan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhao, Zifang
    Columbia Univ, NY 10027 USA.
    Cea, Claudia
    Columbia Univ, NY 10027 USA.
    Gelinas, Jennifer
    Columbia Univ, NY 10032 USA.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Costa, Alex
    Univ Milan, Italy; Natl Res Council Italy CNR, Italy.
    Khodagholy, Dion
    Columbia Univ, NY 10027 USA.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Plant electrophysiology with conformable organic electronics: Deciphering the propagation of Venus flytrap action potentials2023In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 9, no 30, article id eadh4443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical signals in plants are mediators of long-distance signaling and correlate with plant movements and responses to stress. These signals are studied with single surface electrodes that cannot resolve signal propagation and integration, thus impeding their decoding and link to function. Here, we developed a conformable multielectrode array based on organic electronics for large-scale and high-resolution plant electrophysiology. We performed precise spatiotemporal mapping of the action potential (AP) in Venus flytrap and found that the AP actively propagates through the tissue with constant speed and without strong directionality. We also found that spontaneously generated APs can originate from unstimulated hairs and that they correlate with trap movement. Last, we demonstrate that the Venus flytrap circuitry can be activated by cells other than the sensory hairs. Our work reveals key properties of the AP and establishes the capacity of organic bioelectronics for resolving electrical signaling in plants contributing to the mechanistic understanding of long-distance responses in plants.

  • 38.
    Armgarth, Astrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Pantzare, Sandra
    RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Arven, Patrik
    J2 Holding AB, Sweden.
    Lassnig, Roman
    RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Jinno, Hiroaki
    RIKEN, Japan; Univ Tokyo, Japan.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kifle, Yonatan Habteslassie
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cherian, Dennis
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Arbring Sjöström, Theresia
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berthou, Gautier
    Res Inst Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Dowling, Jim
    Res Inst Sweden AB, Sweden; KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Someya, Takao
    RIKEN, Japan; Univ Tokyo, Japan.
    Wikner, Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A digital nervous system aiming toward personalized IoT healthcare2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 7757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body area networks (BANs), cloud computing, and machine learning are platforms that can potentially enable advanced healthcare outside the hospital. By applying distributed sensors and drug delivery devices on/in our body and connecting to such communication and decision-making technology, a system for remote diagnostics and therapy is achieved with additional autoregulation capabilities. Challenges with such autarchic on-body healthcare schemes relate to integrity and safety, and interfacing and transduction of electronic signals into biochemical signals, and vice versa. Here, we report a BAN, comprising flexible on-body organic bioelectronic sensors and actuators utilizing two parallel pathways for communication and decision-making. Data, recorded from strain sensors detecting body motion, are both securely transferred to the cloud for machine learning and improved decision-making, and sent through the body using a secure body-coupled communication protocol to auto-actuate delivery of neurotransmitters, all within seconds. We conclude that both highly stable and accurate sensing-from multiple sensors-are needed to enable robust decision making and limit the frequency of retraining. The holistic platform resembles the self-regulatory properties of the nervous system, i.e., the ability to sense, communicate, decide, and react accordingly, thus operating as a digital nervous system.

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  • 39.
    Artini, Cristina
    et al.
    Univ Genoa, Italy; CNR, Italy.
    Pennelli, Giovanni
    Univ Pisa, Italy.
    Graziosi, Patrizio
    CNR ISMN, Italy; Univ Warwick, England.
    Li, Zhen
    Univ Warwick, England.
    Neophytou, Neophytos
    Univ Warwick, England.
    Melis, Claudio
    Univ Cagliari, Italy.
    Colombo, Luciano
    Univ Cagliari, Italy.
    Isotta, Eleonora
    Univ Trento, Italy; Michigan State Univ, MI USA.
    Lohani, Ketan
    Univ Trento, Italy.
    Scardi, Paolo
    Univ Trento, Italy.
    Castellero, Alberto
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Baricco, Marcello
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Palumbo, Mauro
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Casassa, Silvia
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Maschio, Lorenzo
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Pani, Marcella
    Univ Genoa, Italy; CNR SPIN Genova, Italy.
    Latronico, Giovanna
    Shibaura Inst Technol, Japan.
    Mele, Paolo
    Shibaura Inst Technol, Japan.
    Di Benedetto, Francesca
    ENEA Italian Natl Agcy New Technol Energy & Susta, Italy.
    Contento, Gaetano
    ENEA Italian Natl Agcy New Technol Energy & Susta, Italy.
    De Riccardis, Maria Federica
    ENEA Italian Natl Agcy New Technol Energy & Susta, Italy.
    Fucci, Raffaele
    ENEA Italian Natl Agcy New Technol Energy & Susta, Italy.
    Palazzo, Barbara
    ENEA Italian Natl Agcy New Technol Energy & Susta, Italy.
    Rizzo, Antonella
    ENEA Italian Natl Agcy New Technol Energy & Susta, Italy.
    Demontis, Valeria
    CNR, Italy; CNR, Italy.
    Prete, Domenic
    CNR, Italy; CNR, Italy.
    Isram, Muhammad
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Rossella, Francesco
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Ferrario, Alberto
    CNR ICMATE, Italy.
    Miozzo, Alvise
    CNR ICMATE, Italy.
    Boldrini, Stefano
    CNR ICMATE, Italy.
    Dimaggio, Elisabetta
    Univ Pisa, Italy.
    Franzini, Marcello
    Univ Torino, Italy; Univ Torino, Italy.
    Galliano, Simone
    Univ Torino, Italy.
    Barolo, Claudia
    Univ Torino, Italy; Univ Torino, Italy.
    Mardi, Saeed
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy; Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Reale, Andrea
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy; Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Lorenzi, Bruno
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Narducci, Dario
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Trifiletti, Vanira
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Milita, Silvia
    CNR, Italy.
    Bellucci, Alessandro
    CNR, Italy.
    Trucchi, Daniele M.
    CNR, Italy.
    Roadmap on thermoelectricity2023In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, E-ISSN 1361-6528, Vol. 34, no 29, article id 292001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing energy demand and the ever more pressing need for clean technologies of energy conversion pose one of the most urgent and complicated issues of our age. Thermoelectricity, namely the direct conversion of waste heat into electricity, is a promising technique based on a long-standing physical phenomenon, which still has not fully developed its potential, mainly due to the low efficiency of the process. In order to improve the thermoelectric performance, a huge effort is being made by physicists, materials scientists and engineers, with the primary aims of better understanding the fundamental issues ruling the improvement of the thermoelectric figure of merit, and finally building the most efficient thermoelectric devices. In this Roadmap an overview is given about the most recent experimental and computational results obtained within the Italian research community on the optimization of composition and morphology of some thermoelectric materials, as well as on the design of thermoelectric and hybrid thermoelectric/photovoltaic devices.

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  • 40.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    et al.
    Bahauddin Zakariya Univ, Pakistan; Hamdard Univ Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Hanif, Muhammad
    Bahauddin Zakariya Univ, Pakistan.
    Mahmood, Khalid
    Bahauddin Zakariya Univ, Pakistan.
    Siddique, Farhan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Bahauddin Zakariya Univ, Pakistan.
    Hashem, Heba E.
    Ain Shams Univ, Egypt.
    Aziz, Mubashir
    Bahauddin Zakariya Univ, Pakistan.
    Ameer, Nabeela
    Bahauddin Zakariya Univ, Pakistan.
    Abid, Usman
    Bahauddin Zakariya Univ, Pakistan.
    Latif, Hafsa
    Bahauddin Zakariya Univ, Pakistan.
    Ramzan, Nasreen
    Bahauddin Zakariya Univ, Pakistan.
    Rawat, Ravi
    MVN Univ, India.
    Design, synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, in-vitro antibacterial evaluation and in-silico analysis of polycaprolactone containing chitosan-quercetin microspheres2023In: Journal of Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics, ISSN 0739-1102, E-ISSN 1538-0254, Vol. 41, no 15, p. 7084-7103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of present study was to synthesize a novel chitosan-quercetin (CTS-QT) complex by making a carbodiimide linkage using maleic anhydride as cross-linker and to investigate its enhanced antibacterial and antioxidant activities as compare to pure CTS and QT. Equimolar concentration of QT and maleic anhydride were used to react with 100 mg CTS to form CTS-QT complex. For this purpose, three bacterial strains namely E. Coli, S. Aureus and P. Aeruginosa were used for in-vitro antibacterial analysis (ZOI, MIC, MBC, checker board and time kill assay). Later molecular docking studies were performed on protein structure of E. Coli to assess binding affinity of pure QT and CTS-QT complex. MD simulations with accelerated settings were used to explore the protein-ligand complexs binding interactions and stability. Antioxidant profile was determined by performing DPPH center dot radical scavenging assay, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total reducing power (TRP) assays. Delivery mechanism to CTS-QT complex was improved by synthesizing polycaprolactone containing microspheres (CTS-QT-PCL-Levo-Ms) using Levofloxacin as model drug to enhance their antibacterial profile. Resulted microspheres were evaluated by particle size, charge, surface morphology, in-vitro drug release and hemolytic profile and are all were found within limits. Antibacterial assay revealed that CTS-QT-PCL-Levo-Ms showed more than two folds increased bactericidal activity against E. Coli and P. Aeruginosa, while 1.5 folds against S. Aureus. Green colored formation of phosphate molybdate complexes with highest 85 +/- 1.32% TAC confirmed its antioxidant properties. Furthermore, molecular docking and dynamics studies revealed that CTS-QT was embedded nicely within the active pocket of UPPS with binding energy greater than QT with RSMD value of below 1.5. Conclusively, use of maleic acid, in-vitro and in-silico antimicrobial studies confirm the emergence of CTS-QT complex containing microspheres as novel treatment strategy for all types of bacterial infections. Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma

  • 41.
    Aziz, Mubashir
    et al.
    Islamia Univ Bahawalpur, Pakistan.
    Ejaz, Syeda Abida
    Islamia Univ Bahawalpur, Pakistan.
    Rehman, Hafiz Muzzammel
    Univ Punjab, Pakistan; Alnoorians Grp Inst, Pakistan.
    Alsubaie, A. S. A.
    Taif Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Mahmoud, K. H.
    Taif Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Siddique, Farhan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Royal Inst Med Sci Rims, Pakistan.
    Al-Buriahi, M. S.
    Sakarya Univ, Turkey.
    Alrowaili, Z. A.
    Jouf Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Identification of NEK7 inhibitors: structure based virtual screening, molecular docking, density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations2023In: Journal of Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics, ISSN 0739-1102, E-ISSN 1538-0254, Vol. 41, no 14, p. 6894-6908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NEK7 is a NIMA related-protein kinase that plays a crucial role in spindle assembly and cell division. Dysregulation of NEK7 protein leads to development and progression of different types of malignancies including colon and breast cancers. Therefore, NEK7 could be considered as an attractive target for anti-cancer drug discovery. However, few efforts have been made for the development of selective inhibitors of NIMA-related kinase but still no FDA approved drug is known to selectively inhibit the NEK7 protein. Dacomitinib and Neratinib are two Enamide derivatives that were approved for treatment against non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer respectively. Drug repurposing is a time and cost-efficient method for re-evaluating the activities of previously authorized medications. Thus, the present research involves the repurposing of two FDA-approved medications via comprehensive in silico approach including Density functional theory (DFTs) studies which were conducted to determine the electronic properties of the Dacomitinib and Neratinib. Afterward, binding orientation of selected drugs inside NEK7 activation loop was evaluated through molecular docking approach. Selected drugs exhibited potential molecular interactions engaging important amino acid residues of active site. The docking score of Dacomitinib and Neratinib was -30.77 and -26.78 kJ/mol, respectively. The top ranked pose obtained from molecular docking was subjected to Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations for investigating the stability of protein-ligand complex. The RMSD pattern revealed the stability of protein-ligand complex throughout simulated trajectory. In conclusion, both drugs displayed inhibitory efficacy against NEK7 protein and provide a prospective therapy option for malignant malignancies linked with NEK7. Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma

  • 42.
    Aziz, Mubashir
    et al.
    Islamia Univ Bahawalpur, Pakistan.
    Ejaz, Syeda Abida
    Islamia Univ Bahawalpur, Pakistan.
    Tamam, Nissren
    Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Siddique, Farhan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Royal Inst Med Sci RIMS, Pakistan.
    A comprehensive computational approach for the identification of structure-based potential pharmacological candidates as selective AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 inhibitors: repurposing of purine alkaloids for the treatment of cancer2023In: Journal of Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics, ISSN 0739-1102, E-ISSN 1538-0254, Vol. 41, no 16, p. 7892-7912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Significant metabolic pathways have been linked to AKR1B1 and AKR1B10. These enzymes are crucial biological targets in the therapy of colon cancer. In the past several decades, drug repurposing has gained appeal as a time and cost-efficient strategy for providing new indications for existing drugs. The structural properties of the plant-based alkaloidal drugs theobromine and theophylline were examined using density functional theory (DFT) computations, where the B3LYP/SVP method was used to quantify the dipole moment, polarizability, and optimization energy. Optimized structures obtained through DFT studies were docked inside the active pocket of target proteins to evaluate their inhibitory potential. Moreover, molecular dynamic simulation provides significant insight into a dynamic view of molecular interactions. The findings of current revealed theobromine and theophylline as strong AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 inhibitors, respectively. In addition, the anti-cancer potential of theophylline and theobromine was validated by targeting various tumor proteins, i.e. NF-kappa B, cellular tumor antigen P53 and caspase-3 using a molecular docking approach. Theobromine was found to be strongly interacted with NF-kappa B and caspase-3, whereas theophylline potentially inhibited cellular tumor antigen P53. In addition, the ADMET characteristics of theobromine and theophylline were identified, confirming their drug-like capabilities. These results should open the way for further experimental validation and structure-based drug design/repurposing of AKR1B1/AKR1B10 inhibitors for the treatment of colon cancer and associated malignancies. Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma

  • 43.
    Aziz, Mubashir
    et al.
    Islamia Univ Bahawalpur, Pakistan.
    Ejaz, Syeda Abida
    Islamia Univ Bahawalpur, Pakistan.
    Tamam, Nissren
    Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Siddique, Farhan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Royal Inst Med Sci RIMS, Pakistan.
    Riaz, Naheed
    Islamia Univ Bahawalpur, Pakistan.
    Qais, Faizan Abul
    Aligarh Muslim Univ, India.
    Chtita, Samir
    Hassan II Univ Casablanca, Morocco.
    Iqbal, Jamshed
    COMSATS Univ Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Identification of potent inhibitors of NEK7 protein using a comprehensive computational approach2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 6404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NIMA related Kinases (NEK7) plays an important role in spindle assembly and mitotic division of the cell. Over expression of NEK7 leads to the progression of different cancers and associated malignancies. It is becoming the next wave of targets for the development of selective and potent anti-cancerous agents. The current study is the first comprehensive computational approach to identify potent inhibitors of NEK7 protein. For this purpose, previously identified anti-inflammatory compound i.e., Phenylcarbamoylpiperidine-1,2,4-triazole amide derivatives by our own group were selected for their anti-cancer potential via detailed Computational studies. Initially, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out using Gaussian 09 software which provided information about the compounds stability and reactivity. Furthermore, Autodock suite and Molecular Operating Environment (MOE) softwares were used to dock the ligand database into the active pocket of the NEK7 protein. Both software performances were compared in terms of sampling power and scoring power. During the analysis, Autodock results were found to be more reproducible, implying that this software outperforms the MOE. The majority of the compounds, including M7, and M12 showed excellent binding energies and formed stable protein-ligand complexes with docking scores of - 29.66 kJ/mol and - 31.38 kJ/mol, respectively. The results were validated by molecular dynamics simulation studies where the stability and conformational transformation of the best protein-ligand complex were justified on the basis of RMSD and RMSF trajectory analysis. The drug likeness properties and toxicity profile of all compounds were determined by ADMETlab 2.0. Furthermore, the anticancer potential of the potent compounds were confirmed by cell viability (MTT) assay. This study suggested that selected compounds can be further investigated at molecular level and evaluated for cancer treatment and associated malignancies.

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  • 44.
    Aziz, Mubashir
    et al.
    Islamia Univ Bahawalpur, Pakistan.
    Ejaz, Syeda Abida
    Islamia Univ Bahawalpur, Pakistan.
    Zargar, Seema
    King Saud Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Akhtar, Naveed
    Islamia Univ Bahawalpur, Pakistan.
    Aborode, Abdullahi Tunde
    Mississippi State Univ, MS 39759 USA.
    Wani, Tanveer A.
    King Saud Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Batiha, Gaber El-Saber
    Damanhour Univ, Egypt.
    Siddique, Farhan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Royal Inst Med Sci RIMS, Pakistan.
    Alqarni, Mohammed
    Taif Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Akintola, Ashraf Akintayo
    Kyungpook Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Deep Learning and Structure-Based Virtual Screening for Drug Discovery against NEK7: A Novel Target for the Treatment of Cancer2022In: Molecules, ISSN 1431-5157, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 27, no 13, article id 4098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NIMA-related kinase7 (NEK7) plays a multifunctional role in cell division and NLRP3 inflammasone activation. A typical expression or any mutation in the genetic makeup of NEK7 leads to the development of cancer malignancies and fatal inflammatory disease, i.e., breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, gout, rheumatoid arthritis, and liver cirrhosis. Therefore, NEK7 is a promising target for drug development against various cancer malignancies. The combination of drug repurposing and structure-based virtual screening of large libraries of compounds has dramatically improved the development of anticancer drugs. The current study focused on the virtual screening of 1200 benzene sulphonamide derivatives retrieved from the PubChem database by selecting and docking validation of the crystal structure of NEK7 protein (PDB ID: 2WQN). The compounds library was subjected to virtual screening using Auto Dock Vina. The binding energies of screened compounds were compared to standard Dabrafenib. In particular, compound 762 exhibited excellent binding energy of -42.67 kJ/mol, better than Dabrafenib (-33.89 kJ/mol). Selected drug candidates showed a reactive profile that was comparable to standard Dabrafenib. To characterize the stability of protein-ligand complexes, molecular dynamic simulations were performed, providing insight into the molecular interactions. The NEK7-Dabrafenib complex showed stability throughout the simulated trajectory. In addition, binding affinities, pIC50, and ADMET profiles of drug candidates were predicted using deep learning models. Deep learning models predicted the binding affinity of compound 762 best among all derivatives, which supports the findings of virtual screening. These findings suggest that top hits can serve as potential inhibitors of NEK7. Moreover, it is recommended to explore the inhibitory potential of identified hits compounds through in-vitro and in-vivo approaches.

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  • 45.
    Balamurugan, Chandran
    et al.
    Gwangju Inst Sci & Technol GIST, South Korea; Wonkwang Univ, South Korea.
    Cho, Kyusang
    Gwangju Inst Sci & Technol GIST, South Korea.
    Park, Byoungwook
    Korea Res Inst Chem Technol, South Korea.
    Kim, Jehan
    Pohang Univ Sci & Technol, South Korea.
    Kim, Nara
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pak, Yusin
    Korea Inst Sci & Technol KIST, South Korea.
    Kong, Jaemin
    Gyeongsang Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Kwon, Sooncheol
    Gwangju Inst Sci & Technol GIST, South Korea; Wonkwang Univ, South Korea.
    Large modulation of the chemical and electronic sensitization of TiO2/Ag/NiO nanostructure via in situ hydrothermal-induced heterointerface engineering2022In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 430, article id 132690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical and electronic sensitization in metal oxide gas sensors are severely limited by poor dimension controls of metal oxide nanostructure and their electric/electronic properties. These limitations are overcome using hydrothermal-induced heterointerface engineering approaches. This work demonstrates that forming spherical titanium dioxide nanoparticles on a substrate significantly reduce a surface energy barrier of nucleation and induces novel mesophorous hierarchical TiO2 structure during hydrothermal synthesis, consequently increasing the surface area of the structure by similar to 3 times compared to that of control. In addition, we succeeded in tailoring the energetics of hierarchical TiO2 nanosctructure by decorating with the nickel oxide and silver nanoparticles, which results in a desirable semiconductors/metal heterointerface for fast charge transfer where silver nanoparticles bridge nickel oxide and TiO2 nanostructure, and silver nanoparticles serve as preferential sites for chemisorption and migration of oxygen anions. The resulting heterostructure sensing properties such as sensitivity, limit of detection and selectivity are studied as a function of operating temperature (30-150 degrees C), relative humidity (RH) and various volatile organic analytes concentrations. The TiO2/Ag/NiO heterostructure finally exhibits a high gas response of similar to 2.1 for acetone with a limit of detection of 34 ppb at 30 degrees C (or 21 ppb at 90 degrees C), and retains an excellent selectivity of acetone even at 90 % relative humidity. It exhibited a highly stable and speedy gas response for acetone toward various gases such as formaldehyde, ethanol, hydrogen sulfide, carbon monoxide even operating at 90 degrees C. Our results suggest a potential of constructed TiO2/Ag/NiO heterostructure for superior sensing volatile organic acetone and will also stimulate research on hetero-structured gas sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  • 46.
    Balion, Zbigniev
    et al.
    Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Lithuania.
    Sipailaite, Emilija
    Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Lithuania.
    Stasyte, Gabija
    Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Lithuania.
    Vailionyte, Agne
    Ferentis UAB, Lithuania; Ctr Phys Sci & Technol, Lithuania.
    Mazetyte-Godiene, Airina
    Ferentis UAB, Lithuania; Ctr Phys Sci & Technol, Lithuania.
    Seskeviciute, Ieva
    Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Lithuania.
    Bernotiene, Rasa
    Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Lithuania.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jekabsone, Aiste
    Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Lithuania.
    Investigation of Cancer Cell Migration and Proliferation on Synthetic Extracellular Matrix Peptide Hydrogels2020In: Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology, E-ISSN 2296-4185, Vol. 8, article id 773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical and mechanical properties of a tumor microenvironment are essential players in cancer progression, and it is important to precisely control the extracellular conditions while designing cancerin vitromodels. The study investigates synthetic hydrogel matrices from multi-arm polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized with collagen-like peptide (CLP) CG(PKG)(4)(POG)(4)(DOG)(4)alone and conjugated with either cell adhesion peptide RGD (mimicking fibronectin) or IKVAV (mimicking laminin). Human glioblastoma HROG36, rat C6 glioma cells, and A375 human melanoma cells were grown on the hydrogels and monitored for migration, proliferation, projected cell area, cell shape index, size and number, distribution of focal contacts in individual cells, and focal adhesion number. PEG-CLP-RGD induced migration of both glioma cell lines and also stimulated proliferation (assessed as metabolic activity) of HROG36 cells. Migration of C6 cells were also stimulated by PEG-CLP-IKVAV. These responses strongly correlated with the changes in adhesion and morphology parameters of individual cells - projected cell area, cell shape index, and focal contact number. Melanoma A375 cell proliferation was increased by PEG-CLP-RGD, and this was accompanied by a decrease in cell shape index. However, neither RGD nor IKVAV conjugated to PEG-CLP stimulated migratory capacity of A375 cells. Taken together, the study presents synthetic scaffolds with extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimicking peptides that allow for the exploration of the effect of ECM signaling to cancer cells.

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  • 47.
    Bamgbopa, Musbaudeen O.
    et al.
    Dubai Elect & Water Author DEWA, U Arab Emirates.
    Fetyan, Abdulmonem
    Dubai Elect & Water Author DEWA, U Arab Emirates.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Adelodun, Adedeji A.
    Fed Univ Technol Akure, Nigeria.
    Towards eco-friendly redox flow batteries with all bio-sourced cell components2022In: Journal of Energy Storage, ISSN 2352-152X, E-ISSN 2352-1538, Vol. 50, article id 104352Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research and few pilot deployments have demonstrated promising aqueous organic redox flow battery (RFB) systems. However, the claim that these organic RFB systems are eco-friendlier energy storage than Lithium-ion batteries and aqueous inorganic metallic RFB counterparts needs reinforcement, primarily if cell components other than redox-active species are still based on unsustainable materials. This thesis of the present work presents the prospects of achieving future eco-friendly RFBs with higher consideration for sustainability by adopting significant amounts of abundant bio-sourced/based materials for all main cell components. As we highlight the promising sources of the energy materials from a review of previous studies, we infer that plant derived quinones and other organic polymers may continue to dominate the organic redox-active species space. Furthermore, a candidate methodology to accomplish porous electrodes and membranes/separators of the eco-friendly RFBs is to apply stand-alone bio-based/sourced fibrils derived from cellulose, lignin, chitin, among other materials. These materials can be combined with (un)carbonised biomass or food wastes & residues to impart conductivity, catalytic activity, and ion selectivity. We explore symmetric chemistry as an ideal system for the eco-friendly RFBs of the discourse, given interplay between the electrolyte, electrode material and membrane dictates energy efficiency and cycling stability. These strategies also need to be coupled with further improvements to achieve reliability.

    The full text will be freely available from 2024-03-03 16:15
  • 48.
    Banerjee, Debashree
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hallberg, Tomas
    FOI Swedish Def Res Agcy, Sweden.
    Chen, Shangzhi
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kuang, Chaoyang
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liao, Mingna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kariis, Hans
    FOI Swedish Def Res Agcy, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electrical tuning of radiative cooling at ambient conditions2023In: Cell Reports Physical Science, E-ISSN 2666-3864, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 101274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Passive radiative cooling forms a sustainable means for cooling of objects through thermal radiation. Along with progress on static cooling systems, there is an emerging need for dynamic control to enable thermoregulation. Here, we demonstrate temperature regu-lation of devices at ambient pressure and temperature by electri-cally tuning their radiative cooling power. Our concept exploits the possibility to electrochemically tune the thermal emissivity and thereby cooling power of a conducting polymer, which enabled reversible control of device temperatures of around 0.25 degrees C at ambient conditions in a sky simulator. Besides tuneable radiative cooling by exposure to the sky, the concept could also contribute to reduced needs for indoor climate control by enabling dynamic control of thermal energy flows between indoor objects, such as be-tween people and walls.

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  • 49.
    Baryshnikov, Glib
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Henan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Valiev, Rashid R.
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Valiulina, Lenara I.
    Tomsk State Univ, Russia.
    Kurtsevich, Alexandr E.
    Tomsk State Univ, Russia.
    Kurten, Theo
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Sundholm, Dage
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Pittelkow, Michael
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Zhang, Jinglai
    Henan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Agren, Hans
    Henan Univ, Peoples R China; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Odd-Number Cyclo[n]Carbons Sustaining Alternating Aromaticity2022In: Journal of Physical Chemistry A, ISSN 1089-5639, E-ISSN 1520-5215, Vol. 126, no 16, p. 2445-2452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclo[n]carbons (n = 5, 7, 9,..., 29) composed from an odd number of carbon atoms are studied computationally at density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) levels of theory to get insight into their electronic structure and aromaticity. DFT calculations predict a strongly delocalized carbene structure of the cyclo[n]carbons and an aromatic character for all of them. In contrast, calculations at the CASSCF level yield geometrically bent and electronically localized carbene structures leading to an alternating double aromaticity of the odd-number cyclo[n]carbons. CASSCF calculations yield a singlet electronic ground state for the studied cyclo[n]carbons except for C25, whereas at the DFT level the energy difference between the lowest singlet and triplet states depends on the employed functional. The BHandHLYP functional predicts a triplet ground state of the larger odd-number cyclo[n]carbons starting from n = 13. Current-density calculations at the BHandHLYP level using the CASSCFoptimized molecular structures show that there is a through-space delocalization in the cyclo[n]carbons. The current density avoids the carbene carbon atom, leading to an alternating double aromaticity of the oddnumber cyclo[n]carbons satisfying the antiaromatic [4k+1] and aromatic [4k+3] rules. C11, C15, and C19 are aromatic and can be prioritized in future synthesis. We predict a bond-shift phenomenon for the triplet state of the cyclo[n]carbons leading to resonance structures that have different reactivity toward dimerization.

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  • 50.
    Beket, Gulzada
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Epishine AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Zubayer, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Qilun
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stahn, Jochen
    Paul Scherer Inst PSI, Switzerland.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Osterberg, Thomas
    Epishine AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Bergqvist, Jonas
    Epishine AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Overcoming the voltage losses caused by the acceptor-based interlayer in laminated indoor OPVs2023In: SMARTMAT, ISSN 2766-8525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Harvesting indoor light to power electronic devices for the Internet of Things has become an application scenario for emerging photovoltaics, especially utilizing organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Combined liquid- and solid-state processing, such as printing and lamination used in industry for developing indoor OPVs, also provides a new opportunity to investigate the device structure, which is otherwise hardly possible based on the conventional approach due to solvent orthogonality. This study investigates the impact of fullerene-based acceptor interlayer on the performance of conjugated polymer-fullerene-based laminated OPVs for indoor applications. We observe open-circuit voltage (V-OC) loss across the interface despite this arrangement being presumed to be ideal for optimal device performance. Incorporating insulating organic components such as polyethyleneimine (PEI) or polystyrene (PS) into fullerene interlayers decreases the work function of the cathode, leading to better energy level alignment with the active layer (AL) and reducing the V-OC loss across the interface. Neutron reflectivity studies further uncover two different mechanisms behind the V-OC increase upon the incorporation of these insulating organic components. The self-organized PEI layer could hinder the transfer of holes from the AL to the acceptor interlayer, while the gradient distribution of the PS-incorporated fullerene interlayer eliminates the thermalization losses. This work highlights the importance of structural dynamics near the extraction interfaces in OPVs and provides experimental demonstrations of interface investigation between solution-processed cathodic fullerene layer and bulk heterojunction AL.

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