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  • 1.
    Aberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Danford, Christopher J.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, MA 02215 USA.
    Thiele, Maja
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Talback, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Rasmussen, Ditlev Nytoft
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Jiang, Z. Gordon
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, MA 02215 USA.
    Hammar, Niklas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    But, Anna
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Puukka, Pauli
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Krag, Aleksander
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Sundvall, Jouko
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Erlund, Iris
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lai, Michelle
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, MA 02215 USA.
    Afdhal, Nezam
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, MA 02215 USA.
    Jula, Antti
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Mannisto, Satu
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Lundqvist, Annamari
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Perola, Markus
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Farkkila, Martti
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    A Dynamic Aspartate-to-Alanine Aminotransferase Ratio Provides Valid Predictions of Incident Severe Liver Disease2021In: HEPATOLOGY COMMUNICATIONS, ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 1021-1035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aspartate-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (AAR) is associated with liver fibrosis, but its predictive performance is suboptimal. We hypothesized that the association between AAR and liver disease depends on absolute transaminase levels and developed and validated a model to predict liver-related outcomes in the general population. A Cox regression model based on age, AAR, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level (dynamic AAR [dAAR]) using restricted cubic splines was developed in Finnish population-based health-examination surveys (FINRISK, 2002-2012; n = 18,067) with linked registry data for incident liver-related hospitalizations, hepatocellular carcinoma, or liver death. The model was externally validated for liver-related outcomes in a Swedish population cohort (Swedish Apolipoprotein Mortality Risk [AMORIS] subcohort; n = 126,941) and for predicting outcomes and/or prevalent fibrosis/cirrhosis in biopsied patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), chronic hepatitis C, or alcohol-related liver disease (ALD). The dynamic AAR model predicted liver-related outcomes both overall (optimism-corrected C-statistic, 0.81) and in subgroup analyses of the FINRISK cohort and identified persons with >10% risk for liver-related outcomes within 10 years. In independent cohorts, the C-statistic for predicting liver-related outcomes up to a 10-year follow-up was 0.72 in the AMORIS cohort, 0.81 in NAFLD, and 0.75 in ALD. Area-under-the-curve (AUC) for detecting prevalent cirrhosis was 0.80-0.83 in NAFLD, 0.80 in hepatitis C, but only 0.71 in ALD. In ALD, model performance improved when using aspartate aminotransferase instead of ALT in the model (C-statistic, 0.84 for outcome; AUC, 0.82 for prevalent cirrhosis). Conclusion: A dAAR score provides prospective predictions for the risk of incident severe liver outcomes in the general population and helps detect advanced liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. The dAAR score could potentially be used for screening the unselected general population and as a trigger for further liver evaluations.

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  • 2.
    Akbari, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dodd, Maja
    Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Per
    Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken. epartment of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Vessby, Johan
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zhang, Xiao
    Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA.
    Wang, Tongtong
    Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA.
    Jemielita, Thomas
    Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA.
    Fernandes, Gail
    Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA.
    Engel, Samuel S.
    Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA.
    Hagström, Hannes
    Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Shang, Ying
    Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term major adverse liver outcomes in 1,260 patients with non-cirrhotic NAFLD2024In: JHEP Reports, ISSN 2589-5559, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 100915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & aims: Long-term studies of the prognosis of NAFLD are scarce. Here, we investigated the risk of major adverse liver outcomes (MALO) in a large cohort of patients with NAFLD.

    Methods: We conducted a cohort study with data from Swedish university hospitals. Patients (n = 1,260) with NAFLD without cirrhosis were diagnosed through biopsy or radiology, and had fibrosis estimated through vibration-controlled transient elastography, biopsy, or FIB-4 score between 1974 and 2020 and followed up through 2020. Each patient was matched on age, sex, and municipality with up to 10 reference individuals from the general population (n = 12,529). MALO were ascertained from Swedish national registers. The rate of events was estimated by Cox regression.

    Results: MALO occurred in 111 (8.8%, incidence rate = 5.9/1,000 person-years) patients with NAFLD and 197 (1.6%, incidence rate = 1.0/1,000 person-years) reference individuals during a median follow up of 13 years. The rate of MALO was higher in patients with NAFLD (hazard ratio = 6.6; 95% CI = 5.2-8.5). The risk of MALO was highly associated with the stage of fibrosis at diagnosis. In the biopsy subcohort (72% of total sample), there was no difference in risk between patients with and without non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The 20-year cumulative incidences of MALO were 2% for the reference population, 3% for patients with F0, and 35% for F3. Prognostic information from biopsy was comparable to FIB-4 (C-indices around 0.73 vs. 0.72 at 10 years).

    Conclusions: This study provides updated information on the natural history of NAFLD, showing a high rate of progression to cirrhosis in F3 and a similar prognostic capacity of non-invasive tests to liver biopsy.

    Impact and implications: Several implications for clinical care and future research may be noted based on these results. First, the risk estimates for cirrhosis development are important when communicating risk to patients and deciding on clinical monitoring and treatment. Estimates can also be used in updated health-economic evaluations, and for regulatory agencies. Second, our results again highlight the low predictive information obtained from ascertaining NASHstatus by histology and call for more objective means by which to define NASH. Such methods may include artificial intelligence-supported digital pathology. We highlight that NASH is most likely the causal factor for fibrosis progression in NAFLD, but the subjective definition makes the prognostic value of a histological NASH diagnosis of limited value. Third, the finding that prognostic information from biopsy and the very simple Fibrosis-4 score were comparable is important as it may lead to fewer biopsies and further move the field towards non-invasive means by which to define fibrosis and, importantly, use non-invasive tests as outcomes in clinical trials. However, all modalities had modest discriminatory capacity and new risk stratification systems are needed in NAFLD. Repeated measures of non-invasive scores may be a potential solution.

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  • 3.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Omar, Kime
    Vastmanland Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Csog, Jozsef
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Venetsanos, Dimitrios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Bleeding complications with clopidogrel or ticagrelor in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients: A real life cohort study of two treatment strategies2020In: IJC Heart & Vasculature, E-ISSN 2352-9067, Vol. 27, article id 100495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), including potent P2Y12 inhibition after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is recommended in clinical guidelines. However, bleeding complications are common, and associated with worse outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess incidence of bleeding events with a clopidogrel-based compared to a ticagrelor-based DAPT strategy, in a real world population. Secondary aims were to assess ischemic complications and mortality.

    Methods and Results

    We identified 330 consecutive STEMI patients with a clopidogrel-based and 330 with a ticagrelor-based DAPT strategy. Patientś medical records were searched for bleeding and ischemic complications, over 6 months follow-up.

    The two groups were well balanced in baseline characteristics, age (69 years inboth groups), sex (31% vs 32% females), history of diabetes (19% vs 21%), hypertension (43% in both) and MI (17% vs 15%). There was no difference in CRUSADE bleeding score (28 vs 29). After discharge, there were more than twice as many bleeding events with a ticagrelor-based compared with a clopidogrel-based strategy (13.3% vs. 6.5%, p = 0.005). Bleeding events included significantly more severe bleeding complications (TIMI major/minor [5.8 vs 1.0, p = 0.001]) during the ticagrelor-based period. There was no significant difference in the composite of death, MI or stroke (7.8% vs 7.1%, p = 0.76).

    Conclusions

    In this observational study, a ticagrelor-based DAPT strategy was associated with significantly more bleeding complications, without any significant change in death, MI or stroke. Larger studies are needed to determine whether bleeding complications off-sets benefits with a more potent DAPT strategy in older and more comorbid real-life patients.

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  • 4.
    Anstee, Quentin M.
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Upon Tyne Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Darlay, Rebecca
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cockell, Simon
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Meroni, Marica
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Govaere, Olivier
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Tiniakos, Dina
    Newcastle Univ, England; Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Burt, Alastair D.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Univ Adelaide, Australia.
    Bedossa, Pierre
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Palmer, Jeremy
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Liu, Yang-Lin
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Aithal, Guruprasad P.
    Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allison, Michael
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Yki-Jarvinen, Hannele
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Vacca, Michele
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Dufour, Jean-Francois
    Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Invernizzi, Pietro
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; San Gerardo Hosp, Italy.
    Prati, Daniele
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Francque, Sven
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium.
    Petta, Salvatore
    Univ Palermo, Italy.
    Bugianesi, Elisabetta
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Clement, Karine
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Ratziu, Vlad
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Schattenberg, Joern M.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Valenti, Luca
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Day, Christopher P.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cordell, Heather J.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Daly, Ann K.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Univ, England.
    Correction: Genome-wide association study of non- alcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis in a histologically characterised cohort ( vol 73, pp 505-515 , 2020 )2023In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 78, no 5, p. 1085-1086Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Anstee, Quentin M.
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Upon Tyne Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Darlay, Rebecca
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cockell, Simon
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Meroni, Marica
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Govaere, Olivier
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Tiniakos, Dina
    Newcastle Univ, England; Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Burt, Alastair D.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Univ Adelaide, Australia.
    Bedossa, Pierre
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Palmer, Jeremy
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Liu, Yang-Lin
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Aithal, Guruprasad P.
    Nottingham Univ Hosp NHS Trust, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allison, Michael
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Yki-Jarvinen, Hannele
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Vacca, Michele
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England; Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Dufour, Jean-Francois
    Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Invernizzi, Pietro
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; San Gerardo Hosp, Italy.
    Prati, Daniele
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Francque, Sven
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium.
    Petta, Salvatore
    Univ Palermo, Italy.
    Bugianesi, Elisabetta
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Clement, Karine
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Ratziu, Vlad
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Schattenberg, Joern M.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Valenti, Luca
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Day, Christopher P.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cordell, Heather J.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Daly, Ann K.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Genome-wide association study of non-alcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis in a histologically characterised cohort2020In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 73, no 3, p. 505-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: Genetic factors associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain incompletely understood. To date, most genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have adopted radiologically assessed hepatic triglyceride content as the reference phenotype and so cannot address steatohepatitis or fibrosis. We describe a GWAS encompassing the full spectrum of histologically characterised NAFLD. Methods: The GWAS involved 1,483 European NAFLD cases and 17,781 genetically matched controls. A replication cohort of 559 NAFLD cases and 945 controls was genotyped to confirm signals showing genome-wide or close to genome-wide significance. Results: Case-control analysis identified signals showing p values <= 5 x 10(-8) at 4 locations (chromosome [chr] 2 GCKR/C2ORF16; chr4 HSD17B13; chr19 TM6SF2; chr22 PNPLA3) together with 2 other signals with p <1 x 10(-7) (chr1 near LEPR and chr8 near IDO2/TC1). Case-only analysis of quantitative traits showed that the PNPLA3 signal (rs738409) had genome-wide significance for steatosis, fibrosis and NAFLD activity score and a new signal (PYGO1 rs62021874) had close to genome-wide significance for steatosis (p = 8.2 x 10(-8)). Subgroup case-control analysis for NASH confirmed the PNPLA3 signal. The chr1 LEPR single nucleotide polymorphism also showed genome-wide significance for this phenotype. Considering the subgroup with advanced fibrosis (>= F3), the signals on chr2, chr19 and chr22 maintained their genome-wide significance. Except for GCKR/C2ORF16, the genome-wide significance signals were replicated. Conclusions: This study confirms PNPLA3 as a risk factor for the full histological spectrum of NAFLD at genome-wide significance levels, with important contributions from TM6SF2 and HSD17B13. PYGO1 is a novel steatosis modifier, suggesting that Wnt signalling pathways may be relevant in NAFLD pathogenesis. Lay summary: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common disease where excessive fat accumulates in the liver and may result in cirrhosis. To understand who is at risk of developing this disease and suffering liver damage, we undertook a genetic study to compare the genetic profiles of people suffering from fatty liver disease with genetic profiles seen in the general population. We found that particular sequences in 4 different areas of the human genome were seen at different frequencies in the fatty liver disease cases. These sequences may help predict an individuals risk of developing advanced disease. Some genes where these sequences are located may also be good targets for future drug treatments. (C) 2020 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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  • 6.
    Anstee, Quentin M.
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Upon Tyne Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Darlay, Rebecca
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cockell, Simon
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Meroni, Marica
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Govaere, Olivier
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Tiniakos, Dina
    Newcastle Univ, England; Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Burt, Alastair D.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Univ Adelaide, Australia.
    Bedossa, Pierre
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Palmer, Jeremy
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Liu, Yang-Lin
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Aithal, Guruprasad P.
    Nottingham Univ Hosp NHS Trust, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allison, Michael
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Yki-Jarvinen, Hannele
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Vacca, Michele
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England; Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Dufour, Jean-Francois
    Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Invernizzi, Pietro
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; San Gerardo Hosp, Italy.
    Prati, Daniele
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Francque, Sven
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium.
    Petta, Salvatore
    Univ Palermo, Italy.
    Bugianesi, Elisabetta
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Clement, Karine
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Ratziu, Vlad
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Schattenberg, Jorn M.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Valenti, Luca
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Day, Christopher P.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cordell, Heather J.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Daly, Ann K.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Correction: Genome-wide association study of non-alcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis in a histologically characterised cohort (vol 12, pg 505, 2020)2021In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 1274-1275Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Balkhed, Wile
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Åberg, Fredrik O.
    Transplantation and Liver Surgery Clinic, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Repeated measurements of non-invasive fibrosis tests to monitor the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A long-term follow-up study2022In: Liver international (Print), ISSN 1478-3223, E-ISSN 1478-3231, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 1546-1556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: The presence of advanced hepatic fibrosis is the prime marker for the prediction of liver-related complications in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Blood-based non-invasive tests (NITs) have been developed to evaluate fibrosis and identify patients at risk. Current guidelines propose monitoring the progression of NAFLD using repeated NITs at 2-3-year intervals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of changes in NITs measured at two time points with the progression of NAFLD.

    Methods. We retrospectively included NAFLD patients with NIT measurements in whom the baseline hepatic fibrosis stage had been assessed by biopsy or transient elastography (TE). Subjects underwent follow-up visits at least 1 year from baseline to evaluate the progression of NAFLD. NAFLD progression was defined as the development of end-stage liver disease or fibrosis progression according to repeat biopsy or TE. The following NITs were calculated at baseline and follow-up: Fibrosis-4 (FIB-4), NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS), aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) and dynamic aspartate-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (dAAR).

    Results: One hundred and thirty-five patients were included with a mean follow-up of 12.6 +/- 8.5 years. During follow-up, 41 patients (30%) were diagnosed with progressive NAFLD. Change in NIT scores during follow-up was significantly associated with disease progression for all NITs tested except for NFS. However, the diagnostic precision was suboptimal with area under the receiver operating characteristics 0.56-0.64 and positive predictive values of 0.28-0.36 at sensitivity fixed at 90%.

    Conclusions: Change of FIB-4, NFS, APRI, and dAAR scores is only weakly associated with disease progression in NAFLD. Our findings do not support repeated measurements of these NITs for monitoring the course of NAFLD.

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  • 8.
    Bergram, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Åby.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Rådholm, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Kärna.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Low awareness of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with type 2 diabetes in Swedish Primary Health Care2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 60-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is more common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) compared to individuals without. Recent guidelines recommend screening for NAFLD in patients with T2DM. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of NAFLD in patients with T2DM in a Swedish primary health care setting, how they are cared for and assess the risk of biochemical signs of advanced fibrosis. Material and methods In this cohort study, patients with T2DM from five primary health care centers were included. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed and living habits, medical history, results of diagnostic imaging and anthropometric and biochemical features were noted in a standardized form. The risk of steatosis and advanced fibrosis was assessed using commonly used algorithms (FLI, HSI, NAFLD-LFS, NAFLD ridge score, FIB-4 and NFS). Results In total 350 patients were included. Diagnostic imaging had been performed in 132 patients and of these, 34 (26%) had steatosis, which was not noted in the medical records in 16 (47%) patients. One patient with steatosis had been referred to a hepatologist. Of assessable patients, 71-97% had a high to intermediate risk of steatosis and 29-65% had an intermediate to high risk of advanced fibrosis according to the algorithms used. Conclusion This study indicates a high prevalence of NAFLD among T2DM patients in Swedish primary care. Patients with known NAFLD were followed up to a very low extent. Using fibrosis algorithms in primary health care would result in many patients needing further assessment in secondary care.

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  • 9.
    Blomdahl, Julia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with advanced fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and shows a synergistic effect with type 2 diabetes mellitus2021In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 115, article id 154439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. Whether moderate alcohol consumption plays a role for progression of NAFLD is disputed. Moreover, it is not known which tool is ideal for assessment of alcohol consumption in NAFLD. This study aimed to evaluate if moderate alcohol consumption assessed with different methods, including the biological marker phosphatidylethanol (PEth), is associated with advanced fibrosis in NAFLD. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. All participants were clinically evaluated with medical history, blood tests, and anthropometric measurements. Alcohol consumption was assessed using PEth in blood, the questionnaire AUDIT-C, and clinical interview. Findings: 86 patients were included of which 17% had advanced fibrosis. All participants reported alcohol consumption < 140 g/week. Average weekly alcohol consumption was higher in the group with advanced fibrosis. Moderate alcohol consumption, independently of the method of assessment, was associated with increased probability of advanced fibrosis (adjusted OR 5.5-9.7, 95% CI 1.05-69.6). Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) consuming moderate amounts of alcohol had a significantly higher rate of advanced fibrosis compared with those consuming low amounts (50.0-60.0% vs. 33-21.6%, p < 0.05). Conclusions: Moderate alcohol consumption, irrespective of assessment method (clinical interview, AUDIT-C, and PEth), was associated with advanced fibrosis. PEth in blood >= 50 ng/mL may be a biological marker indicating increased risk for advanced fibrosis in NAFLD. Patients with T2DM consuming moderate amounts of alcohol had the highest risk of advanced fibrosis, indicating a synergistic effect of insulin resistance and alcohol on the histopathological progression of NAFLD. (C) 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc.

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  • 10.
    Blomdahl, Julia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with significant fibrosis progression in NAFLD2023In: HEPATOLOGY COMMUNICATIONS, ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 7, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of moderate alcohol consumption on NAFLD histology is disputed. Assessment of alcohol consumption is commonly performed with interview or questionnaires. Phosphatidylethanol (PEth) in blood is a highly sensitive and specific alcohol biomarker, which only forms in the presence of ethanol. PEth has hitherto not been evaluated in longitudinal NAFLD studies. This study aimed to examine the impact of moderate alcohol consumption on histologic progression and evaluate the utility of PEth in NAFLD. NAFLD patients with serial biopsies were reviewed for inclusion in the study. At baseline, all patients reported alcohol consumption <140 g/week. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements were performed at baseline and follow-up. Alcohol consumption was assessed thoroughly at follow-up with clinical interview, the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) questionnaire, and analysis of PEth in whole blood. Eighty-two patients were included. Mean follow-up time was 17.2 years (SD & PLUSMN;6.0). Patients with significant fibrosis progression (defined as progression of & GE;2 stages or development of cirrhosis-related complications) reported higher alcohol consumption and had significantly higher PEth. Consumption >66-96 g/week (but <140 g) (i.e. moderate alcohol consumption) was associated with increased risk of significant fibrosis progression compared with no or low consumption. PEth & GE;48 ng/mL and binge drinking showed the highest risk for significant fibrosis progression (aOR: 5.9; 95% CI: 1.6-21.4) and aOR: 5.1; 95% CI: 1.4-18.1, respectively). NAFLD patients consuming moderate amounts of alcohol are at increased risk for significant fibrosis progression and development of cirrhosis-related complications. PEth is a potential biomarker to assess harmful alcohol consumption in NAFLD. Patients reporting moderate consumption or exhibiting PEth & GE;48 ng/mL should be advised to reduce alcohol consumption.

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  • 11.
    Boström, E A
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sjöwall, Christoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Bokarewa, M I
    University of Gothenburg.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Resistin is Associated with Breach of Tolerance and Anti-nuclear Antibodies in Patients with Hepatobiliary Inflammation2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 463-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resistin is a cysteine-rich protein, which is abundantly expressed at the site of inflammation, and acts as a regulator of the NF-kB-dependent cytokine cascade. The aim of this study was to evaluate resistin levels in relation to inflammatory mediators, disease phenotype and autoantibody status in a spectrum of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. Resistin levels were measured with an ELISA in sera originated from 227 patients and 40 healthy controls (HC). Fifty patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), 53 ulcerative colitis (UC), 51 Crohns disease (CD), 46 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and 27 primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) were included. The sera were analysed with respect to biochemical parameters of systemic inflammation and liver function and to the presence of antibodies to nuclear antigens (ANA), mitochondria (AMA) and smooth muscle (SMA). Compared with HC, resistin levels were raised in AIH (P = 0.017) and PSC (P = 0.03); compared with NAFLD, levels were elevated in CD (P = 0.041), AIH (P andlt; 0.001) and PSC (P andlt; 0.001). Patients with elevated levels of resistin were more often treated with corticosteroids, but no difference was found between active disease and clinical remission. Resistin levels were significantly higher in ANA-positive individuals compared with ANA-negative (P = 0.025). Resistin levels were directly correlated with IL-6 (r = 0.30, P = 0.02) and IL-8 (r = 0.51, P andlt; 0.001). Elevated levels of resistin were prominent in patients with hepatobiliary inflammation and were associated with breach of self-tolerance, i.e. ANA positivity. Thus, we propose that resistin may be an important marker of disease severity in autoantibody-mediated gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases.

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  • 12.
    Boursier, Jerome
    et al.
    Ctr Hosp Univ Angers, France; Univ Angers, France.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Moreau, Clemence
    Univ Angers, France.
    Bonacci, Martin
    Intercept Pharmaceut, England; Intercept Pharmaceut Inc, NY USA.
    Cure, Sandrine
    Intercept Pharmaceut, England; Intercept Pharmaceut Inc, NY USA.
    Ampuero, Javier
    Univ Seville, Spain.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Tallab, Lilian
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Canivet, Clemence M.
    Ctr Hosp Univ Angers, France; Univ Angers, France.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Sanchez, Yolanda
    Univ Seville, Spain.
    Dincuff, Eloise
    Ctr Hosp Univ Angers, France.
    Lucena, Ana
    Univ Seville, Spain.
    Roux, Marine
    Univ Angers, France.
    Riou, Jeremie
    Univ Angers, France.
    Trylesinski, Aldo
    Intercept Pharmaceut, England; Intercept Pharmaceut Inc, NY USA.
    Romero-Gomez, Manuel
    Univ Seville, Spain.
    Non-invasive tests accurately stratify patients with NAFLD based on their risk of liver-related events2022In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 1013-1020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: Previous studies on the prognostic significance of non-invasive liver fibrosis tests in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) lack direct comparison to liver biopsy. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic accuracy of fibrosis-4 (FIB4) and vibration-controlled transient elastography (VCTE), compared to liver biopsy, for the prediction of liver-related events (LREs) in NAFLD. Methods: A total of 1,057 patients with NAFLD and baseline FIB4 and VCTE were included in a multicenter cohort. Of these patients, 594 also had a baseline liver biopsy. The main study outcome during follow-up was occurrence of LREs, a composite endpoint combining cirrhosis complications and/or hepatocellular carcinoma. Discriminative ability was evaluated using Harrells C-index. Results: FIB4 and VCTE showed good accuracy for the prediction of LREs, with Harrells C-indexes >0.80 (0.817 [0.768-0.866] vs. 0.878 [0.835-0.921], respectively, p = 0.059). In the biopsy subgroup, Harrells C-indexes of histological fibrosis staging and VCTE were not significantly different (0.932 [0.910-0.955] vs. 0.881 [0.832-0.931], respectively, p = 0.164), while both significantly outperformed FIB4 for the prediction of LREs. FIB4 and VCTE were independent predictors of LREs in the whole study cohort. The stepwise FIB4-VCTE algorithm accurately stratified the risk of LREs: compared to patients with "FIB4 <1.30", those with "FIB4 >- 1.30 then VCTE <8.0 kPa" had similar risk of LREs (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.3; 95% CI 0.3-6.8), whereas the risk of LREs significantly increased in patients with "FIB4 >1.30 then VCTE 8.0-12.0 kPa" (aHR 3.8; 95% CI 1.3-10.9), and even more for those with "FIB4 >-1.30 then VCTE >12.0 kPa" (aHR 12.4; 95% CI 5.1- 30.2). Conclusion: VCTE and FIB4 accurately stratify patients with NAFLD based on their risk of LREs. These non-invasive tests are alternatives to liver biopsy for the identification of patients in need of specialized management. Lay summary: The amount of fibrosis in the liver is closely associated with the risk of liver-related complications in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Liver biopsy currently remains the reference standard for the evaluation of fibrosis, but its application is limited by its invasiveness. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of non-invasive liver fibrosis tests to predict liver-related complications in NAFLD. Our results show that the blood test FIB4 and transient elastography stratify the risk of liver-related complications in NAFLD, and that transient elastography has similar prognostic accuracy as liver biopsy. These results support the use of non-invasive liver fibrosis tests instead of liver biopsy for the management of patients with NAFLD.(C) 2022 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Buzzetti, Elena
    et al.
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Hall, Andrew
    Royal Free Hosp, England; Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Manuguerra, Roberta
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Misas, Marta Guerrero
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Covelli, Claudia
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Leandro, Gioacchino
    S de Bellis Res Hosp, Italy.
    Luong, TuVinh
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Manesis, Emanuel K.
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Pinzani, Massimo
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Dhillon, Amar P.
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A.
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Collagen proportionate area is an independent predictor of long-term outcome in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2019In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 1214-1222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Collagen proportionate area (CPA) measurement is a technique that quantifies fibrous tissue in liver biopsies by measuring the amount of collagen deposition as a proportion of the total biopsy area. CPA predicts clinical outcomes in patients with HCV and can sub-classify cirrhosis. Aim To test the ability of CPA to quantify fibrosis and predict clinical outcomes in patients with NAFLD. Methods We assessed consecutive patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD from three European centres. Clinical and laboratory data were collected at baseline and at the time of the last clinical follow-up or death. CPA was performed at two different objective magnifications, whole biopsy macro and x4 objective magnification, named standard (SM) and high (HM) magnification respectively. The correlation between CPA and liver stiffness was assessed in a sub-group of patients. Results Of 437 patients, 32 (7.3%) decompensated and/or died from liver-related causes during a median follow-up of 103 months. CPA correlated with liver stiffness and liver fibrosis stage across the whole spectrum of fibrosis. HM CPA was significantly higher than SM CPA in stages F0-F3 but similar in cirrhosis, reflecting a higher ability to capture pericellular/perisinusoidal fibrosis at early stages. Age at baseline (HR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01-1.08), HM CPA (HR: 1.04 per 1% increase, 95% CI: 1.01-1.08) and presence of advanced fibrosis (HR: 15.4, 95% CI: 5.02-47.84) were independent predictors of liver-related clinical outcomes at standard and competing risk multivariate Cox-regression analysis. Conclusions CPA accurately measures fibrosis and is an independent predictor of clinical outcomes in NAFLD; hence it merits further evaluation as a surrogate endpoint in clinical trials.

  • 14.
    Dulai, Parambir S
    et al.
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA..
    Singh, Siddharth
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
    Patel, Janki
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
    Soni, Meera
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
    Prokop, Larry J
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
    Younossi, Zobair
    Department of Medicine, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA.
    Sebastiani, Giada
    McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wong, Vincent Wai-Sun
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Loomba, Rohit
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
    Increased risk of mortality by fibrosis stage in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.2017In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 65, no 5, p. 1557-1565Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Liver fibrosis is the most important predictor of mortality in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Quantitative risk of mortality by fibrosis stage has not been systematically evaluated. We aimed to quantify the fibrosis stage-specific risk of all-cause and liver-related mortality in NAFLD.

    METHODS: Through a systematic review and meta-analysis, we identified 5 adult NAFLD cohort studies reporting fibrosis stage specific mortality (0-4). Using fibrosis stage 0 as a reference population, fibrosis stage-specific mortality rate ratios (MRR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), for all-cause and liver-related mortality, were estimated. The study is reported according to the PRISMA statement.

    RESULTS: 1,495 NAFLD patients with 17,452 patient years of follow-up were included. Compared to NAFLD patients with no fibrosis (stage 0), NAFLD patients with fibrosis were at an increased risk for all-cause mortality and this risk increased with increase in the stage of fibrosis: stage 1, MRR, 1.58 (95% CI 1.19-2.11); stage 2, MRR, 2.52 (95% CI 1.85-3.42); stage 3, MRR, 3.48 (95% CI 2.51-4.83), and stage 4, MRR, 6.40 (95% CI 4.11-9.95). The results were more pronounced as the risk of liver-related mortality increased exponentially with increase in the stage of fibrosis: stage 1, MRR, 1.41 (95% CI 0.17-11.95); stage 2, MRR, 9.57 (95% CI 1.67-54.93); stage 3, MRR, 16.69 (95% CI 2.92-95.36); and stage 4, MRR, 42.30 (95% CI 3.51-510.34).

    LIMITATIONS: Inability to adjust for co-morbid conditions or demographics known to impact fibrosis progression in NAFLD, and the inclusion of patients with simple steatosis and NASH without fibrosis in the reference comparison group.

    CONCLUSION: The risk of liver-related mortality increases exponentially with increase in fibrosis stage. These data have important implications in assessing utility of each stage and benefits of regression of fibrosis from one stage to another. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Edin, Carl
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Scheffel, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. AMRA Medical AB, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ekholmen.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). AMRA Medical AB, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Carlhäll, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ectopic fat is associated with cardiac remodeling - A comprehensive assessment of regional fat depots in type 2 diabetes using multi-parametric MRI.2022In: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine, E-ISSN 2297-055X, Vol. 9, article id 813427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Different regional depots of fat have distinct metabolic properties and may relate differently to adverse cardiac remodeling. We sought to quantify regional depots of body fat and to investigate their relationship to cardiac structure and function in Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) and controls.

    Methods: From the SCAPIS cohort in Linköping, Sweden, we recruited 92 subjects (35% female, mean age 59.5 ± 4.6 years): 46 with T2D and 46 matched controls. In addition to the core SCAPIS data collection, participants underwent a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging examination at 1.5 T for assessment of left ventricular (LV) structure and function (end-diastolic volume, mass, concentricity, ejection fraction), as well as regional body composition (liver proton density fat fraction, visceral adipose tissue, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, thigh muscle fat infiltration, fat tissue-free thigh muscle volume and epicardial adipose tissue).

    Results: Compared to the control group, the T2D group had increased: visceral adipose tissue volume index (P < 0.001), liver fat percentage (P < 0.001), thigh muscle fat infiltration percentage (P = 0.02), LV concentricity (P < 0.001) and LV E/e'-ratio (P < 0.001). In a multiple linear regression analysis, a negative association between liver fat percentage and LV mass (St Beta -0.23, P < 0.05) as well as LV end-diastolic volume (St Beta -0.27, P < 0.05) was found. Epicardial adipose tissue volume and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue volume index were the only parameters of fat associated with LV diastolic dysfunction (E/e'-ratio) (St Beta 0.24, P < 0.05; St Beta 0.34, P < 0.01, respectively). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, only visceral adipose tissue volume index was significantly associated with T2D, with an odds ratio for T2D of 3.01 (95% CI 1.28-7.05, P < 0.05) per L/m2 increase in visceral adipose tissue volume.

    Conclusions: Ectopic fat is predominantly associated with cardiac remodeling, independently of type 2 diabetes. Intriguingly, liver fat appears to be related to LV structure independently of VAT, while epicardial fat is linked to impaired LV diastolic function. Visceral fat is associated with T2D independently of liver fat and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue.

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  • 16. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology.
    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A clinical and histopathological study2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fatty liver has previously often been associated with excessive alcohol consumption. During the last two decades, the interest in fatty liver occurring in non-drinkers i.e. non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased dramatically. Today, NAFLD is considered as the most common liver disease in the developed world. It is strongly associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and hypertension. Thus, NAFLD is considered as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome.

    The spectrum of NAFLD includes: simple fatty liver without necroinflammatory activity; non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a condition characterised by hepatocellular injury, inflammation, and fibrosis; cirrhosis; and in some individuals hepatocellular carcinoma.

    The degree of steatosis in liver biopsies is usually assessed by a morphological semiquantitative approach in which the pathologist uses a four-graded scale: 0–3 or none, slight, moderate and severe. In this thesis we show that there is a considerable inter- and intraindividual variation in such scoring methods and that a more standardised and quantitative approach is preferable. The area/volume of fat in liver biopsies is greatly overestimated when assessed semiquantitatively. Moreover, the point counting technique has a better reproducibility than visual evaluation and should be preferred in estimates of liver steatosis.

    The long-term clinical and histopathological course of 129 consecutively enrolled NAFLD patients was studied. Mean follow-up (SD) was 13.7 (1.3) years. Survival of NASH patients was reduced compared with a matched reference population. These subjects more often died from cardiovascular and liver-related causes. Seven patients (5.4%) developed end-stage liver disease, including 3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Most NAFLD patients will develop diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance in the long term. Progression of liver fibrosis is associated with more pronounced insulin resistance and significant weight gain.

    During follow-up, 17 patients had been prescribed a statin. At follow-up, patients on medication with statins had significantly higher BMI. Diabetes was significantly more common among patients on medication with statins and they had significantly more pronounced insulin resistance. However, they exhibited a significant reduction of liver steatosis at follow-up as opposed to patients not taking statins. Although patients under statin treatment exhibited a high risk profile for progression of liver fibrosis, only four patients on statin treatment progressed in fibrosis stage. It is concluded that statins can be prescribed safely in patients with elevated liver enzymes because of NAFLD.

    Alcohol consumption was evaluated with a validated questionnaire combined with an oral interview. In a multivariate analysis moderate alcohol consumption, particularly when frequency of heavy episodic drinking was analysed, consistent with the diagnosis of NAFLD to be set, was independently associated with fibrosis progression in NAFLD.

    The NAFLD activity score (NAS) is a newly proposed system to grade the necroinflammatory activity in liver biopsies of NAFLD patients. We evaluated the usefulness of the NAS in predicting clinical deterioration and fibrosis progression in our cohort of NAFLD patients. Although the NAS was independently associated with future risk of progressive fibrosis in NAFLD, the clinical usefulness of the score was limited due to significant overlap in clinical development between NAS-score groups.

    List of papers
    1. Semiquantitative evaluation overestimates the degree of steatosis in liver biopsies: a comparison to stereological point counting.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Semiquantitative evaluation overestimates the degree of steatosis in liver biopsies: a comparison to stereological point counting.
    2005 (English)In: Modern Pathology, ISSN 0893-3952, E-ISSN 1530-0285, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 912-916Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The degree of steatosis in liver biopsies is usually assessed by a morphological semiquantitative approach in which the histopathologist uses a four-graded scale: 0-3 or none, slight, moderate and severe. Scores 1-3 are considered to correspond to fat deposition in <33, 33-66 and >66% of the hepatocytes. There is a considerable inter- and intra-individual variation in such scoring methods and a more standardized and quantitative approach is preferable. In the present study, we compare the semiquantitative technique with the stereological point counting method in the assessment of hepatic steatosis. A total of 75 archived liver needle biopsies were used. They were selected according to the original routine diagnosis of slight, moderate or severe steatosis. In all, 10 randomly selected images from each biopsy were digitized into a computer, a point grid lattice was superimposed and the number of hits on fat globules was counted. A pathologist scored the specimens in a four-graded scale as described above. The mean liver biopsy area (volume) with fat in hepatocytes was 2.2% for grade 1, 9.2% for grade 2 and 23.1% for grade 3. The kappa value for the semiquantitative estimates was 0.71 for the unweigthed kappa and 0.87 for weighted kappa. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.99 for images counted twice and 0.95 when two sets of images were captured from the same biopsy. These ICCs indicate excellent agreement and above that of the semiquantitative estimates. In conclusion, the area/volume of fat content of the hepatocytes is greatly overemphasized in semiquantitative estimation. Furthermore, the point counting technique has a better reproducibility than visual evaluation and should be preferred in estimates of liver steatosis in scientific studies and in clinical contexts when the amount of steatosis is important for treatment and prognosis, such as liver transplantation.

    Keywords
    Liver, quantification, steatosis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17322 (URN)10.1038/modpathol.3800370 (DOI)15920560 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-03-18 Created: 2009-03-18 Last updated: 2020-08-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Long-term follow-up of patients with NAFLD and elevated liver enzymes.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term follow-up of patients with NAFLD and elevated liver enzymes.
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 865-873Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of elevated liver enzymes in patients of developed countries. We determined the long-term clinical and histological courses of such patients. In a cohort study, 129 consecutively enrolled patients diagnosed with biopsy-proven NAFLD were reevaluated. Survival and causes of death were compared with a matched reference population. Living NAFLD patients were offered repeat liver biopsy and clinical and biochemical investigation. Mean follow-up (SD) was 13.7 (1.3) years. Mortality was not increased in patients with steatosis. Survival of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was reduced (P = .01). These subjects more often died from cardiovascular (P = .04) and liver-related (P = .04) causes. Seven patients (5.4%) developed end-stage liver disease, including 3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The absence of periportal fibrosis at baseline had a negative predictive value of 100% in predicting liver-related complications. At follow-up, 69 of 88 patients had diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. Progression of liver fibrosis occurred in 41%. These subjects more often had a weight gain exceeding 5 kg (P = .02), they were more insulin resistant (P = .04), and they exhibited more pronounced hepatic fatty infiltration (P = .03) at follow-up. In conclusion, NAFLD with elevated liver enzymes is associated with a clinically significant risk of developing end-stage liver disease. Survival is lower in patients with NASH. Most NAFLD patients will develop diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance in the long term. Progression of liver fibrosis is associated with more pronounced insulin resistance and significant weight gain.

    Keywords
    Liver, quantification, steatosis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17323 (URN)10.1002/hep.21327 (DOI)17006923 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-03-18 Created: 2009-03-18 Last updated: 2020-08-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Statins in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and chronically elevated liver enzymes: a histopathological follow-up study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Statins in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and chronically elevated liver enzymes: a histopathological follow-up study.
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 135-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: The effect of statins on hepatic histology in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not known. This study explores hepatic histology in NAFLD patients before and after initiation of statin therapy and compares histological outcome with NAFLD patients who had not been prescribed statins.

    Methods: Sixty-eight NAFLD patients were re-evaluated. Follow-up ranged from 10.3 to 16.3 years. Subjects were clinically investigated and a repeat liver biopsy was obtained. No patient was taking statins at baseline while 17 patients were treated with statins at follow-up.

    Results: At baseline, patients that later were prescribed statins had significantly higher BMI and more pronounced hepatic steatosis. At follow-up patients on medication with statins continued to have significantly higher BMI. Diabetes was significantly more common among patients on medication with statins and they had significantly more pronounced insulin resistance. However, they exhibited a significant reduction of liver steatosis at follow-up as opposed to patients not taking statins. Despite exhibiting a high risk profile for progression of liver fibrosis, only four patients on statin treatment progressed in fibrosis stage.

    Conclusions: Statins can be prescribed in patients with elevated liver enzymes because of NAFLD.

    Keywords
    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, Histology, Statin, Metabolic syndrome
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17324 (URN)10.1016/j.jhep.2007.02.013 (DOI)17400325 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-03-18 Created: 2009-03-18 Last updated: 2020-08-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Alcohol consumption is associated with progression of hepatic fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alcohol consumption is associated with progression of hepatic fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Moderate alcohol consumption has been reported to be inversely associated with cardiovascular disease and total mortality. The importance of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing and many NAFLD patients suffer from cardiovascular disease. In these patients, moderate alcohol consumption could be beneficial. The aim of this study was to investigate whether low alcohol intake, consistent with the diagnosis of NAFLD, is associated with fibrosis progression in established NAFLD.

    Material and methods: Seventy-one patients originally referred because of chronically elevated liver enzymes and diagnosed with biopsy-proven NAFLD were re-evaluated. A validated questionnaire combined with an oral interview was used to assess weekly alcohol consumption and the frequency of episodic drinking. Significant fibrosis progression in NAFLD was defined as progression of more than one fibrosis stage or development of endstage liver disease during follow-up.

    Results: Mean follow-up (SD) was 13.8 (1.2) years between liver biopsies. At follow-up, 17 patients (24%) fulfilled the criteria for significant fibrosis progression. The proportion of patients reporting heavy episodic drinking at least once a month was higher among those with significant fibrosis progression (p=0.003) and a trend towards higher weekly alcohol consumption was also seen (p=0.061). In a multivariate binary logistic regression analysis, heavy episodic drinking (p0.001) and insulin resistance (p0.01) were independently associated with significant fibrosis progression.

    Conclusions: Moderate alcohol consumption, consistent with the diagnosis of NAFLD to be set, is associated with fibrosis progression in NAFLD. These patients should be advised to refrain from heavy episodic drinking.

    Keywords
    Alcoholic liver disease, fatty liver, histopathology, liver fibrosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17133 (URN)10.1080/00365520802555991 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-03-07 Created: 2009-03-07 Last updated: 2021-12-28Bibliographically approved
    5. The clinical relevance of the Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score (NAS) in predicting fibrosis progression
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The clinical relevance of the Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score (NAS) in predicting fibrosis progression
    Show others...
    2008 (English)Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The NAFLD activity score (NAS) is a newly proposed system to grade the necroinflammatory activity in liver biopsies of NAFLD patients. This study evaluates the usefulness of the NAS in predicting clinical deterioration and fibrosis progression in NAFLD.

    Methods: One hundred and twenty-nine patients with biopsy proven NAFLD were included in a long-term histological follow-up study. Clinical and histological course were compared between NASH, “borderline NASH”, and “not NASH” patients. Significant fibrosis progression in NAFLD was defined as progression of more than one fibrosis stage or development of end-stage liver disease during follow-up.

    Results: Eighty-eight patients accepted re-evaluation and 68 underwent repeat liver biopsy. Mean time between biopsies was 13.8 ± 1.2 years (range 10.3-16.3). At baseline, NASH was diagnosed in 2 (1.6%) patients, and at follow-up, in 1 (1.5%) patient. A trend towards higher baseline NAS was seen in patients (n = 7) that developed end-stage liver disease (3.1 ± 0.9 vs. 2.4 ± 1.0; P = 0.062). Baseline NAS was significantly higher in patients with progressive fibrosis (2.9 ± 0.9 vs. 2.2 ± 0.9; P = 0.017), and NAS was independently associated with significant fibrosis progression tested in a multivariate analysis (P = 0.023). However, 18% of patients without NASH progressed significantly in fibrosis stage.

    Conclusion: Although the NAS is independently associated with future risk of progressive fibrosis in NAFLD, the clinical usefulness of the score is limited due to the significant overlap in clinical development between NAS-score groups.

    Keywords
    Steatohepatitis, Fatty liver, Fibrosis progression, Clinical follow-up, Histopathology
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17325 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-03-18 Created: 2009-03-18 Last updated: 2020-08-14Bibliographically approved
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  • 17.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Department of Histopathology and Cytology, Aleris Medilab, Täby, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Alcohol consumption is associated with progression of hepatic fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Moderate alcohol consumption has been reported to be inversely associated with cardiovascular disease and total mortality. The importance of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing and many NAFLD patients suffer from cardiovascular disease. In these patients, moderate alcohol consumption could be beneficial. The aim of this study was to investigate whether low alcohol intake, consistent with the diagnosis of NAFLD, is associated with fibrosis progression in established NAFLD.

    Material and methods: Seventy-one patients originally referred because of chronically elevated liver enzymes and diagnosed with biopsy-proven NAFLD were re-evaluated. A validated questionnaire combined with an oral interview was used to assess weekly alcohol consumption and the frequency of episodic drinking. Significant fibrosis progression in NAFLD was defined as progression of more than one fibrosis stage or development of endstage liver disease during follow-up.

    Results: Mean follow-up (SD) was 13.8 (1.2) years between liver biopsies. At follow-up, 17 patients (24%) fulfilled the criteria for significant fibrosis progression. The proportion of patients reporting heavy episodic drinking at least once a month was higher among those with significant fibrosis progression (p=0.003) and a trend towards higher weekly alcohol consumption was also seen (p=0.061). In a multivariate binary logistic regression analysis, heavy episodic drinking (p0.001) and insulin resistance (p0.01) were independently associated with significant fibrosis progression.

    Conclusions: Moderate alcohol consumption, consistent with the diagnosis of NAFLD to be set, is associated with fibrosis progression in NAFLD. These patients should be advised to refrain from heavy episodic drinking.

  • 18.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L.
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    The clinical relevance of the Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score (NAS) in predicting fibrosis progression2008Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The NAFLD activity score (NAS) is a newly proposed system to grade the necroinflammatory activity in liver biopsies of NAFLD patients. This study evaluates the usefulness of the NAS in predicting clinical deterioration and fibrosis progression in NAFLD.

    Methods: One hundred and twenty-nine patients with biopsy proven NAFLD were included in a long-term histological follow-up study. Clinical and histological course were compared between NASH, “borderline NASH”, and “not NASH” patients. Significant fibrosis progression in NAFLD was defined as progression of more than one fibrosis stage or development of end-stage liver disease during follow-up.

    Results: Eighty-eight patients accepted re-evaluation and 68 underwent repeat liver biopsy. Mean time between biopsies was 13.8 ± 1.2 years (range 10.3-16.3). At baseline, NASH was diagnosed in 2 (1.6%) patients, and at follow-up, in 1 (1.5%) patient. A trend towards higher baseline NAS was seen in patients (n = 7) that developed end-stage liver disease (3.1 ± 0.9 vs. 2.4 ± 1.0; P = 0.062). Baseline NAS was significantly higher in patients with progressive fibrosis (2.9 ± 0.9 vs. 2.2 ± 0.9; P = 0.017), and NAS was independently associated with significant fibrosis progression tested in a multivariate analysis (P = 0.023). However, 18% of patients without NASH progressed significantly in fibrosis stage.

    Conclusion: Although the NAS is independently associated with future risk of progressive fibrosis in NAFLD, the clinical usefulness of the score is limited due to the significant overlap in clinical development between NAS-score groups.

  • 19.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Statins in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and chronically elevated liver enzymes: a histopathological follow-up study.2007In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 135-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: The effect of statins on hepatic histology in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not known. This study explores hepatic histology in NAFLD patients before and after initiation of statin therapy and compares histological outcome with NAFLD patients who had not been prescribed statins.

    Methods: Sixty-eight NAFLD patients were re-evaluated. Follow-up ranged from 10.3 to 16.3 years. Subjects were clinically investigated and a repeat liver biopsy was obtained. No patient was taking statins at baseline while 17 patients were treated with statins at follow-up.

    Results: At baseline, patients that later were prescribed statins had significantly higher BMI and more pronounced hepatic steatosis. At follow-up patients on medication with statins continued to have significantly higher BMI. Diabetes was significantly more common among patients on medication with statins and they had significantly more pronounced insulin resistance. However, they exhibited a significant reduction of liver steatosis at follow-up as opposed to patients not taking statins. Despite exhibiting a high risk profile for progression of liver fibrosis, only four patients on statin treatment progressed in fibrosis stage.

    Conclusions: Statins can be prescribed in patients with elevated liver enzymes because of NAFLD.

  • 20.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Aleris Medilab, Täby.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L
    County Hospital, Oskarshamn.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Low clinical relevance of the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (NAS) in predicting fibrosis progression2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 108-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims. The nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) activity score (NAS) is a newly proposed system to grade the necroinflammatory activity in liver biopsies of NAFLD patients. This study evaluates the usefulness of the NAS in predicting clinical deterioration and fibrosis progression in NAFLD. Methods. One hundred and twenty-nine patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD were included in a long-term histological follow-up study. Clinical course and change in fibrosis stage were compared between nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), “borderline NASH,” and “not NASH” patients. Significant fibrosis progression was defined as progression of more than one fibrosis stage or development of end-stage liver disease during follow-up. Results. Eighty-eight patients accepted reevaluation and 68 underwent repeat liver biopsy. Mean time between biopsies was 13.8 ± 1.2 years (range 10.3–16.3). At baseline, NASH was diagnosed in 2 (1.6%) patients, and at follow-up, in 1 (1.5%) patient. A trend toward higher baseline NAS was seen in patients (n = 7) who developed end-stage liver disease (3.1 ± 0.9 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0; p = 0.050). Baseline NAS was associated with progressive disease in a univariate binary logistic regression analysis (p = 0.024), but no difference was seen in the multivariate analysis including the NAS, portal inflammation, and perisinusoidal fibrosis. Moreover, 18% of patients without NASH progressed significantly in fibrosis stage. Conclusions. The ability of the NAS to predict progression of NAFLD is poor. The clinical usefulness of the score is limited due to the significant overlap in clinical development between NAS score groups. To use the NAS as endpoint in treatment trial is not justified.

  • 21.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden;.
    Thorelius, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Long-term follow-up of patients with NAFLD and elevated liver enzymes.2006In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 865-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of elevated liver enzymes in patients of developed countries. We determined the long-term clinical and histological courses of such patients. In a cohort study, 129 consecutively enrolled patients diagnosed with biopsy-proven NAFLD were reevaluated. Survival and causes of death were compared with a matched reference population. Living NAFLD patients were offered repeat liver biopsy and clinical and biochemical investigation. Mean follow-up (SD) was 13.7 (1.3) years. Mortality was not increased in patients with steatosis. Survival of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was reduced (P = .01). These subjects more often died from cardiovascular (P = .04) and liver-related (P = .04) causes. Seven patients (5.4%) developed end-stage liver disease, including 3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The absence of periportal fibrosis at baseline had a negative predictive value of 100% in predicting liver-related complications. At follow-up, 69 of 88 patients had diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. Progression of liver fibrosis occurred in 41%. These subjects more often had a weight gain exceeding 5 kg (P = .02), they were more insulin resistant (P = .04), and they exhibited more pronounced hepatic fatty infiltration (P = .03) at follow-up. In conclusion, NAFLD with elevated liver enzymes is associated with a clinically significant risk of developing end-stage liver disease. Survival is lower in patients with NASH. Most NAFLD patients will develop diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance in the long term. Progression of liver fibrosis is associated with more pronounced insulin resistance and significant weight gain.

  • 22.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hagström, Hannes
    Unit of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stal, Per
    Unit of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Unit of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score and Mortality: Imperfect But Not Insignificant REPLY2016In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 310-311Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hagström, Hannes
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stål, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fibrosis stage is the strongest predictor for disease-specific mortality in NAFLD after up to 33 years of follow-up2015In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 1547-1554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and rationale for the study: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, strongly associated with insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, i.e. fatty liver accompanied by necroinflammatory changes, is mostly defined by the NAFLD activity score (NAS). The aim of the current study was to determine disease-specific mortality in NAFLD, and evaluate the NAS and fibrosis stage as prognostic markers for overall and disease-specific mortality. Methods: In a cohort study, data from 229 well-characterized patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD were collected. Mean follow-up was 26.4 (± 5.6, range 6-33) years. A reference population was obtained from the National Registry of Population, and information on time and cause of death were obtained from the Registry of Causes of Death. Main results: NAFLD patients had an increased mortality compared with the reference population (HR 1.29, CI 1.04-1.59, p=0.020), with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (HR 1.55, CI 1.11-2.15, p=0.01), hepatocellular carcinoma (HR 6.55, CI 2.14-20.03, p=0.001), infectious disease (HR 2.71, CI 1.02-7.26, p=0.046), and cirrhosis (HR 3.2, CI 1.05-9.81, p=0.041). Overall mortality was not increased in patients with NAS 5-8 and fibrosis stage 0-2 (HR 1.41, CI 0.97-2.06, p=0.07), whereas patients with fibrosis stage 3-4, irrespective of NAS, had increased mortality (HR 3.3, CI 2.27-4.76, p<0.001). Conclusions: NAFLD patients have increased risk of death, with a high risk of death from cardiovascular disease and liver-related disease. The NAS was not able to predict overall mortality, whereas fibrosis stage predicted both overall and disease-specific mortality.

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  • 24.
    Ericson, Elke
    et al.
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Bergenholm, Linnea
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Anne-Christine
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Dix, Carly I
    AstraZeneca, England.
    Knöchel, Jane
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Hansson, Sara F.
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Lee, Richard
    Ionis Pharmaceut, CA USA; Verve Therapeut, MA USA.
    Schumi, Jennifer
    AstraZeneca, MD USA.
    Antonsson, Madeleine
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Fjellström, Ola
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Liljeblad, Mathias
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Björn
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Linden, Daniel
    AstraZeneca, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Hepatic patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 levels are increased in I148M risk allele carriers and correlate with NAFLD in humans2022In: Hepatology Communications, ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 6, no 10, p. 2689-2701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) rs738409 variant is a contributor. In mice, the Pnpla3 148M variant accumulates on lipid droplets and probably leads to sequestration of a lipase cofactor leading to impaired mobilization of triglycerides. To advance our understanding of the localization and abundance of PNPLA3 protein in humans, we used liver biopsies from patients with NAFLD to investigate the link to NAFLD and the PNPLA3 148M genotype. We experimentally qualified an antibody against human PNPLA3. Hepatic PNPLA3 protein fractional area and localization were determined by immunohistochemistry in biopsies from a well-characterized NAFLD cohort of 67 patients. Potential differences in hepatic PNPLA3 protein levels among patients related to degree of steatosis, lobular inflammation, ballooning, and fibrosis, and PNPLA3 I148M gene variants were assessed. Immunohistochemistry staining in biopsies from patients with NAFLD showed that hepatic PNPLA3 protein was predominantly localized to the membranes of small and large lipid droplets in hepatocytes. PNPLA3 protein levels correlated strongly with steatosis grade (p = 0.000027) and were also significantly higher in patients with lobular inflammation (p = 0.009), ballooning (p = 0.022), and significant fibrosis (stage 2-4, p = 0.014). In addition, PNPLA3 levels were higher in PNPLA3 rs738409 148M (CG, GG) risk allele carriers compared to 148I (CC) nonrisk allele carriers (p = 0.0029). Conclusion: PNPLA3 protein levels were associated with increased hepatic lipid content and disease severity in patients with NAFLD and were higher in PNPLA3 rs738409 (148M) risk allele carriers. Our hypothesis that increased hepatic levels of PNPLA3 may be part of the pathophysiological mechanism of NAFLD is supported.

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  • 25.
    Farahat, Taghreed M.
    et al.
    Menoufia Univ, Egypt.
    Ungan, Mehmet
    Ankara Univ, Turkey.
    Vilaseca, Josep
    Barcelona Esquerra Primary Hlth Care Consortium, Spain; Univ Barcelona, Spain; Cent Univ Catalonia, Spain.
    Ponzo, Jacqueline
    Univ Republica, Uruguay.
    Gupta, Pramendra Prasad
    BP Koirala Inst Hlth Sci, Nepal.
    Schreiner, Andrew D.
    Med Univ South Carolina, SC 29425 USA.
    Al Sharief, Wadeia
    Family Med Soc, U Arab Emirates; Arab Board Med Specializat Council, U Arab Emirates; Med Educ & Res Dept, U Arab Emirates.
    Casler, Kelly
    Ohio State Univ, OH 43210 USA.
    Abdelkader, Tafat
    Algerian Soc Gen Med, Algeria.
    Abenavoli, Ludovico
    Magna Graecia Univ Catanzaro, Italy.
    Alami, Fatima-Zohra Mchich
    Natl Collect Gen Practitioners Marocco MG Maroc, Morocco.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Jabir, Muntadar S.
    Iraqi Family Phys Soc, Iraq.
    Armstrong, Matthew J.
    Univ Hosp Birmingham NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Osman, Mona H.
    Amer Univ Beirut, Lebanon.
    Wiegand, Johannes
    Univ Leipzig, Germany.
    Attia, Dina
    Beni Suef Univ, Egypt.
    Verhoeven, Veronique
    Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Amir, Ashraf Abdul Qayoum
    Int Med Ctr Hosp Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
    Hegazy, Nagwa N.
    Menoufia Univ, Egypt.
    Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A.
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Fouad, Yasser
    Minia Univ, Egypt.
    Cortez-Pinto, Helena
    Univ Lisbon, Portugal.
    The paradigm shift from NAFLD to MAFLD: A global primary care viewpoint2022In: Liver international (Print), ISSN 1478-3223, E-ISSN 1478-3231, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 1259-1267Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 26.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andregård, O.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prospective evaluation of liver steatosis comparing stereological point-counting biopsy analysis and 1H MRS2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Forsgren, Mikael F
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Sinkus, Ralph
    King's College London, United Kingdom.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Biomarkers of liver fibrosis: prospective comparison of multimodal magnetic resonance, serum algorithms and transient elastography.2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 55, no 7, p. 848-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Accurate biomarkers for quantifying liver fibrosis are important for clinical practice and trial end-points. We compared the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including gadoxetate-enhanced MRI and 31P-MR spectroscopy, with fibrosis stage and serum fibrosis algorithms in a clinical setting. Also, in a subset of patients, MR- and transient elastography (MRE and TE) was evaluated when available.

    METHODS: Patients were recruited prospectively if they were scheduled to undergo liver biopsy on a clinical indication due to elevated liver enzyme levels without decompensated cirrhosis. Within a month of the clinical work-up, an MR-examination and liver needle biopsy were performed on the same day. Based on late-phase gadoxetate-enhanced MRI, a mathematical model calculated hepatobiliary function (relating to OATP1 and MRP2). The hepatocyte gadoxetate uptake rate (KHep) and the normalised liver-to-spleen contrast ratio (LSC_N10) were also calculated. Nine serum fibrosis algorithms were investigated (GUCI, King's Score, APRI, FIB-4, Lok-Index, NIKEI, NASH-CRN regression score, Forns' score, and NAFLD-fibrosis score).

    RESULTS: The diagnostic performance (AUROC) for identification of significant fibrosis (F2-4) was 0.78, 0.80, 0.69, and 0.78 for MRE, TE, LSC_N10, and GUCI, respectively. For the identification of advanced fibrosis (F3-4), the AUROCs were 0.93, 0.84, 0.81, and 0.82 respectively.

    CONCLUSION: MRE and TE were superior for non-invasive identification of significant fibrosis. Serum fibrosis algorithms developed for specific liver diseases are applicable in this cohort of diverse liver diseases aetiologies. Gadoxetate-MRI was sufficiently sensitive to detect the low function losses associated with fibrosis. None was able to efficiently distinguish between stages within the low fibrosis stages.Lay summaryExcessive accumulation of scar tissue, fibrosis, in the liver is an important aspect in chronic liver disease. To replace the invasive needle biopsy, we have explored non-invasive methods to assess liver fibrosis. In our study we found that elastographic methods, which assess the mechanical properties of the liver, are superior in assessing fibrosis in a clinical setting. Of interest from a clinical trial point-of-view, none of the tested methods was sufficiently accurate to distinguish between adjacent moderate fibrosis stages.

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  • 28.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort2019In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, Vol. 15, no 6, article id e1007157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimation of liver function is important to monitor progression of chronic liver disease (CLD). A promising method is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with gadoxetate, a liver-specific contrast agent. For this method, we have previously developed a model for an average healthy human. Herein, we extended this model, by combining it with a patient-specific non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with CLD of varying severity and etiologies. The model explained all MRI data and adequately predicted both timepoints saved for validation and gadoxetate concentrations in both plasma and biopsies. The validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function vary across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate. These mechanisms are shared across many liver functions and can now be estimated from standard clinical images.

    Author summary

    Being able to accurately and reliably estimate liver function is important when monitoring the progression of patients with liver disease, as well as when identifying drug-induced liver injury during drug development. A promising method for quantifying liver function is to use magnetic resonance imaging combined with gadoxetate. Gadoxetate is a liver-specific contrast agent, which is taken up by the hepatocytes and excreted into the bile. We have previously developed a mechanistic model for gadoxetate dynamics using averaged data from healthy volunteers. In this work, we extended our model with a non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework to give patient-specific estimates of the gadoxetate transport-rates. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with liver disease, covering a range of severity and etiologies. All patients underwent an MRI-examination and provided both blood and liver biopsies. Our validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function varies across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate.

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    Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort
  • 29.
    Franzen, L.
    et al.
    Department of Pathology, Clinical Research Centre, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Bodin, L.
    Unit of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Clinical Research Centre, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fiorini, R.N.
    Fiorini, R.N..
    Kirtz, J.
    Kirtz, J..
    Periyasamy, B.
    Periyasamy, B..
    Evans, Z.
    Evans, Z..
    Haines, J.
    Haines, J..
    Cheng, G.
    Cheng, G..
    Polito, C.
    Polito, C..
    Rodwell, D.
    Rodwell, D..
    Zhou, X.
    Zhou, X..
    Campbell, C.
    Campbell, C..
    Birsner, J.
    Birsner, J..
    Schmidt, M.G.
    Schmidt, M.G..
    Lewin, D.
    Lewin, D..
    Chavin, K.D.
    Chavin, K.D..
    Letter to the editor (multiple letter)2005In: Clinical Transplantation, ISSN 0902-0063, E-ISSN 1399-0012, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 571-572p. 571-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 30.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Unit of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Clinical Research Centre, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Semiquantitative evaluation overestimates the degree of steatosis in liver biopsies: a comparison to stereological point counting.2005In: Modern Pathology, ISSN 0893-3952, E-ISSN 1530-0285, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 912-916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The degree of steatosis in liver biopsies is usually assessed by a morphological semiquantitative approach in which the histopathologist uses a four-graded scale: 0-3 or none, slight, moderate and severe. Scores 1-3 are considered to correspond to fat deposition in <33, 33-66 and >66% of the hepatocytes. There is a considerable inter- and intra-individual variation in such scoring methods and a more standardized and quantitative approach is preferable. In the present study, we compare the semiquantitative technique with the stereological point counting method in the assessment of hepatic steatosis. A total of 75 archived liver needle biopsies were used. They were selected according to the original routine diagnosis of slight, moderate or severe steatosis. In all, 10 randomly selected images from each biopsy were digitized into a computer, a point grid lattice was superimposed and the number of hits on fat globules was counted. A pathologist scored the specimens in a four-graded scale as described above. The mean liver biopsy area (volume) with fat in hepatocytes was 2.2% for grade 1, 9.2% for grade 2 and 23.1% for grade 3. The kappa value for the semiquantitative estimates was 0.71 for the unweigthed kappa and 0.87 for weighted kappa. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.99 for images counted twice and 0.95 when two sets of images were captured from the same biopsy. These ICCs indicate excellent agreement and above that of the semiquantitative estimates. In conclusion, the area/volume of fat content of the hepatocytes is greatly overemphasized in semiquantitative estimation. Furthermore, the point counting technique has a better reproducibility than visual evaluation and should be preferred in estimates of liver steatosis in scientific studies and in clinical contexts when the amount of steatosis is important for treatment and prognosis, such as liver transplantation.

  • 31.
    Govaere, Olivier
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cockell, Simon
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Tiniakos, Dina
    Newcastle Univ, England; Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Queen, Rachel
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Younes, Ramy
    Newcastle Univ, England; Univ Turin, Italy.
    Vacca, Michele
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Alexander, Leigh
    SomaL Inc, CO 80301 USA.
    Ravaioli, Federico
    Newcastle Univ, England; Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Palmer, Jeremy
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Petta, Salvatore
    Univ Palermo, Italy.
    Boursier, Jerome
    Angers Univ Hosp, France.
    Rosso, Chiara
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Johnson, Katherine
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Wonders, Kristy
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Day, Christopher P.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Oresic, Matej
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Darlay, Rebecca
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cordell, Heather J.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Marra, Fabio
    Univ Florence, Italy.
    Vidal-Puig, Antonio
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Bedossa, Pierre
    Newcastle Univ, England; Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Schattenberg, Joern M.
    Univ Hosp Mainz, Germany.
    Clement, Karine
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Allison, Michael
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Bugianesi, Elisabetta
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Ratziu, Vlad
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Daly, Ann K.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Anstee, Quentin M.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Tyne Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Transcriptomic profiling across the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease spectrum reveals gene signatures for steatohepatitis and fibrosis2020In: Science Translational Medicine, ISSN 1946-6234, E-ISSN 1946-6242, Vol. 12, no 572, article id eaba4448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms that drive nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain incompletely understood. This large multicenter study characterized the transcriptional changes that occur in liver tissue across the NAFLD spectrum as disease progresses to cirrhosis to identify potential circulating markers. We performed high-throughput RNA sequencing on a discovery cohort comprising histologically characterized NAFLD samples from 206 patients. Unsupervised clustering stratified NAFLD on the basis of disease activity and fibrosis stage with differences in age, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), type 2 diabetes mellitus, and carriage of PNPLA3 rs738409, a genetic variant associated with NAFLD. Relative to early disease, we consistently identified 25 differentially expressed genes as fibrosing steatohepatitis progressed through stages F2 to F4. This 25-gene signature was independently validated by logistic modeling in a separate replication cohort (n = 175), and an integrative analysis with publicly available single-cell RNA sequencing data elucidated the likely relative contribution of specific intrahepatic cell populations. Translating these findings to the protein level, SomaScan analysis in more than 300 NAFLD serum samples confirmed that circulating concentrations of proteins AKR1B10 and GDF15 were strongly associated with disease activity and fibrosis stage. Supporting the biological plausibility of these data, in vitro functional studies determined that endoplasmic reticulum stress up-regulated expression of AKR1B10, GDF15, and PDGFA, whereas GDF15 supplementation tempered the inflammatory response in macrophages upon lipid loading and lipopolysaccharide stimulation. This study provides insights into the pathophysiology of progressive fibrosing steatohepatitis, and proof of principle that transcriptomic changes represent potentially tractable and clinically relevant markers of disease progression.

  • 32.
    Govaere, Olivier
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; Univ Hosp Leuven, Belgium.
    Hasoon, Megan
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Alexander, Leigh
    SomaLogic Inc, CO USA.
    Cockell, Simon
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Tiniakos, Dina
    Newcastle Univ, England; Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Schattenberg, Joern M.
    Univ Hosp Mainz, Germany.
    Boursier, Jerome
    Angers Univ Hosp, France.
    Bugianesi, Elisabetta
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Ratziu, Vlad K.
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Daly, Ann K. M.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Anstee, Quentin M.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Upon Tyne Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    LITMUS Investigators,
    A proteo-transcriptomic map of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease signatures2023In: Nature Metabolism, E-ISSN 2522-5812, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 572-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Govaere et al. integrate circulating protein data from more than 300 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with transcriptomics and develop a non-invasive diagnostics tool to identify patients with at-risk NAFLD based on body mass index, type 2 diabetes status and four circulating proteins. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common, progressive liver disease strongly associated with the metabolic syndrome. It is unclear how progression of NAFLD towards cirrhosis translates into systematic changes in circulating proteins. Here, we provide a detailed proteo-transcriptomic map of steatohepatitis and fibrosis during progressive NAFLD. In this multicentre proteomic study, we characterize 4,730 circulating proteins in 306 patients with histologically characterized NAFLD and integrate this with transcriptomic analysis in paired liver tissue. We identify circulating proteomic signatures for active steatohepatitis and advanced fibrosis, and correlate these with hepatic transcriptomics to develop a proteo-transcriptomic signature of 31 markers. Deconvolution of this signature by single-cell RNA sequencing reveals the hepatic cell types likely to contribute to proteomic changes with disease progression. As an exemplar of use as a non-invasive diagnostic, logistic regression establishes a composite model comprising four proteins (ADAMTSL2, AKR1B10, CFHR4 and TREM2), body mass index and type 2 diabetes mellitus status, to identify at-risk steatohepatitis.

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  • 33.
    Govaere, Olivier
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Petersen, Sine Kragh
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Martinez-Lopez, Nuria
    Albert Einstein Coll Med, NY 10461 USA; Albert Einstein Coll Med, NY 10461 USA.
    Wouters, Jasper
    VIB KU Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Van Haele, Matthias
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; Univ Hosp Leuven, Belgium.
    Mancina, Rosellina M.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jamialahmadi, Oveis
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bilkei-Gorzo, Orsolya
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lassen, Pierre Bel
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Darlay, Rebecca
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Peltier, Julien
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Palmer, Jeremy M.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Younes, Ramy
    Newcastle Univ, England; Univ Turin, Italy.
    Tiniakos, Dina
    Newcastle Univ, England; Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Aithal, Guruprasad P.
    Nottingham Univ Hosp NHS Trust, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allison, Michael
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Vacca, Michele
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Göransson, Melker
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Berlinguer-Palmini, Rolando
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Clark, James E.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Drinnan, Michael J.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Yki-Jarvinen, Hannele
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Dufour, Jean-Francois
    Univ Bern, Switzerland; Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Francque, Sven
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Petta, Salvatore
    Univ Palermo, Italy.
    Bugianesi, Elisabetta
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Schattenberg, Jorn M.
    Univ Hosp Mainz, Germany.
    Day, Christopher P.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cordell, Heather J.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Topal, Baki
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Clement, Karine
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Romeo, Stefano
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ratziu, Vlad
    Univ Paris Diderot, France.
    Roskams, Tania
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; Univ Hosp Leuven, Belgium.
    Daly, Ann K.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Anstee, Quentin M.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Upon Tyne Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Trost, Matthias
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Härtlova, Anetta
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Newcastle Univ, England.
    Macrophage scavenger receptor 1 mediates lipid-induced inflammation in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2022In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 1001-1012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: Obesity-associated inflammation is a key player in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1, CD204) remains incompletely understood. Methods: A total of 170 NAFLD liver biopsies were processed for transcriptomic analysis and correlated with clinicopathological features. Msr1(-/-) and wild-type mice were subjected to a 16-week high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. Mice and ex vivo human liver slices were treated with a monoclonal antibody against MSR1. Genetic susceptibility was assessed using genome-wide association study data from 1,483 patients with NAFLD and 430,101 participants of the UK Biobank. Results: MSR1 expression was associated with the occurrence of hepatic lipid-laden foamy macrophages and correlated with the degree of steatosis and steatohepatitis in patients with NAFLD. Mice lacking Msr1 were protected against diet-induced metabolic disorder, showing fewer hepatic foamy macrophages, less hepatic inflammation, improved dyslipidaemia and glucose tolerance, and altered hepatic lipid metabolism. Upon induction by saturated fatty acids, MSR1 induced a pro-inflammatory response via the JNK signalling pathway. In vitro blockade of the receptor prevented the accumulation of lipids in primary macrophages which inhibited the switch towards a proinflammatory phenotype and the release of cytokines such as TNF-alpha Targeting MSR1 using monoclonal antibody therapy in an obesity-associated NAFLD mouse model and human liver slices resulted in the prevention of foamy macrophage formation and inflammation. Moreover, we identified that rs41505344, a polymorphism in the upstream transcriptional region of MSR1, was associated with altered serum triglycerides and aspartate aminotransferase levels in a cohort of over 400,000 patients. Conclusions: Taken together, our data suggest that MSR1 plays a critical role in lipid-induced inflammation and could thus be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of NAFLD. Lay summary: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic disease primarily caused by excessive consumption of fat and sugar combined with a lack of exercise or a sedentary lifestyle. Herein, we show that the macrophage scavenger receptor MSR1, an innate immune receptor, mediates lipid uptake and accumulation in Kupffer cells, resulting in liver inflammation and thereby promoting the progression of NAFLD in humans and mice. (C) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of European Association for the Study of the Liver.

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  • 34.
    Gruneau, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Disease Progression Modeling for Economic Evaluation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease-A Systematic Review2023In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 283-298Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Globally, 25% of people have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and, currently, there are no approved pharmacologic treatments for NAFLD. With a slow disease progression, long-term impact of pharmacologic treatments can be assessed only by complementing emerging clinical trial evidence with data from other sources in disease progression modeling. Although this modeling is crucial for economic evaluation studies assessing the clinical and economic con-sequences of new treatments, the approach to modeling the natural history of NAFLD differs in contemporary research. This systematic literature review investigated modeling of the natural history of NAFLD.METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted searching PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane, and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database to identify articles focusing on modeling of the natural history of NAFLD. Model structure and transition probabilities were extracted from included studies.RESULTS: Of the 28 articles identified, differences were seen in model structure and data input. Clear definitions of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and NAFLD often were lacking; differences in the granularity of modeling fibrosis progression, the approach to disease regression, and modeling of advanced liver disease varied across studies. Observed transition probabilities for F0 to F1, F1 to F2, F2 to F3, and F3 to compensated cirrhosis varied between 0.059 to 0.095, 0.023 to 0.140, 0.018 to 0.070, and 0.040 to 0.118, respectively.CONCLUSIONS: The difference in disease progression modeling for seemingly similar models warrants further inquiry regarding how to model the natural course of NAFLD. Such differences may have a large impact when assessing the value of emerging pharmacologic treatments.

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  • 35.
    Gruneau, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cost-effectiveness analysis of noninvasive tests to identify advanced fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2023In: HEPATOLOGY COMMUNICATIONS, ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 7, no 7, article id e00191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Advanced fibrosis is associated with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and mortality in NAFLD. As treatments specifically targeted at NAFLD are lacking, patient management focuses on surveillance for early detection of complications related to end-stage liver disease. Although current and emerging diagnostic tools for the detection of advanced fibrosis are crucial for surveillance, their added value is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the costs and health outcomes of noninvasive tests in patient management strategies for diagnosing advanced fibrosis in NAFLD patients. Method: A decision analytical model was developed to evaluate 13 patient management strategies, including a no-testing strategy and 12 diagnostic algorithms with noninvasive tests (fibrosis 4-score, enhanced liver fibrosis, vibration controlled transient elastography), and liver biopsy. Model inputs were synthesized from the literature and Swedish registries. Lifetime health care costs, life years, quality-adjusted life years, clinical outcomes, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated for a cohort of 55-year-old patients diagnosed with NAFLD. Result: The cost per quality-adjusted life year was above (sic)50 000 for all diagnostic algorithms compared to no-testing. The cost per quality-adjusted life year of the most promising diagnostic algorithm (fibrosis 4-score, enhanced liver fibrosis, vibration controlled transient elastography, and liver biopsy) was similar to(sic)181 000 compared with no testing. Sensitivity analysis indicated that if treatment slowed down disease progression, the value of testing increased. Conclusion: The result questions the overall value of comprehensive diagnostic testing in a broad NAFLD population in current routine clinical care. The role of noninvasive tests may change if evidence-based treatments to slow down disease progression emerge.

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  • 36.
    Gummesson, Christina
    et al.
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Alm, Stina
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Cederborg, Anna
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Hellman, Jarl
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hjelmqvist, Hans
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Jood, Katarina
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leanderson, Charlotte
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Moller, Riitta
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Rosengren, Bjorn
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sjalander, Anders
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Svensson, Peter J.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sarnblad, Stefan
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Tejera, Alexander
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) for undergraduate medical education - development and exploration of social validity2023In: BMC Medical Education, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe development of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) as a framework for work-based training and assessment in undergraduate medical education has become popular. EPAs are defined as units of a professional activity requiring adequate knowledge, skills, and attitudes, with a recognized output of professional labor, independently executable within a time frame, observable and measurable in its process and outcome, and reflecting one or more competencies. Before a new framework is implemented in a specific context, it is valuable to explore social validity, that is, the acceptability by relevant stakeholders.AimThe aim of our work was to define Core EPAs for undergraduate medical education and further explore the social validity of the constructs.Method and materialIn a nationwide collaboration, EPAs were developed using a modified Delphi procedure and validated according to EQual by a group consisting of teachers nominated from each of the seven Swedish medical schools, two student representatives, and an educational developer (n = 16). In the next step, social validity was explored in a nationwide survey. The survey introduced the suggested EPAs. For each EPA, the importance of the EPA was rated, as was the raters perception of the present graduates required level of supervision when performing the activity. Free-text comments were also included and analyzed.ResultsTen Core EPAs were defined and validated. The validation scores for EQual ranged from 4.1 to 4.9. The nationwide survey had 473 responders. All activities were rated as "important" by most responders, ranging from 54 to 96%. When asked how independent current graduates were in performing the ten activities, 6 to 35% reported "independent". The three themes of the free text comments were: relevant target areas and content; definition of the activities; and clinical practice and learning.ConclusionTen Core EPAs were defined and assessed as relevant for Swedish undergraduate medical education. There was a consistent gap between the perceived importance and the certainty that the students could perform these professional activities independently at the time of graduation. These results indicate that the ten EPAs may have a role in undergraduate education by creating clarity for all stakeholders.

  • 37.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bu, Dawei
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, TX USA.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Hegmar, Hannes
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Zhang, Ningyan
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    An, Zhiqiang
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Scherer, Philipp E.
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, TX USA; Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    Serum levels of endotrophin are associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 437-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims

    There are no currently available biomarkers that can accurately indicate the presence of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We investigated the association between endotrophin, a cleavage product of collagen type 6α3, and disease severity in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    Methods

    We measured serum endotrophin levels in 211 patients with NAFLD and nine healthy controls. Liver biopsy data was available for 141 (67%) of the patients. Associations between endotrophin and the presence of NASH and advanced fibrosis were investigated alone and in combination with standard clinical parameters using logistic regression.

    Results

    A total of 211 patients were enrolled in this study, consisting of 108 (51%) men and 103 (49%) women with a mean age of 55.6 years. 58 (27%) of the patients had advanced fibrosis. Of those with biopsy data, 87 (62%) had NASH. Serum levels of endotrophin were significantly higher in patients with NAFLD than those in healthy controls (37[±12] vs. 17[±7] ng/mL, p<.001). Serum levels of endotrophin were also significantly higher in patients with NASH than in those without NASH (40[±12] vs. 32[±13] ng/mL, p<.001). A model using age, sex, body mass index and levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glucose and endotrophin effectively predicted the presence of NASH in a derivation (AUROC 0.83, 95%CI = 0.74–0.92) and validation cohort (AUROC 0.71, 95%CI = 0.54–0.88). There was no significant association between serum levels of endotrophin and advanced fibrosis.

    Conclusions

    These data suggest that serum endotrophin could be a valuable biomarker for diagnosing NASH, but not for detecting advanced fibrosis in NAFLD.

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  • 38.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Cardiovascular risk factors in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2019In: Liver international (Print), ISSN 1478-3223, E-ISSN 1478-3231, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 197-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background amp; Aims Patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is unclear whether histological variables may help predict CVD risk. We evaluated histology and traditional CV risk factors as predictors of CVD outcomes in a large NAFLD cohort. Methods We included 603 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients free of baseline CVD and matched these (1:10, by age, sex and municipality) to 6269 population controls. All individuals were cross-linked to national registries to ascertain incident CVD events, defined as acute ischaemic heart disease or stroke. The presence of CV risk factors and liver histology were available in NAFLD patients only. Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) for incident CVD. Results During a mean follow-up of 18.6 years, 168 (28%) of NAFLD patients and 1325 (21%) of controls experienced a CVD event (HR 1.54, 95%CI 1.30-1.83). Within the NAFLD cohort, age, male sex, type 2 diabetes, smoking and triglycerides were associated with risk of CVD. Taking these CV risk factors into account, no histological parameter, including presence of NASH and fibrosis stage, were associated with incident CVD. Conclusions Patients with NAFLD are at an increased risk for CVD compared to matched controls, but histological parameters do not seem to independently predict this risk.

  • 39.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    et al.
    Department of Upper GI, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Stål, Per
    Department of Upper GI, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Department of Upper GI, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Accuracy of Noninvasive Scoring Systems in Assessing Risk of Death and Liver-Related Endpoints in Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease2019In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 1148-1156.e4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims

    Several non-invasive scoring systems have been developed to determine risk of advanced fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We examined the association between 4 scoring systems and incident severe liver disease and overall mortality in a large cohort of patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD.

    Methods

    We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 646 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD, recruited from 2 hospitals in Sweden, from 1971 through 2009. The NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS), FIB-4, APRI, and BARD scores were calculated at the time of the liver biopsy. Based on each score, patients were assigned to categories of low, intermediate, or high risk for advanced fibrosis. Overall mortality and severe liver disease (cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease, liver failure, or hepatocellular carcinoma) were ascertained through linkage with national registers until the end of 2014. Cox regression, area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve, and C-statistic analyses were used to study the predictive capacity of each scoring system.

    Results

    During a mean follow-up time of 19.9±8.7 years, there were 214 deaths and 76 cases of severe liver disease. For overall mortality, AUROC curve values were: NFS, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.68–0.76); FIB-4, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.68–0.76); BARD, 0.62 (95% CI, 0.58–0.66); and APRI, 0.52 (95% CI, 0.47–0.57). For severe liver disease, AUROC curve values were: NFS, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.66–0.78); FIB-4, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.66–0.79); BARD, 0.62 (95% CI, 0.55–0.69); APRI, 0.69 (95% CI, 0.63–0.76). C-statistics for all scores were of moderate capacity to predict outcomes.

    Conclusions

    In a retrospective analysis of data from 646 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD, we found the NFS and the FIB-4 scores to most accurately determine risk of overall death or severe liver disease. However, the AUROC values for these scoring systems are not high enough for use in the clinic; new systems are needed to determine prognoses of patients with NAFLD.

  • 40.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ndegwa, Nelson
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Jalmeus, Molly
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Posserud, Iris
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Klintman, Daniel
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Werner, Marten
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Morbidity, risk of cancer and mortality in 3645 HFE mutations carriers2021In: Liver international (Print), ISSN 1478-3223, E-ISSN 1478-3231, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 545-553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims Mutations in the HFE gene can lead to hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) and have been suggested to increase the risk of extra-hepatic diseases, especially breast and colorectal cancer. Here we investigated long-term outcomes of Swedish patients with HFE mutations. Methods We identified 3645 patients with a homozygous p.C282Y (62%) or a compound heterozygous p.C282Y/p.H63D (38%) mutation from eight centres in Sweden between 1997 and 2017. These were matched 1:10 by age, sex and county of residence to reference individuals from the general population. We ascertained incident outcomes until the end of 2017 by linkage to national registers. Studied outcomes were HH, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), breast cancer (in women), colorectal cancer, type 1 and 2 diabetes, hypothyroidism, Parkinsons disease and mortality. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for these outcomes. Results Median age at diagnosis was 52 years, 44% were females. During a mean follow-up of 7.9 years, we found an increased risk for HCC, HH, cirrhosis, type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis and death. Excess mortality was only seen in men. No increased risk was seen for colorectal or breast cancer. Liver-related outcomes were rare, with a cumulative incidence of HFE mutation carriers in a university hospital setting had an increased risk for mortality in men, along with increased risks of cirrhosis, HCC, diabetes type 2, and osteoarthritis. In general, the absolute risk for adverse outcomes was low and no increased risk for colon or breast cancer was observed.

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  • 41.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Considerations in the search for under-reported alcohol consumption in NAFLD2023In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 78, no 2, p. e66-e67Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Unit of Hepatology, Department of Upper GI, Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Medicine, Huddinge; Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Olbers, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Peltonen, Markku
    Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Carlsson, Lena
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bariatric Surgery Versus Standard Obesity Treatment and the Risk of Severe Liver Disease: Data From the Swedish Obese Subjects Study2021In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 19, no 12, p. 2675-2676Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 43.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Risk for hepatic and extra-hepatic outcomes in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease2022In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 292, no 2, p. 177-189Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined by presence of steatosis in more than 5% of liver cells. The gold standard for diagnosis is liver biopsy, but this is seldom achieved due to costs and risk for side effects, and that is why the diagnosis is mostly made based on a combination of radiology and exclusion of other liver diseases. Disease severity staging can be noninvasively achieved with radiological exams such as elastography or blood-based markers that usually have lower sensitivity and specificity. NAFLD is today the most common chronic liver disease globally with a prevalence estimated to be 25%. Fortunately, for many persons NAFLD is an incidental finding with a good prognosis. Whilst a major focus has been on liver-related outcomes in NAFLD, there has recently been an increased interest in extrahepatic consequences of NAFLD. The most commonly studied outcomes include cardiovascular disease and cancer. The risk of adverse outcomes generally differs according to the baseline fibrosis stage. There is a five-time higher risk of liver-related events in NAFLD patients with fibrosis stage 3 as compared to those with no or little fibrosis. Meanwhile, the presence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) does not seem to influence prognosis in addition to fibrosis stage. Patients with NAFLD clearly have a higher risk for cardiovascular outcomes compared to the general population, with a recent meta-analysis indicating a 37% increased hazard for cardiovascular events as opposed to individuals without NAFLD. The risk of liver cancer is increased, which is mostly driven by presence of cirrhosis, but the increased risk is present also in patients without cirrhosis, and to a greater extent than for other chronic liver disease. Around one-third of patients with NAFLD and liver cancer do not have cirrhosis. Additionally, the risk of extrahepatic malignancies is thought to be moderately increased, with most evidence for a link between NAFLD and colorectal cancer where the risk is approximately 50% higher compared to patients without NAFLD. A particularly salient point is if NAFLD can be considered an independent risk factor for outcomes. Many studies have not been able to adjust for key confounders, or suffer from different forms of bias. The clinical problem is nevertheless to identify persons with an increased risk for adverse hepatic and extrahepatic outcomes. We here discuss the evidence linking NAFLD to severe hepatic and extrahepatic outcomes.

  • 44.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Center for Digestive Diseases, Unit of Hepatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Bottai, Matteo
    Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Center for Digestive Diseases, Unit of Hepatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Per
    Center for Digestive Diseases, Unit of Hepatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elevated serum ferritin is associated with increased mortality in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease after 16 years of follow-up2016In: Liver international (Print), ISSN 1478-3223, E-ISSN 1478-3231, Vol. 36, no 11, p. 1688-1695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: High levels of ferritin in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are associated with significant fibrosis and higher NAFLD activity score (NAS). It is unclear if this association has an impact on mortality. We investigated if high levels of ferritin, with or without iron overload, were associated with an increased mortality in NAFLD.

    METHODS: We included 222 patients between 1979 and 2009 with biopsy-proven NAFLD and available serum ferritin concentrations. The cohort was divided into "high" (n = 89) and "normal" (n = 133) ferritin values, using a cut-point of 350 μg/L in males, and 150 μg/L in females, and stratified upon iron overload status. Data on mortality was obtained from a national, population based register. Poisson regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for mortality. The estimates were adjusted for age at biopsy, sex, smoking, BMI, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and fibrosis stage at the time of biopsy.

    RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 15.6 years (range: 0.5-34.2). Patients with high ferritin had more advanced fibrosis and higher NAS than patients with normal ferritin (p < 0.05). Fifteen years after diagnosis, and after adjusting for confounders, the high-ferritin group showed an increasingly higher mortality that was statistically significant (Hazard ratio = 1.10 per year, 95% Confidence interval 1.01-1.21, p < 0.05). There was no difference in mortality between patients with different iron overload patterns.

    CONCLUSIONS: High levels of ferritin are associated with a long-term increased risk of death. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 45.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Fibrosis stage but not NASH predicts mortality and time to development of severe liver disease in biopsy-proven NAFLD2017In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 1265-1273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background amp; Aims: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is very common in the general population, but identifying patients with increased risk of mortality and liver-specific morbidity remains a challenge. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is thought to enhance this risk; therefore, resolution of NASH is a major endpoint in current pharmacologic studies. Herein, we aim to investigate the long-term prognosis of a large cohort of NAFLD patients, and to study the specific effect of NASH and fibrosis stage on prognosis. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 646 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients. Each case was matched for age, sex and municipality to ten controls. Outcomes on mortality and severe liver disease, defined as cirrhosis, liver decompensation/failure or hepatocellular carcinoma, were evaluated using population-based registers. Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex and type 2 diabetes were used to examine the long-term risk according to fibrosis stage. Likelihood ratio tests were used to assess whether adding NASH to these models increased the predictive capacity. Laplace regression was used to estimate the time to severe liver disease according to stage of fibrosis. Results: During a follow-up of mean 20 years (range 0-40) equivalent to 139,163 person-years, 12% of NAFLD patients and 2.2% of controls developed severe liver disease (p amp;lt; 0.001). Compared to controls, the risk of severe liver disease increased per stage of fibrosis (hazard ratio ranging from 1.9 in F0 to 104.9 in F4). Accounting for the presence of NASH did not change these estimates significantly (likelihood ratio test amp;gt; 0.05 for all stages of fibrosis). Similar results were seen for overall mortality. The lower end of the 95% confidence interval for the 10th percentile of time to development of severe liver disease was 22-26 years in F0-1, 9.3 years in F2, 2.3 years in F3, and 0.9 years to liver decompensation in F4. Conclusions: In this, the largest ever study of biopsy-proven NAFLD, the presence of NASH did not increase the risk of liver-specific morbidity or overall mortality. Knowledge of time to development of severe liver disease according to fibrosis stage can be used in individual patient counselling and for public health decisions. (C) 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 46.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Center for Digestive Diseases, Division of Hepatology Karolinska University HospitalStockholm Sweden. Department of Medicine, Huddinge Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden.
    Stål, Per
    Center for Digestive Diseases, Division of Hepatology Karolinska University Hospital Stockholm Sweden. Department of Medicine and Huddinge Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden..
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Center for Digestive Diseases, Division of Hepatology Karolinska University Hospital Stockholm Sweden. Department of Medicine and Huddinge Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden..
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Risk for development of severe liver disease in lean patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A long-term follow-up study.2018In: Hepatology communications, ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 48-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are overweight or obese. However, a significant proportion of patients have a normal body mass index (BMI), denoted as lean NAFLD. The long-term prognosis of lean NAFLD is unclear. We conducted a cohort study of 646 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Patients were defined as lean (BMI < 25.0), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9), or obese (BMI ≥ 30.0) at the time of biopsy. Each case was matched for age, sex, and municipality to 10 controls. Overall mortality and development of severe liver disease were evaluated using population-based registers. Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex, type 2 diabetes, and fibrosis stage were used to examine the long-term risk of mortality and liver-related events in lean and nonlean NAFLD. Lean NAFLD was seen in 19% of patients, while 52% were overweight and 29% were obese. Patients with lean NAFLD were older, had lower transaminases, lower stages of fibrosis, and lower prevalence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis at baseline compared to patients with a higher BMI. During a mean follow-up of 19.9 years (range 0.4-40 years) representing 12,631 person years and compared to patients who were overweight, patients with lean NAFLD had no increased risk for overall mortality (hazard ratio 1.06; P =  0.73) while an increased risk for development of severe liver disease was found (hazard ratio 2.69; P =  0.007). Conclusion: Although patients with lean NAFLD have lower stages of fibrosis, they are at higher risk for development of severe liver disease compared to patients with NAFLD and a higher BMI, independent of available confounders. (Hepatology Communications 2018;2:48-57).

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  • 47.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Widman, Linnea
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stål, Per
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Health Care Costs of Patients With Biopsy-Confirmed Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Are Nearly Twice Those of Matched Controls2020In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 1592-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Data on healthcare resource use and costs associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in clinical practice are lacking. We compared real-life healthcare costs of patients with NAFLD to matched controls. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of 646 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD in Sweden from 1971 through 2009. Each patient was matched for age, sex, and county of residence with 10 persons from the general population (controls). We retrieved all healthcare contacts through Dec 31, 2014 from national registers. Unit costs were assigned to arrive at a total healthcare cost (in USD [$]) per study subject. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 19.9 years, we recorded a mean of 0.27 hospitalizations per year for patients with NAFLD vs 0.16 for controls (P &lt;.001). This corresponded to an incremental cost of $635 per year for patients with NAFLD. Patients with NAFLD had a higher mean use of outpatient care visits: 1.46 contacts per year compared with 0.86 per year in controls, corresponding to $255 in additional costs (P &lt;.001). Total costs incurred by patients with stage 3-4 fibrosis were higher than by patients with fibrosis stage 0-2 (mean annual costs, $4397 vs $629). Cumulative costs were higher for all stages of fibrosis compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare costs are nearly twice as high in patients with NAFLD than in matched controls. This is mostly attributable to higher costs for hospitalizations, but also to more outpatient visits. Patients with advanced fibrosis had the highest costs.

  • 48.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Onnerhag, Kristina
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Sheikhi, Reza
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Low to moderate lifetime alcohol consumption is associated with less advanced stages of fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 159-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: Moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with a lower risk of disease severity in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). It is unclear if this reflects current or lifetime drinking, or can be attributed to confounders such as diet and exercise. We evaluated the impact of lifetime alcohol consumption on fibrosis severity in NAFLD. Methods: We prospectively enrolled 120 subjects with biopsy-proven NAFLD and through detailed questionnaires examined lifetime alcohol consumption, diet and physical activity. Main outcome measures were odds ratios (OR) for fibrosis stage, calculated through ordinal regression after adjustment for body mass index, diabetes mellitus type 2, smoking and age at biopsy. A biomarker for recent alcohol consumption, phosphatidyl ethanol (PEth) was sampled. Results: An increase in median weekly alcohol consumption to a maximum of 13 drinks per week was associated with lower fibrosis stage (adjusted OR for each incremental unit, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76-0.97; p = .017). The lowest risk for fibrosis was found with the lowest odds seen in the top quartile of alcohol consumption (aOR 0.23; 95% CI 0.08-0.66; p = .006). Adding soft drink and coffee consumptions, and physical activity to the model did not change the estimates. Subjects with PEth amp;gt;= 0.3 mu mol/L had higher ORs for a higher fibrosis stage (aOR 2.77; 95% CI 1.01-7.59; p = .047). Conclusion: Lifetime alcohol consumption with up to 13 units per week is associated with lower fibrosis stage in NAFLD. Elevated PEth is associated with higher stages of fibrosis.

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  • 49.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bedossa, Pierre
    University of Paris Diderot, France.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    SAF score and mortality in NAFLD after up to 41 years of follow-up2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 87-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: A new score for the histological severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), called SAF (Steatosis, Activity and Fibrosis) has been developed. We aimed to evaluate the impact of this score on overall mortality. Methods: We used data from 139 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. All biopsies were graded according to the SAF scoring system and disease severity was classified as mild, moderate or severe. Causes of death were extracted from a national, population-based register. A Cox regression model, adjusted for sex, body mass index (BMI) and diabetes mellitus type 2, was applied. Results: At baseline 35 patients presented with mild or moderate disease respectively, and 69 patients with severe disease. During follow-up (median 25.3 years, range 1.7-40.8) 74 patients died, 11 in the mild group (31%), 18 in the moderate group (51%) and 45 in the severe group (65%), p=.002. Compared to patients with mild disease, patients with moderate disease did not have a significant increase in overall mortality (HR 1.83, 95% CI 0.89-3.77, p=.10). Patients with severe disease had a significant increase in mortality (HR 2.65, 95% CI 1.19-5.93, p=.017). However, when adjusting for fibrosis stage, significance was lost (HR 1.85, 95% CI 0.76-4.54, p=.18). NASH, defined as per the FLIP algorithm, was not associated with mortality compared to not having NASH (HR 1.46, 95% CI 0.74-2.90, p=.28). Conclusions: After adjustment for fibrosis, the SAF score was not associated with increased mortality in NAFLD. This finding should be corroborated in larger cohorts with similar follow-up time.

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  • 50.
    Hagström, Hannes
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Hepatology, Department of Upper GI Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vessby, Johan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Gastroenterology Research Group, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Shang, Ying
    Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    99% of patients with NAFLD meet MASLD criteria and natural history is therefore identical2024In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 80, no 2, p. e76-e77Article in journal (Other academic)
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