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  • 1.
    Bergkvist, Max
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Zötterman, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vascular Occlusion in a Porcine Flap Model: Effects on Blood Cell Concentration and Oxygenation.2017In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Global open, ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 5, no 11, article id e1531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Venous congestion in skin flaps is difficult to detect. This study evaluated the ability of tissue viability imaging (TiVi) to measure changes in the concentration of red blood cells (CRBC), oxygenation, and heterogeneity during vascular provocations in a porcine fasciocutaneous flap model.

    Methods: In 5 pigs, cranial gluteal artery perforator flaps were raised (8 flaps in 5 pigs). The arterial and venous blood flow was monitored with ultrasonic flow probes. CRBC, tissue oxygenation, and heterogeneity in the skin were monitored with TiVi during baseline, 50% and 100% venous occlusion, recovery, 100% arterial occlusion and final recovery, thereby simulating venous and arterial occlusion of a free fasciocutaneous flap. A laser Doppler probe was used as a reference for microvascular perfusion in the flap.

    Results: During partial and complete venous occlusion, increases in CRBC were seen in different regions of the flap. They were more pronounced in the distal part. During complete arterial occlusion, CRBC decreased in all but the most distal parts of the flap. There were also increases in tissue oxygenation and heterogeneity during venous occlusion.

    Conclusions: TiVi measures regional changes in CRBC in the skin of the flap during arterial and venous occlusion, as well as an increase in oxygenated hemoglobin during venous occlusion that may be the result of reduced metabolism and impaired delivery of oxygen to the tissue. TiVi may provide a promising method for measuring flap viability because it is hand-held, easy to-use, and provides spatial information on venous congestion.

  • 2.
    Wikner, Jacob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zötterman, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jalili, Armin
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Aiming for the cloud - a study of implanted battery-free temperature sensors using NFC2016In: 2016 INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON INTEGRATED CIRCUITS (ISIC), IEEE , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present results based on measurements of implantable devices which can be powered externally and communicated with using the near-field communication (NFC) infrastructure. NFC allows us to not have a dedicated gateway and intra-body communication to bridge the data from sensors to phone. In our trials, we have used commercially available sub-components and mounted them on a thin plastic with printed interconnections and coated them for bio-compatibility. Devices were implanted in porcine models during one week. We could during this time measure the in-vivo body temperature through skin and subcutaneous tissue ranging in thickness from some mm to a couple of cm. The implanted sensor devices are mounted on thin, printed-electronics plastic sheets where the coils and conductors are designed with different types of materials. The choice of materials is done in order to offer a low-cost solution to read out data from in-vivo sensors. We compile measured data, practical results and guidelines, together with theoretical results referring to the design of the implanted inductive NFC coil as well as the energy transfer from one mobile device to another.

  • 3. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Zötterman, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging in Reconstructive Surgery2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Reconstructive surgery aims to restore function or normal appearance by reconstructing defective organs after trauma or disease. In patients undergoing reconstructive surgery, previous trauma, surgery or radiotherapy can result in compromised blood supply. This will affect the viability of the tissue and increases the risk for postoperative complications, such as ischemia and infection. It is therefore important to assess the tissue viability, both before, during and after the surgery. This can be done using different techniques that monitor the perfusion of the skin covering the affected area. In this thesis, LSCI have been evaluated for tissue monitoring in reconstructive surgery. The technique allows for a fast and noninvasive assessment of superficial tissue perfusion over a wide field. Based on previous work on the technology, we have seen clear advantages with LSCI compared to other methods, for example laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). We have evaluated laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) as a tool for tissue monitoring in reconstructive surgery in four studies.

    Methods

    In study I we used a bench top model and healthy subjects to address methodological concerns subjected to the LSCI technology. We investigated the effect of motion distance and angle on the assessed perfusion value In study II we used a porcine model to compare LSCI and LDF as tools to detect partial and full venous outflow obstruction. We used both methods to assess a flap based on the cranial gluteal artery perforator with partial and complete occlusion of the vein and artery. In study III we used the same porcine model as in study II to investigate the possibility to use LSCI intraoperatively to identify flap areas with compromised circulation and thereby predict areas with a high risk of postoperative necrosis. In study IV we used LSCI for intraoperative evaluation of tissue viability during deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) free flap surgery and to investigate the perfusion distribution according to the Hartrampf zones, as measured with LSCI, in relation to the selected perforator in the deep inferior epigastric perforator free flap.

    Results

    In study I we saw that tissue perfusion as measured with LSCI increases with increasing tissue motion, independent of frame rate, number of images, and tissue perfusion. Measured perfusion will decrease when images are acquired at an angle larger than 45° but distances between 15 and 40 cm do not affect the measured perfusion. In study II we observed significant decreases in perfusion during both partial and complete venous occlusion with both LSCI and LDF. However, higher variability seen with LDF, measured as % coefficient of variation. In study III a decrease in perfusion during the first 30 min after raising the flap and a perfusion value below 25 PU after 30 min was a predictor for tissue morbidity 72h after surgery. In study IV the highest perfusion values were found in zone I and higher perfusion in zone II compared to zone III, directly after the flap was raised. No remaining significant difference between zone I, II and III could be seen after anastomosis of the vessels. All flaps with a minimum perfusion <30 PU, measured after the flap was shaped and inserted, later suffered from partial flap necrosis.

    Conclusion

    LSCI is a technology that has the potential to contribute to tissue monitoring in reconstructive surgery. It has many advantages over other techniques, such as the fast acquisition time, the spatial resolution and the fact that it is completely non-invasive. However, the current system is still too bulky to be easily introduced into a clinical setting and the technology is also subject to certain drawbacks which limit its usability. It is sensitive to motion artefacts; only superficial tissue is assessed and cannot offer absolute perfusion data. If these disadvantages could be addressed, LSCI could contribute to a more accurate survey of tissue perfusion and thus better outcome in reconstructive surgery.

    List of papers
    1. Methodological concerns with laser speckle contrast imaging in clinical evaluation of microcirculation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Methodological concerns with laser speckle contrast imaging in clinical evaluation of microcirculation
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174703Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) is a non-invasive and fast technique for measuring microvascular blood flow that recently has found clinical use for burn assessment and evaluation of flaps. Tissue motion caused by for example breathing or patient movements may however affect the measurements in these clinical applications, as may distance between the camera and the skin and tissue curvature. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate the effect of frame rate, number of frames/image, movement of the tissue, measuring distance and tissue curvature on the measured perfusion. Methods Methyl nicotinate-induced vasodilation in the forearm skin was measured using LSCI during controlled motion at different speeds, using different combinations of frame rate and number of frames/image, and at varying camera angles and distances. Experiments were made on healthy volunteers and on a cloth soaked in a colloidal suspension of polystyrene microspheres. Results Measured perfusion increased with tissue motion speed. The relation was independent of the absolute perfusion in the skin and of frame rate and number of frames/image. The measured perfusion decreased with increasing angles (16% at 60, p = 0.01). Measured perfusion did not vary significantly between measurement distances from 15 to 40 cm (p = 0.77, %CV 0.9%). Conclusion Tissue motion increases and measurement angles beyond 45 decrease the measured perfusion in LSCI. These findings have to be taken into account when LSCI is used to assess moving or curved tissue surfaces, which is common in clinical applications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2017
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137098 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0174703 (DOI)000399174800074 ()28358906 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|ALF grants, Region Ostergotland

    Available from: 2017-05-05 Created: 2017-05-05 Last updated: 2020-03-18
    2. Monitoring of partial and full venous outflow obstruction in a porcine flap model using laser speckle contrast imaging
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring of partial and full venous outflow obstruction in a porcine flap model using laser speckle contrast imaging
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 936-943Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In microsurgery, there is a demand for more reliable methods of postoperative monitoring of free flaps, especially with regard to tissue-threatening obstructions of the feeding arteries and draining veins. In this study, we evaluated laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) to assess their possibilities to detect partial and full venous outflow obstruction, as well as full arterial occlusion, in a porcine flap model. Methods: Cranial gluteal artery perforator flaps (CGAPs) were raised, and arterial and venous blood flow to and from the flaps was monitored using ultrasonic flow probes. The venous flow was altered with an inflatable cuff to simulate partial and full (50% and 100%) venous obstruction, and arterial flow was completely obstructed using clamps. The flap microcirculation was monitored using LSCI and LDF. Results: Both LDF and the LSCI detected significant changes in flap perfusion. After partial (50%) venous occlusion, perfusion decreased from baseline, LSCI: 63.5 +/- 12.9 PU (p = 0.01), LDF 31.3 +/- 15.7 (p = 0.64). After 100% venous occlusion, a further decrease in perfusion was observed: LSCI 54.6 +/- 14.2 PU (p amp;lt; 0.001) and LDF 16.7 +/- 12.8 PU (p amp;lt; 0.001). After release of the venous cuff, LSCI detected a return of the perfusion to a level slightly, but not significantly, below the baseline level 70.1 +/- 11.5 PU (p=0.39), while the LDF signal returned to a level not significant from the baseline 36.1 +/- 17.9 PU (p amp;gt; 0.99). Perfusion during 100% arterial occlusion decreased significantly as measured with both methods, LSCI: 48.3 +/- 7.7 (PU, pamp;lt;0.001) and LDF: 8.5 +/- 4.0 PU (pamp;lt;0.001). During 50% and 100% venous occlusion, LSCI showed a 20% and 26% inter-subject variability (CV%), respectively, compared to 50% and 77% for LDF. Conclusions: LSCI offers sensitive and reproducible measurements of flap microcirculation and seems more reliable in detecting decreases in blood perfusion caused by venous obstruction. It also allows for perfusion measurements in a relatively large area of flap tissue. This may be useful in identifying areas of the flap with compromised microcirculation during and after surgery. (C) 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2016
    Keywords
    Free flaps; Venous occlusion; Arterial occlusion; Laser Doppler; Laser speckle contrast imaging
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130059 (URN)10.1016/j.bjps.2016.02.015 (DOI)000377698600010 ()27026039 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|county of Ostergotland

    Available from: 2016-07-06 Created: 2016-07-06 Last updated: 2020-03-18
    3. The use of laser speckle contrast imaging to predict flap necrosis: An experimental study in a porcine flap model
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use of laser speckle contrast imaging to predict flap necrosis: An experimental study in a porcine flap model
    2019 (English)In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 72, no 5, p. 771-777Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We evaluated the use of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) in the perioperative planning in reconstructive flap surgery. The aim of the study was to investigate whether LSCI can predict regions with a high risk of developing postoperative necrosis. Our hypothesis was that, perioperatively, such regions have perfusion values below a threshold value and show a negative perfusion trend. Methods: A porcine flap model based on the cranial gluteal artery perforator was used. Images were acquired before surgery, immediately after surgery (t = 0), after 30 min (t =30 min), and after 72h (t = 72 h). Regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen along the central axis of the flap. Clinical evaluation of the flap was made during each time point. Results: At t = 72 h, a demarcation line could be seen at a distance of 15.8 +/- 0.4 cm away from the proximal border of the flaps. At t =0, perfusion decreased gradually from the proximal to the distal ROI. At t =30 min, perfusion was significantly lower in the ROI distal to the final demarcation line than that at t = 0, and in all flaps, these ROIs had a perfusion amp;lt;25 PU. At t= 72 h, perfusion in the ROI proximal to this line returned to baseline levels, whereas perfusion in the distal ROI remained low. Conclusions: In our model, a decrease in perfusion during the first 30 min after surgery and a perfusion amp;lt;25 PU at t = 30 min was a predictor for tissue morbidity 72 h after surgery, which indicates that LSCI is a promising technique for perioperative monitoring in reconstructive flap surgery. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
    Keywords
    Flap monitoring; Reconstructive surgery; Laser speckle contrast imaging; Partial flap necrosis
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156911 (URN)10.1016/j.bjps.2018.11.021 (DOI)000464986400009 ()30711464 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County of Ostergotland

    Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2020-03-18
    4. Intraoperative Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging in DIEP Breast Reconstruction: A Prospective Case Series Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intraoperative Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging in DIEP Breast Reconstruction: A Prospective Case Series Study
    Show others...
    2020 (English)In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Global open, ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 8, no 1, p. e2529-e2529Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a laser-based perfusion imaging technique that recently has been shown to predict ischemic necrosis in an experimental flap model and predicting healing time of scald burns. The aims were to investigate perfusion in relation to the selected perforator during deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap surgery, and to evaluate LSCI in assisting of prediction of postoperative complications. METHODS: Twenty-three patients who underwent DIEP-procedures for breast reconstruction at 2 centers were included. Perfusion was measured in 4 zones at baseline, after raising, after anastomosis, and after shaping the flap. The perfusion in relation to the selected perforator and the accuracy of LSCI in predicting complications were analyzed. RESULTS: After raising the flap, zone I showed the highest perfusion (65 ± 10 perfusion units, PU), followed by zone II (58 ± 12 PU), zone III (53 ± 10 PU), and zone IV (45 ± 10 PU). The perfusion in zone I was higher than zone III (P = 0.002) and zone IV (P < 0.001). After anastomosis, zone IV had lower perfusion than zone I (P < 0.001), zone II (P = 0.01), and zone III (P = 0.02). Flaps with areas <30 PU after surgery had partial necrosis postoperatively (n = 4). CONCLUSIONS: Perfusion is highest in zone I. No perfusion difference was found between zones II and III. Perfusion <30 PU after surgery was correlated with partial necrosis. LSCI is a promising tool for measurement of flap perfusion and assessment of risk of postoperative ischemic complications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wolters Kluwer, 2020
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-164324 (URN)10.1097/GOX.0000000000002529 (DOI)32095386 (PubMedID)
    Note

    32095386[pmid]; PMC7015619[pmcid]

    Available from: 2020-03-17 Created: 2020-03-17 Last updated: 2020-03-23Bibliographically approved
  • 4.
    Zötterman, Johan
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Bergkvist, Max
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Monitoring of partial and full venous outflow obstruction in a porcine flap model using laser speckle contrast imaging2016In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 936-943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In microsurgery, there is a demand for more reliable methods of postoperative monitoring of free flaps, especially with regard to tissue-threatening obstructions of the feeding arteries and draining veins. In this study, we evaluated laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) to assess their possibilities to detect partial and full venous outflow obstruction, as well as full arterial occlusion, in a porcine flap model. Methods: Cranial gluteal artery perforator flaps (CGAPs) were raised, and arterial and venous blood flow to and from the flaps was monitored using ultrasonic flow probes. The venous flow was altered with an inflatable cuff to simulate partial and full (50% and 100%) venous obstruction, and arterial flow was completely obstructed using clamps. The flap microcirculation was monitored using LSCI and LDF. Results: Both LDF and the LSCI detected significant changes in flap perfusion. After partial (50%) venous occlusion, perfusion decreased from baseline, LSCI: 63.5 +/- 12.9 PU (p = 0.01), LDF 31.3 +/- 15.7 (p = 0.64). After 100% venous occlusion, a further decrease in perfusion was observed: LSCI 54.6 +/- 14.2 PU (p amp;lt; 0.001) and LDF 16.7 +/- 12.8 PU (p amp;lt; 0.001). After release of the venous cuff, LSCI detected a return of the perfusion to a level slightly, but not significantly, below the baseline level 70.1 +/- 11.5 PU (p=0.39), while the LDF signal returned to a level not significant from the baseline 36.1 +/- 17.9 PU (p amp;gt; 0.99). Perfusion during 100% arterial occlusion decreased significantly as measured with both methods, LSCI: 48.3 +/- 7.7 (PU, pamp;lt;0.001) and LDF: 8.5 +/- 4.0 PU (pamp;lt;0.001). During 50% and 100% venous occlusion, LSCI showed a 20% and 26% inter-subject variability (CV%), respectively, compared to 50% and 77% for LDF. Conclusions: LSCI offers sensitive and reproducible measurements of flap microcirculation and seems more reliable in detecting decreases in blood perfusion caused by venous obstruction. It also allows for perfusion measurements in a relatively large area of flap tissue. This may be useful in identifying areas of the flap with compromised microcirculation during and after surgery. (C) 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Zötterman, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Braskaminer kan orsaka svåra brännskador hos små barn2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 2017, no 19, p. 873-873Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 6.
    Zötterman, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mirdell, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Horsten, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Methodological concerns with laser speckle contrast imaging in clinical evaluation of microcirculation2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) is a non-invasive and fast technique for measuring microvascular blood flow that recently has found clinical use for burn assessment and evaluation of flaps. Tissue motion caused by for example breathing or patient movements may however affect the measurements in these clinical applications, as may distance between the camera and the skin and tissue curvature. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate the effect of frame rate, number of frames/image, movement of the tissue, measuring distance and tissue curvature on the measured perfusion. Methods Methyl nicotinate-induced vasodilation in the forearm skin was measured using LSCI during controlled motion at different speeds, using different combinations of frame rate and number of frames/image, and at varying camera angles and distances. Experiments were made on healthy volunteers and on a cloth soaked in a colloidal suspension of polystyrene microspheres. Results Measured perfusion increased with tissue motion speed. The relation was independent of the absolute perfusion in the skin and of frame rate and number of frames/image. The measured perfusion decreased with increasing angles (16% at 60, p = 0.01). Measured perfusion did not vary significantly between measurement distances from 15 to 40 cm (p = 0.77, %CV 0.9%). Conclusion Tissue motion increases and measurement angles beyond 45 decrease the measured perfusion in LSCI. These findings have to be taken into account when LSCI is used to assess moving or curved tissue surfaces, which is common in clinical applications.

  • 7.
    Zötterman, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Opsomer, Dries
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Blondeel, Phillip
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Monstrey, Stan
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Intraoperative Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging in DIEP Breast Reconstruction: A Prospective Case Series Study2020In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Global open, ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 8, no 1, p. e2529-e2529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a laser-based perfusion imaging technique that recently has been shown to predict ischemic necrosis in an experimental flap model and predicting healing time of scald burns. The aims were to investigate perfusion in relation to the selected perforator during deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap surgery, and to evaluate LSCI in assisting of prediction of postoperative complications. METHODS: Twenty-three patients who underwent DIEP-procedures for breast reconstruction at 2 centers were included. Perfusion was measured in 4 zones at baseline, after raising, after anastomosis, and after shaping the flap. The perfusion in relation to the selected perforator and the accuracy of LSCI in predicting complications were analyzed. RESULTS: After raising the flap, zone I showed the highest perfusion (65 ± 10 perfusion units, PU), followed by zone II (58 ± 12 PU), zone III (53 ± 10 PU), and zone IV (45 ± 10 PU). The perfusion in zone I was higher than zone III (P = 0.002) and zone IV (P < 0.001). After anastomosis, zone IV had lower perfusion than zone I (P < 0.001), zone II (P = 0.01), and zone III (P = 0.02). Flaps with areas <30 PU after surgery had partial necrosis postoperatively (n = 4). CONCLUSIONS: Perfusion is highest in zone I. No perfusion difference was found between zones II and III. Perfusion <30 PU after surgery was correlated with partial necrosis. LSCI is a promising tool for measurement of flap perfusion and assessment of risk of postoperative ischemic complications.

  • 8.
    Zötterman, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Surgery Department, Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Better Protection of Glass-Fronted Stoves Is Needed in Sweden Because of the Increase in the Number of Contact Burns Among Small Children2018In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 618-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impression among the attending physicians at their Burn Centre is that the number of contact burns caused by glass-fronted stoves is increasing, particularly in the youngest group of patients. It is an interesting subgroup, as these injuries are preventable. The authors’ aim of this study was to find out whether the incidence of burns after contact with glass-fronted stoves has increased.

    The authors included all patients aged between 0 and 3.9 years who presented to the National Burn Centre during the period 2008–2015 with contact burn injuries caused by glass-fronted stoves. The change in incidence over time was calculated from national records and analyzed with simple linear regression.

    Fifty-six patients were included, of whom 20 were treated during the past 2 years of the study. Thirty-seven of the 56 were boys (66%), median (10–90 percentiles) age was 1.1 (0.7–2.5) years, percentage total body surface area burned was 0.6% (0.1–2.0), 12 were admitted for overnight stay in hospital, and seven needed operations. The incidence was 0.34/100 000 children-years during the first 2 years, and it was three times as high during the past 2 years. The increase in incidence was 0.24/100 000 children-years by each 2-year period (P = .02).

    The authors’ results indicate that contact burns among children caused by glass-fronted stoves are increasing in Sweden. The authors propose that there should be a plan for their prevention put in place.

  • 9.
    Zötterman, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    The use of laser speckle contrast imaging to predict flap necrosis: An experimental study in a porcine flap model2019In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 72, no 5, p. 771-777Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We evaluated the use of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) in the perioperative planning in reconstructive flap surgery. The aim of the study was to investigate whether LSCI can predict regions with a high risk of developing postoperative necrosis. Our hypothesis was that, perioperatively, such regions have perfusion values below a threshold value and show a negative perfusion trend. Methods: A porcine flap model based on the cranial gluteal artery perforator was used. Images were acquired before surgery, immediately after surgery (t = 0), after 30 min (t =30 min), and after 72h (t = 72 h). Regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen along the central axis of the flap. Clinical evaluation of the flap was made during each time point. Results: At t = 72 h, a demarcation line could be seen at a distance of 15.8 +/- 0.4 cm away from the proximal border of the flaps. At t =0, perfusion decreased gradually from the proximal to the distal ROI. At t =30 min, perfusion was significantly lower in the ROI distal to the final demarcation line than that at t = 0, and in all flaps, these ROIs had a perfusion amp;lt;25 PU. At t= 72 h, perfusion in the ROI proximal to this line returned to baseline levels, whereas perfusion in the distal ROI remained low. Conclusions: In our model, a decrease in perfusion during the first 30 min after surgery and a perfusion amp;lt;25 PU at t = 30 min was a predictor for tissue morbidity 72 h after surgery, which indicates that LSCI is a promising technique for perioperative monitoring in reconstructive flap surgery. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons.

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