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  • 1.
    Aamodt, Ina Thon
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Lovisenberg Diaconal Univ Coll, Norway.
    Lie, Irene
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Norway.
    Lycholip, Edita
    Vilnius Univ, Lithuania; Vilnius Univ, Lithuania.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Celutkiene, Jelena
    Vilnius Univ, Lithuania.
    Helleso, Ragnhild
    Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Informal Caregivers Experiences with Performing Telemonitoring in Heart Failure Care at Home-A Qualitative Study2022In: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 1237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Informal caregivers have an important role in caring for family members at home. Supporting persons with a chronic illness such as heart failure (HF) in managing their self-care is reported to be a challenge and telemonitoring has been suggested to be of support. Aim: to explore informal caregivers experiences with performing non-invasive telemonitoring to support persons with HF at home for 30 days following hospital discharge in Norway and Lithuania. Methods: A qualitative explorative study of informal caregivers performing non-invasive telemonitoring using lung-impedance measurements and short message service (SMS). Data was collected using semi-structured interviews with informal caregivers of persons with HF in NYHA class III-IV in Norway and Lithuania. Results: Nine interviews were conducted with informal caregivers of persons with HF who performed non-invasive telemonitoring at home. A sequential process of three categories emerged from the data: access to support, towards routinizing, and mastering non-invasive telemonitoring. Conclusion: Informal caregivers performed non-invasive telemonitoring for the first time in this study. Their experiences were of a sequential process that included access to support from health care professionals, establishing a routine together, and access to nurses or physicians in HF care as part of mastering. This study highlights involving informal caregivers and persons with HF together in the implementation and future research of telemonitoring in HF care.

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  • 2.
    Aamodt, Ina Thon
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Lycholip, Edita
    Vilnius Univ, Lithuania.
    Celutkiene, Jelena
    Vilnius Univ, Lithuania.
    von Lueder, Thomas
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Atar, Dan
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Falk, Ragnhild Sorum
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Helleso, Ragnhild
    Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lie, Irene
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Self-Care Monitoring of Heart Failure Symptoms and Lung Impedance at Home Following Hospital Discharge: Longitudinal Study2020In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 22, no 1, article id e15445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-care is key to the daily management of chronic heart failure (HF). After discharge from hospital, patients may struggle to recognize and respond to worsening HF symptoms. Failure to monitor and respond to HF symptoms may lead to unnecessary hospitalizations. Objective: This study aimed to (1) determine the feasibility of lung impedance measurements and a symptom diary to monitor HF symptoms daily at home for 30 days following hospital discharge and (2) determine daily changes in HF symptoms of pulmonary edema, lung impedance measurements, and if self-care behavior improves over time when patients use these self-care monitoring tools. Methods: This study used a prospective longitudinal design including patients from cardiology wards in 2 university hospitals-one in Norway and one in Lithuania. Data on HF symptoms and pulmonary edema were collected from 10 participants (mean age 64.5 years; 90% (9/10) male) with severe HF (New York Heart Association classes III and IV) who were discharged home after being hospitalized for an HF condition. HF symptoms were self-reported using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale for Heart Failure. Pulmonary edema was measured by participants using a noninvasive lung impedance monitor, the Cardio Set Edema Guard Monitor. Informal caregivers aided the participants with the noninvasive measurements. Results: The prevalence and burden of shortness of breath varied from participants experiencing them daily to never, whereas lung impedance measurements varied for individual participants and the group participants, as a whole. Self-care behavior score improved significantly (P=.007) from a median of 56 (IQR range 22-75) at discharge to a median of 81 (IQR range 72-98) 30 days later. Conclusions: Noninvasive measurement of lung impedance daily and the use of a symptom diary were feasible at home for 30 days in HF patients. Self-care behavior significantly improved after 30 days of using a symptom diary and measuring lung impedance at home. Further research is needed to determine if daily self-care monitoring of HF signs and symptoms, combined with daily lung impedance measurements, may reduce hospital readmissions.

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  • 3.
    Aamodt, Ina Thon
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway; Lovisenberg Diaconal Univ Coll, Norway.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Helleso, Ragnhild
    Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lie, Irene
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Tools to Support Self-Care Monitoring at Home: Perspectives of Patients with Heart Failure2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 23, article id 8916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-care monitoring at home can be a challenge for patients with heart failure (HF). Tools that leverage information and communication technology (ICT), comprise medical devices, or have written material may support their efforts at home. The aim of this study was to describe HF patients experiences and their prioritization of tools that support, or could support, self-care monitoring at home. A descriptive qualitative design employing semi-structured interviews was used with HF patients living at home and attending an HF outpatient clinic in Norway. We used a deductive analysis approach, using the concept of self-care monitoring with ICT tools, paper-based tools, medical devices, and tools to consult with healthcare professionals (HCPs) as the categorization matrix. Nineteen HF patients with a mean age of 64 years participated. ICT tools are used by individual participants to identify changes in their HF symptoms, but are not available by healthcare services. Paper-based tools, medical devices, and face-to-face consultation with healthcare professionals are traditional tools that are available and used by individual participants. HF patients use traditional and ICT tools to support recognizing, identifying, and responding to HF symptoms at home, suggesting that they could be used if they are available and supplemented by in-person consultation with HCPs.

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  • 4.
    Adamo, Marianna
    et al.
    Univ Brescia, Italy.
    Chioncel, Ovidiu
    Univ Med & Pharm Carol Davila, Romania.
    Pagnesi, Matteo
    Univ Brescia, Italy.
    Bayes-Genis, Antoni
    Univ Hosp Germans Trias i Pujol, Spain; Univ Hosp Germans Trias i Pujol, Spain; Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain; Inst Salud Carlos III, Spain.
    Abdelhamid, Magdy
    Cairo Univ, Egypt.
    Anker, Stefan D.
    German Ctr Cardiovasc Res DZHK, Germany; Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Antohi, Elena-Laura
    Univ Med & Pharm Carol Davila, Romania.
    Badano, Luigi
    Ist Auxol Italiano, Italy; Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Ben Gal, Tuvia
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Boehm, Michael
    Saarland Univ Hosp, Germany.
    Delgado, Victoria
    Univ Hosp Germans Trias i Pujol, Spain; Univ Hosp Germans Trias i Pujol, Spain; Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain; Inst Salud Carlos III, Spain.
    Dreyfus, Julien
    Ctr Cardiol Nord, France.
    Faletra, Francesco F.
    ISMETT Ist Mediterraneo Trapianti & Terapie Alta S, Italy; Fdn Cardioctr Ticino, Switzerland.
    Farmakis, Dimitrios
    Athens Univ Hosp Attikon, Greece.
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    Athens Univ Hosp Attikon, Greece.
    Grapsa, Julia
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Gustafsson, Finn
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Hausleiter, Joerg
    Div Cardiol, Germany.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karam, Nicole
    Univ Paris Cite, France.
    Lund, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lurz, Philipp
    Univ Med Ctr Mainz, Germany.
    Maisano, Francesco
    Univ Vita Salute, Italy.
    Moura, Brenda
    Univ Porto, Portugal; Porto Armed Forces Hosp, Portugal.
    Mullens, Wilfred
    Hosp Oost Limburg, Belgium.
    Praz, Fabien
    Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Sannino, Anna
    Univ Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Savarese, Gianluigi
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Tocchetti, Carlo Gabriele
    Univ Naples Federico II, Italy.
    van Empel, Vanessa P. M.
    Maastricht Univ Med Ctr MUMC, Netherlands.
    von Bardeleben, Ralph Stephan
    Univ Med Ctr Mainz, Germany.
    Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan
    Dokuz Eylul Univ, Turkiye.
    Zamorano, Jose Luis
    Hosp Univ Ramon y Cajal, Spain.
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Wroclaw Med Univ, Poland.
    Barbato, Emanuele
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Italy.
    Rosano, Giuseppe M. C.
    Dept Med Sci, Italy.
    Metra, Marco
    Univ Brescia, Italy; Univ Brescia, Italy.
    Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of chronic right-sided heart failure and tricuspid regurgitation. A clinical consensus statement of the Heart Failure Association (HFA) and the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) of the ESC2024In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Right-sided heart failure and tricuspid regurgitation are common and strongly associated with poor quality of life and an increased risk of heart failure hospitalizations and death. While medical therapy for right-sided heart failure is limited, treatment options for tricuspid regurgitation include surgery and, based on recent developments, several transcatheter interventions. However, the patients who might benefit from tricuspid valve interventions are yet unknown, as is the ideal time for these treatments given the paucity of clinical evidence. In this context, it is crucial to elucidate aetiology and pathophysiological mechanisms leading to right-sided heart failure and tricuspid regurgitation in order to recognize when tricuspid regurgitation is a mere bystander and when it can cause or contribute to heart failure progression. Notably, early identification of right heart failure and tricuspid regurgitation may be crucial and optimal management requires knowledge about the different mechanisms and causes, clinical course and presentation, as well as possible treatment options. The aim of this clinical consensus statement is to summarize current knowledge about epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of tricuspid regurgitation in right-sided heart failure providing practical suggestions for patient identification and management.

  • 5.
    Aengerud, Karin Hellstroem
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Brannstrom, Margareta
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Symptoms of Acute Myocardial Infarction as Described in Calls to Tele-Nurses and in Questionnaires A Mixed-Methods Study2023In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 150-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundPatient-reported symptoms of acute myocardial infarction (MI) may be affected by recall bias depending on when and where symptoms are assessed.AimThe aim of this study was to gain an understanding of patients symptom description in more detail before and within 24 hours after a confirmed MI diagnosis.MethodsA convergent parallel mixed-methods design was used to examine symptoms described in calls between the tele-nurse and the patient compared with symptoms selected by the patient from a questionnaire less than 24 hours after hospital admission. Quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed separately and then merged into a final interpretation.ResultsThirty patients (median age, 67.5 years; 20 men) were included. Chest pain was the most commonly reported symptom in questionnaires (24/30). Likewise, in 19 of 30 calls, chest pain was the first complaint mentioned, usually described together with the symptom onset. Expressions used to describe symptom quality were pain, pressure, discomfort, ache, cramp, tension, and soreness. Associated symptoms commonly described were pain or numbness in the arms, cold sweat, dyspnea, weakness, and nausea. Bodily sensations, such as feeling unwell or weak, were also described. Fear and tiredness were described in calls significantly less often than reported in questionnaires (P = .01 and P = .02), whereas "other" symptoms were more often mentioned in calls compared with answers given in the questionnaire (P = .02). Some symptoms expressed in the calls were not listed in the questionnaire, which expands the understanding of acute MI symptoms. The results showed no major inconsistencies between datasets.ConclusionPatients MI symptom descriptions in tele-calls and those reported in questionnaires after diagnosis are comparable and convergent.

  • 6.
    Agerstrom, Jens
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Andrell, Cecilia
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bremer, Anders
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Reg Kalmar Cty, Sweden.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    All else equal: Examining treatment bias and stereotypes based on patient ethnicity and socioeconomic status using in-hospital cardiac arrest clinical vignettes2024In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 63, p. 86-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research on ethnic and socioeconomic treatment differences following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) largely draws on register data. Due to the correlational nature of such data, it cannot be concluded whether detected differences reflect treatment bias/discrimination - whereby otherwise identical patients are treated differently solely due to sociodemographic factors. To be able to establish discrimination, experimental research is needed. Objective: The primary aim of this experimental study was to examine whether simulated IHCA patients receive different treatment recommendations based on ethnicity and socioeconomic status (SES), holding all other factors (e.g., health status) constant. Another aim was to examine health care professionals (HCP) stereotypical beliefs about these groups. Methods: HCP (N = 235) working in acute care made anonymous treatment recommendations while reading IHCA clinical vignettes wherein the patients ethnicity (Swedish vs. Middle Eastern) and SES had been manipulated. Afterwards they estimated to what extent hospital staff associate these patient groups with certain traits (stereotypes). Results: No significant differences in treatment recommendations for Swedish versus Middle Eastern or high versus low SES patients were found. Reported stereotypes about Middle Eastern patients were uniformly negative. SES-related stereotypes, however, were mixed. High SES patients were believed to be more competent (e.g., respected), but less warm (e.g., friendly) than low SES patients. Conclusions: Swedish HCP do not seem to discriminate against patients with Middle Eastern or low SES backgrounds when recommending treatment for simulated IHCA cases, despite the existence of negative stereotypes about these groups. Implications for health care equality and quality are discussed.

  • 7. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Ahlberg, Mona
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Being cared for in an Intensive Care Unit – family functioning and support2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When COVID-19 came as an uninvited guest into our everyday lives, nursing in intensive care was affected and thus the studies contain data from both before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Before the pandemic, most intensive care units, which care for patients with critical illness in a technical setting, allowed family members to visit the patient 24 hours a day. The intensive care unit is a stressful and frightening environment for both the patient and their family. They can be affected both mentally and physically, showing symptoms such as difficulty sleeping, stress and depression. The intensive cared patient often does not remember anything from the time they were cared for in the intensive care unit, and the family needs to explain and recount this unconscious time. During the pandemic, this changed, with restrictions and limited opportunities to visit the hospital and patient due to virus outbreaks. Family members received information about the patient's medical condition by phone from a physician.   

    The overall aim of this thesis was to explore and conceptualise the family functioning of families with a family member treated in the intensive care unit. There was also an intention to describe and evaluate how an intervention affects the family and individual family members in families where a family member received intensive care.

    In these studies, qualitative, quantitative, as well as mixed methods were utilised. Participants were adult intensive cared patients from seven intensive care clinics, and their families. The results examined between families are based on the patient and family characteristics.   

    The results from study I show that families who have experienced COVID-19 and with a family member who was cared for in an intensive care unit, have existential thoughts.   

    Study II shows no major impact on family function between families, but the answers differ within the families who experienced intensive care.   

    In study III, concerning families experiencing intensive care and attending family health conversations, there was an awareness of family function. The conversations brought the family closer together, through improved understanding of each other.  

    In study IV family functioning, hope and sense of coherence were com-pared among the participants in two intervention groups: Family health conversations and support group conversations. Family functioning and hope were higher in the group that participated in the family health conversations and comprehensibility, meaningfulness and vitality were higher among the participants in the support group conversation.  

    By exploring how family function affects the individual family member and the family as a unit during critical illness and intensive care, new ways of working can be strengthened in the care of patients and their families.    

    List of papers
    1. Family Health Conversations create awareness of family functioning.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family Health Conversations create awareness of family functioning.
    2020 (English)In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, no 2, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The whole family is affected if one family member is critically ill. The Family Health Conversation Intervention may give the family tools that support healthier family functioning.

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify which components of family function are affected when families participate in Family Health Conversations.

    DESIGN: A secondary analysis was performed of existing qualitative interviews. The Family Health Conversation is an intervention where nurses ask the family reflective questions, and reflection is made possible in three conversation sessions.

    METHODS: This study included transcribed data from 13 follow-up interviews from seven families attending Family Health Conversations after three and 12 months. Data were analysed with narrative analysis, focusing on family function.

    RESULTS: Three themes were identified. The families' family functioning had been supported with: improved understanding of each other-there was an understanding of being in the same situation but still having totally different experiences; more concern for each other-they talked about their different experiences and felt they had become closer to each other; and a process of working through-they had experienced working through various experiences, standing by and supporting, and then being able to move on.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Family Health Conversation Intervention is provided to families, accompanied by nurses. The families in this study gained an awareness of their family function that brought the family closer because of improved understanding of each other and the situation. The families experienced openness, and the family members spoke more freely with each other, which facilitated the progress of working through the experience of critical illness and helped to maintain healthy family functioning.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: It is important to have an overall perspective and to recognize the patient and the family as equally important within the family for awareness of family function.

    Keywords
    family members, family nursing, intensive care, narrativism, secondary analysis
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157714 (URN)10.1111/nicc.12454 (DOI)000516973500006 ()31197904 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Health Research Council in the South-East of Sweden [FORSS 466311]; Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linkoping University, Norrkoping, Sweden

    Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2022-11-10
    2. Family Health Conversations Versus Support Group Conversations When a Family Member Has Been Critically Ill: A Mixed Methods Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family Health Conversations Versus Support Group Conversations When a Family Member Has Been Critically Ill: A Mixed Methods Study
    2021 (English)In: Families, Systems & Health, ISSN 1091-7527, E-ISSN 1939-0602, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 293-305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: When a family member has been critically ill and cared for at an intensive care unit the individual family member as well as the family system are affected and in need of support. The aim of this study was to compare and contrast the responses from 2 different types of follow-up interventions for families of critically ill persons, focusing on individual hopes, health-related quality of life, family functioning and ability to cope with challenges. Method: Adult family members from 3 hospitals attended 1 of 2 interventions 2 months after intensive care. The family health conversation included the family. The support group conversation included just family members and not the patient who had experienced intensive care. Data were collected via self-reported questionnaires and follow-up interviews with family members. Quantitative and qualitative data were first analyzed separately, and the results were then integrated through mixed methods analysis. Results: A total of 38 family members took part in the interventions. Family members in the 2 intervention groups talked about how they had more hope for the future, and about how talking within the family and the group had helped them justify their feelings, which empowered them in the transition toward a healthier quality of life. Comparisons of the interventions show a higher significance of family function and hope in the family health conversation. Discussion: The article illustrates a disparity between how family members function and the needs they have for follow-up. We discuss what kind of follow-up these persons need.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING FOUNDATION-AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC, 2021
    Keywords
    family members; family nursing; family relations; intensive care; mixed methods
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-178966 (URN)10.1037/fsh0000607 (DOI)000687054400012 ()34410772 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Health Research Council in the Southeast of Sweden [FORSS 466311]; Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Norrkoping, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden

    Available from: 2021-09-07 Created: 2021-09-07 Last updated: 2022-11-10
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  • 8.
    Ahlberg, Mona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Family functioning of families experiencing intensive care and the specific impact of the COVID-19 pandemic: A grounded theory study2023In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 76, article id 103397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: In order to provide a deeper understanding of family functioning, the aim of this study was to identify, describe and conceptualise the family functioning of families where a formerly critically ill family member had stayed at the intensive care unit, with the impact of a pandemic.Research methodology/design: The study has a grounded theory design including interviews with eight families.Setting: Former adult intensive care patients cared for Covid-19 infection and their family. Eight patients and twelve family members from three different intensive care units.Main outcome measures: The results presented are grounded in data and identified in the core category "Existential issues" and the categories "Value considerateness; Anxiety and insecurity in life; Insight into the unpredictability of life." Findings: The core category could be found in all data and its relationship and impact on the categories and each other. The core is a theoretical construction, whereas the family functioning of families where a formerly critically ill family member had stayed at the intensive care unit was identified, described, and conceptualised. Being able to talk repeatedly about existential issues and the anxiety and insecurity in life, with people that have similar experiences helps the patient and their family to consider and gain insight into the unpredictability of life, and thereby better cope with changes in life.Conclusion: There is awareness about the love that exists within the family. A willing to supporting each other in the family even if the critical illness made the family anxious and afraid. Implications for clinical practice: Even if the pandemic Covid-19 led to restrictions inhibiting family focused nursing, it is important to confirm the family as a part of the caring of the ICU patient. The patients are not alone, their family are fighting together for the future.

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  • 9.
    Ahlberg, Mona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Family Health Conversations create awareness of family functioning.2020In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, no 2, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The whole family is affected if one family member is critically ill. The Family Health Conversation Intervention may give the family tools that support healthier family functioning.

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify which components of family function are affected when families participate in Family Health Conversations.

    DESIGN: A secondary analysis was performed of existing qualitative interviews. The Family Health Conversation is an intervention where nurses ask the family reflective questions, and reflection is made possible in three conversation sessions.

    METHODS: This study included transcribed data from 13 follow-up interviews from seven families attending Family Health Conversations after three and 12 months. Data were analysed with narrative analysis, focusing on family function.

    RESULTS: Three themes were identified. The families' family functioning had been supported with: improved understanding of each other-there was an understanding of being in the same situation but still having totally different experiences; more concern for each other-they talked about their different experiences and felt they had become closer to each other; and a process of working through-they had experienced working through various experiences, standing by and supporting, and then being able to move on.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Family Health Conversation Intervention is provided to families, accompanied by nurses. The families in this study gained an awareness of their family function that brought the family closer because of improved understanding of each other and the situation. The families experienced openness, and the family members spoke more freely with each other, which facilitated the progress of working through the experience of critical illness and helped to maintain healthy family functioning.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: It is important to have an overall perspective and to recognize the patient and the family as equally important within the family for awareness of family function.

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  • 10.
    Ahlberg, Mona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Persson, Carina
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Exploring family functioning and - hardiness in families experiencing adult intensive care - A cross-sectional study2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being cared for in an intensive care unit affects both the patient being cared for and the family in various ways. The family is of great importance for the recovery of the former intensive-care patient. The aim is to explore family functioning and family hardiness in families of former intensive care patients. A cross-sectional study using two self-reported questionnaires. Former adult intensive care patients and their family were recruited to participate between December 2017 and June 2019. The data were coded and entered the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 25, for analysis. To explore questionnaire data, descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed. Scale values were calculated on, both family wise and between the patients and the family members. STROBE checklist was used. Data was collected from 60 families (60 former intensive cared patients and 85 family members) and showed that 50 families scored healthy family functioning and 52 high strengths in hardiness. The data showed small variations between and within families for family functioning and family hardiness, there were only two families scoring low for both family functioning and hardiness. The variation was higher within the families, but there was no significance level.The conclusions were that family functioning and hardiness was, to a large extent, assessed as good by the families. Nevertheless, it is important to help the family obtain information and support. So, the family need to continue to communicate, finding coping abilities and strengths in adopting new strategies to protect the family unit. The family are very important for members mental and physical recovery as the health of one family member affects the family as a unit.

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  • 11.
    Ahlberg, Mona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Persson, Carina
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Family Health Conversations Versus Support Group Conversations When a Family Member Has Been Critically Ill: A Mixed Methods Study2021In: Families, Systems & Health, ISSN 1091-7527, E-ISSN 1939-0602, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 293-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: When a family member has been critically ill and cared for at an intensive care unit the individual family member as well as the family system are affected and in need of support. The aim of this study was to compare and contrast the responses from 2 different types of follow-up interventions for families of critically ill persons, focusing on individual hopes, health-related quality of life, family functioning and ability to cope with challenges. Method: Adult family members from 3 hospitals attended 1 of 2 interventions 2 months after intensive care. The family health conversation included the family. The support group conversation included just family members and not the patient who had experienced intensive care. Data were collected via self-reported questionnaires and follow-up interviews with family members. Quantitative and qualitative data were first analyzed separately, and the results were then integrated through mixed methods analysis. Results: A total of 38 family members took part in the interventions. Family members in the 2 intervention groups talked about how they had more hope for the future, and about how talking within the family and the group had helped them justify their feelings, which empowered them in the transition toward a healthier quality of life. Comparisons of the interventions show a higher significance of family function and hope in the family health conversation. Discussion: The article illustrates a disparity between how family members function and the needs they have for follow-up. We discuss what kind of follow-up these persons need.

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  • 12.
    Aimo, Alberto
    et al.
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Italy; Fdn Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Italy.
    Vergaro, Giuseppe
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Italy; Fdn Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Italy.
    Gonzalez, Arantxa
    Univ Navarra, Spain; Navarra Inst Hlth Res, Spain; Carlos III Inst Hlth, Spain.
    Barison, Andrea
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Italy; Fdn Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Italy.
    Lupon, Josep
    Hosp Badalona Germans Trias & Pujol, Spain.
    Delgado, Victoria
    Hosp Badalona Germans Trias & Pujol, Spain.
    Richards, A. Mark
    Univ Otago, New Zealand.
    de Boer, Rudolf A.
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Netherlands.
    Thum, Thomas
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria; German Ctr Cardiovasc Res DZHK, Germany.
    Arfsten, Henrike
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria; German Ctr Cardiovasc Res DZHK, Germany.
    Hulsmann, Martin
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Falcao-Pires, Ines
    Univ Porto, Portugal.
    Diez, Javier
    Ctr Appl Med Res, Spain.
    Foo, Roger S. Y.
    Natl Univ Singapore Hosp, Singapore.
    Chan, Mark Yan Yee
    Natl Univ Singapore Hosp, Singapore.
    Anene-Nzelu, Chukwuemeka G.
    Natl Univ Singapore Hosp, Singapore.
    Abdelhamid, Magdy
    Cairo Univ, Egypt.
    Adamopoulos, Stamatis
    Onassis Cardiac Surg Ctr, Greece.
    Anker, Stefan D.
    Charite, Germany; Charite, Germany.
    Belenkov, Yuri
    Lomonosv Moscow State Univ, Russia.
    Gal, Tuvia B.
    Rabin Med Ctr, Israel.
    Cohen-Solal, Alain
    Hosp Lariboisiere, France.
    Bohm, Michael
    Univ Saarland, Germany.
    Chioncel, Ovidiu
    Univ Med & Pharm Carol Davila, Romania.
    Jankowska, Ewa A.
    Wroclaw Med Univ, Poland.
    Gustafsson, Finn
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Hill, Loreena
    Queens Univ Belfast, North Ireland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Januzzi, James L.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, MA 02114 USA; Baim Inst Clin Res, MA USA.
    Jhund, Pardeep
    Univ Glasgow, Scotland.
    Lopatin, Yuri
    Volgograd State Med Univ, Russia.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Metra, Marco
    Univ Brescia, Italy.
    Milicic, Davor
    Univ Zagreb, Croatia.
    Moura, Brenda
    Univ Porto, Portugal; Porto Armed Forces Hosp, Portugal.
    Mueller, Christian
    Univ Hosp, Switzerland.
    Mullens, Wilfried
    Hosp Oost Limburg, Belgium.
    Nunez, Julio
    Univ Valencia, Spain.
    Piepoli, Massimo F.
    Castelsangiovanni Hosp, Italy.
    Rakisheva, Amina
    Sci Res Inst Cardiol & Internal Med, Kazakhstan.
    Ristic, Arsen D.
    Univ Clin Ctr Serbia, Serbia; Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Rossignol, Patrick
    Univ Lorraine, France; CHRU Nancy, France.
    Savarese, Gianluigi
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Tocchetti, Carlo G.
    Univ Naples Federico II, Italy.
    van Linthout, Sophie
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany; German Ctr Cardiovasc Res DZHK, Germany.
    Volterrani, Maurizio
    IRCCS San Raffaele, Italy.
    Seferovic, Petar
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia; Serbian Acad Arts & Sci, Serbia.
    Rosano, Giuseppe
    Univ London, England.
    Coats, Andrew J. S.
    Univ Warwick, England.
    Emdin, Michele
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Italy; Fdn Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Italy.
    Bayes-Genis, Antoni
    Carlos III Inst Hlth, Spain; Hosp Badalona Germans Trias & Pujol, Spain; Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Cardiac remodelling - Part 2: Clinical, imaging and laboratory findings. A review from the Study Group on Biomarkers of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology2022In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 944-958Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In patients with heart failure, the beneficial effects of drug and device therapies counteract to some extent ongoing cardiac damage. According to the net balance between these two factors, cardiac geometry and function may improve (reverse remodelling, RR) and even completely normalize (remission), or vice versa progressively deteriorate (adverse remodelling, AR). RR or remission predict a better prognosis, while AR has been associated with worsening clinical status and outcomes. The remodelling process ultimately involves all cardiac chambers, but has been traditionally evaluated in terms of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction. This is the second part of a review paper by the Study Group on Biomarkers of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology dedicated to ventricular remodelling. This document examines the proposed criteria to diagnose RR and AR, their prevalence and prognostic value, and the variables predicting remodelling in patients managed according to current guidelines. Much attention will be devoted to RR in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction because most studies on cardiac remodelling focused on this setting.

  • 13.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hosp Trust, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Supplemental selenium and coenzyme Q10 reduce glycation along with cardiovascular mortality in an elderly population with low selenium status - A four-year, prospective, randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial2020In: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0946-672X, E-ISSN 1878-3252, Vol. 61, article id UNSP 126541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A low intake of selenium has been shown to increase the risk of cardiovascular mortality, and supplementation of selenium and coenzyme Q10 influences this. The mechanism behind is unclear although effects on inflammation, oxidative stress and microRNA expression have been reported. Fructosamine, a marker of long-term glycaemic control, is also a marker of increased risk of heart disease and death, even in non-diabetics. Objective: To analyse the impact of selenium and coenzyme Q10 supplementation on the concentration of fructosamine. Also, the relation between pre-intervention serum selenium concentration and the effect on fructosamine of the intervention was studied. Methods: Fructosamine plasma concentration was determined in 219 participants after six and 42 months of intervention with selenium yeast (200 mu g/day) and coenzyme Q10 (200 mg/ day) (n = 118 of which 20 had diabetes at inclusion), or placebo (n = 101 of which 18 had diabetes at inclusion). Pre-intervention, the serum selenium levels were 67 mu g/L (active treatment group: 66.6 mu g/L; placebo group: 67.4 mu g/L), corresponding to an estimated intake of 35 mu g/day. Changes in concentrations of fructosamine following intervention were assessed by the use of T-tests, repeated measures of variance, and ANCOVA analyses. Results: Post-intervention selenium concentrations were 210 mu g/L in the active group and 72 mu g/L in the placebo group. A lower concentration of fructosamine could be seen as a result of the intervention in the total population (P = 0.001) in both the males (P = 0.04) and in the females (P = 0.01) in the non-diabetic population (P = 0.002), and in both the younger ( < 76 years) (P = 0.01) and the older (>= 6 years) participants (P = 0.03). No difference could be demonstrated in fructosamine concentration in the diabetic patients, but the total sample was small (n = 38). In subjects with a low pre-intervention level of serum selenium the intervention gave a more pronounced decrease in fructosamine compared with those with a higher baseline selenium level. Conclusion: A significantly lower concentration of fructosamine was observed in the elderly community-living participants supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10 for 42 months compared to those on the placebo. As oxidative mechanisms are involved in the glycation of proteins, less glycoxidation could be a result of the supplementation of selenium and coenzyme Q10, which could have contributed to lower cardiac mortality and less inflammation, as has earlier been reported.

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  • 14.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Def Res Agcy, Sweden.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hosp Trust, Norway; Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Improved cardiovascular health by supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10: applying structural equation modelling (SEM) to clinical outcomes and biomarkers to explore underlying mechanisms in a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled intervention project in Sweden2022In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 61, no 6, p. 3135-3148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Selenium and coenzyme Q10 have synergistic antioxidant functions. In a four-year supplemental trial in elderly Swedes with a low selenium status, we found improved cardiac function, less cardiac wall tension and reduced cardiovascular mortality up to 12 years of follow-up. Here we briefly review the main results, including those from studies on biomarkers related to cardiovascular risk that were subsequently conducted. In an effort, to explain underlying mechanisms, we conducted a structured analysis of the inter-relationship between biomarkers. Methods Selenium yeast (200 mu g/day) and coenzyme Q10 (200 mg/ day), or placebo was given to 443 elderly community-living persons, for 48 months. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was used to investigate the statistical inter-relationships between biomarkers related to inflammation, oxidative stress, insulin-like growth factor 1, expression of microRNA, fibrosis, and endothelial dysfunction and their impact on the clinical effects. The main study was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov at 30th of September 2011, and has the identifier NCT01443780. Results In addition to positive clinical effects, the intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10 was also associated with favourable effects on biomarkers of cardiovascular risk. Using these results in the SEM model, we showed that the weights of the first-order factors inflammation and oxidative stress were high, together forming a second-order factor inflammation/oxidative stress influencing the factors, fibrosis (beta = 0.74; p < 0.001) and myocardium (beta = 0.65; p < 0.001). According to the model, the intervention impacted fibrosis and myocardium through these factors, resulting in improved cardiac function and reduced CV mortality. Conclusion Selenium reduced inflammation and oxidative stress. According to the SEM analysis, these effects reduced fibrosis and improved myocardial function pointing to the importance of supplementation in those low on selenium and coenzyme Q10.

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  • 15. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Allemann, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Online support for informal carers of persons with heart failure: Focus on perceptions, development and experiences2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) is a common condition, and its prevalence is expected to increase. The illness trajectory is unpredictable, and its effects will include a potential impact on informal carers, i.e., family, friends, and significant others. Sometimes these persons are affected by the help and care they provide in such a way that they might themselves need support. However, they may be unrecognised in their endeavours, and might also experience a lack of support, especially from healthcare. Online solutions are considered to have the potential to provide accessible support to carers that is also anticipated to be cost-effective.   

    Aim: This thesis focuses on support to informal carers to persons living with HF, but also take the viewpoint of the person with HF by exploring social supports associations with their health and well-being. The overall aim was to explore perceptions, development, and experiences of online support for informal carers.  

    Method: This thesis comprises four studies. Study I had a cross-sectional design using self-reported data and data from the Swedish Pace-maker and ICD Registry. Data from 1,550 persons with HF who were living with an ICD and who had complete data on the outcome variable were utilised for both descriptive analysis and logistic regression. The outcome variable, perceived social support, was measured using the questionnaire Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), which includes measuring support from significant others, family, and friends. The logistic regression was conducted to compare those dichotomised as having low/medium perceived social support to those having high levels of support. Study II had a qualitative design, and data were collected through 8 focus groups with 23 informal carers of persons with HF to explore their perceptions of how online solutions could be of value for support. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Study III had a descriptive design. It describes the co-design process of an online support pro-gramme for carers through three phases. In phase I, topics and content that reflected carers needs and preferences were identified. In phase II, the content for the support programme was developed and through phase III the content was refined and finalised. Informal carers participated in every phase, and the co-design process also involved professionals with expertise in, for example, HF and caregiving, for the development of content. It was an iterative process, moving back and forth between phases, and the re-search group acted as coordinators and ensured that carers’ voices were kept central to the process. Study IV had a qualitative design, and data were collected through individual semi-structured interviews with 15 carers. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The study focused on informal carers' experiences of online, co-designed support pro-gramme while being participants in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) that has the aim of studying the effects of engaging with the programme.  

    Results: The findings show that one in five diagnosed with HF and living with an ICD reported low/medium levels of social support and that these persons had higher odds of negative psychosocial outcomes. This un-derscores the value and importance of support from informal carers for the well-being of those with HF. The thesis focused on perceptions, development, and experiences of online support for informal carers. The findings suggest that a co-designed support programme has the potential to be usable and useful for carers considering the online format and its content. It may provide insights, preparedness, and validation in relation to being a carer of a person with HF. However, carers may have an ‘ambiguous stance’ towards the online format and going online for support may not be the preferred form of support for all carers.   

    Conclusion: A co-designed online support programme, when built on a trusted platform within a healthcare context, may be considered both usable and useful for carers. The online format and content also provide the potential to offer timely and adaptable support. The content, developed in a collaboration between carers and professionals, offers evidence-based, relevant information, thereby possibly avoiding seeming impersonal, which can also be beneficial. The programme acknowledges the intertwined lives of carers and those with HF, and its content reflects this, potentially also enhancing its perception as usable and useful for carers. Still, the potential of the support programme depends on carers being aware of its existence, or being made aware, and can further recognise its value. The support programme is considered to have the capacity to be relevant for a broad group of carers, and therefore efforts may be of importance to ensure it is accessed and utilised. However, it is also important to take into account that not everyone may be willing or able to go online for support, or may wish to stay in a caring role. Healthcare also needs to recognise this when offering support to carers and the online support may be regarded an option among several. 

    List of papers
    1. Perceived Social Support in Persons With Heart Failure Living With an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: A Cross-sectional Explorative Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived Social Support in Persons With Heart Failure Living With an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: A Cross-sectional Explorative Study
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 6, p. E1-E8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The links between chronic illness, psychological well-being, and social support have previously been established. Social isolation and loneliness have shown an increased mortality risk for those with heart failure (HF). Increasingly more people with HF are living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), but only a few small-scale studies have focused on social support in this population.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore factors related to perceived social support in a large cohort of individuals with HF living with an ICD.

    METHODS: All eligible adult ICD recipients in the Swedish ICD registry were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. For this analysis, those with HF and complete data on perceived social support were included (N = 1550; age, 67.3 (SD, 9.8) years; 19.5% female).

    RESULTS: Most reported a high level of social support, but 18% did not. In logistic regression, living alone was the greatest predictor of low/medium support. Lower social support for those living alone was associated with poorer perceived health status, having symptoms of depression, and experiencing low perceived control. For those living with someone, lower support was associated with female gender, symptoms of depression and anxiety, and less control. Heart failure status and perceived symptom severity were not related to the outcome.

    CONCLUSION: One in five participants reported low/medium social support. Our study underlines the complex relationships between perceived social support, psychological well-being and perceived control over the heart condition. Multiple aspects need to be taken into account when developing interventions to provide psychosocial support and optimize outcomes in this patient group.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154035 (URN)10.1097/JCN.0000000000000523 (DOI)000457866800001 ()30063538 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2023-11-14
    2. Perceptions of Information and Communication Technology as Support for Family Members of Persons With Heart Failure: Qualitative Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of Information and Communication Technology as Support for Family Members of Persons With Heart Failure: Qualitative Study
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    2019 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 21, no 7, article id e13521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) affects not only the person diagnosed with the syndrome but also family members, who often have the role of informal carers. The needs of these carers are not always met, and information and communications technology (ICT) could have the potential to support them in their everyday life. However, knowledge is lacking about how family members perceive ICT and see opportunities for this technology to support them. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of ICT solutions as supportive aids among family members of persons with HF. Methods: A qualitative design was applied. A total of 8 focus groups, comprising 23 family members of persons affected by HF, were conducted between March 2015 and January 2017. Participants were recruited from 1 hospital in Sweden. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to find family members of persons with symptomatic HF from diverse backgrounds. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The analysis revealed 4 categories and 9 subcategories. The first category, about how ICT could provide relevant support, included descriptions of how ICT could be used for communication with health care personnel, for information and communication retrieval, plus opportunities to interact with persons in similar life situations and to share support with peers and extended family. The second category, about how ICT could provide access, entailed how ICT could offer solutions not bound by time or place and how it could be both timely and adaptable to different life situations. ICT could also provide an arena for family members to which they might not otherwise have had access. The third category concerned how ICT could be too impersonal and how it could entail limited personal interaction and individualization, which could lead to concerns about usability. It was emphasized that ICT could not replace physical meetings. The fourth category considered how ICT could be out of scope, reflecting the fact that some family members were generally uninterested in ICT and had difficulties envisioning how it could be used for support. It was also discussed as more of a solution for the future. Conclusions: Family members described multiple uses for ICT and agreed that ICT could provide access to relevant sources of information from which family members could potentially exchange support. ICT was also considered to have its limitations and was out of scope for some but with expected use in the future. Even though some family members seemed hesitant about ICT solutions in general, this might not mean they are unreceptive to suggestions about their usage in, for example, health care. Thus, a variety of factors should be considered to facilitate future implementations of ICT tools in clinical practice.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    JMIR PUBLICATIONS, INC, 2019
    Keywords
    family; caregivers; telemedicine; perception; heart failure; social support; focus groups; qualitative research
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159249 (URN)10.2196/13521 (DOI)000476841200001 ()31313662 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [FORSS-665001]; Swedish National Science Council (VR) [K2015-99X -22124-04-4]; Swedish National Science Council/Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare (VR-FORTE) [2014-4100]

    Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2024-01-17
    3. The co-design of an online support programme with and for informal carers of people with heart failure: A methodological paper
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The co-design of an online support programme with and for informal carers of people with heart failure: A methodological paper
    Show others...
    2023 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 32, no 19-20, p. 7589-7604Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe the co-designing process of an online support programme with and for informal carers of people with heart failure.Design A co-design process built on core concepts and ideas embedded in co-design methodology.Data sources Our co-design process included three phases involving 32 informal caregivers and 25 content creators; (1) Identification of topics and content through literature searches, focus group interviews and user group sessions; (2) Development of the online support programme and; (3) Refinement and finalization which included testing a paper prototype followed by testing the online version and testing and approval of the final version of the support programme.Outcomes The co-design process resulted in a support programme consisting of 15 different modules relevant to informal carers, delivered on a National Health Portal.Conclusion Co-design is an explorative process where researchers need to balance a range of potentially conflicting factors and to ensure that the end users are genuinely included in the process.Relevance to clinical practice Emphasizing equal involvement of end users (e.g. carers or patients) in the design and development of healthcare interventions aligns with contemporary ideas of person-centred care and provides a valuable learning opportunity for those involved. Furthermore, a co-designed online support programme has the capacity to be both accessible and meet end users information and support needs, thereby optimizing their self-care abilities. Additionally, an online support programme provides the opportunity to address current challenges regarding scarce resources and the lack of healthcare personnel.Reporting methods Consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ).Patient or public contribution Both informal carers and content creators were involved in developing the support programme.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY, 2023
    Keywords
    heart diseases; informal caregiving; information and communication technology; participatory design; web-based support
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-197420 (URN)10.1111/jocn.16856 (DOI)001052348700001 ()37605222 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare [dnr 2014-4100]; Swedish Research Council; Familjen Kamprads stiftelse [2014-34016-113474-48]; [20210130]

    Available from: 2023-09-05 Created: 2023-09-05 Last updated: 2024-02-01
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  • 16.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andreasson, Frida
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Lennart
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The co-design of an online support programme with and for informal carers of people with heart failure: A methodological paper2023In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 32, no 19-20, p. 7589-7604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe the co-designing process of an online support programme with and for informal carers of people with heart failure.Design A co-design process built on core concepts and ideas embedded in co-design methodology.Data sources Our co-design process included three phases involving 32 informal caregivers and 25 content creators; (1) Identification of topics and content through literature searches, focus group interviews and user group sessions; (2) Development of the online support programme and; (3) Refinement and finalization which included testing a paper prototype followed by testing the online version and testing and approval of the final version of the support programme.Outcomes The co-design process resulted in a support programme consisting of 15 different modules relevant to informal carers, delivered on a National Health Portal.Conclusion Co-design is an explorative process where researchers need to balance a range of potentially conflicting factors and to ensure that the end users are genuinely included in the process.Relevance to clinical practice Emphasizing equal involvement of end users (e.g. carers or patients) in the design and development of healthcare interventions aligns with contemporary ideas of person-centred care and provides a valuable learning opportunity for those involved. Furthermore, a co-designed online support programme has the capacity to be both accessible and meet end users information and support needs, thereby optimizing their self-care abilities. Additionally, an online support programme provides the opportunity to address current challenges regarding scarce resources and the lack of healthcare personnel.Reporting methods Consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ).Patient or public contribution Both informal carers and content creators were involved in developing the support programme.

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  • 17.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Designing and evaluating information and communication technology-based interventions? Be aware of the needs of older people2020In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 370-372Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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  • 18.
    Amin, Awin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nordén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa. Linköping University.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences.
    Patient-reported participation in hepatopancreatobiliary surgery cancer care: A pilot intervention study with patient-owned fast-track protocols2022In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 31, no 3, article id e13570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Fast-track concepts have been implemented in hepatopancreatobiliary surgery cancer care to improve postoperative recovery. For optimal postoperative care, patient participation is also required. The aim was to investigate and analyse whether an intervention with patient-owned fast-track protocols (PFTPs) may lead to increased patient participation and improve information for patients who underwent surgery for hepatopancreatobiliary cancer. Methods A quantitative comparative design with a control and intervention group was used. The participants in the intervention group followed a PFTP during their admission. After discharge, the patients answered a questionnaire regarding patient participation. Data analyses were performed with descriptive statistics and ANCOVA. Results The results are based on a total of 222 completed questionnaires: 116 in the control group and 106 in the intervention group. It is uncertain whether the PFTP increased patient participation and information, but its use may indicate an improvement for the patient group. Conclusion A successful implementation strategy for the use of PFTP, with daily reconciliations, could be part of the work required to improve overall satisfaction with patient participation.

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  • 19.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Ulrika
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ranerup, Agneta
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Midlov, Patrik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patients and Professionals as Partners in Hypertension Care: Qualitative Substudy of a Randomized Controlled Trial Using an Interactive Web-Based System Via Mobile Phone2021In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 23, no 6, article id e26143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of technology has the potential to support the patients active participation regarding treatment of hypertension. This might lead to changes in the roles of the patient and health care professional and affect the partnership between them. Objective: The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the partnership between patients and health care professionals and the roles of patients and professionals in hypertension management when using an interactive web-based system for self-management of hypertension via the patients own mobile phone. Methods: Focus group interviews were conducted with 22 patients and 15 professionals participating in a randomized controlled trial in Sweden aimed at lowering blood pressure (BP) using an interactive web-based system via mobile phones. The interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: Three themes were identified: the technology, the patient, and the professional. The technology enabled documentation of BP treatment, mainly for sharing knowledge between the patient and the professional. The patients gained increased knowledge of BP values and their relation to daily activities and treatment. They were able to narrate about their BP treatment and take a greater responsibility, inspired by new insights and motivation for lifestyle changes. Based on the patients understanding of hypertension, professionals could use the system as an educational tool and some found new ways of communicating BP treatment with patients. Some reservations were raised about using the system, that it might be too time-consuming to function in clinical practice and that too much measuring could result in stress for the patient and an increased workload for the professionals. In addition, not all professionals and patients had adopted the instructions regarding the use of the system, resulting in less realization of its potential. Conclusions: The use of the system led to the patients taking on a more active role in their BP treatment, becoming more of an expert of their BP. When using the system as intended, the professionals experienced it as a useful resource for communication regarding BP and lifestyle. Patients and professionals described a consultation on more equal grounds. The use of technology in hypertension management can promote a constructive and person-centered partnership between patient and professional. However, implementation of a new way of working should bring benefits and not be considered a burden for the professionals. To establish a successful partnership, both the patient and the professional need to be motivated toward a new way of working.

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  • 20.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Harris, Katie
    Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Chalmers, John
    Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Ekholm, Mikael
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Midlov, Patrik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Variability in home blood pressure and its association with renal function and pulse pressure in patients with treated hypertension in primary care2023In: Journal of Human Hypertension, ISSN 0950-9240, E-ISSN 1476-5527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood pressure variability (BPV) represents a cardiovascular risk factor, regardless of mean level of blood pressure (BP). In this post-hoc analysis from the PERson-centredness in Hypertension management using Information Technology (PERHIT) study, we aimed to explore BPV in daily home measurements in hypertensive patients from primary care, to identify factors associated with high BPV and to investigate whether estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and pulse pressure, as markers of target organ damage (TOD), are associated with BPV. For eight consecutive weeks, 454 participants reported their daily BP and heart rate in their mobile phone, along with reports of lifestyle and hypertension-related factors. Systolic BP (SBP) values were used to calculate BPV with coefficient of variation (CV) as primary estimate. Background characteristics and self-reports were tested between fifths of CV in a linear regression model, adjusted for age and sex. Associations between BPV and eGFR and pulse pressure were tested with linear and logistic regression models. Higher home BPV was associated with higher age, BP, heart rate, and smoking. BPV was lower for participants with low alcohol consumption and treatment with calcium channel blockers. There was a significant association between BPV and pulse pressure (P = 0.015), and between BPV and eGFR (P = 0.049). Participants with high BPV reported more dizziness and palpitations. In conclusion, pulse pressure and eGFR were significantly associated with home BPV. Older age, high BP, heart rate, and smoking were associated with high BPV, but treatment with calcium channel blockers and low alcohol consumption was associated with low BPV. Trial registration: The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov [NCT03554382].

  • 21.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wennersten, Andre
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Healthcare, Sweden.
    Midloev, Patrik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    PERson-centredness in Hypertension management using Information Technology: a randomized controlled trial in primary care2023In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 246-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives:To increase the proportion of individuals with hypertension obtaining a blood pressure (BP) of less than 140/90 mmHg by improving the management of hypertension in daily life from a person-centred perspective.Methods:In this unblinded randomized controlled trial, we tested an interactive web-based self-management system for hypertension. A total of 949 patients with hypertension from 31 primary healthcare centres (PHCCs) in Sweden were randomized 1 : 1 to either the intervention or usual care group. The intervention included daily measurement - via the participants mobile phone - of BP and pulse and reports of well being, symptoms, lifestyle, medication intake and side effects for eight consecutive weeks. It also included reminders and optional motivational messages. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants obtaining BP of less than 140/90 mmHg at 8 weeks and 12 months. Significance was tested by Pearsons chi(2)-test.Results:A total of 862 patients completed the trial, 442 in the intervention group and 420 in the control group. The primary outcome (BP <140/90 mmHg) at 8 weeks was achieved by 48.8% in the intervention group and 39.9% in the control group (P = 0.006). At 12 months, 47.1% (intervention) and 41.0% (control group) had a BP less than 140/90 mmHg (P = 0.071).Conclusion:The proportion of participants with a controlled BP of less than 140/90 mmHg increased after using the interactive system for self-management of hypertension for 8 weeks compared with usual care. Although the trend continued, there was no significant difference after 12 months. The results indicate that the effect of the intervention is significant, but the long-term effect is uncertain.

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  • 22.
    Andersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Vilhelmsson, Mattias
    Reg Hosp Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Fomichov Casaballe, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Patient involvement in surgical care-Healthcare personnel views and behaviour regarding patient involvement2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background All professions in surgical care have a responsibility to include patients in their health care. By Swedish law, all care should be done in dialogue with the patient. The essential part of health care is the meeting between patient and healthcare professional. In the interaction, a decision can be made, and needs can be identified to a safer care. Previous studies on patient participation have focussed on patients perspectives in surgical care, but there is a paucity of studies about the personnels perspective of estimated patient involvement in surgical care. Aim The aim of this study was to identify and describe healthcare personnels view and behaviour regarding patient involvement in surgical care. Method A quantitative study with various professions was conducted. A validated questionnaire was used, remaining questions grouped under following areas: patient involvement, acute phase, hospital time, discharge phase and questions on employment and workplace. Results A total of 140 questionnaires were sent out to a surgical clinic in Sweden, and 102 questionnaires were answered. All professionals stated that clear information is an important part of patient involvement in surgical care. Statistically significant differences existed between the professions in the subscale information. Physicians rated their information higher than the Registered Nurses (p = 0.005) and the practical nurses did (p = 0.001). Hindrances to involving patients were lack of time and other priority tasks. Conclusions Professionals in surgical care graded information to be the most important thing for patient involvement. Participation in important decisions, including the possibility to express personal views and ask questions, is important factors for patient involvement. Barriers against patient involvement are lack of time and prioritisation of other work activities.

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  • 23.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lennie, Terry A.
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40536 USA.
    Chung, Misook L.
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40536 USA.
    Diet variety mediates the relationship between appetite and micronutrient intake in patients with heart failure2023In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 537-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Eating a varied diet promotes adequate micronutrient intake. Poor appetite could decrease the desire to eat a varied diet leading to dietary micronutrient insufficiencies. The interrelationships among appetite, diet variety, and dietary micronutrient intake have not been investigated in patients with heart failure (HF). The purpose of the study was to determine whether the relationship between appetite and micronutrient insufficiency was mediated through diet variety. Methods and results A total of 238 patients with HF, mean age 61 +/- 12.1; 68% male, and 45% NYHA class III/IV were included in this secondary analysis. Data collection consisted of a 4-day food diary and self-reported appetite on a 10-point visual analogue scale. Micronutrient insufficiency was defined as the total number of 17 minerals and vitamins that were insufficient in the diet. Diet variety was calculated as the number of 23 food types consumed over the 4 days. Mediation analysis, controlling for covariates age, gender, NYHA class, and body mass index showed that diet variety mediated the relationship between appetite and micronutrient insufficiencies [indirect effect = -0.0828, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.1585 to -0.0150]. There was no direct effect of appetite on micronutrient insufficiency (c = -0.1802; 95% CI = -0.3715 to.0111). Conclusions Diet variety played a previously unrecognized role in the relationship between appetite and dietary micronutrient intake in patients with HF. More research is needed to validate these associations in patients with HF.

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  • 24.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Operations management PVC.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kärner Köhler, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Does problem-based learning improve patient empowerment and cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease in a Swedish primary care setting? A long-term prospective, randomised, parallel single randomised trial (COR-PRIM)2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e065230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To investigate long-term effects of a 1-year problem-based learning (PBL) on self-management and cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD).Design A prospective, randomised, parallel single centre trial.Settings Primary care settings in Sweden.Participants 157 patients with stable CHD completed the study. Subjects with reading and writing impairments, mental illness or expected survival less than 1 year were excluded.Intervention Participants were randomised and assigned to receive either PBL (intervention) or home-sent patient information (control group). In this study, participants were followed up at baseline, 1, 3 and 5 years.Primary and secondary outcomes Primary outcome was patient empowerment (Swedish Coronary Empowerment Scale, SWE-CES) and secondary outcomes General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), self-rated health status (EQ-VAS), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), body mass index (BMI), weight and smoking. Outcomes were adjusted for sociodemographic factors.Results The PBL intervention group resulted in a significant improved change in SWE-CES over the 5-year period (mean (M), 39.39; 95% CI 37.88 to 40.89) compared with the baseline (M 36.54; 95% CI 35.40 to 37.66). PBL intervention group increased HDL-C level (M 1.39; 95% CI 1.28 to 1.50) compared with baseline (M 1.24; 95% CI 1.15 to 1.33) and for EQ-VAS (M 77.33; 95% CI 73.21 to 81.45) compared with baseline (M 68.13; 95% CI 63.66 to 72.59) while these outcomes remained unchanged in the control group. There were no significant differences in BMI, weight or scores on GSES, neither between nor within groups over time. The overall proportion of smokers was significantly higher in the control group than in the experimental group.Conclusion One-year PBL intervention had positive effect on patient empowerment, health status and HDL-C at a 5-year follow-up compared with the control group. PBL education aiming to improve patient empowerment in cardiac rehabilitation should account for sociodemographic factors.

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  • 25.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    van der Wal, Martje H. L.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Cardiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands.
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.
    Department of Cardiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Yang, Bei
    entre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Julius Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
    Changes in Appetite During the Heart Failure Trajectory and Association With Fatigue, Depressive Symptoms, and Quality of Life2021In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 539-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Decreased appetite can contribute to malnutrition in patients with heart failure (HF). Little is known about the trajectory of appetite over time in patients with HF and the factors associated with decreased appetite after discharge from the hospital.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate changes in appetite over time and explore how fatigue, depressive symptoms, and quality of life are associated with decreased appetite.

    METHODS: Data from the multicenter randomized Coordinating study evaluating Outcomes of Advising and Counseling in Heart Failure were used. Logistic regression and mixed-effects logistic regression were used to investigate changes in appetite over time and to explore the relationship between appetite and fatigue, depressive symptoms, and quality of life.

    RESULTS: A total of 734 patients with HF (mean age, 69 years) were included. Decreased appetite was present at all follow-up measurements; however, decreased appetite was significantly lower at the 1-month (odds ratio [OR], 0.43; confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.63), 6-month (OR, 0.31; CI, 0.20-0.47), 12-month (OR, 0.22; CI, 0.14-0.34), and 18-month (OR, 0.24; CI, 0.15-0.37) follow-ups compared with baseline. Decreased appetite was associated with fatigue (OR, 3.09; CI, 1.98-4.84), depressive symptoms (OR, 1.76; CI, 1.35-2.29), and low quality of life (OR, 1.01; CI, 1.01-1.02) across all measurement points adjusted for covariates.

    CONCLUSIONS: Appetite improved after discharge; however, at all time points, at least 22% of patients reported decreased appetite. Fatigue, depressive symptoms, and low quality of life are factors associated with decreased appetite. Decreased appetite is a long-standing problem in that it does not disappear spontaneously after an acute HF deterioration.

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  • 26.
    Andreassen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    An interactive digital calendar with mobile phone reminders (RemindMe) for people with cognitive impairment: a pilot randomized controlled trial2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 270-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background People with cognitive impairment often need support to perform everyday-life activities. Interventions are available, but evidence-based interventions are lacking. Aim This pilot RCT aimed to investigate use of an intervention with an interactive digital calendar with mobile phone reminders (RemindMe) in relation to change in outcomes and impact on occupational performance, independence, health-related quality of life, and psychosocial impact of the support for people with cognitive impairment. Method The study design was a multi-centre parallel-group pilot RCT [ClinicalTrails.gov, identifier: NCT04470219]. Fifteen participants from primary rehabilitation centres in Sweden were recruited and randomly assigned to intervention group (n = 8) receiving the intervention with RemindMe, or control group (n = 7) receiving usual treatment by an occupational therapist. Data were collected at baseline, after two- and four months, and analysed using descriptive and non-parametric statistics. Result The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM item n-r) showed significant differences. There were no significant differences in health-related quality of life nor in the psychosocial impact of the used support. Conclusion Plausible changes in outcome measures were found in COPM and FIM (items n-r). These instruments indicate change in outcome measures and impact on occupational performance and independence.

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  • 27.
    Andreassen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Boman, Inga-Lill
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Feasibility of an Intervention for Patients with Cognitive Impairment Using an Interactive Digital Calendar with Mobile Phone Reminders (RemindMe) to Improve the Performance of Activities in Everyday Life2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 7, article id 2222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to increase evidence-based interventions by investigating the feasibility of an intervention using an interactive digital calendar with mobile phone reminders (RemindMe) as support in everyday life. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from participating patients (n = 8) and occupational therapists (n = 7) from three rehabilitation clinics in Sweden. The intervention consisted of delivering the interactive digital calendar RemindMe, receiving an individualized introduction, a written manual, and individual weekly conversations for two months with follow-up assessments after two and four months. Feasibility areas of acceptability, demand, implementation, practicality, and integration were examined. Patients expressed their interest and intention to use RemindMe and reported a need for reminders and individualized support. By using reminders in activities in everyday life their autonomy was supported. The study also demonstrated the importance of confirming reminders and the possible role of habit-forming. Occupational therapists perceived the intervention to be useful at the rehabilitation clinics and the weekly support conversations enabled successful implementation. This study confirmed the importance of basing and tailoring the intervention to patients needs and thus being person-centered.

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  • 28.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Aidemark, Jan
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Lennart
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hanson, Elizabeth Jane
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Lifeworld in co-designing with informal carers2019In: JOURNAL OF ENABLING TECHNOLOGIES, ISSN 2398-6263, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to reflect on carers’ experiences of being involved in the development of a web-based support programme for carers of people with heart failure (CPwHF), and discuss the challenges related to their involvement in the development process. The focus was on the different phases in the project as well as the methodological challenges and opportunities that occurred in the user group sessions conducted.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This research adopt an explorative design studying a co-design process to develop an information and communication technology based support programme for and with CPwHF. Habermas’ concepts of lifeworld and system are used as a theoretical framework to analyse the co-design process employed in the study.

    Findings

    Reflecting on the co-design approach adopted, the findings highlight the methodological challenges that arise with carer involvement and the possible tensions that occur between researchers’ ambitions to include users in the design process, and the goal of developing a product or service, in the different phases of the design process.

    Originality/value

    Findings highlight that there is a tension between the system and lifeworld in the co-design process which are not totally compatible. The paper highlights that there is a need to develop flexible and reflexive human-centred design methodologies, able to meet carers’ needs and ideas, and at the same time balance this with proposed research outcomes.

  • 29.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Measuring hair cortisol concentration, insomnia symptoms and quality of life in preschool children with severe early childhood caries - a case-control pilot study2023In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 81, no 7, p. 508-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveThis study aimed to 1) investigate the relationships between hair cortisol concentration (HCC), insomnia symptoms, Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) in preschool children with severe early childhood caries, 2) compare HCC, insomnia symptoms, HRQoL and OHRQoL in preschool children with severe early childhood caries with these factors in children without clinical signs of dental caries, and 3) explore correlations between caries scores and HCC, insomnia symptoms, HRQoL and OHRQoL.Material and MethodsA case-control pilot study, including 12 children with severe early childhood caries and 28 controls, aged 3-5 years. Dental examination was performed and hair samples for cortisol were taken. Parents filled out questionnaires about their childs insomnia symptoms, HRQoL and OHRQoL. Interpreters were used in families with language difficulties.ResultsThe key findings in this pilot study were tendencies that children with severe early childhood caries had more insomnia symptoms, and poorer OHRQoL than the controls. Caries scores was correlated with insomnia symptoms and OHRQoL.ConclusionsDentists should include questions about the childs sleep when they see the child, as insomnia related to dental caries may lead to several physical, mental, and social problems.

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  • 30.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Grundström, Hanna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences.
    Supporting girls with painful menstruation - A qualitative study with school nurses in Sweden2023In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 68, p. e109-e115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Painful menstruation is common among girls. To optimize school nurses' work more knowledgeabout their experiences of supporting these girls is needed. The aim of this study was to describe school nurses'experiences of supporting girls with menstrual pain.Methods: Interviews were conducted with 15 school nurses in Sweden and analyzed using thematic analysis.Results: Three themes emerged: Taking menstrual pain seriously, Being a disseminator of knowledge, andExternal conditions for conducting professional work as a school nurse.Conclusion: School nurses felt competent in supporting girls with menstrual pain. However, they lacked struc-tural, written guidelines and routines for how to treat, support, follow-up and refer girls with menstrual pain.Practice implications: School education about menstruation and sexual health needs to be strengthened. Cooper-ation with other healthcare facilities and networks with other school nurses should be increased. Specific guide-lines on how to support girls with menstrual pain should be implemented.

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  • 31.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Def Res Agcy, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Correction: Swedish translation and validation of the Pediatric Insomnia Severity Index (vol 20, 253, 2020)2020In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, BMC PEDIATRICS, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 333Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via the original article.

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  • 32.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Def Res Agcy, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sundell, Anna Lena Lena
    Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Swedish translation and validation of the Pediatric Insomnia Severity Index2020In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, BMC PEDIATRICS, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    To increase health and well-being in young children, it is important to acknowledge and promote the child’s sleep behaviour. However, there is a lack of brief, validated sleep screening instruments for children. The aims of the study were to (1) present a Swedish translation of the PISI, (2) examine the factor structure of the Swedish version of PISI, and test the reliability and validity of the PISI factor structure in a sample of healthy children in Sweden.

    Methods

    The English version of the PISI was translated into Swedish, translated back into English, and agreed upon before use. Parents of healthy 3- to 10-year-old children filled out the Swedish version of the PISI and the generic health-related quality of life instrument KIDSCREEN-27 two times. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses for baseline and test-retest, structural equation modelling, and correlations between the PISI and KIDSCREEN-27 were performed.

    Results

    In total, 160 parents filled out baseline questionnaires (test), whereof 100 parents (63%) filled out the follow-up questionnaires (retest). Confirmative factor analysis of the PISI found two correlated factors: sleep onset problems (SOP) and sleep maintenance problems (SMP). The PISI had substantial construct and test-retest reliability. The PISI factors were related to all KIDSCREEN-27 dimensions.

    Conclusions

    The Swedish version of the PISI is applicable for screening sleep problems and is a useful aid in dialogues with families about sleep.

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  • 33.
    Antoniadou, Marianna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Norway.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    Malardalens Univ, Sweden.
    Strategies Used by Professionals in Pediatric Rehabilitation to Engage the Child in the Intervention Process: A Scoping Review2024In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo investigate strategies used by professionals in pediatric rehabilitation to engage children in every step of the intervention process, including assessment, goal setting, planning and implementation of the intervention, and results evaluation.MethodsA scoping literature review was conducted, and seven databases were searched, including CINAHL and MEDLINE, ProQuest Central, PsycINFO, Social Science Premium Collection, PubMed, and Web of Science. A citation search of included articles was completed. Predetermined criteria, quality standards, and PIO framework guided the selection process. Results were presented in relation to Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and the contextual model of therapeutic change.ResultsIn total, 20 studies were included in the review. Pediatric professionals reported that therapeutic use of self and their own engagement in the intervention facilitated the establishment of a supportive relationship. Providing clear explanations about their role and therapy rationale developed positive expectations. By making the child feel successful within-session and outside-session activities, professionals enhanced child mastery. Professionals' strategies were abstractly described.ConclusionsFurther research is needed to investigate strategies that are effective in the different steps of the intervention. More observational, longitudinal studies are required to capture fluctuations in in-session engagement.

  • 34.
    Arabiat, Diana
    et al.
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Univ Jordan, Jordan; Australian Res Council Ctr Excellence Digital Chi, Australia.
    Al Jabery, Mohammad
    Univ Jordan, Jordan.
    Robinson, Sue
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Australian Res Council Ctr Excellence Digital Chi, Australia.
    Whitehead, Lisa
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Australian Res Council Ctr Excellence Digital Chi, Australia.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Edith Cowan Univ, Australia.
    Interactive technology use and child development: A systematic review2023In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 679-715Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThere is mixed evidence regarding the impact of interactive digital devices on child development. Tentatively some studies suggested that the use of digital devices may correlate negatively with language, executive function, and motor skills. However, attempts to amalgamate this evidence has been limited related to the available number of experimental and cohort studies that have evaluated the impact of digital technology use on child development. We conducted this review to determine the impact of interactive digital devices on child development among children aged 7 years or younger. Interactive technology has been defined as methods, tools, or devices that users interact with in order to achieve specific tasks. Data sourceTo carry out this systematic review, databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsychINFO, Scopus and Google Scholar were searched for relevant studies. Study selectionWe used the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology for systematic reviews. Data extractionData extraction and synthesis was carried out by two reviewers and checked by a third reviewer. Studies were stratified into tiers depending on the level of evidence provided and the domain of development assessed. ResultsFifty-three studies were eligible for inclusion in the review, 39 Tier 1 (randomized controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies) and 16 Tier 2 (descriptive studies). Childrens use of interactive digital technology was positively associated with receptive language and executive function and negatively associated or unrelated to motor proficiency. Other critical aspects informing the evidence, such as dose of exposure, intensity, or duration, were inconsistently reported, making estimates of exposure tentative and imprecise. ConclusionThe studies included in this review were predominantly correlational or comparative in nature and focuses on cognitive domains of learning rather than a specific developmental outcome. It is difficult to generalize our findings beyond the digital devices or applications that have been evaluated by earlier studies. The contextual factors that may moderate the relationship require elaboration in future studies.

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  • 35.
    Arabiat, Diana
    et al.
    Univ Jordan, Jordan; Edith Cowan Univ, Australia.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Edith Cowan Univ, Australia.
    Hoti, Kreshnik
    Univ Prishtina, Kosovo.
    Hughes, Jeffery
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Pain assessment tools for use in infants: a meta-review2023In: BMC Pediatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 307Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIdentifying pain in infants is challenging due to their inability to self-report pain, therefore the availability of valid and reliable means of assessing pain is critical.ObjectiveThis meta-review sought to identify evidence that could guide the selection of appropriate tools in this vulnerable population.MethodsWe searched Scopus, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, MIDRIS, EMCare and Google Scholar for eligible systematic reviews. Eligible reviews documented psychometric properties of available observational tools used to assess pain in infants.ResultsA total of 516 reviews were identified of which 11 met our inclusion criteria. We identified 36 pain assessment tools (evaluated in 11 reviews) of which seven were reported in at least three reviews. The level of evidence reported on the psychometric properties of pain assessment tools varied widely ranging from low to good reliability and validity, whilst there are limited data on usability and clinical utility.ConclusionsCurrently, no observer administered pain assessment tool can be recommended as the gold standard due to limited availability and quality of the evidence that supports their validity, reliability and clinical utility. This meta-review attempts to collate the available evidence to assist clinicians to decide on what is the most appropriate tool to use in their clinical practice setting. It is important that researchers adopt a standard approach to evaluating the psychometric properties of pain assessment tools and evaluations of the clinical utility in order that the highest level of evidence can be used to guide tool selection.

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  • 36.
    Ardo, Jessica
    et al.
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Lee, Jung-Ah
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Hildebrand, Janett A.
    Univ Southern Calif, CA 90007 USA.
    Guijarro, Diana
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Ghasemazadeh, Hassan
    Washington State Univ, WA USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Evangelista, Lorraine S.
    Univ Texas Med Branch, TX 77555 USA.
    Codesign of a cardiovascular disease prevention text message bank for older adults2021In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 104, no 11, p. 2772-2784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Develop and validate a text message bank to support healthier lifestyle behaviors in older adults at risk for cardiovascular disease utilizing a codesign approach. Methods: Initially, the researchers, based on literature, developed a bank of 68 SMS text messages focusing on healthy eating (24 messages), physical activity (24 messages), and motivational feedback (20 messages), based on a scoping review of the literature on promoting behavioral change to engage in healthy lifestyle behaviors. In the next step, a panel of five experts analyzed every subset of SMS text messages. Further validation was conducted by nine older adults (>= 60 years). The user demographics, telephone literacy, understanding, and appeal for every SMS text message were evaluated using a 31-item questionnaire. Results: Participants provided an acceptable understanding of the critical concept found in the 49 SMS text message (physical activity M = 1.73 +/- 0.18; diet M = 1.73 +/- 0.26; motivation M = 1.85 +/- 0.25; range 0-2). The average ratings for physical activity (i.e., likability), healthy eating, and motivation were 8.62 +/- 0.64, 8.57 +/- 0.76, and 8.40 +/- 0.83, respectively (range 0-10). Conclusion: Co-designers were able to identify the technological and content requirements for each text message and infographic to enhance understanding and appeal. Practice implications: A feasibility study will need to be conducted as a next step to testing the effectiveness of text messages in a mobile-based intervention to promote healthy behaviors in older adults at high CVD risk. (C) 2021 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Kalmar Cty Council, Sweden.
    Brannstrom, Margareta
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Evangelista, Lorraine S.
    Univ Texas Med Branch, TX 77555 USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden; Dalen Hosp, Sweden.
    Palliative key aspects are of importance for symptom relief during the last week of life in patients with heart failureIn: ESC Heart Failure, E-ISSN 2055-5822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims This study aimed to describe symptom prevalence of pain, shortness of breath, anxiety, and nausea and to identify factors associated with symptom relief in patients with heart failure during their last week of life. Methods and results This nationwide study used data from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care and the Swedish Causes of Death Certificate Register. The sample included 4215 patients with heart failure as the underlying cause of death. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to analyse data. Pain was the most prevalent symptom (64.0%), followed by anxiety (45.1%), shortness of breath (28.8%), and nausea (11.4%). Pain was the most often totally relieved (77.5%), followed by anxiety (68.4%), nausea (54.7%), and shortness of breath (37.1%). Key aspects of palliative care such as documented palliative care in the patient record, individual medication prescriptions by injection, symptom assessment with validated scales, documented end-of-life discussions with patients and/or family members, and external consultation were significantly associated with symptom relief. Relief of pain, shortness of breath, anxiety, and nausea were significantly better managed in nursing homes and hospice/inpatient palliative care compared with care in hospitals. Conclusions The results show that key aspects of palliative care during the last week of life are significantly associated with symptom relief. Increased access to palliative care could provide a way to improve care during the last week of life for patients with heart failure. Home-based settings provided more symptom relief than hospitals, which may indicate that the latter focuses on treatments and saving lives rather than promoting life before death.

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  • 38.
    Arestedt, Liselott
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Martinsson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Eldh, Ann Catrine
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Context Factors Facilitating and Hindering Patient Participation in Dialysis Care: A Focus Group Study With Patients and Staff2020In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 457-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Safe health care of good quality depends on structured and unceasing efforts to progress, promoting strategies tailored to the context, including elements such as patients preferences. Although patient participation is a common concept in health care, there is yet limited understanding of the factors that facilitate and hinder it in a healthcare context. Aims This paper identifies what patients and health professionals depict in terms of enablers and barriers for patient participation in dialysis care. Methods An explorative qualitative design was applied with seven focus group discussions with patients, staff, and managers across different types of hospitals, with the texts analyzed with content analysis. Results The dialysis context represents three key elements-people, resources, and interactions-that can both enable and hinder patient participation. Both barriers and facilitators for patient participation were found to reside at individual, team, and organizational levels, with a greater number of enabling factors implied by both patients and staff. Linking Evidence to Action While the dialysis context comprises opportunities for progress in favor of patient participation, a shared understanding of the concept is needed, along with how contextual factors can facilitate conditions for participation by patient preferences. In addition, the most favorable strategy for implementing person-centered care is not yet known, but to facilitate patient participation from a patient perspective, creating opportunities to enable staff and patients to share a common understanding is needed, along with tools to facilitate a dialogue on patient participation.

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  • 39.
    Arnold, Amanda
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wärdig, Rikard
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum Akad Halsa & Vard, Sweden.
    Brief Admission for Patients with Self-Harm from the Perspective of Outpatient Healthcare Professionals2022In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 356-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe the role of brief-admission (BA) in treating high-risk patients with self-harm from the perspective of outpatient healthcare staff in Sweden. Ten outpatient healthcare professionals from three psychiatric clinics were interviewed. Data were analyzed using a conventional content analysis. The findings of this study help support the role of BA as an acute crisis management intervention, and describe how BA serves as a useful adjunct to outpatient treatment, especially for patients with complementarily psychotherapeutic interventions. The findings also suggest that implementing BA may increase treatment opportunities for outpatient staff and strengthen the concept of person-centered care.

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  • 40.
    Asklöv, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ekenger, Regina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Transmasculine Persons Experiences of Encounters with Health Care Professionals Within Reproductive, Perinatal, and Sexual Health in Sweden: A Qualitative Interview Study2021In: Transgender Health, ISSN 2688-4887, E-ISSN 2380-193X, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 325-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Transmasculine persons may experience stigma, which increases the risk of psychological distress. They may need reproductive, perinatal, and sexual health care; however, qualitative studies addressing transgender individuals experiences are scarce. This study aimed at interpreting and describing the experiences of transmasculine persons in encounters with health care professionals (HCPs) within reproductive, perinatal, and sexual health care. Methods: Nine qualitative semi-structured online interviews were conducted via email with transmasculine persons, and data were analyzed by using Braun and Clarkes thematic analysis. Results: Two themes were identified. The first theme is normalization and confirmation of the gender identity. This theme comprises the knowledge and experience that these transmasculine persons are facing. The verbal approach from the HCPs was important as well as could be addressed with a non-binary approach. The second theme is Respect in an especially exposed situation. This theme shows the great importance of being involved in the care and at the same time being met with openness and empathy. There must be good prospects of being able to preserve dignity. Conclusion: Transmasculine persons are in an exposed position in reproductive, perinatal, and sexual health care. The encounters in health care could be negatively affected if HCPs show inadequate knowledge or express gender stereotypical attitudes. A good encounter is characterized by respect, preserved integrity, involvement in the care, and an open attitude toward gender variations.

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  • 41. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Ax, Anna-Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Exercise in patients with cancer: Effects on health-related quality of life, costs, and cost-effectiveness during oncological treatment2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Short and long-term side effects of oncological treatment negatively affect daily living and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patient with cancer. Exercise during treatment is beneficial for HRQoL, however evidence as to what exercise intensity is most optimal for improving HRQoL and cost-effectiveness is lacking. Cost-effectiveness is important information for decisionmakers when implementing healthcare interventions, such as exercise programmes. The overall aim of this thesis was to study functioning in daily life, HRQoL, costs, and cost-effectiveness of an exercise intervention of different exercise intensities in patients with cancer receiving oncological treatment. 

    Method: Study I was qualitative and explored how individuals with cancer receiving curative treatment and participating in an exercise intervention experienced their functioning in daily life. Semi-structured individual interviews (n =21) were performed and analysed with thematic analysis. Studies II–IV were quantitative and used data from a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of high-intensity (HI) and low-to-moderate-intensity (LMI) exercise of combined resistance and endurance training with or without self-regulatory behaviour change support. The RCT was preceded by a descriptive longitudinal study with usual care (UC). Participants were diagnosed with breast, prostate, or colon cancer and received (neo)adjuvant oncological treatment. Study II evaluated the effects on HRQoL of exercising at HI (n =288) and LMI (n =289) versus UC (n =89) up to 18 months after start of oncological treatment, using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Data were analysed using descriptive and multivariate statistics. Study III evaluated resource utilisation and societal costs of the exercise intervention in the RCT (n =534) versus UC (n =85), and of HI (n =269) versus LMI (n =265) exercise 18 months after start of oncological treatment. Societal costs included costs of healthcare resource utilisation (healthcare visits, hospitalisation, prescribed medication), productivity loss (disability pensions and sick leave), and the exercise intervention. Study IV evaluated the cost-effectiveness of the exercise intensities in the RCT (HI: n =99 and LMI: n =90) at 1-year follow-up post intervention. Cost data were retrieved from Study III and health outcome were collected using the EQ-5D-5L questionnaire and calculated for quality-adjusted life-years. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated as the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). 

    Results: Participants experienced impairments from oncological treatment but strove to maintain function in daily life. The exercise programme improved physical and psychological wellbeing during treatment (Study I). There were no significant differences in HRQoL between exercise intensities up to 1 year after the exercise intervention. The exercise groups scored significant better HRQoL compared to UC over time (Study II). There was no significant difference in mean societal costs between the exercise intervention and UC, nor between the exercise intensities (Study III). There was no significant difference in cost or in effect between the exercise intensities. Although the mean ICER indicated that HI was cost-effective compared to LMI, the uncertainty was large (Study IV). 

    Conclusion: Participating in an exercise programme during oncological treatment was a positive and supportive experience that contributed to increase physical and psychological wellbeing. Exercise of HI and LMI during oncological treatment had similar effect on HRQoL and societal costs. In addition, the exercise group had beneficial effects on HRQoL and no significant difference in societal costs compared to UC, meaning the exercise programme did not save or add societal cost. Thus, based on cost-effectiveness we suggest decisionmakers and clinicians implement exercise programmes including both HI and LMI in cancer care and recommend exercise regardless of intensity according to the patient’s preferences to improve or to maintain aspects of HRQoL during oncological treatment. 

    List of papers
    1. Exercise: A positive feature on functioning in daily life during cancer treatment – Experiences from the Phys-Can study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise: A positive feature on functioning in daily life during cancer treatment – Experiences from the Phys-Can study
    Show others...
    2020 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Nursing, Vol. 44, article id 101713Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Impaired functioning due to cancer treatment is a challenge for daily life. Exercise during treatment can improve functioning. However, research describing experiences of how exercise affects activities of daily life is limited. We aimed to explore how individuals with cancer receiving curative treatment and participating in an exercise intervention experienced their functioning in daily life.

    Methods

    Twenty-one participants were recruited from Phys-Can, an exercise intervention study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted after the intervention had finished, and data was analysed using thematic analysis.

    Results

    Two main themes evolved: “Striving to maintain a normal life in a new context” and “Struggling with impairments from side effects of cancer treatment”. The supervised group exercise proved popular, and participants reported positive effects on physical and psychological functioning, as well as social and informative support from other participants. Participants struggled with impaired cognitive and physical functioning and exhaustion. They strove to maintain a normal life by adjusting their activities.

    Conclusions

    Perceived physical and psychological benefits from exercise during cancer treatment suggest that exercise should be a part of cancer rehabilitation to facilitate activities and participation in daily life. Striving to maintain a normal life during cancer treatment is vital, and adjustments are needed to maintain activities and participation in daily life. Cancer nurses should motivate patients to engage in physical activity and encourage the introduction of exercise as part of their rehabilitation. They could also support patients in making adjustments to maintain functioning in daily life.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2020
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162990 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2019.101713 (DOI)000523651500023 ()31877511 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Fulltext published under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

    https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

    Funding agencies: Department of Oncology, Linkoping University Hospital, Sweden; Region Ostergotland, Sweden; Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Cancer Society; Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council

    Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2023-04-27Bibliographically approved
    2. Short- and long-term effect of high versus low-to-moderate intensity exercise to optimise health-related quality of life after oncological treatment - results from the Phys-Can project
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Short- and long-term effect of high versus low-to-moderate intensity exercise to optimise health-related quality of life after oncological treatment - results from the Phys-Can project
    Show others...
    2022 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 30, p. 5949-5963Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effect of high intensity (HI) vs low-to-moderate intensity (LMI) exercise on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) up to 18 months after commencement of oncological treatment in patients with breast, colorectal or prostate cancer. In addition, we conducted a comparison with usual care (UC). Methods Patients scheduled for (neo)adjuvant oncological treatment (n = 577) were randomly assigned to 6 months of combined resistance and endurance training of HI or LMI. A longitudinal descriptive study (UC) included participants (n = 89) immediately before the RCT started. HRQoL was assessed by EORTC QLQ-C30 at baseline, 3, 6 and 18 months (1 year after completed exercise intervention) follow-up. Linear mixed models were used to study the groups over time. Results Directly after the intervention, HI scored significant (P = 0.02), but not clinically relevant, higher pain compared with LMI. No other significant difference in HRQoL was found between the exercise intensities over time. Clinically meaningful improvements in HRQoL over time were detected within both exercise intensities. We found favourable significant differences in HRQoL in both exercise intensities compared with UC over time. Conclusion This study adds to the strong evidence of positive effect of exercise and shows that exercise, regardless of intensity, can have beneficial effects on HRQoL during oncological treatment and also for a substantial time after completion of an exercise intervention. In this study, for one year after. Implications for cancer survivors Patients can be advised to exercise at either intensity level according to their personal preferences, and still benefit from both short-term and long-term improvements in HRQoL.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Heidelberg, Germany: Springer, 2022
    Keywords
    Cancer; Oncological treatment; Exercise; HRQoL
    National Category
    Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-184562 (URN)10.1007/s00520-022-07016-3 (DOI)000779224400002 ()35391574 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85127637021 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies: Linköping University; Swedish Cancer Society; Swedish Research Council, European Commission; Region Östergötland, Sweden; Oncology Department Foundations Research Fund in Linköping, Sweden

    Available from: 2022-05-03 Created: 2022-05-03 Last updated: 2023-04-27Bibliographically approved
    3. Long-term resource utilisation and associated costs of exercise during (neo)adjuvant oncological treatment: the Phys-Can project
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term resource utilisation and associated costs of exercise during (neo)adjuvant oncological treatment: the Phys-Can project
    Show others...
    2022 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 61, no 7, p. 888-896Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background Exercise during oncological treatment is beneficial to patient health and can counteract the side effects of treatment. Knowledge of the societal costs associated with an exercise intervention, however, is limited. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the long-term resource utilisation and societal costs of an exercise intervention conducted during (neo)adjuvant oncological treatment in a randomised control trial (RCT) versus usual care (UC), and to compare high-intensity (HI) versus low-to-moderate intensity (LMI) exercise in the RCT. Methods We used data from the Physical Training and Cancer (Phys-Can) project. In the RCT, 577 participants were randomised to HI or to LMI of combined endurance and resistance training for 6 months, during oncological treatment. The project also included 89 participants with UC in a longitudinal observational study. We measured at baseline and after 18 months. Resource utilisation and costs of the exercise intervention, health care, and productivity loss were compared using analyses of covariance (RCT vs. UC) and t test (HI vs. LMI). Results Complete data were available for 619 participants (RCT HI: n = 269, LMI: n = 265, and UC: n = 85). We found no difference in total societal costs between the exercise intervention groups in the RCT and UC. However, participants in the RCT had lower rates of disability pension days (p < .001), corresponding costs (p = .001), and pharmacy costs (p = .018) than the UC group. Nor did we find differences in resource utilisation or costs between HI and LMI exercise int the RCT. Conclusion Our study showed no difference in total societal costs between the comprehensive exercise intervention and UC or between the exercise intensities. This suggests that exercise, with its well-documented health benefits during oncological treatment, produces neither additional costs nor savings.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis Ltd, 2022
    Keywords
    Cancer; exercise; health care costs; sick leave; costs; cost analysis
    National Category
    Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-185605 (URN)10.1080/0284186X.2022.2075238 (DOI)000799825800001 ()35607981 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Cancer Society; Swedish Research Council; Region Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2022-06-09 Created: 2022-06-09 Last updated: 2023-05-04Bibliographically approved
    4. Cost-effectiveness of different exercise intensities during oncological treatment in the Phys-Can RCT
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost-effectiveness of different exercise intensities during oncological treatment in the Phys-Can RCT
    Show others...
    2023 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Cost-effectiveness is important in the prioritisation between interventions in health care. Exercise is cost-effective compared to usual care during oncological treatment; however, the significance of exercise intensity to the cost-effectiveness is unclear. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of the randomised controlled trial Phys-Can, a six-month exercise programme of high (HI) or low-to-moderate intensity (LMI) during (neo)adjuvant oncological treatment.

    Methods

    A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed, based on 189 participants with breast, colorectal, or prostate cancer (HI: n = 99 and LMI: n = 90) from the Phys-Can RCT in Sweden. Costs were estimated from a societal perspective, and included cost of the exercise intervention, health care utilisation and productivity loss. Health outcomes were assessed as quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), using EQ-5D-5L at baseline, post intervention and 12 months after the completion of the intervention.

    Results

    At 12-month follow-up after the intervention, the total cost per participant did not differ significantly between HI (€27,314) and LMI exercise (€29,788). There was no significant difference in health outcome between the intensity groups. On average HI generated 1.190 QALYs and LMI 1.185 QALYs. The mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratio indicated that HI was cost effective compared with LMI, but the uncertainty was large.

    Conclusions

    We conclude that HI and LMI exercise have similar costs and effects during oncological treatment. Hence, based on cost-effectiveness, we suggest that decision makers and clinicians can consider implementing both HI and LMI exercise programmes and recommend either intensity to the patients with cancer during oncological treatment to facilitate improvement of health.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2023
    Keywords
    Cancer, exercise, health, cost-effectiveness
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-193277 (URN)10.1080/0284186X.2023.2200149 (DOI)000971022300001 ()37074759 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: This work was supported by grants from the Swedish Cancer Society; the Swedish Research Council, and the Region Östergötland, Sweden.

    Available from: 2023-04-27 Created: 2023-04-27 Last updated: 2023-05-09Bibliographically approved
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  • 42.
    Ax, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Demmelmaier, Ingrid
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Sport Science and Physical Education, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Berntsen, Sveinung
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Sport Science and Physical Education, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Sjövall, Katarina
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Operations management.
    Nordin, Karin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cost-effectiveness of different exercise intensities during oncological treatment in the Phys-Can RCT2023In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Cost-effectiveness is important in the prioritisation between interventions in health care. Exercise is cost-effective compared to usual care during oncological treatment; however, the significance of exercise intensity to the cost-effectiveness is unclear. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of the randomised controlled trial Phys-Can, a six-month exercise programme of high (HI) or low-to-moderate intensity (LMI) during (neo)adjuvant oncological treatment.

    Methods

    A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed, based on 189 participants with breast, colorectal, or prostate cancer (HI: n = 99 and LMI: n = 90) from the Phys-Can RCT in Sweden. Costs were estimated from a societal perspective, and included cost of the exercise intervention, health care utilisation and productivity loss. Health outcomes were assessed as quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), using EQ-5D-5L at baseline, post intervention and 12 months after the completion of the intervention.

    Results

    At 12-month follow-up after the intervention, the total cost per participant did not differ significantly between HI (€27,314) and LMI exercise (€29,788). There was no significant difference in health outcome between the intensity groups. On average HI generated 1.190 QALYs and LMI 1.185 QALYs. The mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratio indicated that HI was cost effective compared with LMI, but the uncertainty was large.

    Conclusions

    We conclude that HI and LMI exercise have similar costs and effects during oncological treatment. Hence, based on cost-effectiveness, we suggest that decision makers and clinicians can consider implementing both HI and LMI exercise programmes and recommend either intensity to the patients with cancer during oncological treatment to facilitate improvement of health.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 43.
    Ax, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Demmelmaier, Ingrid
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Univ Agder, Norway.
    Berntsen, Sveinung
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Univ Agder, Norway.
    Sjövall, Katarina
    Kristianstad Univ, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordin, Karin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Long-term resource utilisation and associated costs of exercise during (neo)adjuvant oncological treatment: the Phys-Can project2022In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 61, no 7, p. 888-896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Exercise during oncological treatment is beneficial to patient health and can counteract the side effects of treatment. Knowledge of the societal costs associated with an exercise intervention, however, is limited. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the long-term resource utilisation and societal costs of an exercise intervention conducted during (neo)adjuvant oncological treatment in a randomised control trial (RCT) versus usual care (UC), and to compare high-intensity (HI) versus low-to-moderate intensity (LMI) exercise in the RCT. Methods We used data from the Physical Training and Cancer (Phys-Can) project. In the RCT, 577 participants were randomised to HI or to LMI of combined endurance and resistance training for 6 months, during oncological treatment. The project also included 89 participants with UC in a longitudinal observational study. We measured at baseline and after 18 months. Resource utilisation and costs of the exercise intervention, health care, and productivity loss were compared using analyses of covariance (RCT vs. UC) and t test (HI vs. LMI). Results Complete data were available for 619 participants (RCT HI: n = 269, LMI: n = 265, and UC: n = 85). We found no difference in total societal costs between the exercise intervention groups in the RCT and UC. However, participants in the RCT had lower rates of disability pension days (p < .001), corresponding costs (p = .001), and pharmacy costs (p = .018) than the UC group. Nor did we find differences in resource utilisation or costs between HI and LMI exercise int the RCT. Conclusion Our study showed no difference in total societal costs between the comprehensive exercise intervention and UC or between the exercise intensities. This suggests that exercise, with its well-documented health benefits during oncological treatment, produces neither additional costs nor savings.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Ax, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology and Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Maria
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordin, Karin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Exercise: A positive feature on functioning in daily life during cancer treatment – Experiences from the Phys-Can study2020In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Nursing, Vol. 44, article id 101713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Impaired functioning due to cancer treatment is a challenge for daily life. Exercise during treatment can improve functioning. However, research describing experiences of how exercise affects activities of daily life is limited. We aimed to explore how individuals with cancer receiving curative treatment and participating in an exercise intervention experienced their functioning in daily life.

    Methods

    Twenty-one participants were recruited from Phys-Can, an exercise intervention study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted after the intervention had finished, and data was analysed using thematic analysis.

    Results

    Two main themes evolved: “Striving to maintain a normal life in a new context” and “Struggling with impairments from side effects of cancer treatment”. The supervised group exercise proved popular, and participants reported positive effects on physical and psychological functioning, as well as social and informative support from other participants. Participants struggled with impaired cognitive and physical functioning and exhaustion. They strove to maintain a normal life by adjusting their activities.

    Conclusions

    Perceived physical and psychological benefits from exercise during cancer treatment suggest that exercise should be a part of cancer rehabilitation to facilitate activities and participation in daily life. Striving to maintain a normal life during cancer treatment is vital, and adjustments are needed to maintain activities and participation in daily life. Cancer nurses should motivate patients to engage in physical activity and encourage the introduction of exercise as part of their rehabilitation. They could also support patients in making adjustments to maintain functioning in daily life.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 45.
    Ax, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Nordin, Karin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Short- and long-term effect of high versus low-to-moderate intensity exercise to optimise health-related quality of life after oncological treatment - results from the Phys-Can project2022In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 30, p. 5949-5963Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effect of high intensity (HI) vs low-to-moderate intensity (LMI) exercise on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) up to 18 months after commencement of oncological treatment in patients with breast, colorectal or prostate cancer. In addition, we conducted a comparison with usual care (UC). Methods Patients scheduled for (neo)adjuvant oncological treatment (n = 577) were randomly assigned to 6 months of combined resistance and endurance training of HI or LMI. A longitudinal descriptive study (UC) included participants (n = 89) immediately before the RCT started. HRQoL was assessed by EORTC QLQ-C30 at baseline, 3, 6 and 18 months (1 year after completed exercise intervention) follow-up. Linear mixed models were used to study the groups over time. Results Directly after the intervention, HI scored significant (P = 0.02), but not clinically relevant, higher pain compared with LMI. No other significant difference in HRQoL was found between the exercise intensities over time. Clinically meaningful improvements in HRQoL over time were detected within both exercise intensities. We found favourable significant differences in HRQoL in both exercise intensities compared with UC over time. Conclusion This study adds to the strong evidence of positive effect of exercise and shows that exercise, regardless of intensity, can have beneficial effects on HRQoL during oncological treatment and also for a substantial time after completion of an exercise intervention. In this study, for one year after. Implications for cancer survivors Patients can be advised to exercise at either intensity level according to their personal preferences, and still benefit from both short-term and long-term improvements in HRQoL.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 46.
    Bayes-Genis, Antoni
    et al.
    Hosp Badalona Germans Trias & Pujol, Spain; Inst Salud Carlos III, Spain.
    Januzzi, James L.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, MA 02114 USA; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA; Baim Inst Clin Res, MA USA.
    Richards, A. Mark
    Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Singapore; Univ Otago, New Zealand.
    Arfsten, Henrike
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    de Boer, Rudolf A.
    Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Emdin, Michele
    Scuola Super Sant Anna, Italy; Fdn Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Italy.
    Gonzalez, Arantxa
    Inst Salud Carlos III, Spain; Univ Navarra, Spain; Navarra Inst Hlth Res IdiSNA, Spain.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jhund, Pardeep S.
    Univ Glasgow, Scotland.
    Mueller, Christian
    Univ Basel, Switzerland; Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Nunez, Julio
    Inst Salud Carlos III, Spain; Univ Valencia, Spain.
    Rossignol, Patrick
    Univ Lorraine, France.
    Milinkovic, Ivan
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Rosano, Giuseppe M. C.
    Univ & IRCCS San Raffaele, Italy.
    Coats, Andrew
    Monash Univ, Australia; Univ Warwick, England.
    Seferovic, Petar
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia; Serbian Acad Arts & Sci, Serbia.
    The Peptide for Life Initiative: a call for action to provide equal access to the use of natriuretic peptides in the diagnosis of acute heart failure across Europe2021In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 1432-1436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 47.
    Ben Avraham, Binyamin
    et al.
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Crespo-Leiro, Marisa Generosa
    Univ A Coruna UDC La Coruna, Spain.
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece; Univ Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Gotsman, Israel
    Hadassah Univ Hosp, Israel.
    Seferovic, Petar
    Belgrade Univ Med Ctr, Serbia.
    Hasin, Tal
    Shaare Zedek Med Ctr, Israel.
    Potena, Luciano
    Bologna Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Milicic, Davor
    Univ Zagreb, Croatia.
    Coats, Andrew J. S.
    Univ Warwick, England.
    Rosano, Giuseppe
    Univ London, England; IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Italy.
    Ruschitzka, Frank
    Univ Hosp, Switzerland.
    Metra, Marco
    Univ Brescia, Italy.
    Anker, Stefan
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Altenberger, Johann
    SKA Rehabilitat zentrum Grossgmain, Austria.
    Adamopoulos, Stamatis
    Onassis Cardiac Surg Ctr, Greece.
    Barac, Yaron D.
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Chioncel, Ovidiu
    Univ Med & Pharm Carol Davila, Romania.
    De Jonge, Nicolaas
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Elliston, Jeremy
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Frigeiro, Maria
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Italy; Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Italy.
    Goncalvesova, Eva
    Odd Srdcovehozlyhavania Transplantade, Slovakia.
    Grupper, Avishay
    Chaim Sheba Med Ctr, Israel; Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Hamdan, Righab
    Beirut Cardiac Inst, Lebanon.
    Hammer, Yoav
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Hill, Loreena
    Queens Univ, North Ireland.
    Ben Zadok, Osnat Itzhaki
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Abuhazira, Miriam
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Lavee, Jacob
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel; Sheba Med Ctr, Israel.
    Mullens, Wilfried
    Univ Hasselt, Belgium.
    Nalbantgil, Sanemn
    Ege Univ Hosp, Turkey.
    Piepoli, Massimo F.
    Guglielmo da Saliceto Hosp, Italy.
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Wroclaw Med Univ, Poland.
    Ristic, Arsen
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Ruhparwar, Arjang
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Shaul, Aviv
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Tops, Laurens F.
    Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Tsui, Steven
    Royal Papworth Hosp, England.
    Winnik, Stephan
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland; Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Finn
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Ben Gal, Tuvia
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    HFA of the ESC Position paper on the management of LVAD supported patients for the non LVAD specialist healthcare provider: Part 1: Introduction and at the non-hospital settings in the community2021In: ESC Heart Failure, E-ISSN 2055-5822, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 4394-4408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The accepted use of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) technology as a good alternative for the treatment of patients with advanced heart failure together with the improved survival of the LVAD-supported patients on the device and the scarcity of donor hearts has significantly increased the population of LVAD-supported patients. The expected and non-expected device-related and patient-device interaction complications impose a significant burden on the medical system exceeding the capacity of the LVAD implanting centres. The ageing of the LVAD-supported patients, mainly those supported with the destination therapy indication, increases the risk for those patients to experience comorbidities common in the older population. The probability of an LVAD-supported patient presenting with medical emergency to a local emergency department, internal, or surgical ward of a non-LVAD implanting centre is increasing. The purpose of this trilogy is to supply the immediate tools needed by the non-LVAD specialized physician: ambulance clinicians, emergency ward physicians, general cardiologists, internists, anaesthesiologists, and surgeons, to comply with the medical needs of this fast-growing population of LVAD-supported patients. The different issues discussed will follow the patients pathway from the ambulance to the emergency department and from the emergency department to the internal or surgical wards and eventually to the discharge home from the hospital back to the general practitioner. In this first part of the trilogy on the management of LVAD-supported patients for the non-LVAD specialist healthcare provider, after the introduction on the assist devices technology in general, definitions and structured approach to the assessment of the LVAD-supported patient in the ambulance and emergency department is presented including cardiopulmonary resuscitation for LVAD-supported patients.

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  • 48.
    Ben Gal, Tuvia
    et al.
    Rabin Med Ctr, Israel; Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Ben Avraham, Binyamin
    Rabin Med Ctr, Israel; Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Abu-Hazira, Miriam
    Rabin Med Ctr, Israel; Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Frigerio, Maria
    ASST Grande Osped Metropolitano Niguarda, Italy.
    Crespo-Leiro, Maria G.
    Univ A Coruna CHUAC, Spain.
    Oppelaar, Anne Marie
    Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Perkiö Kato, Naoko
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    The consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic for self-care in patients supported with a left ventricular assist device2020In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 933-936Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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  • 49.
    Ben Gal, Tuvia
    et al.
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Ben Avraham, Binyamin
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Milicic, Davor
    Univ Zagreb, Croatia.
    Crespo-Leiro, Marisa G.
    Univ A Coruna UDC, Spain.
    Coats, Andrew J. S.
    Univ Warwick, England.
    Rosano, Giuseppe
    St Georges Hosp NHS Trust Univ London, England; IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Italy.
    Seferovic, Petar
    Belgrade Univ Med Ctr, Serbia.
    Ruschitzka, Frank
    Univ Hosp, Switzerland.
    Metra, Marco
    Univ Brescia, Italy.
    Anker, Stefan
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece; Univ Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Altenberger, Johann
    SKA Rehabilitat Zentrum Grossgmain, Austria.
    Adamopoulos, Stamatis
    Onassis Cardiac Surg Ctr, Greece.
    Barak, Yaron
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Chioncel, Ovidiu
    Emergency Inst Cardiovasc Dis Prof Dr CC Iliescu, Romania; Univ Med & Pharm Carol Davila, Romania.
    Jonge, Nicolaas
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Elliston, Jeremy
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Frigerio, Maria
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Italy; Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Italy.
    Goncalvesova, Eva
    Odd Srdcovehozlyhavania Transplantacie, Slovakia.
    Gotsman, Israel
    Hadassah Univ Hosp, Israel.
    Grupper, Avishai
    Lev Leviev Heart Ctr, Israel; Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Hamdan, Righab
    Beirut Cardiac Inst, Lebanon.
    Hammer, Yoav
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Hasin, Tal
    Shaare Zedek Med Ctr, Israel.
    Hill, Loreena
    Queens Univ, North Ireland.
    Ben Zadok, Osnat Itzhaki
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Abuhazira, Miriam
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Lavee, Jacob
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel; Sheba Med Ctr, Israel.
    Mullens, Wilfried
    Ziekenhuis Oost Limburg, Belgium; Univ Hasselt, Belgium.
    Nalbantgil, Sanemn
    Ege Univ Hosp, Turkey.
    Piepoli, Massimo F.
    Guglielmo da Saliceto Hosp, Italy.
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Univ Hosp, Poland; Wroclaw Med Univ, Poland.
    Potena, Luciano
    Bologna Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Ristic, Arsen
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Ruhparwar, Arjang
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Shaul, Aviv
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Tops, Laurence F.
    Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Tsui, Steven
    Royal Papworth Hosp, England.
    Winnik, Stephan
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland; Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Finn
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Guidance on the management of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) supported patients for the non-LVAD specialist healthcare provider: executive summary2021In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 23, no 10, p. 1597-1609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The accepted use of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) technology as a good alternative for the treatment of patients with advanced heart failure together with the improved survival of patients on the device and the scarcity of donor hearts has significantly increased the population of LVAD supported patients. Device-related, and patient-device interaction complications impose a significant burden on the medical system exceeding the capacity of LVAD implanting centres. The probability of an LVAD supported patient presenting with medical emergency to a local ambulance team, emergency department medical team and internal or surgical wards in a non-LVAD implanting centre is increasing. The purpose of this paper is to supply the immediate tools needed by the non-LVAD specialized physician - ambulance clinicians, emergency ward physicians, general cardiologists, and internists - to comply with the medical needs of this fast-growing population of LVAD supported patients. The different issues discussed will follow the patients pathway from the ambulance to the emergency department, and from the emergency department to the internal or surgical wards and eventually back to the general practitioner.

  • 50.
    Ben Gal, Tuvia
    et al.
    Heart Failure Unit, Cardiology Department, "Rabin" Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.
    Perkiö Kato, Naoko
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Yaari, Vicky
    Heart Failure Unit, Cardiology Department, "Rabin" Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.
    Avraham, Ben
    Heart Failure Unit, Cardiology Department, "Rabin" Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.
    Verheijden Klompstra, Leonie
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Psychometric Testing of the Hebrew Version of the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale2020In: Heart, Lung and Circulation, ISSN 1443-9506, E-ISSN 1444-2892, no 7, p. E121-E130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The assessment of self-care behaviour is important for tailoring care to patients and evaluating the effectiveness of heart failure (HF) disease-management programmes. The European HF Self-care Behaviour (EHFScB) scale is a validated instrument used worldwide.

    AIM: The purpose of the study was to evaluate psychometric properties of the Hebrew version of the nine-item EHFScB scale in Israeli patients with HF.

    METHOD: To develop the Hebrew version of the EHFScB scale, forward and back translation was performed. The psychometric evaluation was based on data from 102 patients with HF (mean age 61±12 yr, male 75%, New York Heart Association [NYHA] class II 42% and NYHA class III 51%) included in two cross-sectional studies performed in 2007 and 2015-2017 in an Israeli hospital. Content validity, construct validity, known-groups validity, and discriminant validity were assessed. Reliability was evaluated with internal consistency.

    RESULTS: Content validity and useability were confirmed by HF experts and patients with HF. Construct validity was tested using factor analysis and two factors were extracted (factor 1: consulting behaviour; factor 2: adherence to the regimen). Known-groups validity testing revealed a significant difference before and after an educational intervention in the total score (n=40 [41.6±23.8] vs [67.6±21.8]; p<0.01). A weak correlation between the self-care score and health-related quality of life (r= -0.299, p<0.01) was observed, showing that these concepts were related but not overlapping. Cronbach's alpha was 0.78 for the total scale, 0.76 for factor 1, and 0.68 for factor 2, suggesting that the internal consistency of this scale was acceptable.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides support for the useability, validity, and reliability of the nine-item Hebrew version of the EHFScB scale.

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