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  • 1.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    et al.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Moati, Taha Ali
    General Surgery department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Aesthetic Outcome After Reconstruction of Complex SoftTissue Defects with Free Antero-Lateral Thigh Flap UsingSimple Equipment2015In: Journal of surgery, ISSN 2330-0914, Vol. 3, no 2-1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: We aimed to assess the aesthetic outcome of surgical reconstruction by free ALT flap using binocular single-refraction magnifying glasses and a modified post- operative surveillance protocol. Methods: 16 patients were operated for free antero-lateral thigh flap to reconstruct complex soft tissue defects with a close clinical follow up protocol for post operative care depending on the attending personnel in the Plastic surgery unit, Suez Canal University hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. Aesthetic outcome was assessed using a questionnaire based on Posch et al. 2005, including the following items colour, contour, presence of hair, overall appearance and donor site scar. Results: The patients’ assessed aesthetic outcome was acceptable in majority of the cases; median score was 4 for all assessed items. Complete flap loss occurred in one case, other complications as arterial thrombosis and hematomas and infection were detected and managed accordingly with flap salvage in the 3 complicated cases. Conclusion: The result suggests that the proposed protocol is sufficient as an alternative. The aesthetic outcome assessed by the patient and the failure rate was in line with other studies.

  • 2.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Validation of the burn intervention score in a National Burn Centre2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, no 5, p. 1159-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Linköping burn score has been used for two decades to calculate the cost to the hospital of each burned patient. Our aim was to validate the Burn Score in a dedicated Burn Centre by analysing the associations with burn-specific factors: percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA%), cause of injury, patients referred from other (non-specialist) centres, and survival, to find out which of these factors resulted in higher scores. Our second aim was to analyse the variation in scores of each category of care (surveillance, respiration, circulation, wound care, mobilisation, laboratory tests, infusions, and operation).

    We made a retrospective analysis of all burned patients admitted during the period 2000–15. Multivariable regression models were used to analyse predictive factors for an increased daily burn score, the cumulative burn score (the sum of the daily burn scores for each patient) and the total burn score (total sum of burn scores for the whole group throughout the study period) in addition to sub-analysis of the different categories of care that make up the burn score.

    We retrieved 22 301 daily recordings for inpatients. Mobilisation and care of the wound accounted for more than half of the total burn score during the study. Increased TBSA% and age over 45 years were associated with increased cumulative (model R2 0.43, p < 0.001) and daily (model R2 0.61, p < 0.001) burn scores. Patients who died had higher daily burn scores, while the cumulative burn score decreased with shorter duration of hospital stay (p < 0.001).

    To our knowledge this is the first long term analysis and validation of a system for scoring burn interventions in patients with burns that explores its association with the factors important for outcome. Calculations of costs are based on the score, and it provides an indicator of the nurses’ workload. It also gives important information about the different dimensions of the care provided from thorough investigation of the scores for each category.

  • 3.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Division of overall duration of stay into operative stay and postoperative stay improves the overall estimate as a measure of quality of outcome in burn care.2017In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients and Methods: Surgically managed burn patients admitted between 2010-14 were included. Operative stay was defined as the time from admission until the last operation, postoperative stay as the time from the last operation until discharge. The difference in variation was analysed with F-test. A retrospective review of medical records was done to explore reasons for extended postoperative stay. Multivariable regression was used to assess factors associated with operative stay and postoperative stay.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Operative stay/TBSA% showed less variation than total duration/TBSA% (F test = 2.38, pless than0.01). The size of the burn, and the number of operations, were the independent factors that influenced operative stay (R2 0.65). Except for the size of the burn other factors were associated with duration of postoperative stay: wound related, psychological and other medical causes, advanced medical support, and accommodation arrangements before discharge, of which the two last were the most important with an increase of (mean) 12 and 17 days (pless than0.001, R2 0.51).less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Adjusted operative stay showed less variation than total hospital stay and thus can be considered a more accurate outcome measure for surgically managed burns. The size of burn and number of operations are the factors affecting this outcome measure.

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  • 4.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Improvement in mortality at a National Burn Centre since 2000: Was it the result of increased resources?2017In: Medicine, ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 25, article id e6727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The aim of this study was to find out whether the charging costs (calculated using interventional burn score) increased as mortality decreased. During the last 2 decades, mortality has declined significantly in the Linköping Burn Centre. The burn score that we use has been validated as a measure of workload and is used to calculate the charging costs of each burned patient. We compared the charging costs and mortality in 2 time periods (2000–2007 and 2008–2015). A total of 1363 admissions were included. We investigated the change in the burn score, as a surrogate for total costs per patient. Multivariable regression was used to analyze risk-adjusted mortality and burn score. The median total body surface area % (TBSA%) was 6.5% (10–90 centile 1.0–31.0), age 33 years (1.3–72.2), duration of stay/ TBSA% was 1.4 days (0.3–5.3), and 960 (70%) were males. Crude mortality declined from 7.5% in 2000–2007 to 3.4% in 2008–2015, whereas the cumulative burn score was not increased (P=.08). Regression analysis showed that risk-adjusted mortality decreased (odds ratio 0.42, P=.02), whereas the adjusted burn score did not change (P=.14, model R2 0.86). Mortality decreased but there was no increase in the daily use of resources as measured by the interventional burn score. The data suggest that the improvements in quality obtained have been achieved within present routines for care of patients (multidisciplinary/ orientated to patients’ safety).

    Abbreviation: TBSA% = total body surface area %.

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  • 5.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nettelblad, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Versatility of the Extensor Digitorum Brevis Muscle Flap in Lower Limb Reconstruction2018In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open, E-ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 6, no 12, article id e2071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reconstruction of complex defects in the lower leg is a challenge. Although microvascular free tissue transfer is a popular technique, experience and available resources limit its use. Furthermore, free tissue transfer is not always required in the reconstruction of small lower leg defects, as many of them can be reconstructed with local alternatives such as an extensor digitorum brevis flap (EDB). Our aim was to describe our experience of the last 20 years with the EDB as a local muscle flap to cover small complex lower leg defects to establish its clinical feasibility and to document its associated complications. Methods: All adult patients who were operated with EDB flap reconstruction of the lower limb during 1997–2017 at the Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, were included in this retrospective study. Results: Of 64 patients operated, only 7 had total flap failure, and the rate of complete success was 73% (47/64). Most of the skin defects were associated with fractures or complications thereof and were located in the ankle region, the dorsum of the foot, and the distal third of tibia or even the proximal tibia. Defects in the malleolar region and coexisting cardiovascular condition were factors associated with flap loss (either partial or total). Conclusion: The pedicled EDB-flap has, in our hands, proved to be a versatile and safe reconstructive option in the reconstruction of small defects in the lower leg and foot. Long-time follow-up is, however, recommended. 

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  • 6.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Turesson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Hansson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Needle Fasciotomy or Collagenase Injection in the Treatment of Dupuytren’s Contracture: A Retrospective Study2020In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open, E-ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 8, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dupuytren’s contracture is common among older people in Sweden. Previous studies comparing the treatment with an injection of collagenase with percutaneous needle fasciotomy found no differences. Methods: We retrospectively compared the degree of improvement in the deficit in extension of the joints in 2 groups of patients who had been treated with collagenase (71 fingers) or needle fasciotomy (109 fingers) before and 1 year after treatment. We compared the improvement of the extension deficit among the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joints before and after the intervention; additionally, the level of improvement was classified into 3 levels (mild = 0° to 29°; moderate = 30° to 60°; considerable = 61° and more). Results: The degree of improvement of extension in the MCP joints was 11° greater in the collagenase group (P = 0.001). The number of patients who had an improvement of >60° (considerable) in extension was greater in the collagenase group (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Collagenase was more effective than needle fasciotomy in treating extension deficits of the MCP joints in Dupuytren’s contracture in this retrospective analysis. Further prospective studies are required to confirm the finding.

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  • 7.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Moghazy, Amr
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abbas, Ashraf
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    A prospective randomized cost billing comparison of local fasciocutaneous perforator versus free Gracilis flap reconstruction for lower limb in a developing economy2016In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1878-0539, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 1121-1127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distal half leg complex wounds are usually a formidable problem that necessitates either local or free flap coverage. The aim of this study was to compare cost billing charges in free Gracilis flap (fGF) and local fasciocutaneous perforator flap (lFPF) in reconstructing complex soft tissue leg and foot defects. Patients and methods: Thirty consecutive adult (amp;gt; 15-year-old) patients with soft tissue defects in the leg and/or foot requiring tissue coverage with a flap in the period between 2012 and 2015 were randomly assigned (block randomization) to either an fGF or lFPF procedure. The outcome measures addressed were total billed charges costs, perioperative billed charges cost, partial or complete flap loss, length of hospital stay, inpatient postsurgical care duration, complications, operating time and number of operative scrub staff. Results: One patient suffered from complete flap loss in each group. Reconstruction with lFPF showed total lower billed charges costs by 62% (2509 USD) (p amp;lt; 0.001) and perioperative billed charges cost by 54% (779 USD) (p amp;lt; 0.001), and shorter total hospital stay (36.5 days; p amp;lt; 0.001), inpatient postsurgical care duration (6.4 days; p amp;lt; 0.001), operating time (4.3 h; p amp;lt; 0.001) and fewer scrub staff (2.2 persons; p amp;lt; 0.001). Conclusion: These results suggest that neither flap is totally superior to the other; the choice should instead be based on the outcome sought and logistics. lFPF requires lower billed charges cost and resource use and saves operative time and personnel and reduces length of hospital stay. Our approach changed towards using perforator flaps in medium-sized defects, keeping the free flap option for larger defects. (C) 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Response to comments on: A prospective randomized cost billing comparison of local fasciocutaneous perforator versus free Gracilis flap reconstruction for lower limb in a developing economy2017In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1878-0539, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 1307-1308Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Evaluation of Male Breast Glandular Liposculpturing, Response on Commentary2019In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 548-549Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Male Breast Glandular Liposculpturing, Response on Commentary2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 1709-1710Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 11.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Male Breast Glandular Liposculpture Challenges2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 1437-1437Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 12.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Lidocaine infusion has a 25% opioid-sparing effect on background pain after burns: A prospective, randomised, double-blind, controlled trial2020In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 465-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The pain of a burn mainly results from the inflammatory cascade that is induced by the injured tissue, and is classified as background, breakthrough, procedural and postoperative pain. High doses of opioids are usually needed to treat background pain, so its management includes a combination of types of analgesia to reduce the side effects. Lidocaine given intravenously has been shown in two small, uncontrolled studies to have an appreciable effect on pain after burns.

    Objectives

    In this prospective double-blind controlled trial we aimed to examine and quantify the opioid-sparing effect of a continuous infusion of lidocaine for the treatment of background pain during the early period after a burn.

    Methods

    Adult patients injured with burns of >10 total body surface area burned (TBSA%) and treated with a morphine based patient-controlled analgesia device (PCA) were randomised to have either lidocaine infusion starting with a bolus dose (1 mg lidocaine/kg) followed by continuous infusion (180 mg lidocaine/hour) or a placebo infusion, for seven consecutive days. Total daily consumption of opioids (mg) and amount of pain (visual analogue score, VAS) were recorded.

    Results

    We included 19 patients, 10 of whom were given a lidocaine infusion. There were no differences between groups in VAS, TBSA%, time of enrolment to the study since the initial burn, or duration of hospital stay. The opioid consumption in the lidocaine group declined by roughly 25% during the period of the study.

    Conclusion

    An intravenous infusion of lidocaine was safe and had an opioid-sparing effect when treating background pain in burns.

  • 13.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Use of the burn intervention score to calculate the charges of the care of burns2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 303-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background To our knowledge this is the first published estimate of the charges of the care of burns in Sweden. The Linköping Burn Interventional Score has been used to calculate the charges for each burned patient since 1993. The treatment of burns is versatile, and depends on the depth and extension of the burn. This requires a flexible system to detect the actual differences in the care provided. We aimed to describe the model of burn care that we used to calculate the charges incurred during the acute phase until discharge, so it could be reproduced and applied in other burn centres, which would facilitate a future objective comparison of the expenses in burn care. Methods All patients admitted with burns during the period 2010–15 were included. We analysed clinical and economic data from the daily burn scores during the acute phase of the burn until discharge from the burn centre. Results Total median charge/patient was US$ 28 199 (10th–90th centiles 4668-197 781) for 696 patients admitted. Burns caused by hot objects and electricity resulted in the highest charges/TBSA%, while charges/day were similar for the different causes of injury. Flame burns resulted in the highest mean charges/admission, probably because they had the longest duration of stay. Mean charges/patient increased in a linear fashion among the different age groups. Conclusion Our intervention-based estimate of charges has proved to be a valid tool that is sensitive to the procedures that drive the costs of the care of burns such as large TBSA%, intensive care, and operations. The burn score system could be reproduced easily in other burn centres worldwide and facilitate the comparison regardless of the differences in the currency and the economic circumstances.

  • 14.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Surg Dept, Plast Surg Unit, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department Suez, Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Evaluation of Glandular Liposculpture as a Single Treatment for Grades I and II Gynaecomastia2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 1222-1230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Gynaecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, of which the psychological burden on the patient can be considerable, with the increased risk of disorders such as depression, anxiety, and social phobia. Minimal scarring can be achieved by liposuction alone, though it is known to have a limited effect on the dense glandular and fibroconnective tissues. We know of few studies published on “liposuction alone”, so we designed this study to evaluate the outcome of combining liposuction with glandular liposculpturing through two axillary incisions as a single treatment for the management of grades I and II gynaecomastia.

    Methods

    We made a retrospective analysis of 18 patients with grade I or II gynaecomastia who were operated on by combined liposuction and glandular liposculpturing using a fat disruptor cannula, without glandular excision, during the period 2014–2016. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Breast Evaluation Questionnaire (BEQ), which is a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very dissatisfied; 2 = dissatisfied; 3 = neither; 4 = satisfied; 5 = very satisfied). The post-operative aesthetic appearance of the chest was evaluated by five independent observers on a scale from 1 to 5 (5 = considerable improvement).

    Results

    The patient mean (SD) overall satisfaction score was 4.7 (0.7), in which 92% of the responders were “satisfied” to “very satisfied”. The mean (SD) BEQ for all questions answered increased from 2.1 (0.2) “dissatisfied” preoperatively to 4.1 (0.2) “satisfied” post-operatively. The observers’ mean (SD) rate for the improvement in the shape of the front chest wall was 4.1 (0.7). No haematomas were recorded, one patient developed a wound infection, and two patients complained of remnants of tissue. The median (IQR) body mass index was 27.4 (26.7–29.4), 11 patients had gynaecomastia grade I, and 7 patients grade II. The median (IQR) volume of aspirated fat was 700 ml (650–800), operating time was 67 (65–75) minutes, 14 patients had general anaesthesia, and hospital charges were US$ 538 (481–594).

    Conclusions

    Combined liposuction and liposculpturing using the fat disruptor cannula resulted in satisfied patients and acceptable outcomes according to the observers’ ratings. It could be a useful alternative with an outcome that corresponds to that of more expensive methods.

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  • 15.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Ellabban, Mohamed A.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Pros and Cons of Early and Late Skin Grafting in Children with Burns—Evaluation of Common Concepts2022In: European Burn Journal, E-ISSN 2673-1991, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 180-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is no consensus regarding the timing of surgery in children with smallerburn size, specifically in deep dermal burns. Delayed surgery has risks in terms of infection anddelayed wound healing. Early surgery also risks the removal of potentially viable tissue. Our aim wasto investigate the effect of the timing of surgical intervention on the size of the area operated on andthe time to wound healing. Methods: A retrospective analysis for all children (<18 years) with burnsize <20% body surface area (BSA%) during 2009–2020 who were operated on with a split-thicknessskin graft. The patients were grouped by the timing of the first skin graft operation: early = operatedon within 14 days of injury; delayed = operated on more than two weeks after injury. Results: A totalof 84 patients were included in the study, 43 who had an early operation and 41 who had a delayedoperation. There were no differences between the groups regarding burn size, or whether the burnswere superficial or deep. The mean duration of healing time was seven days longer in the group withdelayed operation (p = 0.001). The area operated on was somewhat larger (not significantly so) in thegroup who had early operation. Nine children had two skin graft operations, eight in the early groupand one in the delayed group (p = 0.03). Conclusion: The patients who were operated on early hadthe advantage of a shorter healing time, but there was a higher rate of complementary operationsand a tendency towards a larger burn excision.

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  • 16.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vieweg, Rosa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Irschik, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Development of delirium: Association with old age, severe burns, and intensive care2020In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 797-803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Delirium is defined as a disturbance of attention and awareness that develops over a short period of time, is a change from the baseline, and typically fluctuates over time. Burn care involves a high prevalence of known risk factors for delirium such as sedation, inflammation, and prolonged stay in hospital. Our aim was to explore the extent of delirium and the impact of factors associated with it for adult patients who have been admitted to hospital with burns. Methods In this retrospective study, all adult patients who had been admitted with burns during a four-year period were studied, including both those who were treated with intensive care and intermediate care only (no intensive care). Daily records of the assessment of delirium using the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale (Nu-DESC) were analysed together with age, sex, the percentage of total body surface area burned, operations, and numbers of wound care procedures under anaesthesia, concentrations of plasma C-reactive protein, and other clinical variables. Logistic regression was used to analyse factors that were associated with delirium and its effect on mortality, and linear regression was used to analyse its effect on the duration of hospital stay. Results Fifty-one patients (19%) of the total 262 showed signs of delirium (Nu-DESC score of 2 or more) at least once during their stay in hospital. Signs of delirium were recorded in 42/89 patients (47%) who received intensive care, and in 9/173 (5%) who had intermediate care. Independent factors for delirium in the multivariable regression were: age over 74 years; number of operations and wound care procedures under anaesthesia; and the provision of intensive care (area under the curve 0.940, 95% CI 0.899–0.981). Duration of hospital stay, adjusted for age and burn size, was 13.2 (95% CI 7.4–18.9, p < 0.001) days longer in the group who had delirium. We found no independent effects of delirium on mortality. Conclusion We found a strong association between delirium and older age, provision ofr intensive care, and number of interventions under anaesthesia. A further 5% of patients who did not receive intensive care also showed signs of delirium, which is a finding that deserves to be thoroughly investigated in the future.

  • 17.
    Aboelnaga, Ahmed
    et al.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Salah, Omar
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Microbial cellulose dressing compared with silver sulphadiazine for the treatment of partial thickness burns: A prospective, randomised, clinical trial2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 1982-1988Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The current treatment for partial thickness burns at the trial site is silver sulphadiazine, as it minimises bacterial colonisation of wounds. Its deleterious effect on wound healing, together with the need for repeated, often painful, procedures, has brought about the search for a better treatment. Microbial cellulose has shown promising results that avoid these disadvantages. The aim of this study was therefore to compare microbial cellulose with silver sulphadiazine as a dressing for partial thickness burns.

    Method

    All patients who presented with partial thickness (superficial and deep dermal) burns from October 2014 to October 2016 were screened for this randomised clinical trial. Twenty patients were included in each group: the cellulose group was treated with microbial cellulose sheets and the control group with silver sulphadiazine cream 10 mg/g. The wound was evaluated every third day. Pain was assessed using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) scale during and after each procedure. Other variables recorded were age, sex, percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), clinical signs of infection, time for epithelialisation and hospital stay. Linear multivariable regression was used to analyse the significance of differences between the treatment groups by adjusting for the size and depth of the burn, and the patient’s age.

    Results

    Median TBSA% was 9% (IQR 5.5–12.5). The median number of dressing changes was 1 (IQR 1–2) in the cellulose group, which was lower than that in the control group (median 9.5, IQR 6–16) (p < 0.001). Multivariable regression analysis showed that the group treated with microbial cellulose spent 6.3 (95% CI 0.2–12.5) fewer days in hospital (p = 0.04), had a mean score that was 3.4 (95% CI 2.5–4.3) points lower during wound care (p < 0.001), and 2.2 (95% CI 1.6–2.7) afterwards (p < 0.001). Epithelialisation was quicker, but not significantly so.

    Conclusion

    These results suggest that the microbial cellulose dressing is a better first choice for treatment of partial thickness burns than silver sulphadiazine cream. Fewer dressings of the wound were done and, combined with the low pain scores, this is good for both the patients and the health care system. The differences in randomisation of the area of burns is, however, a concern that needs to be included in the interpretation of the results.

  • 18.
    Backstrom, D.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Al-Ayoubi, Fawzi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Letter: Outcome of trauma patients2010In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 54, no 7, p. 902-903Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 19.
    Bak, Zoltan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cardiac dysfunction after burns2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 603-609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Using transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) we investigated the occurrence, and the association of possible abnormalities of motion of the regional wall of the heart (WMA) or diastolic dysfunction with raised troponin concentrations, or both during fluid resuscitation in patients with severe burns.

    Patients and methods

    Ten consecutive adults (aged 36–89 years, two women) with burns exceeding 20% total burned body surface area who needed mechanical ventilation were studied. Their mean Baux index was 92.7, and they were resuscitated according to the Parkland formula. Thirty series of TEE examinations and simultaneous laboratory tests for myocyte damage were done 12, 24, and 36 h after the burn.

    Results

    Half (n = 5) the patients had varying grades of leakage of the marker that correlated with changeable WMA at 12, 24 and 36 h after the burn (p ≤ 0.001, 0.044 and 0.02, respectively). No patient had WMA and normal concentrations of biomarkers or vice versa. The mitral deceleration time was short, but left ventricular filling velocity increased together with stroke volume.

    Conclusion

    Acute myocardial damage recorded by both echocardiography and leakage of troponin was common, and there was a close correlation between them. This is true also when global systolic function is not deteriorated. The mitral flow Doppler pattern suggested restrictive left ventricular diastolic function.

  • 20.
    Bak, Zoltan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Hemodynamic Changes During Resuscitation After Burns Using the Parkland Formula2009In: Journal of Trauma, ISSN 0022-5282, E-ISSN 1529-8809, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Parkland formula (2-4 mL/kg/burned area of total body surface area %) with urine output and mean arterial pressure (MAP) as endpoints; for the fluid resuscitation in burns is recommended all over the world. There has recently been a discussion on whether central circulatory endpoints should be used instead, and also whether volumes of fluid should be larger. Despite this, there are few central hemodynamic data available in the literature about the results when the formula is used correctly.

    Methods: Ten burned patients, admitted to our unit early, and with a burned area of >20% of total body sur-face area were investigated at 12, 24, and 36 hours after injury. Using transesophageal echocardiography, pulmonary artery catheterization, and transpulmonary thermodilution to monitor them, we evaluated the cardiovascular coupling when urinary output and MAP were used as endpoints.

    Results: Oxygen transport variables, heart rate, MAP, and left ventricular fractional area, did not change significantly during fluid resuscitation. Left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic area and global end-diastolic volume index increased from subnormal values at 12 hours to normal ranges at 24 hours after the burn. Extravascular lung intrathoracal blood volume ratio was increased 12 hours after the burn.

    Conclusions: Preload variables, global systolic function, and oxygen transport recorded simultaneously by three separate methods showed no need to increase the total fluid volume within 36 hours of a major burn. Early (12 hours) signs of central circulatory hypovolemia, however, support more rapid infusion of fluid at the beginning of treatment.

  • 21.
    Bak, Zoltan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Human cardiovascular dose-response to supplemental oxygen2007In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 191, no 1, p. 15-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the central and peripheral cardiovascular adaptation and its coupling during increasing levels of hyperoxaemia. We hypothesized a dose-related effect of hyperoxaemia on left ventricular performance and the vascular properties of the arterial tree.

    Methods: Oscillometrically calibrated arterial subclavian pulse trace data were combined with echocardiographic recordings to obtain non-invasive estimates of left ventricular volumes, aortic root pressure and flow data. For complementary vascular parameters and control purposes whole-body impedance cardiography was applied. In nine (seven males) supine, resting healthy volunteers, aged 23–48 years, data was collected after 15 min of air breathing and at increasing transcutaneous oxygen tensions (20, 40 and 60 kPa), accomplished by a two group, random order and blinded hyperoxemic protocol.

    Results: Left ventricular stroke volume [86 ± 13 to 75 ± 9 mL (mean ± SD)] and end-diastolic area (19.3 ± 4.4 to 16.8 ± 4.3 cm2) declined (P < 0.05), and showed a linear, negative dose–response relationship to increasing arterial oxygen levels in a regression model. Peripheral resistance and characteristic impedance increased in a similar manner. Heart rate, left ventricular fractional area change, end-systolic area, mean arterial pressure, arterial compliance or carbon dioxide levels did not change.

    Conclusion: There is a linear dose–response relationship between arterial oxygen and cardiovascular parameters when the systemic oxygen tension increases above normal. A direct effect of supplemental oxygen on the vessels may therefore not be excluded. Proximal aortic and peripheral resistance increases from hyperoxaemia, but a decrease of venous return implies extra cardiac blood-pooling and compensatory relaxation of the capacitance vessels.

  • 22.
    Bäckström, Denise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Larsen, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Deaths caused by injury among people of working age (18-64) are decreasing, while those among older people (64+) are increasing2018In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 589-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Injury is an important cause of death in all age groups worldwide, and contributes to many losses of human and economic resources. Currently, we know a few data about mortality from injury, particularly among the working population. The aim of the present study was to examine death from injury over a period of 14 years (1999-2012) using the Swedish Cause of Death Registry (CDR) and the National Patient Registry, which have complete national coverage.

    METHOD: CDR was used to identify injury-related deaths among adults (18 years or over) during the years 1999-2012. ICD-10 diagnoses from V01 to X39 were included. The significance of changes over time was analyzed by linear regression.

    RESULTS: The incidence of prehospital death decreased significantly (coefficient -0.22, r (2) = 0.30; p = 0.041) during the study period, while that of deaths in hospital increased significantly (coefficient 0.20, r (2) = 0.75; p < 0.001). Mortality/100,000 person-years in the working age group (18-64 years) decreased significantly (coefficient -0.40, r (2) = 0.37; p = 0.020), mainly as a result of decrease in traffic-related deaths (coefficient -0.34, r (2) = 0.85; p < 0.001). The incidence of deaths from injury among elderly (65 years and older) patients increased because of the increase in falls (coefficient 1.71, r (2) = 0.84; p < 0.001) and poisoning (coefficient 0.13, r (2) = 0.69; p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: The epidemiology of injury in Sweden has changed during recent years in that mortality from injury has declined in the working age group and increased among those people 64 years old and over.

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  • 23.
    Bäckström, Denise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Change in child mortality patterns after injuries in Sweden: a nationwide 14-year study.2017In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 343-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Sweden has one of the world's lowest child injury mortality rates, but injuries are still the leading cause of death among children. Child injury mortality in the country has been declining, but this decline seems to decrease recently. Our objective was therefore to further examine changes in the mortality of children's death from injury over time and to assess the contribution of various effects on mortality. The underlying hypothesis for this investigation is that the incidence of lethal injuries in children, still is decreasing and that this may be sex specific.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied all deaths from injury in Sweden under-18-year-olds during the 14 years 1999-2012. We identified those aged under 18 whose underlying cause of death was recorded as International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) diagnosis from V01 to X39 in the Swedish cause of death, where all dead citizens are registered.

    RESULTS: From the 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2012, 1213 children under the age of 18 died of injuries in Sweden. The incidence declined during this period (r = -0.606, p = 0.02) to 3.3 deaths/100,000 children-years (95 % CI 2.6-4.2). Death from unintentional injury was more common than that after intentional injury (p < 0.0001). There was a reduction in the incidence of unintentional injuries during the study period (r = -0.757, p = 0.03). The most common causes of death were injury to the brain (n = 337, 41 %), followed by drowning (n = 109, 13 %). The number of deaths after intentional injury increased (r = 0.585, p = 0.03) and at the end of the period was 1.5 deaths/100,000 children-years. The most common causes of death after intentional injuries were asphyxia (n = 177, 45 %), followed by injury to the brain (n = 76, 19 %).

    DISCUSSION: Mortality patterns in injured children in Sweden have changed from being dominated by unintentional injuries to a more equal distribution between unintentional and intentional injuries as well as between sexes and the overall rate has declined further. These findings are important as they might contribute to the preventive work that is being done to further reduce mortality in injured children.

  • 24.
    Dogan, Sinan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elserafy, Ahmed Taher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vuola, Jyrki
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki Burn Centre, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kankuri, Esko
    Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Grigoriadi, Marina Perdiki
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology.
    Valtonen, Jussi
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki Burn Centre, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Lindford, Andrew
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki Burn Centre, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    A prospective dual-centre intra-individual controlled study for the treatment of burns comparing dermis graft with split-thickness skin auto-graft2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 21666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate if donor and recipient site morbidity (healing time and cosmesis) could be reduced by a novel, modified split-thickness skin grafting (STSG) technique using a dermal component in the STSG procedure (DG). The STSG technique has been used for 150 years in surgery with limited improvements. Its drawbacks are well known and relate to donor site morbidity and recipient site cosmetic shortcomings (especially mesh patterns, wound contracture, and scarring). The Dermal graft technique (DG) has emerged as an interesting alternative, which reduces donor site morbidity, increases graft yield, and has the potential to avoid the mesh procedure in the STSG procedure due to its elastic properties. A prospective, dual-centre, intra-individual controlled comparison study. Twenty-one patients received both an unmeshed dermis graft and a regular 1:1.5 meshed STSG. Aesthetic and scar assessments were done using The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) and a Cutometer Dual MPA 580 on both donor and recipient sites. These were also examined histologically for remodelling and scar formation. Dermal graft donor sites and the STSG donor sites healed in 8 and 14 days, respectively (p < 0.005). Patient-reported POSAS showed better values for colour for all three measurements, i.e., 3, 6, and 12 months, and the observers rated both vascularity and pigmentation better on these occasions (p < 0.01). At the recipient site, (n = 21) the mesh patterns were avoided as the DG covered the donor site due to its elastic properties and rendered the meshing procedure unnecessary. Scar formation was seen at the dermal donor and recipient sites after 6 months as in the standard scar healing process. The dermis graft technique, besides potentially rendering a larger graft yield, reduced donor site morbidity, as it healed faster than the standard STSG. Due to its elastic properties, the DG procedure eliminated the meshing requirement (when compared to a 1:1.5 meshed STSG). This promising outcome presented for the DG technique needs to be further explored, especially regarding the elasticity of the dermal graft and its ability to reduce mesh patterns. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT05189743) 12/01/2022. © 2022, The Author(s).

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  • 25.
    Elawa, Sherif
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredriksson, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Perimed AB, Järfälla, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Zötterman, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Droog Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Skin perfusion and oxygen saturation after mastectomy and radiation therapy in breast cancer patients2024In: Breast, ISSN 0960-9776, E-ISSN 1532-3080, Vol. 75, article id 103704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathophysiological mechanism behind complications associated with postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) and subsequent implant-based breast reconstruction are not completely understood. The aim of this study was to examine if there is a relationship between PMRT and microvascular perfusion and saturation in the skin after mastectomy and assess if there is impaired responsiveness to a topically applied vasodilator (Methyl nicotinate - MN). Skin microvascular perfusion and oxygenation >2 years after PMRT were measured using white light diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) in the irradiated chest wall of 31 women with the contralateral breast as a control. In the non-irradiated breast, the perfusion after application of MN (median 0.84, 25th-75th centile 0.59-1.02 % RBC × mm/s) was higher compared to the irradiated chest wall (median 0.51, 25th-75th centile 0.21-0.68 % RBC × mm/s, p < 0.001). The same phenomenon was noted for saturation (median 91 %, 25th-75th centile 89-94 % compared to 89 % 25th-75th centile 77-93 %, p = 0.001). Eight of the women (26%) had a ≥10 % difference in skin oxygenation between the non-irradiated breast and the irradiated chest wall. These results indicate that late microvascular changes caused by radiotherapy of the chest wall significantly affect skin perfusion and oxygenation.

  • 26.
    Ellabban, Mohamed A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdel Kader, Ghada
    Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Gomaa, Amr A.
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdel Fattah, Islam Omar
    Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Experimental study of the effects of nitroglycerin, botulinum toxin A, and clopidogrel on bipedicled superficial inferior epigastric artery flap survival.2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 20891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beneficial effects could be achieved by various agents such as nitroglycerin, botulinum toxin A (BoTA), and clopidogrel to improve skin flap ischaemia and venous congestion injuries. Eighty rats were subjected to either arterial ischaemia or venous congestion and applied to a bipedicled U-shaped superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) flap with the administration of nitroglycerin, BoTA, or clopidogrel treatments. After 7 days, all rats were sacrificed for flap evaluation. Necrotic area percentage was significantly minimized in flaps treated with clopidogrel (24.49%) versus the ischemic flaps (34.78%); while nitroglycerin (19.22%) versus flaps with venous congestion (43.26%). With ischemia, light and electron microscopic assessments revealed that nitroglycerin produced degeneration of keratinocytes and disorganization of collagen fibers. At the same time, with clopidogrel administration, there was an improvement in the integrity of these structures. With venous congestion, nitroglycerin and BoTA treatments mitigated the epidermal and dermal injury; and clopidogrel caused coagulative necrosis. There was a significant increase in tissue gene expression and serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in ischemic flaps with BoTA and clopidogrel, nitroglycerin, and BoTA clopidogrel in flaps with venous congestion. With the 3 treatment agents, gene expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were up-regulated in the flaps with ischemia and venous congestion. With all treatment modalities, its serum levels were significantly increased in flaps with venous congestion and significantly decreased in ischemic flaps. Our analyses suggest that the best treatment option for ischemic flaps is clopidogrel, while for flaps with venous congestion are nitroglycerin and BoTA.

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  • 27.
    Ellabban, Mohamed A.
    et al.
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Ibrahim, Ahmed M.
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Gomah, Amr A.
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Salah, Omar
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Aboelnaga, Ahmed M.
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Assessment of Freestyle Local Facial Perforator Flaps for Coverage of Facial Defects2021In: The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, ISSN 1049-2275, E-ISSN 1536-3732, Vol. 32, no 2, p. e122-e125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess local freestyle facial perforator flaps in the reconstruction of small to medium-sized facial defects.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a case series, local freestyle perforator flaps were used in Suez Canal University Hospital to reconstruct 28 facial defects in 26 patients between 2017 and 2019. Adequate perforators were identified near those defects and flaps were designed as propeller or VY advancement. Four scales from the FACE-Q (satisfaction with facial appearance, satisfaction with the outcome, psychological function, and appearance-related psychosocial distress) and 2 scales from the SCAR-Q (Appearance scale and Symptom scale) were used as well as the observer part of the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. The mean follow up period was 10 months.

    RESULTS: Complete reconstruction was achieved in all cases with a high rate of patient satisfaction which was assessed by FACE-Q and SCAR-Q. Moreover, observer assessment by Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale score showed high patient satisfaction with the scars with a mean (SD) 15.5 (3.4) and there was a positive correlation between subjective and objective: results (r2 from 0.27 to 0.41, P < 0.01). Regarding complications, bulkiness occurred in 2 flaps, congestion in 2 flaps, dehiscence in 1 flap, and tip necrosis in 5 flaps. Accordingly, secondary intervention in the form of medicinal leech therapy was used in 3 flaps, delayed closure for the dehisced flap and debulking for 1 flap.

    CONCLUSIONS: Local freestyle perforator flap reconstruction is one of the recommended techniques for small to medium-sized facial defects which gives a high aesthetic outcome and patient satisfaction.

  • 28.
    Ellabban, Mohamed A.
    et al.
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Wyckman, Alexander
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Dual Reconstruction of Lumbar and Gluteal Defects with Freestyle Propeller Flap and Muscle Flap2021In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open, E-ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 9, no 1, article id e3376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The reconstruction of complex tissue defects in the lumbar and gluteal areas is a surgical challenge. The use of freestyle perforator-based flaps has gained popularity in the reconstruction of these defects due to several advantages: versatility, minimal donor-site morbidity, and tension-free closure. The present study reports the outcome of using a dual coverage of lumbar and gluteal defects with a gluteus maximus rotation flap as a deep layer and a freestyle propeller perforator-based flap as a superficial layer. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 18 patients who had a dual coverage of complex wounds of the lumbar and the gluteal areas was conducted. Different propeller flaps were used as superior gluteal artery perforator flap (SGAP), inferior gluteal artery perforator flap (IGAP), and posterior thigh perforator flap (PTP). Results: The study included 15 men and 3 women. The mean age was 26.3 years. The causes of the defects were: pressure ulcers in 14 patients and post-traumatic in 4 patients. A total of 28 freestyle flaps was used: 11 patients had 1 flap, 4 had 2 flaps, and 3 had 3 flaps. The mean postoperative follow-up was 12.2 months. The complications registered in the medical records were venous congestion in 2 patients, partial flap necrosis in 2 patients, and wound dehiscence in 1 patient. Conclusions: A freestyle propeller perforator-based flap combined with a gluteus maximus muscle flap is a solution that provides well-padding over bony prominence with a low complication rate. However, a long-term follow-up is needed to verify these results. Published online 26 January 2021. Received for publication October 7, 2020; accepted November 23, 2020. Disclosure: The authors have no financial interest to declare in relation to the content of this article. Mohamed A. Ellabban, MSc, MRCS, MD, FEBOPRAS Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit Surgery Department Faculty of Medicine Suez Canal University Ismailia, Egypt E-mail: Mohamed.ellabban@med.suez.edu.eg This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. Copyright © 2021 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. All rights reserved.

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  • 29.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Mirdell, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Laser speckle contrast imaging in children with scalds: Its influence on timing of intervention, duration of healing and care, and costs2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 798-804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Background

    Scalds are the most common type of burn injury in children, and the initial evaluation of burn depth is a problem. Early identification of deep dermal areas that need excision and grafting would save unnecessary visits and stays in hospital. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) shows promise for the evaluation of this type of burn. The aim of this study was to find out whether perfusion measured with LSCI has an influence on the decision for operation, duration of healing and care period, and costs, in children with scalds.

    Methods

    We studied a group of children with scalds whose wounds were evaluated with LSCI on day 3–4 after injury during the period 2012–2015. Regression (adjustment for percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), age, and sex) was used to analyse the significance of associations between degree of perfusion and clinical outcome.

    Results

    We studied 33 children with a mean TBSA% of 6.0 (95% CI 4.4–7.7)%. Lower perfusion values were associated with operation (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve 0.86, 95% CI 0.73–1.00). The perfusion cut-off with 100% specificity for not undergoing an operation was ≥191 PU units (66.7% sensitivity and 72.7% accurately classified). Multivariable analyses showed that perfusion was independently associated with duration of healing and care period.

    Conclusion

    Lower perfusion values, as measured with LSCI, are associated with longer healing time and longer care period. By earlier identification of burns that will be operated, perfusion measurements may further decrease the duration of care of burns in children with scalds.

  • 30.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Changes in patterns of treatment of burned children at the Linkoping Burn Centre, Sweden, 2009-20142017In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 1111-1119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Children are a relatively large group among patients with burns in Sweden. We changed the management of childrens burns to a flexible, outpatient-based plan. The aim was to follow up the outpatient management for childrens burns during the period 20092014, and track it, to find out to what extent the patients had been treated flexibly as outpatients, and to clarify the reasons behind those who did not fit in the plan. Methods: Descriptive retrospective analysis dividing the patients into three groups: inpatients only, flexible management, and outpatients. Other variables recorded included: age, sex, percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), percentage full thickness burn (FTB%), cause of burn, county of residence, operations required, number of visits to the outpatient department, costs, and duration of overnight stay in the hospital. Results: The study group included 620 children: nine were managed strictly as inpatients, 204 as flexible outpatients, and 407 strictly as outpatients. Among the total there were 269 children who came from remote areas (43%), and of these 260 were treated as outpatients and flexible outpatients. Median TBSA% in the whole group was 1 (10th-90th centile 0-9) with the biggest median TBSA% 12 (5-38) in the inpatient group. The most common cause of injury was scalds (332/620,-54%). Costs/patient (US$) was lower in the flexible outpatient group than in the inpatient group (median 10 557 (3213-35802) and 35343 (7344-66554), respectively). Conclusion: Based on the results, we expect that the flexible outpatient treatment plan for children with minor to moderate burns can be expanded in the future. The results encourage us to continue the service and to further reduce duration of stay in hospital below the level already achieved (25% of the whole period of care). (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 31.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt .
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Letter: "Is the length of time in acute burn surgery associated with poorer outcomes?"2014In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 772-773Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 32.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbas, A.H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, O.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nagi, M.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Scald management protocols - outcome differences in two different time periods using different treatment strategies.2016In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 139-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the years the treatment of scalds in our centre has changed, moving more towards the use of biological dressings (xenografts). Management of scalds with mid dermal or deep dermal injuries differs among centers using different types of dressings, and recently biological membrane dressings were recommended for this type of injury. Here we describe differences in treatment outcome in different periods of time. All patients with scalds who presented to the Linkoping Burn Centre during two periods, early (1997-98) and later (2010-12) were included. Data were collected in the unit database and analyzed retrospectively. A lower proportion of autograft operations was found in the later period, falling from 32% to 19%. Hospital stay was shorter in the later period (3.5 days shorter, p=0.01) and adjusted duration of hospital stay/TBSA% was shorter (1.2 to 0.7, p=0.07). The two study groups were similar in most of the studied variables: we could not report any significant differences regarding outcome except for unadjusted duration of hospital stay. Further studies are required to investigate functional and aesthetic outcome differences between the treatment modalities.

  • 33.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Plast Surg Unit, Dept Surg, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Treatment of Children With Scalds by Xenografts: Report From a Swedish Burn Centre2016In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 37, no 6, p. E586-E591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scalds are the most common type of burn in children, and one way to treat them is with xenografts with no topical antimicrobials in line with the recommendations of a recent review. However, this treatment has not been examined in detail. Our aim was to describe the treatment of such children when biological dressings (xenografts) were used without local antimicrobials. We reviewed the medical records of all children admitted to a Swedish National Burn Centre during the period 2010-2012 with scalds who were treated with xenografts. Percentage TBSA injured, age, length of hospital stay, number of operations, antibiotics given, duration of antibiotic treatment, and pain score during the first 3 days, application of xenografts, and clinical notes of wound infection were recorded. We studied 67 children, (43 of whom were boys), with a median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 1 (1-2) year and median (IQR) TBSA% 6.2 (4-11). Twenty children (30%) required operation. Twelve (18%) developed a wound infection, 29 (43%) had other infections, and 26 (39%) were free from infection. The median (IQR) duration of systemic antibiotics was 10 (6-13) days. On the day that the xenografts were applied 10 of the children had a Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) score between 3 and 7, and during the following 2 days, only four children scored in this range. The remaining 57 children had scores amp;lt;3 on the day that xenografts were applied and on the following 2 days. Median (IQR) length of stay/TBSA% was 0.7 (0.4-1.0). Treatment with xenografts was associated with median length of stay/TBSA% amp;lt; 1 and low pain scores. Despite a high rate of prescription of systemic antibiotics, most were for reasons other than wound infection.

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  • 34.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Staged excisions of moderate-sized burns compared with total excision with immediate autograft: an evaluation of two strategies.2017In: International journal of burns and trauma, ISSN 2160-2026, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Different surgical techniques have evolved since excision and autografting became the treatment of choice for deep burns in the 1970s. The treatment plan at the Burn Center, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden, has shifted from single-stage excision and immediate autografting to staged excisions and temporary cover with xenografts before autografting. The aim of this study was to find out if the change in policy resulted in extended duration of hospital stay/total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA%).

    METHODS: Retrospective clinical cohort including surgically-managed patients with burns of 15%-60% TBSA% within each treatment group. The first had early full excisions of deep dermal and full thickness burns and immediate autografts (1997-98), excision and immediate autograft group) and the second had staged excisions before final autografts using xenografts for temporary cover (2010-11, staged excision group).

    RESULTS: The study included 57 patients with deep dermal and full-thickness burns, 28 of whom had excision and immediate autografting, and 29 of whom had staged excisions with xenografting before final autografting. Adjusted (LOS/TBSA%) was close to 1, and did not differ between groups. Mean operating time for the staged excision group was shorter and the excised area/operation was smaller. The total operating time/TBSA% did not differ between groups.

    CONCLUSION: Staged excisions with temporary cover did not affect adjusted LOS/TBSA% or total operating time. Staged excisions may be thought to be more expensive because of the cost of covering the wound between stages, but this needs to be further investigated as do the factors that predict long term outcome.

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  • 35.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbas, A.H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, O.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Temporary coverage of burns with a xenograft and sequential excision, compared with total early excision and autograft2016In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 196-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 80s and 90s, early and total excision of full thickness burns followed by immediate autograft was the most common treatment, with repeated excision and grafting, mostly for failed grafts. It was hypothesized, therefore, that delayed coverage with an autograft preceded by a temporary xenograft after early and sequential smaller excisions would lead to a better wound bed with fewer failed grafts, a smaller donor site, and possibly also a shorter duration of stay in hospital. We carried out a case control study with retrospective analysis from our National Burn Centre registry for the period 1997-2011. Patients who had been managed with early total excision and autograft were compared with those who had had sequential smaller excisions covered with temporary xenografts until the burn was ready for the final autograft. The sequential excision and xenograft group (n=42) required one-third fewer autografts than patients in the total excision and autograft group (n=45), who needed more than one operation (p<0.001). We could not detect any differences in duration of stay in hospital / total body surface area burned% (duration of stay/TBSA%) (2.0 and 1.8) (p=0.83). The two groups showed no major differences in terms of adjusted duration of stay, but our findings suggest that doing early, smaller, sequential excisions using a xenograft for temporary cover can result in shorter operating times, saving us the trouble of making big excisions. However, costs tended to be higher when the burns were > 25% TBSA.

  • 36.
    El-Serafi, Ahmed T.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    El-Serafi, Ibrahim
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Ajman Univ, U Arab Emirates.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    A Systematic Review of Keratinocyte Secretions: A Regenerative Perspective2022In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1661-6596, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 23, no 14, article id 7934Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell regenerative therapy is a modern solution for difficult-to-heal wounds. Keratinocytes, the most common cell type in the skin, are difficult to obtain without the creation of another wound. Stem cell differentiation towards keratinocytes is a challenging process, and it is difficult to reproduce in chemically defined media. Nevertheless, a co-culture of keratinocytes with stem cells usually achieves efficient differentiation. This systematic review aims to identify the secretions of normal human keratinocytes reported in the literature and correlate them with the differentiation process. An online search revealed 338 references, of which 100 met the selection criteria. A total of 80 different keratinocyte secretions were reported, which can be grouped mainly into cytokines, growth factors, and antimicrobial peptides. The growth-factor group mostly affects stem cell differentiation into keratinocytes, especially epidermal growth factor and members of the transforming growth factor family. Nevertheless, the reported secretions reflected the nature of the involved studies, as most of them focused on keratinocyte interaction with inflammation. This review highlights the secretory function of keratinocytes, as well as the need for intense investigation to characterize these secretions and evaluate their regenerative capacities.

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  • 37.
    El-Serafi, Ahmed T.
    et al.
    Sharjah Institute for Medical Research and College of Medicine, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, UAE(a); Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    El-Serafi, Ibrahim T.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Division of Experimental Cancer Medicine, Faculty of MDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Skin regeneration in three dimensions, current status, challenges and opportunities2017In: Differentiation, ISSN 0301-4681, E-ISSN 1432-0436, Vol. 96, p. 4p. 26-29Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin regeneration is a life-saving need for many patients, whom list is stretched from burn victims to motor-car accidents. Spraying cells, either keratinocytes or stem cells, were associated with variable results and, in many cases, unfavorable outcomes. As the spatial configuration of the skin is distinctive, many trials investigated the bio-printing or the construction of three dimensional skin models where different layers of the skin were preserved. Although some of these models showed the histological configuration of the skin, their acceptance by the wound was questionable as a consequence of delayed vascularization. In this mini-review, different models for three dimensional regeneration of the skin will be discussed with their main points of strength and challenges as well as their possible opportunities.

  • 38.
    Gus, Eduardo
    et al.
    Victorian Adult Burns Service , Melbourne, Australia.
    Almeland, Stian Kreken
    Norwegian National Burn Center, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Barnes, David
    St. Andrews Burns Service, Broomsfield Hospital, Chelmsford, United Kingdom.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Singer, Yvonne
    Victorian Adult Burns Service, Melbourne, Australia.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    van Zuijlen, Paul
    Red Cross Hospital, Netherlands; Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, The Netherlands.
    Cleland, Heather
    Victorian Adult Burns Service, Melbourne, Australia.
    Burn unit design - the missing link for quality and safety.2021In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 369-375Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between infrastructure, technology, model of care and human resources influences patient outcomes and safety, staff productivity and satisfaction, retention of personnel, and treatment and social costs. This concept underpins the need for evidence-based design, and has been widely adopted to inform hospital infrastructure planning. The aim of this review is to establish evidence-based, universally-applicable key features of a burn unit that support function in a comprehensive patient-centred model of care. A literature search in medical, architectural and engineering databases was conducted. Burn associations' guidelines and relevant articles published in English, between 1990 and 2020, were included, and the available evidence is summarized in the review. Few studies have been published on burn unit design in the last thirty years. Most of them focus on the role of design in infection control and prevention, and consist primarily of descriptive or observational reports, opportunistic historical cohort studies, and reviews. The evidence available in the literature is not sufficient to create a definitive infrastructure guideline to inform burn unit design, and there are considerable difficulties in creating evidence that will be widely applicable. In the absence of a strong evidence base, consensus guidelines on burn unit infrastructure should be developed, to help healthcare providers, architects and engineers make informed decisions, when designing new or renovated facilities.

  • 39.
    Johansson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Herwald, Heiko
    Lund University, Department Clin Science, Div Infect Med, Lund, Sweden .
    Lindbom, Lennart
    Karolinska Institute, Department Physiol and Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Sjoberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Dynamics of leucocytes correlate with increased pulmonary vascular permeability and decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratio early after major burns2009Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The lung is affected soon after a major burn as indicated by a decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratio. The exact mechanism underlying this is not known. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) are activated systemically and their numbers are largely increased soon after a burn followed by a rapid decline to low normal or subnormal numbers within 24 hours, possibly by increased extravasation. Experimental data have supported the hypothesis that an important target for this extravasation is the lungs. Other studies also show that when PMN adhere to endothelial cells they increase vascular permeability, and this effect is mediated, at least in part, by release of heparin binding protein (HBP, also known as CAP-37 and azurocidin). We hypothesised that there is a relation between early increased pulmonary vascular permeability or a decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratio and the dynamic change in blood leucocytes after a burn, possibly mediated by the local release of HBP.

    Material and methods: This is a prospective, descriptive, exploratory, singlecentre study at a national burn centre. We investigated the dynamic changes of leucocytes in blood, plasma concentrations of HBP, pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) by thermodilution, and PaO2:FiO2 ratios in 20 patients during the first 21 days after a major burn (20% >total burn surface area %).

    Results: Median total burn surface area was 40% (IQR 25-52) and full thickness burn 28% (IQR 2-39). There was a correlation between the early (<24 hours) alteration in circulating white blood cell count and both early increased vascular permeability in the lung (r=0.63, p=0.004) and the decreased oxygenation index defined as PaO2:FiO2 < 27 kPa (p=0.004). There were no associations between plasma concentrations of HBP and measured pulmonary vascular permeability or PaO2:FiO2 ratios.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that trapping of leucocytes in the lung may be an important factor in early increased pulmonary vascular permeability and decrease of the PaO2:FiO2 ratio. Our data do not support the idea that HBP, assessed by systemic plasma concentrations, mediate this effect.

  • 40.
    Johansson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Östersund Hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Herwald, Heiko
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindbom, Lennart
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Alteration of Leukocyte Count Correlates With Increased Pulmonary Vascular Permeability and Decreased PaO2:FiO(2) Ratio Early After Major Burns2015In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 484-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leukocytes are activated systemically and their numbers increase soon after a burn followed by a rapid decline to low normal or subnormal levels, possibly by increased extravasation. Experimental data support that an important target for such extravasation is the lungs and that leukocytes when they adhere to endothelial cells cause an increase in vascular permeability. The authors investigated a possible relation between early increased pulmonary vascular permeability or a decreased PaO2:FiO(2) ratio and the dynamic change in concentration of blood leukocytes after a burn. This is a prospective, exploratory, single-center study. The authors measured the dynamic changes of leukocytes in blood starting early after the burn, pulmonary vascular permeability index by thermodilution, and PaO2:FiO(2)-ratios in 20 patients during the first 21 days after a major burn (greater than20% TBSA%). Median TBSA was 40% interquartile range (IQR, 25-52) and full thickness burn 28% (IQR, 2-39). There was a correlation between the early (less than24 hours) alteration in white blood cell count and both early increased pulmonary vascular permeability (r = .63, P = .004) and the decreased oxygenation index defined as PaO2:FiO(2) less than 27 kPa (P = .004). The authors have documented a correlation between dynamic change of blood leukocytes and pulmonary failure early after burns.

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  • 41.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elawa, Sherif
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Larsson, Alexander
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Biosynthetic cellulose compared to porcine xenograft in the treatment of partial-thickness burns: A randomised clinical trial2022In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 1236-1245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to compare two dressing treatments for partial-thickness burns: biosynthetic cellulose dressing (BsC) (Epiprotect (R) S2Medical AB, Linkoping, Sweden) and porcine xenograft (EZ Derm (R), Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden). Methods: Twenty-four adults with partial-thickness burns were included in this randomized clinical trial conducted at The Burn Centers in Linkoping and Uppsala, Sweden between June 2016 and November 2018. Time to healing was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were wound infection, pain, impact on everyday life, length of hospital stay, cost, and burn scar outcome (evaluated with POSAS). Results: We found no significant differences between the two dressing groups regarding time to healing, wound infection, pain, impact on everyday life, duration of hospital stay, cost, or burn scar outcome at the first follow up. Burn scar outcome at the 12-month follow up showed that the porcine xenograft group patients scored their scars higher on the POSAS items thickness (p = 0.048) and relief (p = 0.050). This difference was, however, not confirmed by the observer. Conclusions: The results showed the dressings performed similarly when used in adults with burns evaluated as partial thickness. (C) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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  • 42.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Scarring At Donor Sites After Split-Thickness Skin Graft: A Prospective, Longitudinal, Randomized Trial2018In: Advances in Skin & Wound Care, ISSN 1527-7941, E-ISSN 1538-8654, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 183-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate scarring at split-thickness skin graft donor sites 8 years after surgery.

    METHODS: At surgery, 67 patients were randomized to hydrofiber, polyurethane foam, or porcine xenograft treatment. Scars were evaluated with the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale.

    RESULTS: Results showed significant differences in observed scar outcomes at donor sites, leaving the polyurethane foam–treated and the porcine xenograft–treated patients with the least satisfying scars. Multivariable regression analysis showed that the group treated with the xenografts had worse scores for overall opinion of the scar than did the other groups (P = .03), the most important factor being pigmentation. There was no correlation between duration of healing time and quality of the scar.

    CONCLUSIONS: There were significant differences among the groups, with the hydrofiber group being the most satisfied with the appearance of their scar.

  • 43.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Scarring at Donor Sites after Split-Thickness Skin Graft: A Prospective, Longitudinal, Randomized Trial2020In: Advances in Skin & Wound Care, ISSN 1527-7941, E-ISSN 1538-8654, Vol. 33, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate if previous findings on the association between dressing treatments and subjective opinion on final donor site scar outcome using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) can be confirmed objectively. The previous study showed that patients dressed with hydrofiber covered with film were more satisfied with their donor site scars than patients receiving porcine xenograft or polyurethane foam dressings. METHODS: Scar outcome measurements were assessed by a blinded observer using POSAS and the Cutometer dual MPA 580 device to measure the viscoelasticity of skin. RESULTS: A total of 17 participants were included in this study, five of whom were treated with hydrofiber, six with polyurethane foam, and another six with porcine xenograft. There were no significant differences among groups in any of the POSAS items or in the viscoelasticity measurements made with the Cutometer. CONCLUSIONS: The investigators could not confirm previous associations between dressing treatment and long-term donor site scars. No associations between donor sites healing times and final scarring were found. Hypopigmentation was reported in 15 of 17 donor sites evaluated.

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  • 44.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Superiority of silver-foam over porcine xenograft dressings for treatment of scalds in children: A prospective randomised controlled trial2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 1401-1409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Our aim was to compare two different regimens for the treatment of children with partial-thickness scalds. These were treated with either a porcine xenograft (EZderm (R), Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden) or a silver-foam dressing (Mepilex (R) Ag, Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden). Methods: We organised a prospective randomised clinical trial that included 58 children admitted between May 2015 and May 2018 with partial-thickness scalds to The Burn Centre in Linkoping, Sweden. The primary outcome was time to healing. Secondary outcomes were pain, need for operation, wound infection, duration of hospital stay, changes of dressings, and time taken. Results: The patients treated with silver-foam dressing had a significantly shorter healing time. The median time to 97% healing for this group was 9 (7-23) days compared to 15 (9-29) days in the porcine xenograft group (p = 0.004). The median time to complete healing for the silver-foam group was 15 (9-29) days and for the porcine xenograft group 20.5 (11-42) days (p = 0.010). Pain, wound infection, duration of hospital stay, and the proportion of operations were similar between the groups. Number of dressing changes and time for dressing changes were lower in the silver-foam dressing group (p = 0.03 for both variables). Conclusions: We compared two different treatments for children with partial-thickness scalds, and the data indicate that wound healing was faster, fewer dressing changes were needed, and dressing times were shorter in the silver-foam group. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 45.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Three Years Experience of a Novel Biosynthetic Cellulose Dressing in Burns2019In: ADVANCES IN WOUND CARE, ISSN 2162-1918, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The use of porcine xenograft (PX) is widely spread in burn care. However, it may cause immunologic responses and other ethical and cultural considerations in different cultures. Therefore, there is a need for alternatives. The aim of this work is to test a novel biosynthetic cellulose dressing (Epiprotect((R))) on burn patients. Approach: Charts from 38 patients with superficial burns (SBs) (n=18) or excised burns (n=20) that got biosynthetic cellulose dressing instead of PX at a national burn center during 3 years were reviewed. Time to healing, length of stay, and wound infection were extracted from the medical records. Results: SBs hospitalization time was 11 days comparable to PXs reported by others. In the excised group, median duration of hospital stay was 35 days. Time to healing was 28 days. Seven wound infections were confirmed in the superficial group (39%) and 11 infections in the excised group (61%). Patients with superficial wounds reported pain relief on application. Innovation: A dressing (17x21cm) consisting of biosynthetic cellulose replacing PX. Conclusion: Outcome of treatment of SBs or temporary coverage of excised deep burns with biosynthetic cellulose is comparable to treatment with PX. However, biosynthetic cellulose has benefits such as providing pain relief on application and ethical or cultural issues with the material is nonexistent.

  • 46.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Suprathel® or Mepilex® Ag for treatment of partial thickness burns in children: A case control study2023In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 49, no 7, p. 1585-1591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The study aim was to investigate if Suprathel® can be an adequate alternative to Mepilex® Ag for the treatment of partial-thickness scalds in children.

    Methods

    A retrospective study including 58 children admitted to The Burn Centre in Linköping, Sweden between year 2015 and 2022. Of the 58 children, 30 were dressed with Suprathel ® and 28 with Mepilex ® Ag. Outcomes investigated were healing time, burn wound infection (BWI), need for operations and number of dressing changes.

    Results

    We found no significant differences in any of the outcomes. In the Suprathel ® group 17 children and in the Mepilex ® Ag group 15 children were healed within 14 days. Ten children from each group received antibiotics for suspected BWI and two from each group underwent an operation with skin grafting. Each group had on median four dressing changes.

    Conclusions

    Two different treatments were compared for children with partial-thickness scalds, and the data indicates that similar results are received with both dressings.

  • 47.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Åstrand, Liselott
    Sharjah Institute for Medical Research, University of Sharjah, UAE.
    Fayiz, Safa
    Sharjah Institute for Medical Research, University of Sharjah, UAE.
    Khalaf, Ahmed
    Sharjah Institute for Medical Research, University of Sharjah, UAE.
    Divyasree, Parambath
    Sharjah Institute for Medical Research, University of Sharjah, UAE.
    El-Serafi, Ahmed Taher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Sharjah Institute for Medical Research, University of Sharjah, UAE; Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sprayed cultured autologous keratinocytes in the treatment of severe burns: a retrospective matched cohort study.2020In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 134-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The standard treatment of burns is early excision followed by autologous skin grafting. The closure of extensive deep burns poses a considerable challenge. Cultured autologous keratinocytes have been used since 1981 in an effort to improve healing. However, the time required to culture the cells and the lack of a dermal component limit the expectations of outcome. Our aim was to compare the duration of hospital stay between patients who were treated with autologous skin grafts and cultured autologous keratinocytes and those who were treated with autologous skin grafting without cultured autologous keratinocytes. In this retrospective study all patients treated with cultured autologous keratinocytes between 2012 and 2015 were matched by size and depth of burn with patients not treated with cultured autologous keratinocytes. Multivariable regression was used to analyse associations between duration of hospital stay and treatment adjusted for age, mortality, size and depth of the burn. Then, we investigated the possibility of differentiation of human bone marrow stem cell line to keratinocyte- like cells as a future direction. The regression analysis showed a coefficient of 17.36 (95% CI -17.69 to 52.40), p= 0.32, for hospital stay in the treatment group, compared with the matched group. Our results showed no difference in the duration of hospital stay between the two treatments. Autologous stem cells should be considered as a future modality of burn management, although further studies are needed.

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  • 48.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Burn scar outcome at six and 12 months after injury in children with partial thickness scalds: Effects of dressing treatment.2020In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 546-551, article id S0305-4179(19)30714-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: In line with other researchers in the field of burns' care, we think that research investigating the long-term outcome of scars is largely lacking. As scarring is of the utmost importance to the patient, clinicians who treat burns must aim to find treatments that lead to a good end result. The aim of this study was to study scar outcomes at six and 12 months after injury. It is an extension of a previous randomised controlled trial (RCT) in which two dressings (porcine xenograft and silver foam dressing) were examined with respect to their ability to help heal partial thickness scalds.

    METHOD: Children aged six months - six years with acute partial thickness scalds, on the trunk, or extremities, or both, were included. In the previous study, the silver foam was found to have significantly shorter healing times than the xenograft. Children were assessed at six and 12 months after injury for this study, and photographs were taken of the burn site, and both the patient and observer scar assessment scale (POSAS) and the Vancouver scar scale (VSS) were completed and evaluated by blinded observers.

    RESULTS: Of the 58 children from the original RCT, 39 returned to the clinic for evaluation of their scars at six months, and 34 at 12 months after injury. There were no differences in POSAS, VSS total scores, or incidence of hypertrophic scarring between the different dressings. Fifteen children were assessed as having hypertrophic scarring, all of whom had healing times that had extended beyond 14 days.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study compared burn scarring after two different treatments for burns in children with partial-thickness scalds and the data suggested that neither dressing had a more favourable impact on scar outcome. The conclusion is, however, tempered by the non-return of all the patients to the follow up. However, as anticipated, regardless of the dressing used, longer healing times were associated with higher scar scores (more scarring) and hypertrophic scarring.

  • 49.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Östholm Balkhed, Åse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Wound infection among children with moderate burns – An explorative review of the association between reported frequency and diagnosis2023In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The Linkoping burn centre in Sweden has, even though being a high income country, reported high burn wound infections (BWI) frequencies in scalded children compared to similar populations in other parts of the world.

    Aim: The aim was to investigate possible explanations for differences in frequency of BWI among children with partial thickness burns treated at the Linköping burn centre in Sweden, and that reported in other studies.

    Method: In order to investigate what BWI criteria that were used in similar studies a literature search on PubMed Central was done along with a retrospective analysis of children previously diagnosed as infected to confirm or reject the high infection frequency reported earlier.

    Result: Of the 34 selected publications reporting on BWI frequency 16 (47%) did not define a criteria for the BWI diagnosis and almost a third did not report on wound culturing. Of those who did report the use a third do not mention any bacterial growth found is these cultures. The retrospective analysis on children at the centre did not show any decrease in infection frequency even with some disagreement on onset for the BWI.

    Conclusion: The reporting of criteria and diagnosis of burn wound infection is highly variable making it difficult to interpret results and come to conclusions. The high frequency of BWI at the centre might be a result of close monitoring due to study participation, use of clean instead of sterile routine at dressing changes or low thresholds for the diagnosis in respect to changes in infection markers.

  • 50.
    Lagerwall, Cathrine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Shahin, Hady
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdallah, Sallam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    El-Serafi, Ahmed Taher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Xeno-free workflow exhibits comparable efficiency and quality of keratinocytes isolated from human skin biopsies2021In: Regenerative Therapy, ISSN 2352-3204, Vol. 18, p. 401-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Regenerative solutions of the skin represent a hope for burn victims with extensive skin loss and chronic wound patients. The development of xeno-free workflow is crucial for clinical application in compliance with the directives of the European Medicines Agency. This study aimed at evaluating the outcome of the xeno-free isolation workflow of keratinocytes from human skin biopsy. Methods Skin biopsies were obtained from volunteers. The epidermis was digested with TrypLE™ Select, which was deactivated by dilution or with trypsin, deactivated by media with fetal bovine serum. Freshly isolated cells were compared for total cell number, viability, activity of caspase 3, gene expression and the presence of the keratinocyte surface markers cytokeratin 14. The cells were cultured in xeno-free conditions for one week and characterized regarding the number and viability as well as the metalloproteinase secretion. Results The number of obtained cells was similar in both workflows. The cell viability was less in the TrypLE group, with slight reduction of the cell surface marker cytokeratin 14. Caspase 3 activity was comparable as well as the gene expression of the apoptotic markers BAX, BCL2 and SLUG, as well as the keratinocyte markers cytokeratin 14, stratifin and filaggrin. Upon culture, the number of keratinocytes, their viability and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 10 were equal in both groups. Conclusion This study reports the possibility of isolating functioning and viable keratinocytes through a xeno-free workflow for clinical application.

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