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  • 1.
    Aberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Danford, Christopher J.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, MA 02215 USA.
    Thiele, Maja
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Talback, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Rasmussen, Ditlev Nytoft
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Jiang, Z. Gordon
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, MA 02215 USA.
    Hammar, Niklas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    But, Anna
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Puukka, Pauli
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Krag, Aleksander
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Sundvall, Jouko
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Erlund, Iris
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lai, Michelle
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, MA 02215 USA.
    Afdhal, Nezam
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, MA 02215 USA.
    Jula, Antti
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Mannisto, Satu
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Lundqvist, Annamari
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Perola, Markus
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Finland.
    Farkkila, Martti
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    A Dynamic Aspartate-to-Alanine Aminotransferase Ratio Provides Valid Predictions of Incident Severe Liver Disease2021In: HEPATOLOGY COMMUNICATIONS, ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 1021-1035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aspartate-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (AAR) is associated with liver fibrosis, but its predictive performance is suboptimal. We hypothesized that the association between AAR and liver disease depends on absolute transaminase levels and developed and validated a model to predict liver-related outcomes in the general population. A Cox regression model based on age, AAR, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level (dynamic AAR [dAAR]) using restricted cubic splines was developed in Finnish population-based health-examination surveys (FINRISK, 2002-2012; n = 18,067) with linked registry data for incident liver-related hospitalizations, hepatocellular carcinoma, or liver death. The model was externally validated for liver-related outcomes in a Swedish population cohort (Swedish Apolipoprotein Mortality Risk [AMORIS] subcohort; n = 126,941) and for predicting outcomes and/or prevalent fibrosis/cirrhosis in biopsied patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), chronic hepatitis C, or alcohol-related liver disease (ALD). The dynamic AAR model predicted liver-related outcomes both overall (optimism-corrected C-statistic, 0.81) and in subgroup analyses of the FINRISK cohort and identified persons with >10% risk for liver-related outcomes within 10 years. In independent cohorts, the C-statistic for predicting liver-related outcomes up to a 10-year follow-up was 0.72 in the AMORIS cohort, 0.81 in NAFLD, and 0.75 in ALD. Area-under-the-curve (AUC) for detecting prevalent cirrhosis was 0.80-0.83 in NAFLD, 0.80 in hepatitis C, but only 0.71 in ALD. In ALD, model performance improved when using aspartate aminotransferase instead of ALT in the model (C-statistic, 0.84 for outcome; AUC, 0.82 for prevalent cirrhosis). Conclusion: A dAAR score provides prospective predictions for the risk of incident severe liver outcomes in the general population and helps detect advanced liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. The dAAR score could potentially be used for screening the unselected general population and as a trigger for further liver evaluations.

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  • 2.
    Ahmad, Awais
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Autoantibodies Associated with Autoimmune Liver Diseases in a Healthy Population: Evaluation of a Commercial Immunoblot Test2022In: Diagnostics, ISSN 2075-4418, Vol. 12, no 7, article id 1572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autoantibodies constitute important tools for diagnosing the autoimmune liver diseases (AILD) autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis. The EUROLINE immunoblot assay, detecting multiple specificities, is widely used, but the clinical importance of weakly positive findings is unclear. The manufacturers recommended cut-off was evaluated by investigating AILD-associated autoantibodies in 825 blood donors and 60 confirmed AILD cases. Positive findings were followed up with immunofluorescence microscopy on rat tissue, anti-M2-ELISA, alternative immunoblot assay, and liver function tests. Thirty-six (4.4%) blood donors were positive with EUROLINE. The most common specificities were LC-1 (1.6%), gp210 (1.3%), and AMA-M2 (1.1%). In general, the positive results were higher in patients than in blood donors, whereas anti-LC-1 was higher in blood donors. The liver function tests were slightly elevated in 2 of the 36 immunoblot positive blood donors. The majority of the positive EUROLINE findings could not be confirmed with the follow-up tests. The EUROLINE-Autoimmune Liver Diseases-(IgG) immunoblot detected autoantibodies in 4.4% of blood donors without signs of AILD. Our findings indicate that the recommended cut-off can be raised for most specificities without loss of diagnostic sensitivity. The prevalence of anti-LC-1 among blood donors indicates a problem with the antigen source.

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  • 3.
    Ahmad, Awais
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Heijke, R.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Wirestam, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Autoantibodies associated with primary biliary cholangitis are common among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus even in the absence of elevated liver enzymes2021In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 203, no 1, p. 22-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of concomitant autoimmune liver diseases (AILD) is more detailed in primary Sjogrens syndrome (pSS) compared to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Herein, the prevalence of autoantibodies associated with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) was investigated in stored sera from patients with SLE (n = 280) and pSS (n = 114). Antibodies against mitochondria (AMA), liver-kidney microsomal (LKM) antigen, smooth muscle (SMA) and anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) were analysed with immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, AILD-associated autoantibodies were tested with immunoblot. Prior to sampling, eight SLE (2 center dot 9%) and three pSS (2 center dot 6%) cases were diagnosed with AILD. Among SLE-cases without known AILD (n = 272), 26 (9 center dot 6%) had PBC-associated autoantibodies, 15 (5 center dot 5%) AIH-associated autoantibodies (excluding ANA) and one serological overlap. Most subjects with PBC-associated autoantibodies had liver enzymes within reference limits (22 of 27, 81%) or mild laboratory cholestasis (two of 27, 7 center dot 4%), while one fulfilled the diagnostic PBC-criteria. AMA-M2 detected by immunoblot was the most common PBC-associated autoantibody in SLE (20 of 272, 7 center dot 4%). The prevalence of SMA (4 center dot 4%) was comparable with a healthy reference population, but associated with elevated liver enzymes in four of 12 (25%), none meeting AIH-criteria. The patient with combined AIH/PBC-serology had liver enzymes within reference limits. Among pSS cases without known AILD (n = 111), nine (8 center dot 1%) had PBC-associated, 12 (10 center dot 8%) AIH-associated autoantibodies and two overlapped. PBC-associated autoantibodies were found as frequently in SLE as in pSS but were, with few exceptions, not associated with laboratory signs of liver disease. Overall, AILD-associated autoantibodies were predominantly detected by immunoblot and no significant difference in liver enzymes was found between AILD autoantibody-negative and -positive patients.

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  • 4.
    Akbari, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dodd, Maja
    Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Per
    Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken. epartment of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Vessby, Johan
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zhang, Xiao
    Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA.
    Wang, Tongtong
    Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA.
    Jemielita, Thomas
    Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA.
    Fernandes, Gail
    Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA.
    Engel, Samuel S.
    Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA.
    Hagström, Hannes
    Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Shang, Ying
    Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term major adverse liver outcomes in 1,260 patients with non-cirrhotic NAFLD2024In: JHEP Reports, ISSN 2589-5559, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 100915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & aims: Long-term studies of the prognosis of NAFLD are scarce. Here, we investigated the risk of major adverse liver outcomes (MALO) in a large cohort of patients with NAFLD.

    Methods: We conducted a cohort study with data from Swedish university hospitals. Patients (n = 1,260) with NAFLD without cirrhosis were diagnosed through biopsy or radiology, and had fibrosis estimated through vibration-controlled transient elastography, biopsy, or FIB-4 score between 1974 and 2020 and followed up through 2020. Each patient was matched on age, sex, and municipality with up to 10 reference individuals from the general population (n = 12,529). MALO were ascertained from Swedish national registers. The rate of events was estimated by Cox regression.

    Results: MALO occurred in 111 (8.8%, incidence rate = 5.9/1,000 person-years) patients with NAFLD and 197 (1.6%, incidence rate = 1.0/1,000 person-years) reference individuals during a median follow up of 13 years. The rate of MALO was higher in patients with NAFLD (hazard ratio = 6.6; 95% CI = 5.2-8.5). The risk of MALO was highly associated with the stage of fibrosis at diagnosis. In the biopsy subcohort (72% of total sample), there was no difference in risk between patients with and without non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The 20-year cumulative incidences of MALO were 2% for the reference population, 3% for patients with F0, and 35% for F3. Prognostic information from biopsy was comparable to FIB-4 (C-indices around 0.73 vs. 0.72 at 10 years).

    Conclusions: This study provides updated information on the natural history of NAFLD, showing a high rate of progression to cirrhosis in F3 and a similar prognostic capacity of non-invasive tests to liver biopsy.

    Impact and implications: Several implications for clinical care and future research may be noted based on these results. First, the risk estimates for cirrhosis development are important when communicating risk to patients and deciding on clinical monitoring and treatment. Estimates can also be used in updated health-economic evaluations, and for regulatory agencies. Second, our results again highlight the low predictive information obtained from ascertaining NASHstatus by histology and call for more objective means by which to define NASH. Such methods may include artificial intelligence-supported digital pathology. We highlight that NASH is most likely the causal factor for fibrosis progression in NAFLD, but the subjective definition makes the prognostic value of a histological NASH diagnosis of limited value. Third, the finding that prognostic information from biopsy and the very simple Fibrosis-4 score were comparable is important as it may lead to fewer biopsies and further move the field towards non-invasive means by which to define fibrosis and, importantly, use non-invasive tests as outcomes in clinical trials. However, all modalities had modest discriminatory capacity and new risk stratification systems are needed in NAFLD. Repeated measures of non-invasive scores may be a potential solution.

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  • 5.
    Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction in water–fat MRI2015In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 468-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the water-signal performance of the consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction (CIIC) method to correct for intensity inhomogeneities METHODS: Water-fat volumes were acquired using 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T symmetrically sampled 2-point Dixon three-dimensional MRI. Two datasets: (i) 10 muscle tissue regions of interest (ROIs) from 10 subjects acquired with both 1.5T and 3.0T whole-body MRI. (ii) Seven liver tissue ROIs from 36 patients imaged using 1.5T MRI at six time points after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. The performance of CIIC was evaluated quantitatively by analyzing its impact on the dispersion and bias of the water image ROI intensities, and qualitatively using side-by-side image comparisons.

    RESULTS:

    CIIC significantly ( P1.5T≤2.3×10-4,P3.0T≤1.0×10-6) decreased the nonphysiological intensity variance while preserving the average intensity levels. The side-by-side comparisons showed improved intensity consistency ( Pint⁡≤10-6) while not introducing artifacts ( Part=0.024) nor changed appearances ( Papp≤10-6).

    CONCLUSION:

    CIIC improves the spatiotemporal intensity consistency in regions of a homogenous tissue type. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2014.

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  • 6.
    Anstee, Quentin M.
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Upon Tyne Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Darlay, Rebecca
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cockell, Simon
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Meroni, Marica
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Govaere, Olivier
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Tiniakos, Dina
    Newcastle Univ, England; Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Burt, Alastair D.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Univ Adelaide, Australia.
    Bedossa, Pierre
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Palmer, Jeremy
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Liu, Yang-Lin
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Aithal, Guruprasad P.
    Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allison, Michael
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Yki-Jarvinen, Hannele
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Vacca, Michele
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Dufour, Jean-Francois
    Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Invernizzi, Pietro
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; San Gerardo Hosp, Italy.
    Prati, Daniele
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Francque, Sven
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium.
    Petta, Salvatore
    Univ Palermo, Italy.
    Bugianesi, Elisabetta
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Clement, Karine
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Ratziu, Vlad
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Schattenberg, Joern M.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Valenti, Luca
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Day, Christopher P.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cordell, Heather J.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Daly, Ann K.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Univ, England.
    Correction: Genome-wide association study of non- alcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis in a histologically characterised cohort ( vol 73, pp 505-515 , 2020 )2023In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 78, no 5, p. 1085-1086Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Anstee, Quentin M.
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Upon Tyne Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Darlay, Rebecca
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cockell, Simon
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Meroni, Marica
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Govaere, Olivier
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Tiniakos, Dina
    Newcastle Univ, England; Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Burt, Alastair D.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Univ Adelaide, Australia.
    Bedossa, Pierre
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Palmer, Jeremy
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Liu, Yang-Lin
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Aithal, Guruprasad P.
    Nottingham Univ Hosp NHS Trust, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allison, Michael
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Yki-Jarvinen, Hannele
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Vacca, Michele
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England; Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Dufour, Jean-Francois
    Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Invernizzi, Pietro
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; San Gerardo Hosp, Italy.
    Prati, Daniele
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Francque, Sven
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium.
    Petta, Salvatore
    Univ Palermo, Italy.
    Bugianesi, Elisabetta
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Clement, Karine
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Ratziu, Vlad
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Schattenberg, Joern M.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Valenti, Luca
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Day, Christopher P.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cordell, Heather J.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Daly, Ann K.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Genome-wide association study of non-alcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis in a histologically characterised cohort2020In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 73, no 3, p. 505-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: Genetic factors associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain incompletely understood. To date, most genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have adopted radiologically assessed hepatic triglyceride content as the reference phenotype and so cannot address steatohepatitis or fibrosis. We describe a GWAS encompassing the full spectrum of histologically characterised NAFLD. Methods: The GWAS involved 1,483 European NAFLD cases and 17,781 genetically matched controls. A replication cohort of 559 NAFLD cases and 945 controls was genotyped to confirm signals showing genome-wide or close to genome-wide significance. Results: Case-control analysis identified signals showing p values <= 5 x 10(-8) at 4 locations (chromosome [chr] 2 GCKR/C2ORF16; chr4 HSD17B13; chr19 TM6SF2; chr22 PNPLA3) together with 2 other signals with p <1 x 10(-7) (chr1 near LEPR and chr8 near IDO2/TC1). Case-only analysis of quantitative traits showed that the PNPLA3 signal (rs738409) had genome-wide significance for steatosis, fibrosis and NAFLD activity score and a new signal (PYGO1 rs62021874) had close to genome-wide significance for steatosis (p = 8.2 x 10(-8)). Subgroup case-control analysis for NASH confirmed the PNPLA3 signal. The chr1 LEPR single nucleotide polymorphism also showed genome-wide significance for this phenotype. Considering the subgroup with advanced fibrosis (>= F3), the signals on chr2, chr19 and chr22 maintained their genome-wide significance. Except for GCKR/C2ORF16, the genome-wide significance signals were replicated. Conclusions: This study confirms PNPLA3 as a risk factor for the full histological spectrum of NAFLD at genome-wide significance levels, with important contributions from TM6SF2 and HSD17B13. PYGO1 is a novel steatosis modifier, suggesting that Wnt signalling pathways may be relevant in NAFLD pathogenesis. Lay summary: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common disease where excessive fat accumulates in the liver and may result in cirrhosis. To understand who is at risk of developing this disease and suffering liver damage, we undertook a genetic study to compare the genetic profiles of people suffering from fatty liver disease with genetic profiles seen in the general population. We found that particular sequences in 4 different areas of the human genome were seen at different frequencies in the fatty liver disease cases. These sequences may help predict an individuals risk of developing advanced disease. Some genes where these sequences are located may also be good targets for future drug treatments. (C) 2020 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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  • 8.
    Anstee, Quentin M.
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Upon Tyne Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Darlay, Rebecca
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cockell, Simon
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Meroni, Marica
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Govaere, Olivier
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Tiniakos, Dina
    Newcastle Univ, England; Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Burt, Alastair D.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Univ Adelaide, Australia.
    Bedossa, Pierre
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Palmer, Jeremy
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Liu, Yang-Lin
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Aithal, Guruprasad P.
    Nottingham Univ Hosp NHS Trust, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allison, Michael
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Yki-Jarvinen, Hannele
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Vacca, Michele
    Cambridge Univ NHS Fdn Trust, England; Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Dufour, Jean-Francois
    Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Invernizzi, Pietro
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy; San Gerardo Hosp, Italy.
    Prati, Daniele
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Francque, Sven
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium.
    Petta, Salvatore
    Univ Palermo, Italy.
    Bugianesi, Elisabetta
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Clement, Karine
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Ratziu, Vlad
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Schattenberg, Jorn M.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Valenti, Luca
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Day, Christopher P.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Cordell, Heather J.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Daly, Ann K.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Correction: Genome-wide association study of non-alcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis in a histologically characterised cohort (vol 12, pg 505, 2020)2021In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 1274-1275Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Armandi, Angelo
    et al.
    Univ Turin, Italy; Univ Med Ctr, Germany.
    Sanavia, Tiziana
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Younes, Ramy
    Boehringer Ingelheim Int GmbH, Germany.
    Caviglia, Gian Paolo
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Rosso, Chiara
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Govaere, Olivier
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Liguori, Antonio
    Fdn Policlin Univ A Gemelli IRCCS, Italy; Fdn Policlin Univ A Gemelli IRCCS, Italy; Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Francione, Paolo
    Fdn IRCCS Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy.
    Gallego-Duran, Rocio
    Virgen Rocio Univ Hosp, Spain.
    Ampuero, Javier
    Virgen Rocio Univ Hosp, Spain.
    Pennisi, Grazia
    Univ Palermo, Italy.
    Aller, Rocio
    Hosp Clin Valladolid, Spain.
    Tiniakos, Dina
    Newcastle Univ, England; Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Burt, Alastair
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    David, Ezio
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Vecchio, Fabio
    Dipartimento Univ Med & Chirurg Traslazionale, Italy.
    Maggioni, Marco
    Ca Granda IRCCS Fdn, Italy.
    Cabibi, Daniela
    Univ Palermo, Italy.
    Mcleod, Duncan
    Westmead Hosp, Australia.
    Pareja, Maria Jesus
    Hosp Univ Valme, Spain.
    Zaki, Marco Y. W.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Minia Univ, Egypt.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Huddinge Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica
    Fdn IRCCS Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy; Univ Milan, Italy.
    Valenti, Luca
    Univ Milan, Italy; Fdn IRCCS Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin Milano, Italy.
    Grieco, Antonio
    Dipartimento Univ Med & Chirurg Traslazionale, Italy.
    Miele, Luca
    Fdn Policlin Univ A Gemelli IRCCS, Italy; Fdn Policlin Univ A Gemelli IRCCS, Italy; Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Fariselli, Piero
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Eslam, Mohammed
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Petta, Salvatore
    Univ Palermo, Italy.
    Hagstroem, Hannes
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Huddinge Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    George, Jacob
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Schattenberg, Joern M.
    Univ Med Ctr, Germany; Saarland Univ, Germany.
    Romero-Gomez, Manuel
    Virgen Rocio Univ Hosp, Spain.
    Anstee, Quentin Mark
    Newcastle Univ, England; Newcastle Tyne Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Bugianesi, Elisabetta
    Univ Turin, Italy.
    Serum ferritin levels can predict long-term outcomes in patients with metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease2024In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Hyperferritinaemia is associated with liver fibrosis severity in patients with metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD), but the longitudinal implications have not been thoroughly investigated. We assessed the role of serum ferritin in predicting long-term outcomes or death. Design We evaluated the relationship between baseline serum ferritin and longitudinal events in a multicentre cohort of 1342 patients. Four survival models considering ferritin with confounders or non-invasive scoring systems were applied with repeated five-fold cross-validation schema. Prediction performance was evaluated in terms of Harrell's C-index and its improvement by including ferritin as a covariate. Results Median follow-up time was 96 months. Liver-related events occurred in 7.7%, hepatocellular carcinoma in 1.9%, cardiovascular events in 10.9%, extrahepatic cancers in 8.3% and all-cause mortality in 5.8%. Hyperferritinaemia was associated with a 50% increased risk of liver-related events and 27% of all-cause mortality. A stepwise increase in baseline ferritin thresholds was associated with a statistical increase in C-index, ranging between 0.02 (lasso-penalised Cox regression) and 0.03 (ridge-penalised Cox regression); the risk of developing liver-related events mainly increased from threshold 215.5 mu g/L (median HR=1.71 and C-index=0.71) and the risk of overall mortality from threshold 272 mu g/L (median HR=1.49 and C-index=0.70). The inclusion of serum ferritin thresholds (215.5 mu g/L and 272 mu g/L) in predictive models increased the performance of Fibrosis-4 and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Fibrosis Score in the longitudinal risk assessment of liver-related events (C-indices>0.71) and overall mortality (C-indices>0.65). Conclusions This study supports the potential use of serum ferritin values for predicting the long-term prognosis of patients with MASLD.

  • 10.
    Balkhed, Wile
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Åberg, Fredrik O.
    Transplantation and Liver Surgery Clinic, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Repeated measurements of non-invasive fibrosis tests to monitor the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A long-term follow-up study2022In: Liver international (Print), ISSN 1478-3223, E-ISSN 1478-3231, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 1546-1556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: The presence of advanced hepatic fibrosis is the prime marker for the prediction of liver-related complications in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Blood-based non-invasive tests (NITs) have been developed to evaluate fibrosis and identify patients at risk. Current guidelines propose monitoring the progression of NAFLD using repeated NITs at 2-3-year intervals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of changes in NITs measured at two time points with the progression of NAFLD.

    Methods. We retrospectively included NAFLD patients with NIT measurements in whom the baseline hepatic fibrosis stage had been assessed by biopsy or transient elastography (TE). Subjects underwent follow-up visits at least 1 year from baseline to evaluate the progression of NAFLD. NAFLD progression was defined as the development of end-stage liver disease or fibrosis progression according to repeat biopsy or TE. The following NITs were calculated at baseline and follow-up: Fibrosis-4 (FIB-4), NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS), aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) and dynamic aspartate-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (dAAR).

    Results: One hundred and thirty-five patients were included with a mean follow-up of 12.6 +/- 8.5 years. During follow-up, 41 patients (30%) were diagnosed with progressive NAFLD. Change in NIT scores during follow-up was significantly associated with disease progression for all NITs tested except for NFS. However, the diagnostic precision was suboptimal with area under the receiver operating characteristics 0.56-0.64 and positive predictive values of 0.28-0.36 at sensitivity fixed at 90%.

    Conclusions: Change of FIB-4, NFS, APRI, and dAAR scores is only weakly associated with disease progression in NAFLD. Our findings do not support repeated measurements of these NITs for monitoring the course of NAFLD.

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  • 11.
    Berg, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Ericson, Ann-Charlott
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sjöstrand, Sven-Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology .
    Unique localization of eNOS-IR in human gastric mucosa.2000In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 5095-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Berg, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöstrand, Sven-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ericson, Ann-Charlott
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Morphological support for paracrine inhibition of gastric acid secretion by nitric oxide in humans2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 36, no 10, p. 1016-1021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Functional studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) inhibits gastric acid secretion in a variety of species, including man. We have performed a morphological study with the intention of localizing the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in the human gastric mucosa.

    Methods: Fifteen healthy subjects voluntarily participated in the study, and mucosal biopsies were obtained from the cardia, corpus and antrum. The presence and localization of eNOS were studied using immunohistochemical techniques.

    Results: eNOS-immunoreactivity (eNOS-IR) is found in surface mucous cells of cardia, corpus and antrum. Unique to the oxyntic mucosa is the presence of eNOS-IR in 'endocrine-like' cells, found in close contact with parietal cells.

    Conclusions: eNOS-IR cells in close apposition to parietal cells provide morphological support for paracrine inhibition of gastric acid secretion by NO.

  • 13.
    Bergquist, Annika
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; European Reference Network Hepatol Dis, Sweden.
    Weismüller, Tobias J.
    Univ Bonn, Germany.
    Levy, Cynthia
    Univ Miami, FL USA; Univ Miami, FL USA.
    Rupp, Christian
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Germany.
    Joshi, Deepak
    Kings Coll Hosp London, England.
    Nayagam, Jeremy Shanika
    Kings Coll Hosp London, England; Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Montano-Loza, Aldo J.
    Univ Alberta, Canada.
    Lytvyak, Ellina
    Univ Alberta, Canada.
    Wunsch, Ewa
    Med Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Milkiewicz, Piotr
    Med Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Zenouzi, Roman
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Schramm, Christoph
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Cazzagon, Nora
    Univ Padua, Italy; Univ Padua, Italy.
    Floreani, Annarosa
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Liby, Ingalill Friis
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Wiestler, Miriam
    Hannover Med Sch, Germany; European Reference Network Hepatol Dis, Germany.
    Wedemeyer, Heiner
    Hannover Med Sch, Germany; European Reference Network Hepatol Dis, Germany.
    Zhou, Taotao
    Univ Bonn, Germany.
    Strassburg, Christian P.
    Univ Bonn, Germany.
    Rigopoulou, Eirini
    Gen Univ Hosp Larissa, Greece.
    Dalekos, George
    Gen Univ Hosp Larissa, Greece.
    Narasimman, Manasa
    Univ Miami, FL USA.
    Verhelst, Xavier
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Degroote, Helena
    Univ Ghent, Belgium; European Reference Network Hepatol Dis, Belgium.
    Vesterhus, Mette
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway; Haraldsplass Deaconess Hosp, Norway.
    Kremer, Andreas E.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany; Univ Hosp Erlangen, Germany; Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Buendgens, Bennet
    Univ Duisburg, Germany.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skåne Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Jorgensen, Kristin Kaasen
    Akershus Univ Hosp, Norway.
    von Seth, Erik
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; European Reference Network Hepatol Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cornillet Jeannin, Martin
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Örebro Univ, Sweden.
    Martin, Harry
    Univ Coll Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Wiencke, Kristine
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Werner, Marten
    Umeå Univ, Sweden.
    Beretta-Piccoli, Benedetta Terziroli
    Univ Svizzera Italiana, Switzerland.
    Marzioni, Marco
    Univ Politecn Marche, Italy.
    Isoniemi, Helena
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Arola, Johanna
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Wefer, Agnes
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Soderling, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Farkkila, Martti
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Lenzen, Henrike
    Hannover Med Sch, Germany; European Reference Network Hepatol Dis, Hannover, Germany; Univ Duisburg, Univ Hosp Essen, Germany.
    The International PSC Study Group,
    Impact on follow-up strategies in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis2023In: Liver international (Print), ISSN 1478-3223, E-ISSN 1478-3231, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 127-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: Evidence for the benefit of scheduled imaging for early detection of hepatobiliary malignancies in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is limited. We aimed to compare different follow-up strategies in PSC with the hypothesis that regular imaging improves survival.

    Methods: We collected retrospective data from 2975 PSC patients from 27 centres. Patients were followed from the start of scheduled imaging or in case of clinical follow-up from 1 January 2000, until death or last clinical follow-up alive. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality.

    Results: A broad variety of different follow-up strategies were reported. All except one centre used regular imaging, ultrasound (US) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two centres used scheduled endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in addition to imaging for surveillance purposes. The overall HR (CI95%) for death, adjusted for sex, age and start year of follow-up, was 0.61 (0.47-0.80) for scheduled imaging with and without ERCP; 0.64 (0.48-0.86) for US/MRI and 0.53 (0.37-0.75) for follow-up strategies including scheduled ERCP. The lower risk of death remained for scheduled imaging with and without ERCP after adjustment for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) or high-grade dysplasia as a time-dependent covariate, HR 0.57 (0.44-0.75). Hepatobiliary malignancy was diagnosed in 175 (5.9%) of the patients at 7.9 years of follow-up. Asymptomatic patients (25%) with CCA had better survival if scheduled imaging had been performed.

    Conclusions: Follow-up strategies vary considerably across centres. Scheduled imaging was associated with improved survival. Multiple factors may contribute to this result including early tumour detection and increased endoscopic treatment of asymptomatic benign biliary strictures.

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  • 14.
    Bergram, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Åby.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Rådholm, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Kärna.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Low awareness of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with type 2 diabetes in Swedish Primary Health Care2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 60-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is more common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) compared to individuals without. Recent guidelines recommend screening for NAFLD in patients with T2DM. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of NAFLD in patients with T2DM in a Swedish primary health care setting, how they are cared for and assess the risk of biochemical signs of advanced fibrosis. Material and methods In this cohort study, patients with T2DM from five primary health care centers were included. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed and living habits, medical history, results of diagnostic imaging and anthropometric and biochemical features were noted in a standardized form. The risk of steatosis and advanced fibrosis was assessed using commonly used algorithms (FLI, HSI, NAFLD-LFS, NAFLD ridge score, FIB-4 and NFS). Results In total 350 patients were included. Diagnostic imaging had been performed in 132 patients and of these, 34 (26%) had steatosis, which was not noted in the medical records in 16 (47%) patients. One patient with steatosis had been referred to a hepatologist. Of assessable patients, 71-97% had a high to intermediate risk of steatosis and 29-65% had an intermediate to high risk of advanced fibrosis according to the algorithms used. Conclusion This study indicates a high prevalence of NAFLD among T2DM patients in Swedish primary care. Patients with known NAFLD were followed up to a very low extent. Using fibrosis algorithms in primary health care would result in many patients needing further assessment in secondary care.

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  • 15. Birgegård, G
    et al.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, GE: gastromed.
    Förbisett problem vid inflammatorisk tarmsjukdom: Blodbrist går oftast att behandla.2001In: Patientkanalen, ISSN 1403-7149, Vol. 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Blomdahl, Julia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with advanced fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and shows a synergistic effect with type 2 diabetes mellitus2021In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 115, article id 154439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. Whether moderate alcohol consumption plays a role for progression of NAFLD is disputed. Moreover, it is not known which tool is ideal for assessment of alcohol consumption in NAFLD. This study aimed to evaluate if moderate alcohol consumption assessed with different methods, including the biological marker phosphatidylethanol (PEth), is associated with advanced fibrosis in NAFLD. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. All participants were clinically evaluated with medical history, blood tests, and anthropometric measurements. Alcohol consumption was assessed using PEth in blood, the questionnaire AUDIT-C, and clinical interview. Findings: 86 patients were included of which 17% had advanced fibrosis. All participants reported alcohol consumption < 140 g/week. Average weekly alcohol consumption was higher in the group with advanced fibrosis. Moderate alcohol consumption, independently of the method of assessment, was associated with increased probability of advanced fibrosis (adjusted OR 5.5-9.7, 95% CI 1.05-69.6). Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) consuming moderate amounts of alcohol had a significantly higher rate of advanced fibrosis compared with those consuming low amounts (50.0-60.0% vs. 33-21.6%, p < 0.05). Conclusions: Moderate alcohol consumption, irrespective of assessment method (clinical interview, AUDIT-C, and PEth), was associated with advanced fibrosis. PEth in blood >= 50 ng/mL may be a biological marker indicating increased risk for advanced fibrosis in NAFLD. Patients with T2DM consuming moderate amounts of alcohol had the highest risk of advanced fibrosis, indicating a synergistic effect of insulin resistance and alcohol on the histopathological progression of NAFLD. (C) 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc.

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  • 17.
    Blomdahl, Julia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with significant fibrosis progression in NAFLD2023In: HEPATOLOGY COMMUNICATIONS, ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 7, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of moderate alcohol consumption on NAFLD histology is disputed. Assessment of alcohol consumption is commonly performed with interview or questionnaires. Phosphatidylethanol (PEth) in blood is a highly sensitive and specific alcohol biomarker, which only forms in the presence of ethanol. PEth has hitherto not been evaluated in longitudinal NAFLD studies. This study aimed to examine the impact of moderate alcohol consumption on histologic progression and evaluate the utility of PEth in NAFLD. NAFLD patients with serial biopsies were reviewed for inclusion in the study. At baseline, all patients reported alcohol consumption <140 g/week. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements were performed at baseline and follow-up. Alcohol consumption was assessed thoroughly at follow-up with clinical interview, the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) questionnaire, and analysis of PEth in whole blood. Eighty-two patients were included. Mean follow-up time was 17.2 years (SD & PLUSMN;6.0). Patients with significant fibrosis progression (defined as progression of & GE;2 stages or development of cirrhosis-related complications) reported higher alcohol consumption and had significantly higher PEth. Consumption >66-96 g/week (but <140 g) (i.e. moderate alcohol consumption) was associated with increased risk of significant fibrosis progression compared with no or low consumption. PEth & GE;48 ng/mL and binge drinking showed the highest risk for significant fibrosis progression (aOR: 5.9; 95% CI: 1.6-21.4) and aOR: 5.1; 95% CI: 1.4-18.1, respectively). NAFLD patients consuming moderate amounts of alcohol are at increased risk for significant fibrosis progression and development of cirrhosis-related complications. PEth is a potential biomarker to assess harmful alcohol consumption in NAFLD. Patients reporting moderate consumption or exhibiting PEth & GE;48 ng/mL should be advised to reduce alcohol consumption.

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  • 18.
    Bodemar, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Danielson, BG
    Treatment of anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease with iron sucrose2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 454-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-associated anaemia usually responds to intravenous iron. If not, additive treatment with erythropoietin has been proposed. The objective of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with iron sucrose alone. Methods: Sixty-one patients with IBD and anaemia (average haemoglobin 97 g/L) were treated with iron sucrose (iron dose 1.4 ± 0.5 g). The indications for iron sucrose were poor response and/or intolerance to oral iron. Treatment response was defined as an increase in haemoglobin of ≥20 g/L or to normal haemoglobin levels (>120 g/L). Two independent investigators retrospectively assessed laboratory variables, clinical findings, and concomitant medication. Results: Two patients were transferred to other hospitals after treatment and therefore could not be evaluated. Fifty-four of the remaining 59 patients (91%) responded within 12 weeks. Sixty percent of the patients had responded within 8 weeks. Five patients had no or only a partial response to iron sucrose of which three had prolonged gastrointestinal blood losses. Eight patients with normal or elevated levels of ferritin could be considered to have anaemia of chronic disease, and all of them responded to iron sucrose. During a follow-up period of 117 ± 85 (4-291) (mean ± s (standard deviation) (range)) weeks 19 patients (32%) needed at least one second course of iron sucrose because of recurrent disease. Conclusions: Anaemia associated with IBD can be successfully treated with intravenously administered iron sucrose, provided that bowel inflammation is treated adequately and enough iron is given. Treatment with iron sucrose is safe. Follow-up of haemoglobin and iron parameters to avoid further iron deficiency anaemia is recommended.

  • 19.
    Borssen, Åsa D.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Annika
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Weiland, Ola
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Verbaan, Hans
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Werner, Marten
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Histological improvement of liver fibrosis in well-treated patients with autoimmune hepatitis A cohort study2017In: Medicine, ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 34, article id e7708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic autoimmune liver disease that if left untreated may lead to the development of cirrhosis. Previous studies on AIH patients have suggested that fibrosis and even cirrhosis can be reversed by medical treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of medical treatment for protection of developing fibrosis and cirrhosis. A total of 258 liver biopsies from 101 patients (72 women, 29 men) were analyzed by a single pathologist and classified according to the Ishak grading (inflammation) and staging (fibrosis) system. Liver histology was stratified according to the temporal changes of fibrosis stage (increased, decreased, or stable), and groups were compared. Complete or partial response to medical treatment was 94.9%. Reduction of fibrosis stage from the first to the last biopsy was seen in 63 patients (62.4%). We found an association between a reduction in the fibrosis stage and continuous glucocorticoid medication, as well as lowered scores of inflammation at last biopsy. Twenty-one patients had cirrhosis (Ishak stage 6) at least in one of the previous biopsies, but only 5 patients at the last biopsy. Histological improvement is common in AIH patients that respond to medical treatment, and a reduction or stabilization of fibrosis stage occurs in about 2/3 of such patients.

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  • 20.
    Boström, E A
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sjöwall, Christoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Bokarewa, M I
    University of Gothenburg.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Resistin is Associated with Breach of Tolerance and Anti-nuclear Antibodies in Patients with Hepatobiliary Inflammation2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 463-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resistin is a cysteine-rich protein, which is abundantly expressed at the site of inflammation, and acts as a regulator of the NF-kB-dependent cytokine cascade. The aim of this study was to evaluate resistin levels in relation to inflammatory mediators, disease phenotype and autoantibody status in a spectrum of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. Resistin levels were measured with an ELISA in sera originated from 227 patients and 40 healthy controls (HC). Fifty patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), 53 ulcerative colitis (UC), 51 Crohns disease (CD), 46 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and 27 primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) were included. The sera were analysed with respect to biochemical parameters of systemic inflammation and liver function and to the presence of antibodies to nuclear antigens (ANA), mitochondria (AMA) and smooth muscle (SMA). Compared with HC, resistin levels were raised in AIH (P = 0.017) and PSC (P = 0.03); compared with NAFLD, levels were elevated in CD (P = 0.041), AIH (P andlt; 0.001) and PSC (P andlt; 0.001). Patients with elevated levels of resistin were more often treated with corticosteroids, but no difference was found between active disease and clinical remission. Resistin levels were significantly higher in ANA-positive individuals compared with ANA-negative (P = 0.025). Resistin levels were directly correlated with IL-6 (r = 0.30, P = 0.02) and IL-8 (r = 0.51, P andlt; 0.001). Elevated levels of resistin were prominent in patients with hepatobiliary inflammation and were associated with breach of self-tolerance, i.e. ANA positivity. Thus, we propose that resistin may be an important marker of disease severity in autoantibody-mediated gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases.

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  • 21.
    Botella, S
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Div Cell Biol, Dept Biomed & Surg, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ericson, A
    Sjostrand, S
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    H-pylori infection is associated with increased expression of capsaicin receptors in gastric epithelial cells2002In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 51, p. 414-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Boursier, Jerome
    et al.
    Ctr Hosp Univ Angers, France; Univ Angers, France.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Moreau, Clemence
    Univ Angers, France.
    Bonacci, Martin
    Intercept Pharmaceut, England; Intercept Pharmaceut Inc, NY USA.
    Cure, Sandrine
    Intercept Pharmaceut, England; Intercept Pharmaceut Inc, NY USA.
    Ampuero, Javier
    Univ Seville, Spain.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Tallab, Lilian
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Canivet, Clemence M.
    Ctr Hosp Univ Angers, France; Univ Angers, France.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Sanchez, Yolanda
    Univ Seville, Spain.
    Dincuff, Eloise
    Ctr Hosp Univ Angers, France.
    Lucena, Ana
    Univ Seville, Spain.
    Roux, Marine
    Univ Angers, France.
    Riou, Jeremie
    Univ Angers, France.
    Trylesinski, Aldo
    Intercept Pharmaceut, England; Intercept Pharmaceut Inc, NY USA.
    Romero-Gomez, Manuel
    Univ Seville, Spain.
    Non-invasive tests accurately stratify patients with NAFLD based on their risk of liver-related events2022In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 1013-1020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: Previous studies on the prognostic significance of non-invasive liver fibrosis tests in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) lack direct comparison to liver biopsy. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic accuracy of fibrosis-4 (FIB4) and vibration-controlled transient elastography (VCTE), compared to liver biopsy, for the prediction of liver-related events (LREs) in NAFLD. Methods: A total of 1,057 patients with NAFLD and baseline FIB4 and VCTE were included in a multicenter cohort. Of these patients, 594 also had a baseline liver biopsy. The main study outcome during follow-up was occurrence of LREs, a composite endpoint combining cirrhosis complications and/or hepatocellular carcinoma. Discriminative ability was evaluated using Harrells C-index. Results: FIB4 and VCTE showed good accuracy for the prediction of LREs, with Harrells C-indexes >0.80 (0.817 [0.768-0.866] vs. 0.878 [0.835-0.921], respectively, p = 0.059). In the biopsy subgroup, Harrells C-indexes of histological fibrosis staging and VCTE were not significantly different (0.932 [0.910-0.955] vs. 0.881 [0.832-0.931], respectively, p = 0.164), while both significantly outperformed FIB4 for the prediction of LREs. FIB4 and VCTE were independent predictors of LREs in the whole study cohort. The stepwise FIB4-VCTE algorithm accurately stratified the risk of LREs: compared to patients with "FIB4 <1.30", those with "FIB4 >- 1.30 then VCTE <8.0 kPa" had similar risk of LREs (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.3; 95% CI 0.3-6.8), whereas the risk of LREs significantly increased in patients with "FIB4 >1.30 then VCTE 8.0-12.0 kPa" (aHR 3.8; 95% CI 1.3-10.9), and even more for those with "FIB4 >-1.30 then VCTE >12.0 kPa" (aHR 12.4; 95% CI 5.1- 30.2). Conclusion: VCTE and FIB4 accurately stratify patients with NAFLD based on their risk of LREs. These non-invasive tests are alternatives to liver biopsy for the identification of patients in need of specialized management. Lay summary: The amount of fibrosis in the liver is closely associated with the risk of liver-related complications in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Liver biopsy currently remains the reference standard for the evaluation of fibrosis, but its application is limited by its invasiveness. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of non-invasive liver fibrosis tests to predict liver-related complications in NAFLD. Our results show that the blood test FIB4 and transient elastography stratify the risk of liver-related complications in NAFLD, and that transient elastography has similar prognostic accuracy as liver biopsy. These results support the use of non-invasive liver fibrosis tests instead of liver biopsy for the management of patients with NAFLD.(C) 2022 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 23.
    Buzzetti, Elena
    et al.
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Hall, Andrew
    Royal Free Hosp, England; Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Manuguerra, Roberta
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Misas, Marta Guerrero
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Covelli, Claudia
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Leandro, Gioacchino
    S de Bellis Res Hosp, Italy.
    Luong, TuVinh
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Manesis, Emanuel K.
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Pinzani, Massimo
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Dhillon, Amar P.
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A.
    Royal Free Hosp, England; UCL, England.
    Collagen proportionate area is an independent predictor of long-term outcome in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2019In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 1214-1222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Collagen proportionate area (CPA) measurement is a technique that quantifies fibrous tissue in liver biopsies by measuring the amount of collagen deposition as a proportion of the total biopsy area. CPA predicts clinical outcomes in patients with HCV and can sub-classify cirrhosis. Aim To test the ability of CPA to quantify fibrosis and predict clinical outcomes in patients with NAFLD. Methods We assessed consecutive patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD from three European centres. Clinical and laboratory data were collected at baseline and at the time of the last clinical follow-up or death. CPA was performed at two different objective magnifications, whole biopsy macro and x4 objective magnification, named standard (SM) and high (HM) magnification respectively. The correlation between CPA and liver stiffness was assessed in a sub-group of patients. Results Of 437 patients, 32 (7.3%) decompensated and/or died from liver-related causes during a median follow-up of 103 months. CPA correlated with liver stiffness and liver fibrosis stage across the whole spectrum of fibrosis. HM CPA was significantly higher than SM CPA in stages F0-F3 but similar in cirrhosis, reflecting a higher ability to capture pericellular/perisinusoidal fibrosis at early stages. Age at baseline (HR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01-1.08), HM CPA (HR: 1.04 per 1% increase, 95% CI: 1.01-1.08) and presence of advanced fibrosis (HR: 15.4, 95% CI: 5.02-47.84) were independent predictors of liver-related clinical outcomes at standard and competing risk multivariate Cox-regression analysis. Conclusions CPA accurately measures fibrosis and is an independent predictor of clinical outcomes in NAFLD; hence it merits further evaluation as a surrogate endpoint in clinical trials.

  • 24.
    Chaireti, Roza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Coagulat Unit, Div Haematol, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rajani, Rupesh
    Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Annika
    Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Melin, Tor
    Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Friis-Liby, Inga-Lill
    Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kapraali, Marjo
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences Danderyd Hospital, Division of Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lindahl, Tomas L.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Almer, Sven
    Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Solna, Sweden.
    Increased thrombin generation in splanchnic vein thrombosis is related to the presence of liver cirrhosis and not to the thrombotic event2014In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 134, no 2, p. 455-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In recent years there have been increasing evidence associating liver disease with hypercoagulability, rather than bleeding.

    Aims: To evaluate the haemostatic potential in patients with liver disease.

    Methods: We measured thrombin generation in the presence and absence of thrombomodulin in patients with portal vein thrombosis (PVT, n=47), Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS, n=15) and cirrhosis (n=24) and compared the results to those obtained from healthy controls (n=21). Fifteen patients with PVT and 10 patients with BCS were treated with warfarin and were compared with an equal number of patients with atrial fibrillation matched for prothrombin time-international normalized ratio. We assessed resistance to thrombomodulin by using ratios [marker measured in the presence]/[marker measured in the absence of thrombomodulin].

    Results: There were no differences between patients with BCS, patients on warfarin treatment and controls. Cirrhotic patients generated more thrombin in the presence of thrombomodulin and exhibited thrombomodulin resistance compared with controls [p=0.006 for endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) and p<0.001 for peak thrombin. P<0.001 for both ratios ETP and peak] and patients with non-cirrhotic PVT (p=0.001, p=0.006, p<0.001, p<0.001 for ETP, peak, ratio ETP, ratio peak). The patients with cirrhotic PVT exhibited higher ETP (p=0.044) and peak (p=0.02) in the presence of thrombomodulin than controls, as well as thrombomodulin resistance (ETP ratio: p=0.001, peak ratio: p=0.001).

    Conclusions: Hypercoagulability and thrombomodulin resistance in patients with cirrhosis were independent of the presence of splanchnic vein thrombosis. The hypercoagulability in patients with cirrhotic PVT could have implications for considering longer treatment with anticoagulants in this group.

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  • 25.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kechagias, StergiosLinköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.Stenke, LeifKarolinska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Internmedicin2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Internmedicin beskriver uppkomstmekanismer, förlopp och medicinsk handläggning av den stora grupp sjukdomar som involverar kroppens centrala organsystem, inklusive hjärta-lungor-cirkulation, mage-tarm-lever, benmärg-blod, njurar, rörelseorgan och hormonsekretion.

    Internmedicin utkom första gången 1978 och har sedan dess varit en uppskattad kunskapskälla för medicinstuderande under hela utbildningen liksom en oumbärlig uppslagsbok för kliniskt verksamma läkare. I denna sjätte reviderade upplaga är en majoritet av kapitlen nyskrivna eller grundligt uppdaterade. Som tidigare utgörs författarlistan av Sveriges ledande kliniska specialister och forskare inom sina respektive områden. Varje sjukdomstillstånd beskrivs detaljerat med uppgifter om bland annat etiologi, symtom, utredning och behandling. Framställningen är rikt illustrerad, och i varje kapitel belyser man den centrala handläggningen med kliniska patientfall.

  • 26.
    Danielsson Borssen, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Annika
    Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Weiland, Ola
    Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Verbaan, Hans
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Werner, Marten
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Epidemiology and causes of death in a Swedish cohort of patients with autoimmune hepatitis2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 1022-1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidemiological studies of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) show varying figures on prevalence and incidence, and data on the long-term prognosis are scarce.Objective To investigate the epidemiology, long-term prognosis and causes of death in a Swedish AIH cohort.Material and methods: Data collected from 634 AIH patients were matched to the Cause of Death Registry, and survival analyses were made. Prevalence and incidence were calculated for university hospitals with full coverage of cases and compared to the County of Vasterbotten in Northern Sweden.Results: AIH point prevalence was 17.3/100,000 inhabitants in 2009, and the yearly incidence 1990-2009 was 1.2/100,000 inhabitants and year. The time between diagnosis and end of follow-up, liver transplantation or death was in median 11.3 years (range 0-51.5 years). Men were diagnosed earlier (pamp;lt;.001) and died younger than women (p=.002). No gender differences were found concerning transplant-free, overall survival and liver-related death. Cirrhosis at diagnosis was linked to an inferior survival (pamp;lt;.001). Liver-related death was the most common cause of death (32.7%). The relative survival started to diverge from the general population 4 years after diagnosis but a distinct decline was not observed until after more than 10 years.Conclusions: Long-term survival was reduced in patients with AIH. No gender difference regarding prognosis was seen but men died younger, probably as a result of earlier onset of disease. Cirrhosis at diagnosis was a risk factor for poor prognosis and the overall risk of liver-related death was increased.

  • 27.
    Dulai, Parambir S
    et al.
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA..
    Singh, Siddharth
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
    Patel, Janki
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
    Soni, Meera
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
    Prokop, Larry J
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
    Younossi, Zobair
    Department of Medicine, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA.
    Sebastiani, Giada
    McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wong, Vincent Wai-Sun
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Loomba, Rohit
    University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
    Increased risk of mortality by fibrosis stage in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.2017In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 65, no 5, p. 1557-1565Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Liver fibrosis is the most important predictor of mortality in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Quantitative risk of mortality by fibrosis stage has not been systematically evaluated. We aimed to quantify the fibrosis stage-specific risk of all-cause and liver-related mortality in NAFLD.

    METHODS: Through a systematic review and meta-analysis, we identified 5 adult NAFLD cohort studies reporting fibrosis stage specific mortality (0-4). Using fibrosis stage 0 as a reference population, fibrosis stage-specific mortality rate ratios (MRR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), for all-cause and liver-related mortality, were estimated. The study is reported according to the PRISMA statement.

    RESULTS: 1,495 NAFLD patients with 17,452 patient years of follow-up were included. Compared to NAFLD patients with no fibrosis (stage 0), NAFLD patients with fibrosis were at an increased risk for all-cause mortality and this risk increased with increase in the stage of fibrosis: stage 1, MRR, 1.58 (95% CI 1.19-2.11); stage 2, MRR, 2.52 (95% CI 1.85-3.42); stage 3, MRR, 3.48 (95% CI 2.51-4.83), and stage 4, MRR, 6.40 (95% CI 4.11-9.95). The results were more pronounced as the risk of liver-related mortality increased exponentially with increase in the stage of fibrosis: stage 1, MRR, 1.41 (95% CI 0.17-11.95); stage 2, MRR, 9.57 (95% CI 1.67-54.93); stage 3, MRR, 16.69 (95% CI 2.92-95.36); and stage 4, MRR, 42.30 (95% CI 3.51-510.34).

    LIMITATIONS: Inability to adjust for co-morbid conditions or demographics known to impact fibrosis progression in NAFLD, and the inclusion of patients with simple steatosis and NASH without fibrosis in the reference comparison group.

    CONCLUSION: The risk of liver-related mortality increases exponentially with increase in fibrosis stage. These data have important implications in assessing utility of each stage and benefits of regression of fibrosis from one stage to another. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 28.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Department of Histopathology and Cytology, Aleris Medilab, Täby, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Alcohol consumption is associated with progression of hepatic fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Moderate alcohol consumption has been reported to be inversely associated with cardiovascular disease and total mortality. The importance of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing and many NAFLD patients suffer from cardiovascular disease. In these patients, moderate alcohol consumption could be beneficial. The aim of this study was to investigate whether low alcohol intake, consistent with the diagnosis of NAFLD, is associated with fibrosis progression in established NAFLD.

    Material and methods: Seventy-one patients originally referred because of chronically elevated liver enzymes and diagnosed with biopsy-proven NAFLD were re-evaluated. A validated questionnaire combined with an oral interview was used to assess weekly alcohol consumption and the frequency of episodic drinking. Significant fibrosis progression in NAFLD was defined as progression of more than one fibrosis stage or development of endstage liver disease during follow-up.

    Results: Mean follow-up (SD) was 13.8 (1.2) years between liver biopsies. At follow-up, 17 patients (24%) fulfilled the criteria for significant fibrosis progression. The proportion of patients reporting heavy episodic drinking at least once a month was higher among those with significant fibrosis progression (p=0.003) and a trend towards higher weekly alcohol consumption was also seen (p=0.061). In a multivariate binary logistic regression analysis, heavy episodic drinking (p0.001) and insulin resistance (p0.01) were independently associated with significant fibrosis progression.

    Conclusions: Moderate alcohol consumption, consistent with the diagnosis of NAFLD to be set, is associated with fibrosis progression in NAFLD. These patients should be advised to refrain from heavy episodic drinking.

  • 29.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L.
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    The clinical relevance of the Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score (NAS) in predicting fibrosis progression2008Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The NAFLD activity score (NAS) is a newly proposed system to grade the necroinflammatory activity in liver biopsies of NAFLD patients. This study evaluates the usefulness of the NAS in predicting clinical deterioration and fibrosis progression in NAFLD.

    Methods: One hundred and twenty-nine patients with biopsy proven NAFLD were included in a long-term histological follow-up study. Clinical and histological course were compared between NASH, “borderline NASH”, and “not NASH” patients. Significant fibrosis progression in NAFLD was defined as progression of more than one fibrosis stage or development of end-stage liver disease during follow-up.

    Results: Eighty-eight patients accepted re-evaluation and 68 underwent repeat liver biopsy. Mean time between biopsies was 13.8 ± 1.2 years (range 10.3-16.3). At baseline, NASH was diagnosed in 2 (1.6%) patients, and at follow-up, in 1 (1.5%) patient. A trend towards higher baseline NAS was seen in patients (n = 7) that developed end-stage liver disease (3.1 ± 0.9 vs. 2.4 ± 1.0; P = 0.062). Baseline NAS was significantly higher in patients with progressive fibrosis (2.9 ± 0.9 vs. 2.2 ± 0.9; P = 0.017), and NAS was independently associated with significant fibrosis progression tested in a multivariate analysis (P = 0.023). However, 18% of patients without NASH progressed significantly in fibrosis stage.

    Conclusion: Although the NAS is independently associated with future risk of progressive fibrosis in NAFLD, the clinical usefulness of the score is limited due to the significant overlap in clinical development between NAS-score groups.

  • 30.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Statins in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and chronically elevated liver enzymes: a histopathological follow-up study.2007In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 135-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: The effect of statins on hepatic histology in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not known. This study explores hepatic histology in NAFLD patients before and after initiation of statin therapy and compares histological outcome with NAFLD patients who had not been prescribed statins.

    Methods: Sixty-eight NAFLD patients were re-evaluated. Follow-up ranged from 10.3 to 16.3 years. Subjects were clinically investigated and a repeat liver biopsy was obtained. No patient was taking statins at baseline while 17 patients were treated with statins at follow-up.

    Results: At baseline, patients that later were prescribed statins had significantly higher BMI and more pronounced hepatic steatosis. At follow-up patients on medication with statins continued to have significantly higher BMI. Diabetes was significantly more common among patients on medication with statins and they had significantly more pronounced insulin resistance. However, they exhibited a significant reduction of liver steatosis at follow-up as opposed to patients not taking statins. Despite exhibiting a high risk profile for progression of liver fibrosis, only four patients on statin treatment progressed in fibrosis stage.

    Conclusions: Statins can be prescribed in patients with elevated liver enzymes because of NAFLD.

  • 31.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Aleris Medilab, Täby.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L
    County Hospital, Oskarshamn.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Low clinical relevance of the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (NAS) in predicting fibrosis progression2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 108-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims. The nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) activity score (NAS) is a newly proposed system to grade the necroinflammatory activity in liver biopsies of NAFLD patients. This study evaluates the usefulness of the NAS in predicting clinical deterioration and fibrosis progression in NAFLD. Methods. One hundred and twenty-nine patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD were included in a long-term histological follow-up study. Clinical course and change in fibrosis stage were compared between nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), “borderline NASH,” and “not NASH” patients. Significant fibrosis progression was defined as progression of more than one fibrosis stage or development of end-stage liver disease during follow-up. Results. Eighty-eight patients accepted reevaluation and 68 underwent repeat liver biopsy. Mean time between biopsies was 13.8 ± 1.2 years (range 10.3–16.3). At baseline, NASH was diagnosed in 2 (1.6%) patients, and at follow-up, in 1 (1.5%) patient. A trend toward higher baseline NAS was seen in patients (n = 7) who developed end-stage liver disease (3.1 ± 0.9 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0; p = 0.050). Baseline NAS was associated with progressive disease in a univariate binary logistic regression analysis (p = 0.024), but no difference was seen in the multivariate analysis including the NAS, portal inflammation, and perisinusoidal fibrosis. Moreover, 18% of patients without NASH progressed significantly in fibrosis stage. Conclusions. The ability of the NAS to predict progression of NAFLD is poor. The clinical usefulness of the score is limited due to the significant overlap in clinical development between NAS score groups. To use the NAS as endpoint in treatment trial is not justified.

  • 32.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden;.
    Thorelius, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Long-term follow-up of patients with NAFLD and elevated liver enzymes.2006In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 865-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of elevated liver enzymes in patients of developed countries. We determined the long-term clinical and histological courses of such patients. In a cohort study, 129 consecutively enrolled patients diagnosed with biopsy-proven NAFLD were reevaluated. Survival and causes of death were compared with a matched reference population. Living NAFLD patients were offered repeat liver biopsy and clinical and biochemical investigation. Mean follow-up (SD) was 13.7 (1.3) years. Mortality was not increased in patients with steatosis. Survival of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was reduced (P = .01). These subjects more often died from cardiovascular (P = .04) and liver-related (P = .04) causes. Seven patients (5.4%) developed end-stage liver disease, including 3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The absence of periportal fibrosis at baseline had a negative predictive value of 100% in predicting liver-related complications. At follow-up, 69 of 88 patients had diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. Progression of liver fibrosis occurred in 41%. These subjects more often had a weight gain exceeding 5 kg (P = .02), they were more insulin resistant (P = .04), and they exhibited more pronounced hepatic fatty infiltration (P = .03) at follow-up. In conclusion, NAFLD with elevated liver enzymes is associated with a clinically significant risk of developing end-stage liver disease. Survival is lower in patients with NASH. Most NAFLD patients will develop diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance in the long term. Progression of liver fibrosis is associated with more pronounced insulin resistance and significant weight gain.

  • 33.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hagström, Hannes
    Unit of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stal, Per
    Unit of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Unit of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score and Mortality: Imperfect But Not Insignificant REPLY2016In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 310-311Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hagström, Hannes
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stål, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fibrosis stage is the strongest predictor for disease-specific mortality in NAFLD after up to 33 years of follow-up2015In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 1547-1554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and rationale for the study: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, strongly associated with insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, i.e. fatty liver accompanied by necroinflammatory changes, is mostly defined by the NAFLD activity score (NAS). The aim of the current study was to determine disease-specific mortality in NAFLD, and evaluate the NAS and fibrosis stage as prognostic markers for overall and disease-specific mortality. Methods: In a cohort study, data from 229 well-characterized patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD were collected. Mean follow-up was 26.4 (± 5.6, range 6-33) years. A reference population was obtained from the National Registry of Population, and information on time and cause of death were obtained from the Registry of Causes of Death. Main results: NAFLD patients had an increased mortality compared with the reference population (HR 1.29, CI 1.04-1.59, p=0.020), with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (HR 1.55, CI 1.11-2.15, p=0.01), hepatocellular carcinoma (HR 6.55, CI 2.14-20.03, p=0.001), infectious disease (HR 2.71, CI 1.02-7.26, p=0.046), and cirrhosis (HR 3.2, CI 1.05-9.81, p=0.041). Overall mortality was not increased in patients with NAS 5-8 and fibrosis stage 0-2 (HR 1.41, CI 0.97-2.06, p=0.07), whereas patients with fibrosis stage 3-4, irrespective of NAS, had increased mortality (HR 3.3, CI 2.27-4.76, p<0.001). Conclusions: NAFLD patients have increased risk of death, with a high risk of death from cardiovascular disease and liver-related disease. The NAS was not able to predict overall mortality, whereas fibrosis stage predicted both overall and disease-specific mortality.

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  • 35.
    Ericson, Ann-Charlott
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Öqvist, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Sjöstrand, Sven-Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Morphological examination of the termination pattern of substance P-immunoreactive nerve fibers in human antral mucosa2002In: Regulatory Peptides, ISSN 0167-0115, E-ISSN 1873-1686, Vol. 107, no 1-3, p. 79-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The termination pattern of substance P (SP)-containing axons in human antral mucosa was examined using immunohistochemical techniques at the light and electron microscopic level. SP-immunoreactive (IR) axons were found to extend towards the pit region of the glands, where intraepithelial axons were observed. Electron microscopy showed immunostained axon profiles in close contact with the basement membrane of surface mucous cells. Membrane-to-membrane contacts between labeled axons and myofibroblast-like cells were identified, and SP-IR axons that were apposed to the epithelium were also in contact with subjacent myofibroblast-like cells. The anatomical relationship between SP-IR axons and the cells of the muscularis mucosae was investigated by light microscopy. Immunoreactivity for a-smooth muscle actin (a-sma) was used to visualize the smooth muscle cells, and the a-sma-IR cells were found to create a network that surrounded the gastric glands. Immunostained varicose axons ran alongside and in close apposition to the labeled muscle strands. Ultrastructural examination showed close contacts between SP-IR axon profiles and smooth muscle-like cells. In conclusion, SP-containing neurons may be important for sensory and secretomotor functions in the human antral mucosa.

  • 36.
    Ericson, Ann-Charlott
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nur, E Mohammed
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Petersson, F
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    The Effects of Capsaicin on Gastrin Secretion in Isolated Human Antral Glands: Before and After Ingestion of Red Chilli2009In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 491-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Capsaicin is known to have regulatory effects on gastrointestinal functions via the vanilloid receptor (VR1). We reported previously that endocrine-like cells in the human antrum express VR1.

    Aim: To identify VR1-expressing endocrine-like cells in human antral glands and to examine whether stimulation with capsaicin causes release of gastrin, somatostatin, and serotonin. Further, to investigate the effects of a chilli-rich diet.

    Methods: Gastroscopic biopsies were received from 11 volunteers. Seven of the 11 subjects agreed to donor gastric biopsies a second time after a 3-week chilli-rich diet containing 1.4-4.2 mg capsaicin/day. VR1-immunoreactive cells were identified by double-staining immunohistochemistry against gastrin, somatostatin, and serotonin. For the stimulation studies, we used an in vitro method where antral glands in suspension were stimulated with 0.01 mM capsaicin and physiological buffer was added to the control vials. The concentrations of secreted hormones were detected and calculated with radioimmunoassay (RIA).

    Results: The light microscopic examination revealed that VR1 was localized in gastrin cells. The secretory studies showed an increase in release of gastrin and somatostatin compared to the control vials (P = 0.003; P = 0.013). Capsaicin-stimulation caused a consistent raise of the gastrin concentrations in the gland preparations from all subjects. A chilli-rich diet had an inhibitory effect on gastrin release upon stimulation compared to the results that were obtained before the start of the diet.

    Conclusion: This study shows that capsaicin stimulates gastrin secretion from isolated human antral glands, and that a chilli-rich diet decreases this secretion.

  • 37.
    Ericson, Elke
    et al.
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Bergenholm, Linnea
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Anne-Christine
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Dix, Carly I
    AstraZeneca, England.
    Knöchel, Jane
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Hansson, Sara F.
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Lee, Richard
    Ionis Pharmaceut, CA USA; Verve Therapeut, MA USA.
    Schumi, Jennifer
    AstraZeneca, MD USA.
    Antonsson, Madeleine
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Fjellström, Ola
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Liljeblad, Mathias
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Björn
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Linden, Daniel
    AstraZeneca, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Hepatic patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 levels are increased in I148M risk allele carriers and correlate with NAFLD in humans2022In: Hepatology Communications, ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 6, no 10, p. 2689-2701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) rs738409 variant is a contributor. In mice, the Pnpla3 148M variant accumulates on lipid droplets and probably leads to sequestration of a lipase cofactor leading to impaired mobilization of triglycerides. To advance our understanding of the localization and abundance of PNPLA3 protein in humans, we used liver biopsies from patients with NAFLD to investigate the link to NAFLD and the PNPLA3 148M genotype. We experimentally qualified an antibody against human PNPLA3. Hepatic PNPLA3 protein fractional area and localization were determined by immunohistochemistry in biopsies from a well-characterized NAFLD cohort of 67 patients. Potential differences in hepatic PNPLA3 protein levels among patients related to degree of steatosis, lobular inflammation, ballooning, and fibrosis, and PNPLA3 I148M gene variants were assessed. Immunohistochemistry staining in biopsies from patients with NAFLD showed that hepatic PNPLA3 protein was predominantly localized to the membranes of small and large lipid droplets in hepatocytes. PNPLA3 protein levels correlated strongly with steatosis grade (p = 0.000027) and were also significantly higher in patients with lobular inflammation (p = 0.009), ballooning (p = 0.022), and significant fibrosis (stage 2-4, p = 0.014). In addition, PNPLA3 levels were higher in PNPLA3 rs738409 148M (CG, GG) risk allele carriers compared to 148I (CC) nonrisk allele carriers (p = 0.0029). Conclusion: PNPLA3 protein levels were associated with increased hepatic lipid content and disease severity in patients with NAFLD and were higher in PNPLA3 rs738409 (148M) risk allele carriers. Our hypothesis that increased hepatic levels of PNPLA3 may be part of the pathophysiological mechanism of NAFLD is supported.

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  • 38.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andregård, O.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prospective evaluation of liver steatosis comparing stereological point-counting biopsy analysis and 1H MRS2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Forsgren, Mikael F
    et al.
    Linköping University. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    On the Evaluation of 31P MRS Human Liver Protocols2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Forsgren, Mikael F
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Sinkus, Ralph
    King's College London, United Kingdom.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Biomarkers of liver fibrosis: prospective comparison of multimodal magnetic resonance, serum algorithms and transient elastography.2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 55, no 7, p. 848-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Accurate biomarkers for quantifying liver fibrosis are important for clinical practice and trial end-points. We compared the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including gadoxetate-enhanced MRI and 31P-MR spectroscopy, with fibrosis stage and serum fibrosis algorithms in a clinical setting. Also, in a subset of patients, MR- and transient elastography (MRE and TE) was evaluated when available.

    METHODS: Patients were recruited prospectively if they were scheduled to undergo liver biopsy on a clinical indication due to elevated liver enzyme levels without decompensated cirrhosis. Within a month of the clinical work-up, an MR-examination and liver needle biopsy were performed on the same day. Based on late-phase gadoxetate-enhanced MRI, a mathematical model calculated hepatobiliary function (relating to OATP1 and MRP2). The hepatocyte gadoxetate uptake rate (KHep) and the normalised liver-to-spleen contrast ratio (LSC_N10) were also calculated. Nine serum fibrosis algorithms were investigated (GUCI, King's Score, APRI, FIB-4, Lok-Index, NIKEI, NASH-CRN regression score, Forns' score, and NAFLD-fibrosis score).

    RESULTS: The diagnostic performance (AUROC) for identification of significant fibrosis (F2-4) was 0.78, 0.80, 0.69, and 0.78 for MRE, TE, LSC_N10, and GUCI, respectively. For the identification of advanced fibrosis (F3-4), the AUROCs were 0.93, 0.84, 0.81, and 0.82 respectively.

    CONCLUSION: MRE and TE were superior for non-invasive identification of significant fibrosis. Serum fibrosis algorithms developed for specific liver diseases are applicable in this cohort of diverse liver diseases aetiologies. Gadoxetate-MRI was sufficiently sensitive to detect the low function losses associated with fibrosis. None was able to efficiently distinguish between stages within the low fibrosis stages.Lay summaryExcessive accumulation of scar tissue, fibrosis, in the liver is an important aspect in chronic liver disease. To replace the invasive needle biopsy, we have explored non-invasive methods to assess liver fibrosis. In our study we found that elastographic methods, which assess the mechanical properties of the liver, are superior in assessing fibrosis in a clinical setting. Of interest from a clinical trial point-of-view, none of the tested methods was sufficiently accurate to distinguish between adjacent moderate fibrosis stages.

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  • 41.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort2019In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, Vol. 15, no 6, article id e1007157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimation of liver function is important to monitor progression of chronic liver disease (CLD). A promising method is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with gadoxetate, a liver-specific contrast agent. For this method, we have previously developed a model for an average healthy human. Herein, we extended this model, by combining it with a patient-specific non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with CLD of varying severity and etiologies. The model explained all MRI data and adequately predicted both timepoints saved for validation and gadoxetate concentrations in both plasma and biopsies. The validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function vary across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate. These mechanisms are shared across many liver functions and can now be estimated from standard clinical images.

    Author summary

    Being able to accurately and reliably estimate liver function is important when monitoring the progression of patients with liver disease, as well as when identifying drug-induced liver injury during drug development. A promising method for quantifying liver function is to use magnetic resonance imaging combined with gadoxetate. Gadoxetate is a liver-specific contrast agent, which is taken up by the hepatocytes and excreted into the bile. We have previously developed a mechanistic model for gadoxetate dynamics using averaged data from healthy volunteers. In this work, we extended our model with a non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework to give patient-specific estimates of the gadoxetate transport-rates. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with liver disease, covering a range of severity and etiologies. All patients underwent an MRI-examination and provided both blood and liver biopsies. Our validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function varies across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate.

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    Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort
  • 42.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Comparing 2D and 3D Magnetic Resonance Elastography Techniques in a Clinical Setting: Initial Experiences2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: It has been shown that liver fibrosis, and even cirrhosis, may be reversible in humans. For this reason there is a great need for the imminent introduction of non-invasive and clinically useful methods in order to monitor fibrosis in patients [1, 2]. A body of evidence points to the fact that MRE is a highly useful candidate towards this end [3]. However, before using such techniques more widely, it is important to verify that comparable physical measures are provided by alternative and clinically relevant MRE approaches. The aim of this pilot study was to compare 2D and 3D MRE, also known as MR Rheology, using a commercially available 2D system, with an acoustic transducer, and 3D MRE research system, with an electromagnetic transducer, with respect to liver stiffness and elasticity in patients with diffuse or suspected diffuse liver disease. Materials and Methods: Seven patients, referred to our hospital for evaluation of elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and/or alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels but without signs of cirrhosis on physical examination, were recruited from a previous study [4], and examined in the course of one day. Fibrosis staging from prior biopsy were gained from [4], see Table 1. The 3D MRE method included an active electromagnetic transducer generating waves at 56 Hz, and a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MR-scanner, with a phased array body coil (Sense TorsoXL, all 16 coil elements), GRE sequence parameters include; FOV = 320x256 mm2, matrix = 80x38, slice thickness = 4 mm, # slices = 9, FA = 15°, TR = 112 ms, TE = 9.21 ms, SENSE = 2. The 2D MRE method included a passive acoustic transducer generating waves at 60 Hz, and a 1.5 T GE 450W MR-scanner, with a phased array body coil (HD8 Torso, all 8 coil elements), GRE sequence parameters include; FOV = 440x440 mm2, matrix = 256x64, slice thickness = 10 mm, # slices = 4, FA = 30°, TR = 50 ms, TE = 21.7 ms, ASSET = 2. The transducers were on both systems placed on the anterior chest wall to the right of xiphoid process (patient in a supine position), the time between each MRE acquisition was dependent on how long it took to transfer the patient between the two MR systems in the hospital (<10 min) A region of interest (ROI) was placed in an appropriate single 10 mm slice acquired using the GE MR-scanner. A corresponding ROI for the Philips system, covering the same anatomical region, was placed over three slices (4 mm thickness each). This yielded a total cranio-caudal coverage of the ROIs equal to 10 mm (on the GE data) and 12 mm (on the Philips data). The mean and standard deviations of the stiffness (GE), elasticity (Philips) and Gabs,Elastic (Philips) were calculated. Gabs,Elastic is the absolute value of the shear modulus, which in principle is equivalent to the viscoelastic property, shear stiffness. In the 3D method the shear waves were obtained by applying the curl operator and using the Voigt rheological model to obtain shear elasticity maps [5, 6]. In the 2D method the GE system provided the stiffness maps. Statistics was performed using Mathematica 9. ROI drawing and quantification of the data from the GE system was performed using Sectra PACS IDS7, and ROI drawing and quantification of the data from the Philips system was performed using a custom software package implemented in ROOT, generously provided by R. Sinkus (Kings College, London, UK). Results: The measured values are presented in Table 1. Both elasticity and Gabs,Elastic correlates well with the stiffness measurement carried out in the GE system (Fig. 1), as was shown by the elasticity and stiffness correlation R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001) slope = 1.08 (P < 0.001), intercept = 0.61 kPa (P = 0.08), Gabs,Elastic and stiffness correlation R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001), slope = 0.95 (P< 0.001) intercept = 0.28 kPa (P = 0.43)

  • 43.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Wolfram MathCore AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Comparing hepatic 2D and 3D magnetic resonance elastography methods in a clinical setting – Initial experiences2015In: European Journal of Radiology Open, E-ISSN 2352-0477, Vol. 2, p. 66-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Continuous monitoring of liver fibrosis progression in patients is not feasible with the current diagnostic golden standard (needle biopsy). Recently, magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a promising method for such continuous monitoring. Since there are different MRE methods that could be used in a clinical setting there is a need to investigate whether measurements produced by these MRE methods are comparable. Hence, the purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the measurements of the viscoelastic properties produced by 2D (stiffness) and 3D (elasticity and ‘Gabs,Elastic’) MRE are comparable.

    Materials and methods

    Seven patients with diffuse or suspect diffuse liver disease were examined in the same day with the two MRE methods. 2D MRE was performed using an acoustic passive transducer, with a 1.5 T GE 450 W MR system. 3D MRE was performed using an electromagnetic active transducer, with a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MR system. Finally, mean viscoelastic values were extracted from the same anatomical region for both methods by an experienced radiologist.

    Results

    Stiffness correlated well with the elasticity, R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 1.08, intercept = 0.61 kPa), as well as with ‘Gabs,ElasticR2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 0.95, intercept = 0.28 kPa).

    Conclusion

    This pilot study shows that different MRE methods can produce comparable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of the liver. The existence of such comparable measurements is important, both from a clinical as well as a research perspective, since it allows for equipment-independent monitoring of disease progression.

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  • 44.
    Franzen, L.
    et al.
    Department of Pathology, Clinical Research Centre, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Bodin, L.
    Unit of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Clinical Research Centre, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fiorini, R.N.
    Fiorini, R.N..
    Kirtz, J.
    Kirtz, J..
    Periyasamy, B.
    Periyasamy, B..
    Evans, Z.
    Evans, Z..
    Haines, J.
    Haines, J..
    Cheng, G.
    Cheng, G..
    Polito, C.
    Polito, C..
    Rodwell, D.
    Rodwell, D..
    Zhou, X.
    Zhou, X..
    Campbell, C.
    Campbell, C..
    Birsner, J.
    Birsner, J..
    Schmidt, M.G.
    Schmidt, M.G..
    Lewin, D.
    Lewin, D..
    Chavin, K.D.
    Chavin, K.D..
    Letter to the editor (multiple letter)2005In: Clinical Transplantation, ISSN 0902-0063, E-ISSN 1399-0012, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 571-572p. 571-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 45.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Unit of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Clinical Research Centre, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Semiquantitative evaluation overestimates the degree of steatosis in liver biopsies: a comparison to stereological point counting.2005In: Modern Pathology, ISSN 0893-3952, E-ISSN 1530-0285, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 912-916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The degree of steatosis in liver biopsies is usually assessed by a morphological semiquantitative approach in which the histopathologist uses a four-graded scale: 0-3 or none, slight, moderate and severe. Scores 1-3 are considered to correspond to fat deposition in <33, 33-66 and >66% of the hepatocytes. There is a considerable inter- and intra-individual variation in such scoring methods and a more standardized and quantitative approach is preferable. In the present study, we compare the semiquantitative technique with the stereological point counting method in the assessment of hepatic steatosis. A total of 75 archived liver needle biopsies were used. They were selected according to the original routine diagnosis of slight, moderate or severe steatosis. In all, 10 randomly selected images from each biopsy were digitized into a computer, a point grid lattice was superimposed and the number of hits on fat globules was counted. A pathologist scored the specimens in a four-graded scale as described above. The mean liver biopsy area (volume) with fat in hepatocytes was 2.2% for grade 1, 9.2% for grade 2 and 23.1% for grade 3. The kappa value for the semiquantitative estimates was 0.71 for the unweigthed kappa and 0.87 for weighted kappa. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.99 for images counted twice and 0.95 when two sets of images were captured from the same biopsy. These ICCs indicate excellent agreement and above that of the semiquantitative estimates. In conclusion, the area/volume of fat content of the hepatocytes is greatly overemphasized in semiquantitative estimation. Furthermore, the point counting technique has a better reproducibility than visual evaluation and should be preferred in estimates of liver steatosis in scientific studies and in clinical contexts when the amount of steatosis is important for treatment and prognosis, such as liver transplantation.

  • 46.
    Gruneau, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Disease Progression Modeling for Economic Evaluation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease-A Systematic Review2023In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 283-298Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Globally, 25% of people have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and, currently, there are no approved pharmacologic treatments for NAFLD. With a slow disease progression, long-term impact of pharmacologic treatments can be assessed only by complementing emerging clinical trial evidence with data from other sources in disease progression modeling. Although this modeling is crucial for economic evaluation studies assessing the clinical and economic con-sequences of new treatments, the approach to modeling the natural history of NAFLD differs in contemporary research. This systematic literature review investigated modeling of the natural history of NAFLD.METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted searching PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane, and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database to identify articles focusing on modeling of the natural history of NAFLD. Model structure and transition probabilities were extracted from included studies.RESULTS: Of the 28 articles identified, differences were seen in model structure and data input. Clear definitions of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and NAFLD often were lacking; differences in the granularity of modeling fibrosis progression, the approach to disease regression, and modeling of advanced liver disease varied across studies. Observed transition probabilities for F0 to F1, F1 to F2, F2 to F3, and F3 to compensated cirrhosis varied between 0.059 to 0.095, 0.023 to 0.140, 0.018 to 0.070, and 0.040 to 0.118, respectively.CONCLUSIONS: The difference in disease progression modeling for seemingly similar models warrants further inquiry regarding how to model the natural course of NAFLD. Such differences may have a large impact when assessing the value of emerging pharmacologic treatments.

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  • 47.
    Gruneau, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cost-effectiveness analysis of noninvasive tests to identify advanced fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2023In: HEPATOLOGY COMMUNICATIONS, ISSN 2471-254X, Vol. 7, no 7, article id e00191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Advanced fibrosis is associated with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and mortality in NAFLD. As treatments specifically targeted at NAFLD are lacking, patient management focuses on surveillance for early detection of complications related to end-stage liver disease. Although current and emerging diagnostic tools for the detection of advanced fibrosis are crucial for surveillance, their added value is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the costs and health outcomes of noninvasive tests in patient management strategies for diagnosing advanced fibrosis in NAFLD patients. Method: A decision analytical model was developed to evaluate 13 patient management strategies, including a no-testing strategy and 12 diagnostic algorithms with noninvasive tests (fibrosis 4-score, enhanced liver fibrosis, vibration controlled transient elastography), and liver biopsy. Model inputs were synthesized from the literature and Swedish registries. Lifetime health care costs, life years, quality-adjusted life years, clinical outcomes, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated for a cohort of 55-year-old patients diagnosed with NAFLD. Result: The cost per quality-adjusted life year was above (sic)50 000 for all diagnostic algorithms compared to no-testing. The cost per quality-adjusted life year of the most promising diagnostic algorithm (fibrosis 4-score, enhanced liver fibrosis, vibration controlled transient elastography, and liver biopsy) was similar to(sic)181 000 compared with no testing. Sensitivity analysis indicated that if treatment slowed down disease progression, the value of testing increased. Conclusion: The result questions the overall value of comprehensive diagnostic testing in a broad NAFLD population in current routine clinical care. The role of noninvasive tests may change if evidence-based treatments to slow down disease progression emerge.

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  • 48.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bu, Dawei
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, TX USA.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Hegmar, Hannes
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Zhang, Ningyan
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    An, Zhiqiang
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Scherer, Philipp E.
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, TX USA; Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    Serum levels of endotrophin are associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 437-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims

    There are no currently available biomarkers that can accurately indicate the presence of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We investigated the association between endotrophin, a cleavage product of collagen type 6α3, and disease severity in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    Methods

    We measured serum endotrophin levels in 211 patients with NAFLD and nine healthy controls. Liver biopsy data was available for 141 (67%) of the patients. Associations between endotrophin and the presence of NASH and advanced fibrosis were investigated alone and in combination with standard clinical parameters using logistic regression.

    Results

    A total of 211 patients were enrolled in this study, consisting of 108 (51%) men and 103 (49%) women with a mean age of 55.6 years. 58 (27%) of the patients had advanced fibrosis. Of those with biopsy data, 87 (62%) had NASH. Serum levels of endotrophin were significantly higher in patients with NAFLD than those in healthy controls (37[±12] vs. 17[±7] ng/mL, p<.001). Serum levels of endotrophin were also significantly higher in patients with NASH than in those without NASH (40[±12] vs. 32[±13] ng/mL, p<.001). A model using age, sex, body mass index and levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glucose and endotrophin effectively predicted the presence of NASH in a derivation (AUROC 0.83, 95%CI = 0.74–0.92) and validation cohort (AUROC 0.71, 95%CI = 0.54–0.88). There was no significant association between serum levels of endotrophin and advanced fibrosis.

    Conclusions

    These data suggest that serum endotrophin could be a valuable biomarker for diagnosing NASH, but not for detecting advanced fibrosis in NAFLD.

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  • 49.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Stal, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Cardiovascular risk factors in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2019In: Liver international (Print), ISSN 1478-3223, E-ISSN 1478-3231, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 197-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background amp; Aims Patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is unclear whether histological variables may help predict CVD risk. We evaluated histology and traditional CV risk factors as predictors of CVD outcomes in a large NAFLD cohort. Methods We included 603 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients free of baseline CVD and matched these (1:10, by age, sex and municipality) to 6269 population controls. All individuals were cross-linked to national registries to ascertain incident CVD events, defined as acute ischaemic heart disease or stroke. The presence of CV risk factors and liver histology were available in NAFLD patients only. Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) for incident CVD. Results During a mean follow-up of 18.6 years, 168 (28%) of NAFLD patients and 1325 (21%) of controls experienced a CVD event (HR 1.54, 95%CI 1.30-1.83). Within the NAFLD cohort, age, male sex, type 2 diabetes, smoking and triglycerides were associated with risk of CVD. Taking these CV risk factors into account, no histological parameter, including presence of NASH and fibrosis stage, were associated with incident CVD. Conclusions Patients with NAFLD are at an increased risk for CVD compared to matched controls, but histological parameters do not seem to independently predict this risk.

  • 50.
    Hagstrom, Hannes
    et al.
    Department of Upper GI, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Stål, Per
    Department of Upper GI, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Department of Upper GI, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Accuracy of Noninvasive Scoring Systems in Assessing Risk of Death and Liver-Related Endpoints in Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease2019In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 1148-1156.e4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims

    Several non-invasive scoring systems have been developed to determine risk of advanced fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We examined the association between 4 scoring systems and incident severe liver disease and overall mortality in a large cohort of patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD.

    Methods

    We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 646 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD, recruited from 2 hospitals in Sweden, from 1971 through 2009. The NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS), FIB-4, APRI, and BARD scores were calculated at the time of the liver biopsy. Based on each score, patients were assigned to categories of low, intermediate, or high risk for advanced fibrosis. Overall mortality and severe liver disease (cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease, liver failure, or hepatocellular carcinoma) were ascertained through linkage with national registers until the end of 2014. Cox regression, area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve, and C-statistic analyses were used to study the predictive capacity of each scoring system.

    Results

    During a mean follow-up time of 19.9±8.7 years, there were 214 deaths and 76 cases of severe liver disease. For overall mortality, AUROC curve values were: NFS, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.68–0.76); FIB-4, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.68–0.76); BARD, 0.62 (95% CI, 0.58–0.66); and APRI, 0.52 (95% CI, 0.47–0.57). For severe liver disease, AUROC curve values were: NFS, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.66–0.78); FIB-4, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.66–0.79); BARD, 0.62 (95% CI, 0.55–0.69); APRI, 0.69 (95% CI, 0.63–0.76). C-statistics for all scores were of moderate capacity to predict outcomes.

    Conclusions

    In a retrospective analysis of data from 646 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD, we found the NFS and the FIB-4 scores to most accurately determine risk of overall death or severe liver disease. However, the AUROC values for these scoring systems are not high enough for use in the clinic; new systems are needed to determine prognoses of patients with NAFLD.

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