liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Dogan, Sinan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elserafy, Ahmed Taher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vuola, Jyrki
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki Burn Centre, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kankuri, Esko
    Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Grigoriadi, Marina Perdiki
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology.
    Valtonen, Jussi
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki Burn Centre, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Lindford, Andrew
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki Burn Centre, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    A prospective dual-centre intra-individual controlled study for the treatment of burns comparing dermis graft with split-thickness skin auto-graft2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 21666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate if donor and recipient site morbidity (healing time and cosmesis) could be reduced by a novel, modified split-thickness skin grafting (STSG) technique using a dermal component in the STSG procedure (DG). The STSG technique has been used for 150 years in surgery with limited improvements. Its drawbacks are well known and relate to donor site morbidity and recipient site cosmetic shortcomings (especially mesh patterns, wound contracture, and scarring). The Dermal graft technique (DG) has emerged as an interesting alternative, which reduces donor site morbidity, increases graft yield, and has the potential to avoid the mesh procedure in the STSG procedure due to its elastic properties. A prospective, dual-centre, intra-individual controlled comparison study. Twenty-one patients received both an unmeshed dermis graft and a regular 1:1.5 meshed STSG. Aesthetic and scar assessments were done using The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) and a Cutometer Dual MPA 580 on both donor and recipient sites. These were also examined histologically for remodelling and scar formation. Dermal graft donor sites and the STSG donor sites healed in 8 and 14 days, respectively (p < 0.005). Patient-reported POSAS showed better values for colour for all three measurements, i.e., 3, 6, and 12 months, and the observers rated both vascularity and pigmentation better on these occasions (p < 0.01). At the recipient site, (n = 21) the mesh patterns were avoided as the DG covered the donor site due to its elastic properties and rendered the meshing procedure unnecessary. Scar formation was seen at the dermal donor and recipient sites after 6 months as in the standard scar healing process. The dermis graft technique, besides potentially rendering a larger graft yield, reduced donor site morbidity, as it healed faster than the standard STSG. Due to its elastic properties, the DG procedure eliminated the meshing requirement (when compared to a 1:1.5 meshed STSG). This promising outcome presented for the DG technique needs to be further explored, especially regarding the elasticity of the dermal graft and its ability to reduce mesh patterns. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT05189743) 12/01/2022. © 2022, The Author(s).

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Holm, Sebastian
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Tell, Katinka
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Löfgren, Jenny
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sociodemographic Patterns of Pediatric Patients in Specialized Burn Care in Sweden2022In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open, E-ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 10, no 4, article id e4246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of mortality in children. Burns affect children disproportionally. Although burn incidence and mortality are decreasing, differences in the risk depend on socioeconomic status. The present study aimed to investigate the sociodemographic patterns of pediatric patients (0-17 years) managed at the two burn centers in Sweden. Uppsala, and Linkoping, between 2010 and 2020. Method: This retrospective register-based study used hospital records from the two burn centers combined with information front Statistics Sweden plus data regarding number of asylum seekers from the Swedish Migrations Agency. Choropleth maps representing the patients geographical distribution were created. Information about income levels per geographic area was added. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to investigate differences in median income levels between the areas where the patients lived, related to Swedens median income. Results: The study included 2455 patients. Most of the children aged below 5 years (76%) and were boys (60%). The mean percentage of total skin area was 4.2%. There was no significant increment or decrease in the incidence of pediatric burns during the study. Most patients with recorded zip codes lived in areas with an income level below the national median (n = 1974, 83%). Children with asylum status were over-represented compared with residents and/or Swedish citizens. Conclusions: In Sweden, most pediatric burns occur in families that live in areas with low-income levels. Pediatric burns affect children with asylum status disproportionally compared with those who are residents in and/or citizens of Sweden. Prevention strategies should be designed and implemented to alleviate this health inequity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Karlsson, Matilda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Studying the healing and long-term outcomes of two partial thickness wound models using different wound dressings2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Safe and effective wound dressing treatments are important for proper wound healing. Such procedures therefore need to be evidence-based regarding the most important outcome measures such as healing time, less discomfort for the patient, duration of hospital care and, importantly, less scarring. As the relation between longer healing times and more severe scarring is known, it is important to find dressing treatments that reduces such complications by providing fast and proper wound healing. In this thesis, four established wound dressing treatments (hydrofibre covered with film; porcine xenografts and polyurethane foam, with and without silver), were evaluated for two types of acute, partial thickness wounds: split thickness skin graft (STSG) donor sites and partial thickness burn wounds in two randomised, controlled clinical trials (RCT) with longterm scar follow ups. The relations between factors thought to influence wound healing and scarring as sex, infection, wound extent and depth, healing time and skin grafting were also investigated in these two wound models.

    Methods: Data from these trials were collected on sex, infection rates, wound depth and extent, need of skin grafting, healing times and scarring frequency together with demographic data. Scars were evaluated at 8 years in Study II and III and at 6 and 12 months after injury in Study V.

    Results: Two dressing treatments; hydrofibre covered with film and porcine xenografts gave significantly faster healing of the STSG donor sites than the standard of care (SOC) dressing, the polyurethane foam. The hydrofibre was thereafter implemented as the new SOC at the department. The long-term scar follow up showed that the hydrofibre group was most satisfied with their donor site scar, providing further evidence for the implementation of this dressing strategy. From the observer’s perspective no differences were found between these treatment groups. For partial thickness burns the treatment with a silvercontaining foam dressing showed significantly shorter healing time, whereas for the scars, no difference between dressing groups could be detected. A number of factors were identified that affected healing time: for donor sites only male sex was associated with shorter healing time. Sex was also the only factor that influenced donor site scarring, where female patients, both subjectively and objectively, were rated with higher scores (worse outcome). For partial thickness burns a larger extent of the burn wound, presence of deep dermal burns, and the need of skin grafting, all had a negative impact on both healing time and final scar. The final scar was also significantly affected by longer wound healing times and infection.

    Conclusion: The results suggest that the use of hydrofibre dressings covered with film on donor sites resulted in positive short-term and long-term outcomes. Regarding partial thickness burns, silver foam dressing resulted in faster healing but as for the final scar, no difference could be seen. Several factors were associated with longer healing times and more severe scarring such as: female sex, larger burns, deep dermal burns, skin grafting, and infection. Longer healing times were related to more severe scarring.

    List of papers
    1. Dressing the split-thickness skin graft donor site: a randomized clinical trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dressing the split-thickness skin graft donor site: a randomized clinical trial
    2014 (English)In: Advances in Skin & Wound Care, ISSN 1527-7941, E-ISSN 1538-8654, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this study was to compareAquacel (ConvaTec, Skillman, New Jersey), Allevyn (Smith &Nephew, St Petersburg, Florida), and Mediskin I (Mo¨ lnlycke, HealthCare AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) in the treatment of split-thicknessskin graft donor sites.

    DESIGN: This study was performed as a prospective randomized,3-arm, clinical study.

    SETTING: A clinical study performed at a hand and plastic surgerydepartment with burn unit.

    PARTICIPANTS: The study included 67 adults with a total of73 donor sites, which were on the thigh, not reharvested, andranged between 30- and 400-cm2 area.

    INTERVENTIONS: Subjects were randomly assigned to treatmentwith Aquacel, Allevyn, or Mediskin I.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The donor site was assessed onpostoperative days 3, 14, and 21 for healing, infection, pain,impact on everyday life, ease of use, and cost.

    MAIN RESULTS: The obtained results demonstrate significantlyfaster re-epithelialization for patients treated with Aquacel orMediskin I compared with Allevyn. Regarding infections, therewere no significant differences between the groups. Patientswearing Aquacel experienced significantly less pain changing thedressing and less impact on everyday life than the patientswearing Allevyn. Aquacel was shown to be significantly easier forthe caregiver to use than Allevyn and Mediskin I. There is asignificant difference in cost of treatment between the dressings,whereas Mediskin I is the most expensive.

    CONCLUSION: The authors’ results support the use of Aquacel in thetreatment of split-thickness skin graft donor sites. Aquacel has alow cost per unit, is user friendly, gives short healing time, andminimizes patient discomfort.

     

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014
    Keywords
    split-thickness skin grafting, donor sites, wound dressing
    National Category
    Other Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103995 (URN)10.1097/01.ASW.0000437786.92529.22 (DOI)000335388100005 ()24343389 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-02-05 Created: 2014-02-05 Last updated: 2023-01-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Scarring At Donor Sites After Split-Thickness Skin Graft: A Prospective, Longitudinal, Randomized Trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scarring At Donor Sites After Split-Thickness Skin Graft: A Prospective, Longitudinal, Randomized Trial
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Advances in Skin & Wound Care, ISSN 1527-7941, E-ISSN 1538-8654, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 183-188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate scarring at split-thickness skin graft donor sites 8 years after surgery.

    METHODS: At surgery, 67 patients were randomized to hydrofiber, polyurethane foam, or porcine xenograft treatment. Scars were evaluated with the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale.

    RESULTS: Results showed significant differences in observed scar outcomes at donor sites, leaving the polyurethane foam–treated and the porcine xenograft–treated patients with the least satisfying scars. Multivariable regression analysis showed that the group treated with the xenografts had worse scores for overall opinion of the scar than did the other groups (P = .03), the most important factor being pigmentation. There was no correlation between duration of healing time and quality of the scar.

    CONCLUSIONS: There were significant differences among the groups, with the hydrofiber group being the most satisfied with the appearance of their scar.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018
    National Category
    Surgery Otorhinolaryngology Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146085 (URN)10.1097/01.ASW.0000530684.31491.5f (DOI)000435188200008 ()29561343 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2023-01-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Superiority of silver-foam over porcine xenograft dressings for treatment of scalds in children: A prospective randomised controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Superiority of silver-foam over porcine xenograft dressings for treatment of scalds in children: A prospective randomised controlled trial
    Show others...
    2019 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 1401-1409Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Our aim was to compare two different regimens for the treatment of children with partial-thickness scalds. These were treated with either a porcine xenograft (EZderm (R), Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden) or a silver-foam dressing (Mepilex (R) Ag, Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden). Methods: We organised a prospective randomised clinical trial that included 58 children admitted between May 2015 and May 2018 with partial-thickness scalds to The Burn Centre in Linkoping, Sweden. The primary outcome was time to healing. Secondary outcomes were pain, need for operation, wound infection, duration of hospital stay, changes of dressings, and time taken. Results: The patients treated with silver-foam dressing had a significantly shorter healing time. The median time to 97% healing for this group was 9 (7-23) days compared to 15 (9-29) days in the porcine xenograft group (p = 0.004). The median time to complete healing for the silver-foam group was 15 (9-29) days and for the porcine xenograft group 20.5 (11-42) days (p = 0.010). Pain, wound infection, duration of hospital stay, and the proportion of operations were similar between the groups. Number of dressing changes and time for dressing changes were lower in the silver-foam dressing group (p = 0.03 for both variables). Conclusions: We compared two different treatments for children with partial-thickness scalds, and the data indicate that wound healing was faster, fewer dressing changes were needed, and dressing times were shorter in the silver-foam group. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
    Keywords
    Burns; Partial thickness burns; Scalds; Children; Wound dressings; Healing
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160409 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2019.04.004 (DOI)000483339500017 ()31230798 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2023-01-11
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (png)
    presentationsbild
  • 4.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Scarring At Donor Sites After Split-Thickness Skin Graft: A Prospective, Longitudinal, Randomized Trial2018In: Advances in Skin & Wound Care, ISSN 1527-7941, E-ISSN 1538-8654, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 183-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate scarring at split-thickness skin graft donor sites 8 years after surgery.

    METHODS: At surgery, 67 patients were randomized to hydrofiber, polyurethane foam, or porcine xenograft treatment. Scars were evaluated with the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale.

    RESULTS: Results showed significant differences in observed scar outcomes at donor sites, leaving the polyurethane foam–treated and the porcine xenograft–treated patients with the least satisfying scars. Multivariable regression analysis showed that the group treated with the xenografts had worse scores for overall opinion of the scar than did the other groups (P = .03), the most important factor being pigmentation. There was no correlation between duration of healing time and quality of the scar.

    CONCLUSIONS: There were significant differences among the groups, with the hydrofiber group being the most satisfied with the appearance of their scar.

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Superiority of silver-foam over porcine xenograft dressings for treatment of scalds in children: A prospective randomised controlled trial2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 1401-1409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Our aim was to compare two different regimens for the treatment of children with partial-thickness scalds. These were treated with either a porcine xenograft (EZderm (R), Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden) or a silver-foam dressing (Mepilex (R) Ag, Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden). Methods: We organised a prospective randomised clinical trial that included 58 children admitted between May 2015 and May 2018 with partial-thickness scalds to The Burn Centre in Linkoping, Sweden. The primary outcome was time to healing. Secondary outcomes were pain, need for operation, wound infection, duration of hospital stay, changes of dressings, and time taken. Results: The patients treated with silver-foam dressing had a significantly shorter healing time. The median time to 97% healing for this group was 9 (7-23) days compared to 15 (9-29) days in the porcine xenograft group (p = 0.004). The median time to complete healing for the silver-foam group was 15 (9-29) days and for the porcine xenograft group 20.5 (11-42) days (p = 0.010). Pain, wound infection, duration of hospital stay, and the proportion of operations were similar between the groups. Number of dressing changes and time for dressing changes were lower in the silver-foam dressing group (p = 0.03 for both variables). Conclusions: We compared two different treatments for children with partial-thickness scalds, and the data indicate that wound healing was faster, fewer dressing changes were needed, and dressing times were shorter in the silver-foam group. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jarnhed-Andersson, Ingmarie
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tarpila, Erkki
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Dressing the split-thickness skin graft donor site: a randomized clinical trial2014In: Advances in Skin & Wound Care, ISSN 1527-7941, E-ISSN 1538-8654, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this study was to compareAquacel (ConvaTec, Skillman, New Jersey), Allevyn (Smith &Nephew, St Petersburg, Florida), and Mediskin I (Mo¨ lnlycke, HealthCare AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) in the treatment of split-thicknessskin graft donor sites.

    DESIGN: This study was performed as a prospective randomized,3-arm, clinical study.

    SETTING: A clinical study performed at a hand and plastic surgerydepartment with burn unit.

    PARTICIPANTS: The study included 67 adults with a total of73 donor sites, which were on the thigh, not reharvested, andranged between 30- and 400-cm2 area.

    INTERVENTIONS: Subjects were randomly assigned to treatmentwith Aquacel, Allevyn, or Mediskin I.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The donor site was assessed onpostoperative days 3, 14, and 21 for healing, infection, pain,impact on everyday life, ease of use, and cost.

    MAIN RESULTS: The obtained results demonstrate significantlyfaster re-epithelialization for patients treated with Aquacel orMediskin I compared with Allevyn. Regarding infections, therewere no significant differences between the groups. Patientswearing Aquacel experienced significantly less pain changing thedressing and less impact on everyday life than the patientswearing Allevyn. Aquacel was shown to be significantly easier forthe caregiver to use than Allevyn and Mediskin I. There is asignificant difference in cost of treatment between the dressings,whereas Mediskin I is the most expensive.

    CONCLUSION: The authors’ results support the use of Aquacel in thetreatment of split-thickness skin graft donor sites. Aquacel has alow cost per unit, is user friendly, gives short healing time, andminimizes patient discomfort.

     

  • 7.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Suprathel® or Mepilex® Ag for treatment of partial thickness burns in children: A case control study2023In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 49, no 7, p. 1585-1591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The study aim was to investigate if Suprathel® can be an adequate alternative to Mepilex® Ag for the treatment of partial-thickness scalds in children.

    Methods

    A retrospective study including 58 children admitted to The Burn Centre in Linköping, Sweden between year 2015 and 2022. Of the 58 children, 30 were dressed with Suprathel ® and 28 with Mepilex ® Ag. Outcomes investigated were healing time, burn wound infection (BWI), need for operations and number of dressing changes.

    Results

    We found no significant differences in any of the outcomes. In the Suprathel ® group 17 children and in the Mepilex ® Ag group 15 children were healed within 14 days. Ten children from each group received antibiotics for suspected BWI and two from each group underwent an operation with skin grafting. Each group had on median four dressing changes.

    Conclusions

    Two different treatments were compared for children with partial-thickness scalds, and the data indicates that similar results are received with both dressings.

  • 8.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Åstrand, Liselott
    Sharjah Institute for Medical Research, University of Sharjah, UAE.
    Fayiz, Safa
    Sharjah Institute for Medical Research, University of Sharjah, UAE.
    Khalaf, Ahmed
    Sharjah Institute for Medical Research, University of Sharjah, UAE.
    Divyasree, Parambath
    Sharjah Institute for Medical Research, University of Sharjah, UAE.
    El-Serafi, Ahmed Taher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Sharjah Institute for Medical Research, University of Sharjah, UAE; Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sprayed cultured autologous keratinocytes in the treatment of severe burns: a retrospective matched cohort study.2020In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 134-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The standard treatment of burns is early excision followed by autologous skin grafting. The closure of extensive deep burns poses a considerable challenge. Cultured autologous keratinocytes have been used since 1981 in an effort to improve healing. However, the time required to culture the cells and the lack of a dermal component limit the expectations of outcome. Our aim was to compare the duration of hospital stay between patients who were treated with autologous skin grafts and cultured autologous keratinocytes and those who were treated with autologous skin grafting without cultured autologous keratinocytes. In this retrospective study all patients treated with cultured autologous keratinocytes between 2012 and 2015 were matched by size and depth of burn with patients not treated with cultured autologous keratinocytes. Multivariable regression was used to analyse associations between duration of hospital stay and treatment adjusted for age, mortality, size and depth of the burn. Then, we investigated the possibility of differentiation of human bone marrow stem cell line to keratinocyte- like cells as a future direction. The regression analysis showed a coefficient of 17.36 (95% CI -17.69 to 52.40), p= 0.32, for hospital stay in the treatment group, compared with the matched group. Our results showed no difference in the duration of hospital stay between the two treatments. Autologous stem cells should be considered as a future modality of burn management, although further studies are needed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Burn scar outcome at six and 12 months after injury in children with partial thickness scalds: Effects of dressing treatment.2020In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 546-551, article id S0305-4179(19)30714-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: In line with other researchers in the field of burns' care, we think that research investigating the long-term outcome of scars is largely lacking. As scarring is of the utmost importance to the patient, clinicians who treat burns must aim to find treatments that lead to a good end result. The aim of this study was to study scar outcomes at six and 12 months after injury. It is an extension of a previous randomised controlled trial (RCT) in which two dressings (porcine xenograft and silver foam dressing) were examined with respect to their ability to help heal partial thickness scalds.

    METHOD: Children aged six months - six years with acute partial thickness scalds, on the trunk, or extremities, or both, were included. In the previous study, the silver foam was found to have significantly shorter healing times than the xenograft. Children were assessed at six and 12 months after injury for this study, and photographs were taken of the burn site, and both the patient and observer scar assessment scale (POSAS) and the Vancouver scar scale (VSS) were completed and evaluated by blinded observers.

    RESULTS: Of the 58 children from the original RCT, 39 returned to the clinic for evaluation of their scars at six months, and 34 at 12 months after injury. There were no differences in POSAS, VSS total scores, or incidence of hypertrophic scarring between the different dressings. Fifteen children were assessed as having hypertrophic scarring, all of whom had healing times that had extended beyond 14 days.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study compared burn scarring after two different treatments for burns in children with partial-thickness scalds and the data suggested that neither dressing had a more favourable impact on scar outcome. The conclusion is, however, tempered by the non-return of all the patients to the follow up. However, as anticipated, regardless of the dressing used, longer healing times were associated with higher scar scores (more scarring) and hypertrophic scarring.

  • 10.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Östholm Balkhed, Åse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Wound infection among children with moderate burns – An explorative review of the association between reported frequency and diagnosis2023In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 742-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The Linkoping burn centre in Sweden has, even though being a high income country, reported high burn wound infections (BWI) frequencies in scalded children compared to similar populations in other parts of the world.

    Aim: The aim was to investigate possible explanations for differences in frequency of BWI among children with partial thickness burns treated at the Linköping burn centre in Sweden, and that reported in other studies.

    Method: In order to investigate what BWI criteria that were used in similar studies a literature search on PubMed Central was done along with a retrospective analysis of children previously diagnosed as infected to confirm or reject the high infection frequency reported earlier.

    Result: Of the 34 selected publications reporting on BWI frequency 16 (47%) did not define a criteria for the BWI diagnosis and almost a third did not report on wound culturing. Of those who did report the use a third do not mention any bacterial growth found is these cultures. The retrospective analysis on children at the centre did not show any decrease in infection frequency even with some disagreement on onset for the BWI.

    Conclusion: The reporting of criteria and diagnosis of burn wound infection is highly variable making it difficult to interpret results and come to conclusions. The high frequency of BWI at the centre might be a result of close monitoring due to study participation, use of clean instead of sterile routine at dressing changes or low thresholds for the diagnosis in respect to changes in infection markers.

  • 11.
    Pham, Tuan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Andersson, Caroline M.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mirdell, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Automated VSS-based Burn Scar Assessment using Combined Texture and Color Features of Digital Images in Error-Correcting Output Coding2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 16744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of burn scars is an important study in both medical research and clinical settings because it can help determine response to burn treatment and plan optimal surgical procedures. Scar rating has been performed using both subjective observations and objective measuring devices. However, there is still a lack of consensus with respect to the accuracy, reproducibility, and feasibility of the current methods. Computerized scar assessment appears to have potential for meeting such requirements but has been rarely found in literature. In this paper an image analysis and pattern classifcation approach for automating burn scar rating based on the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) was developed. Using the image data of pediatric patients, a rating accuracy of 85% was obtained, while 92% and 98% were achieved for the tolerances of one VSS score and two VSS scores, respectively. The experimental results suggest that the proposed approach is very promising as a tool for clinical burn scar assessment that is reproducible and cost-efective.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    C-reactive protein response patterns after antibiotic treatment among children with scalds2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, p. 718-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Scalds are the most common cause of burns in children, yet there is little information available about the inflammatory response. The aim of the study was to investigate the response to treatment with antibiotics among scalded children by following the C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration, procalcitonin (PCT) concentration, and white blood cell count (WCC) during the first two weeks after injury.

    Methods

    All children with scalds who presented to the Burn Centre during 2010–2016 were included in this retrospective study. All measurements of CRP, PCT, and WCC from the first 14 days after injury were recorded, and each patient’s maximum values during days 0–2, 3–7, and 8–14 were used for calculations. Multivariable regression for panel data was used to study the inflammatory response after antibiotic treatment.

    Results

    A total of 216 children were included. C-reactive protein was 45 mg/L (p < 0.001) higher in the group treated with antibiotics, and decreased with 8.8 mg/L per day over the studied time in this group, which was more than twice as fast as among the children who were not given antibiotics.

    Conclusion

    The CRP response, among children with minor scalds treated with antibiotics, shows an appreciable rise during the first week of injury that subsided rapidly during the second week.

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf