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  • 151.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, P
    Jonkoping, Sweden .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    COPING STRATEGY AND PERCEIVED HOPELESSNESS ARE IMPORTANT FOR HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER CRITICAL ILLNESS in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S392-S3922010In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 36, p. S392-S392Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 152.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, P
    Jonkoping, Sweden .
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    PERCEIVED HOPELESSNESS AFTER ICU CARE IS A PREDICTOR OF LONG TERM SURVIVAL in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S385-S3852010In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 36, p. S385-S385Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 153.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Work and Environmental Science.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Simonsson, Eva
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Social integration: an important factor for health-related quality of life after critical illness2011In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, ISSN 0342-4642, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 831-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine to what extent availability of social integration affects health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in former intensive care unit (ICU) patients and how it relates to corresponding findings in a general reference group. Controlled, multicenter, prospective, explorative study. HRQoL data (SF-36) were collected from three combined medical and surgical ICUs in the south-east of Sweden. Social integration was assessed by the Availability of Social Integration (AVSI) instrument (seven questions related to the social interaction of the patient). As reference group, a random sample (n = 6,093) of people from the uptake area of the hospitals was used. Social integration (AVSI), HRQoL (SF-36), and comorbidity were examined also in the reference group. None. The level of social integration significantly affected HRQoL for the former ICU patients, whereas no such effect was seen for the general reference group. For the ICU patients, social integration affected HRQoL to a larger extent than age, sex, and the ICU-related factors examined, but to a lower extent than the pre-existing diseases. For a comprehensive assessment of HRQoL in former ICU patients, it is mandatory to include the effect of social integration.

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  • 154.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Health-related quality of life scores after intensive care are almost equal to those of the normal population: a multicenter observational study2013In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. R236-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION:

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients treated in intensive care has been reported to be lower compared with age- and sex-adjusted control groups. Our aim was to test whether stratifying for coexisting conditions would reduce observed differences in HRQoL between patients treated in the ICU and a control group from the normal population. We also wanted to characterize the ICU patients with the lowest HRQoL within these strata.

    METHODS:

    We did a cross-sectional comparison of scores of the short-form health survey (SF-36) questionnaire in a multicenter study of patients treated in the ICU (n = 780) and those from a local public health survey (n = 6,093). Analyses were in both groups adjusted for age and sex, and data stratified for coexisting conditions. Within each stratum, patients with low scores (below -2 SD of the control group) were identified and characterized.

    RESULTS:

    After adjustment, there were minor and insignificant differences in mean SF-36 scores between patients and controls. Eight (n = 18) and 22% (n = 51) of the patients had low scores (-2 SD of the control group) in the physical and mental dimensions of SF-36, respectively. Patients with low scores were usually male, single, on sick leave before admission to critical care, and survived a shorter time after being in ICU.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    After adjusting for age, sex, and coexisting conditions, mean HRQoL scores were almost equal in patients and controls. Up to 22% (n = 51) of the patients had, however, a poor quality of life as compared with the controls (-2 SD). This group, which more often consisted of single men, individuals who were on sick leave before admission to the ICU, had an increased mortality after ICU. This group should be a target for future support.

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  • 155.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, P
    Jonkoping, Sweden .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    IS HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AFFECTED BY AN EARLY (andlt; 3 YEARS) DEATH AFTER ICU CARE AS COMPARED WITH SURVIVING ICU PATIENTS? in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S393-S3932010In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 36, p. S393-S393Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 156.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fredriksson, M
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Can ICU admission be predicted?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After intensive care (IC), patients report poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Many factors affect the patients and influence the HRQoL after discharge. One of these factors is the patient's health status before the critical care period. In a previous study we found that the IC patients have a high frequency of pre-existing diseases. However, it is unknown to what extent these pre-existing diseases affect the consumption of hospital resources (measured as days as inpatients) in the time period before admission to the ICU and during the years following it. The consumption prior to the ICU event may also be claimed to herald an increased risk for a later ICU admittance? The aim of this study was to examine the hospital care consumption of former ICU patients 3 years prior to and 3 years after the intensive care period. This was examined in relation to the pre-existing health status.

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  • 157.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Effects of education, income and employment on ICU and post-ICU survival - A nationwide Swedish cohort study of individual-level data with 1-year follow up2024In: Journal of critical care, ISSN 0883-9441, E-ISSN 1557-8615, Vol. 80, article id 154497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine relationships between education, income, and employment (socioeconomic status, SES) and intensive care unit (ICU) survival and survival 1 year after discharge from ICU (Post-ICU survival). Methods: Individual data from ICU patients were linked to register data of education level, disposable income, employment status, civil status, foreign background, comorbidities, and vital status. Associations between SES, ICU survival and 1-year post-ICU survival was analysed using Cox's regression. Results: We included 58,279 adults (59% men, median length of stay in ICU 4.0 days, median SAPS3 score 61). Survival rates at discharge from ICU and one year after discharge were 88% and 63%, respectively. Risk of ICU death (Hazard ratios, HR) was significantly higher in unemployed and retired compared to patients who worked prior to admission (1.20; 95% CI: 1.10-1.30 and 1.15; (1.07-1.24), respectively. There was no consistent association between education, income and ICU death. Risk of post-ICU death decreased with greater income and was roughly 16% lower in the highest compared to lowest income quintile (HR 0.84; 0.79-0.88). Higher education levels appeared to be associated with reduced risk of death during the first year after ICU discharge. Conclusions: Significant relationships between low SES in the critically ill and increased risk of death indicate that it is important to identify and support patients with low SES to improve survival after intensive care. Studies of survival after critical illness need to account for participants SES.

  • 158.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Simonsson, Eva
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Role of preexisting disease in patients' perceptions of health-related quality of life after intensive care.2005In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 1557-1564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To find out how patients perceive their health-related quality of life after they have been treated in an intensive care unit and whether preexisting disease influenced their perception.

    DESIGN:: Follow-up, quantitative, dual-site study.

    SETTING: Combined medical and surgical intensive care units of one university and one general hospital in Sweden.

    PATIENTS: Among the 1,938 patients admitted, 562 were considered eligible (>24 hrs in the intensive care unit, and age >18 yrs). The effect of preexisting disease was assessed by use of a large reference group, a random sample (n = 10,000) of the main intake area of the hospitals.

    INTERVENTIONS: None.

    MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: During 2000-2002, data were collected from the intensive care unit register and from a questionnaire mailed to the patients 6 months after their discharge from hospital. Subjects in the reference group were sent postal questionnaires during 1999. Of the patients in the intensive care unit group, 74% had preexisting diseases compared with 51% in the reference group. Six months after discharge, health-related quality of life was significantly lower among patients than in the reference group. When comparisons were restricted to the previously healthy people in both groups, the observed differences were about halved, and when we compared the patients in the intensive care unit who had preexisting diseases with subjects in the reference group who had similar diseases, we found little difference in perceived health-related quality of life. In some dimensions of health-related quality of life, we found no differences between patients in the intensive care unit and the subjects in the reference population.

    CONCLUSIONS: Preexisting diseases significantly affect the extent of the decline of health-related quality of life after critical care, and this effect may have been underestimated in the past. As most patients who are admitted to an intensive care unit have at least one preexisting disease, it is important to account for these effects when examining outcome.

  • 159.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Intensiv Care Unit, Ryhov Hospital, 551 85 Jönköping, Sweden.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Prevalence of sleep disturbances and long-term reduced health-related quality of life after critical care: a prospective multicenter cohort study2008In: Critical care (London, England), ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. R97-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present prospective multicenter cohort study was to examine the prevalence of sleep disturbance and its relation to the patient's reported health-related quality of life after intensive care. We also assessed the possible underlying causes of sleep disturbance, including factors related to the critical illness.

    METHODS: Between August 2000 and November 2003 we included 1,625 consecutive patients older than 17 years of age admitted for more than 24 hours to combined medical and surgical intensive care units (ICUs) at three hospitals in Sweden. Conventional intensive care variables were prospectively recorded in the unit database. Six months and 12 months after discharge from hospital, sleep disturbances and the health-related quality of life were evaluated using the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-form Health Survey, respectively. As a nonvalidated single-item assessment, the quality of sleep prior to the ICU period was measured. As a reference group, a random sample (n = 10,000) of the main intake area of the hospitals was used.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of self-reported quality of sleep did not change from the pre-ICU period to the post-ICU period. Intensive care patients reported significantly more sleep disturbances than the reference group (P < 0.01). At both 6 and 12 months, the main factor that affected sleep in the former hospitalised patients with an ICU stay was concurrent disease. No effects were related to the ICU period, such as the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score, the length of stay or the treatment diagnosis. There were minor correlations between the rate and extent of sleep disturbance and the health-related quality of life.

    CONCLUSION: There is little change in the long-term quality of sleep patterns among hospitalised patients with an ICU stay. This applies both to the comparison before and after critical care as well as between 6 and 12 months after the ICU stay. Furthermore, sleep disturbances for this group are common. Concurrent disease was found to be most important as an underlying cause, which emphasises that it is essential to include assessment of concurrent disease in sleep-related research in this group of patients.

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  • 160.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Nordlund, Anders
    TFS Trial Form Support AB, Lund.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Simonsson, Eva
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Pre-existing disease: the most important factor for health related quality of life long-term after critical illness: a prospective, longitudinal, multicentre trial2010In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 14, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The aim of the present multicenter study was to assess long term (36 months) health related quality of life in patients after critical illness, compare ICU survivors health related quality of life to that of the general population and examine the impact of pre-existing disease and factors related to ICU care on health related quality of life.

    Methods

    Prospective, longitudinal, multicentre trial in three combined medical and surgical intensive care units of one university and two general hospitals in Sweden. By mailed questionnaires, health related quality of life was assessed at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after the stay in ICU by EQ-5D and SF-36, and information of pre-existing disease was collected at the 6 months measure. ICU related factors were obtained from the local ICU database. Comorbidity and health related quality of life (EQ-5D; SF-36) was examined in the reference group. Among the 5306 patients admitted, 1663 were considered eligible (>24 hrs in the intensive care unit, and age ≥ 18 yrs, and alive 6 months after discharge). At the 6 month measure 980 (59%) patients answered the questionnaire. Of these 739 (75%) also answered at 12 month, 595 (61%) at 24 month, and 478 (47%) answered at the 36 month measure. As reference group, a random sample (n = 6093) of people from the uptake area of the hospitals were used in which concurrent disease was assessed and adjusted for.

    Results

    Only small improvements were recorded in health related quality of life up to 36 months after ICU admission. The majority of the reduction in health related quality of life after care in the ICU was related to the health related quality of life effects of pre-existing diseases. No significant effect on the long-term health related quality of life by any of the ICU-related factors was discernible.

    Conclusions

    A large proportion of the reduction in the health related quality of life after being in the ICU is attributable to pre-existing disease. The importance of the effect of pre-existing disease is further supported by the small, long term increment in the health related quality of life after treatment in the ICU. The reliability of the conclusions is supported by the size of the study populations and the long follow-up period.

     

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  • 161.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Att leva efter intensivvård - longitudinell uppföljning av hälsorelaterad livskvalitet (HRQoL)2007In: SFAI-tidningen, ISSN 0283-8818, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 70-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

       

  • 162.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Gren, H
    The Swedish Intensive Care Registry, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Mårdh, C
    The Swedish Intensive Care Registry, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Karlström, G
    The Swedish Intensive Care Registry, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Assessing outcome after critical illness by use of a nation intensive care registry (SIR)2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 163.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Assessing patient reported outcome measures (PROM) after critical illness using a nationwide intensive care registry2012In: Proceedings of the 20th International Health Promoting Hospitals and Health Services, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 164.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Willebrand, M
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gerdin, B
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ekselius, L
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Long term health-related quality of life after burns is strongly dependent on pre-existing disease and psychosocial issues and less due to the burn itself2013In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is reduced after a burn, and is affected by coexisting conditions. The aims of the investigation were to examine and describe effects of coexisting disease on HRQoL, and to quantify the proportion of burned people whose HRQoL was below that of a reference group matched for age, gender, and coexisting conditions.

    Method

    A nationwide study covering 9 years and examined HRQoL 12 and 24 months after the burn with the SF-36 questionnaire. The reference group was from the referral area of one of the hospitals.

    Results

    The HRQoL of the burned patients was below that of the reference group mainly in the mental dimensions, and only single patients were affected in the physical dimensions. The factor that significantly affected most HRQoL dimensions (n = 6) after the burn was unemployment, whereas only smaller effects could be attributed directly to the burn.

    Conclusion

    Poor HRQoL was recorded for only a small number of patients, and the decline were mostly in the mental dimensions when compared with a group adjusted for age, gender, and coexisting conditions. Factors other than the burn itself, such as mainly unemployment and pre-existing disease, were most important for the long term HRQoL experience in these patients.

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  • 165.
    Oster, Caisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hensing, Ida
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lojdstrom, Therese
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Parents Perceptions of Adaptation and Family Life After Burn Injuries in Children2014In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 606-613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore parents experiences after their childs burn injury, focusing on how the burn had influenced family life and child adjustment. Six semi-structured interviews with parents of children treated at burn centers 2 to 7 years previously revealed the theme, "Feeling quite alone in striving to regain family wellbeing". Identification of difficulties perceived by the parents during rehabilitation and up until the present is useful when developing pediatric burn care and support for parents of children with burns.

  • 166.
    Parker, Victoria E. R.
    et al.
    AstraZeneca, England.
    Robertson, Darren
    AstraZeneca, England.
    Erazo-Tapia, Edmundo
    Maastricht Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Havekes, Bas
    Maastricht Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Phielix, Esther
    Maastricht Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    de Ligt, Marlies
    Maastricht Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Roumans, Kay H. M.
    Maastricht Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Mevenkamp, Julian
    Maastricht Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Clin Trial Consultants AB, Sweden.
    Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B.
    Maastricht Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Johansson, Edvin
    Antaros Med AB, Sweden.
    Chang, Yi-Ting
    AstraZeneca, MD 20878 USA.
    Esterline, Russell
    AstraZeneca, MD USA.
    Smith, Kenneth
    Univ Nottingham, England.
    Wilkinson, Daniel J.
    Univ Nottingham, England.
    Hansen, Lars
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Johansson, Lars
    Antaros Med AB, Sweden.
    Ambery, Philip
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Jermutus, Lutz
    AstraZeneca, England.
    Schrauwen, Patrick
    Maastricht Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Cotadutide promotes glycogenolysis in people with overweight or obesity diagnosed with type 2 diabetes2023In: Nature Metabolism, E-ISSN 2522-5812, Vol. 5, p. 2086-2093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cotadutide is a dual glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucagon receptor agonist under development for the treatment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is a complex disease with no approved pharmacotherapies, arising from an underlying state of systemic metabolic dysfunction in association with T2DM and obesity. Cotadutide has been shown to improve glycaemic control, body weight, lipids, liver fat, inflammation and fibrosis. We conducted a two-part, randomized phase 2a trial in men and women with overweight or obesity diagnosed with T2DM to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cotadutide compared with placebo and liraglutide. The primary endpoints were change from baseline to day 28 of treatment in postprandial hepatic glycogen (part A) and to day 35 of treatment in fasting hepatic glycogen (part B) with cotadutide versus placebo. Secondary endpoints in part B were changes in fasting hepatic glycogen with cotadutide versus the mono glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, liraglutide, and change in hepatic fat fraction. The trial met its primary endpoint. We showed that cotadutide promotes greater reductions in liver glycogen and fat compared with placebo and liraglutide. Safety and tolerability findings with cotadutide were comparable to those of previous reports. Thus, this work provides evidence of additional benefits of cotadutide that could be attributed to glucagon receptor engagement. Our results suggest that cotadutide acts on the glucagon receptor in the human liver to promote glycogenolysis and improve the metabolic health of the liver. ClinicalTrials.gov registration: NCT03555994. In a two-part randomized phase 2a trial in men and women with overweight or obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, cotadutide promoted greater reductions in liver glycogen and fat than placebo and liraglutide.

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  • 167. Parment, Karin
    et al.
    Zetterberg, Anna
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Bakteman, Karin
    Steinwall, Ingrid
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Long-term immunosuppression in burned patients assessed by in vitro neutrophil oxidative burst (Phagoburst®)2007In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 865-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the duration and magnitude of immunosuppression induced by burns as measured by the neutrophil oxidative burst in vitro. Design: Prospective exploratory cohort study. Setting: Tertiary referral unit, University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden (National Burn Unit). Patients and healthy volunteers (controls): Twenty-eight subjects consecutively admitted to the Burn Unit. The mean total burn surface area (TBSA%) was 36 (range 13-87) and mean age 44 years (range 14-89). Patients' data were collected prospectively in the burn unit, which also included sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Interventions: None. Measurements and results: To assess the changes in the oxidative capacity of neutrophils after the burn, blood samples for the Phagoburst® analysis were taken on admission and at least once every second week for the duration of stay in hospital and thereafter monthly up to 12 months after the burn. Neutrophils were stimulated in vitro by Escherichia coli, phorbol 12-phorbol myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP). Oxidative burst was measured by flow cytometry. Oxidative capacity of the neutrophils decreased similarly for all three stimulants: there was a pathological decrease shortly after admission, with the lowest value occurring between days 7 and 10, followed by a gradual recovery during the ensuing months. Full recovery (to the values of the controls) was seen first 3.5 months after the burn. Using multiple regression, we found that only age and time since the burn significantly (p < 0.05) affected the oxidative burst. White cell count (WCC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) values returned to reference ranges long before the oxidative burst. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that immunosuppression in those injured by burns, as assessed by the in vitro oxidative burst of neutrophils, remains long after the event of the burn (up to 3.5 months after burn). Absence of correlations to TBSA%, FTB%, blood transfusion, opiates provided, and multiple organ failure score and laboratory infection variables together with the finding that decreased oxidative burst was uniform after the injury, suggesting that this immunosuppression is primarily due to the general metabolic response rather than recurring infections. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

  • 168.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Drake Af Hagelsrum, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Ydenius, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Patient Reported Experiences at a Swedish National Burn Centre2022In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 249-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that burn patients were satisfied with the received care. Satisfaction was not strongly associated to burns or to psycho-social characteristics, suggesting that other factors, related to burn care specific aspects, may be important. The aim of this study was to analyze the independent effect of provided workload on the general satisfaction in adult patients at a Swedish national Burn Centre. The study population (n = 122) included patients ≥18 years, treated at the Linköping Burn Centre between 2016 and 2017. Experienced burn care was evaluated with the PS-RESKA survey (score range: 0-4), and provided workload was scored with the Burn Scoring System (BSC). Groups were compared with χ 2 test, MW test, or Fisher´s exact test. Multivariable logistic regression analyzed the independent effect of BSC on the outcome High Satisfaction (= score ≥3 to the survey-question: "How would you score your global experience at the Burn Centre?"). In-patients (n = 60) had more often larger burns and required more workload than out-patients (median[IQR]: TBSA% = 6.3 [3-12.3] % vs. 0.7 [0.3-2] %, p < .001; BSC = 65 [25.5-135.5] vs. 6 [4-9], p < .001). Both groups were highly satisfied with the experienced care (mean score [SD] = 3.68 [0.57] vs. 3.41 [0.77], p = .03). Neither characteristics of the patients (age, sex), nor TBSA% nor provided workload (BSC) were independently associated with High Satisfaction. Regardless of burn severity, demographics and provided workload, adult patients with burns were highly satisfied with the experienced burn care. This finding suggested that the reason of the satisfaction was multifactorial.

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  • 169.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Department of Surgery, Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Are there any differences in the provided burn care between men and women? A retrospective study2018In: Burns & Trauma, E-ISSN 2321-3876, Vol. 6, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Disparity between medical treatment for men and women has been recorded worldwide. However, it is difficult to find out if the disparities in both the use of resources and outcome depend entirely on sex-related discrimination. Our aim was to investigate if there are differences in burn treatments between the sexes.

    Methods

    All patients admitted with burns to Linköping University Hospital during the 16-year period 2000–2015 were included. Interventions were prospectively recorded using the validated Burn SCoring system (BSC). Data were analysed using a multivariable panel regression model adjusted for age, percentage total body surface area (%TBSA), and in-hospital mortality.

    Results

    A total of 1363 patients were included, who generated a total of 22,301 daily recordings while they were inpatients. Males were 70% (930/1363). Sex was not an independent factor for daily scores after adjustment for age, %TBSA, and mortality in hospital (model R2=0.60, p < 0.001).

    Conclusion

    We found no evidence of inequity between the sexes in treatments given in our burn centre when we had adjusted for size of burn, age, and mortality. BSC seems to be an appropriate model in which to evaluate sex-related differences in the delivery of treatments.

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  • 170.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Eladany, Mostafa M.
    Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Long-term mortality after self-inflicted burns2024In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 252-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Those with self-inflicted burns are a small but consistent group among burn patients, with large injuries and conflicting findings regarding their in-hospital mortality. Overall, burn survivors have a shorter life expectancy, as compared with national controls, but long-term mortality after self-inflicted burns is understudied. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate possible differences in long-term mortality among survivors after self-inflicted and accidental burns.Methods: All adult patients with burns admitted at the Linkoping Burn Centre and discharged alive between 2000 and 2017 were included, and end of follow up was April 26, 2021. Those with unknown survival status at that time were excluded. A Cox proportional hazards regression model, adjusted for age and sex, was used to analyse long term mortality.Results: Among the 930 patients included in this study, 37 had self-inflicted burns. Overall, median follow up period was 8.8 years and crude mortality was 24.7%. After adjustment for age and sex, self-inflicted burns were independently associated with long-term mortality, Hazard Ratio= 2.08 (95% CI 1.13-3.83). Post hoc analysis showed that the effect was most pronounced during the first years after discharge although it was noticeable over the whole study period.Conclusion: Long-term risk of mortality after discharge from a burn centre was higher in patients with self-inflicted burns than in patients with accidental burns. The effect was noticeable over the whole study period although it was most pronounced during the first years after discharge.

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  • 171.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: a national exploratory study2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 280-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The Baux score - the sum of age and total body surface area burned (TBSA %) - is a good predictor of mortality has a high specificity but low sensitivity. Our aim was to examine the causes of death in patients who die with Baux scores of <100, which may explain the lower sensitivity and possibly affect the prediction of mortality.

    METHODS: All patients admitted to our centre for burn care from 1993 to 2015 (n=1946) were included in this retrospective, descriptive, exploratory study. The study group comprised those patients who died with Baux scores of <100 (n=23), and their medical charts were examined for the cause of death and for coexisting diseases.

    RESULTS: Crude mortality was 5% (93/1946) for the overall cohort, and a quarter of the patients who died (23/93) had Baux scores of less than 100 (range 64-99). In this latter group, flame burns were the most common (18/23), the median (10th-90th centile) age was 70 (46-86) years and for TBSA 21 (5.0-40.5) %, of which 7 (0-27.0) % of the area was full thickness. The main causes of death in 17 of the 23 were classified as "other than burn", being cerebral disease (n=9), cardiovascular disease (n=6), and respiratory failure (n=2). Among the remaining six (burn-related) deaths, multiple organ failure (predominantly renal failure) was responsible. When we excluded the cases in which the cause of death was not related to the burn, the Baux mortality prediction value improved (receiver operating characteristics area under the curve, AUC) from 0.9733 (95% CI 0.9633-0.9834) to 0.9888 (95% CI 0.9839-0.9936) and the sensitivity estimate increased from 45.2% to 53.9%.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with burns who died with a Baux score <100 were a quarter of all the patients who died. An important finding is that most of these deaths were caused by reasons other than the burn, usually cerebrovascular disease. This may be the explanation why the sensitivity of the Baux score is low, as factors other than age and TBSA % explain the fatal outcome.

  • 172.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Inclusion of coexisting morbidity in a TBSA% and age based model for the prediction of mortality after burns does not increase its predictive power2015In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1868-1876Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several models for predicting mortality have been developed for patients with burns, and the most commonly used are based on age and total body surface area (TBSA%). They often show good predictive precision as depicted by high values for area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). However the effect of coexisting morbidity on such prediction models has not to our knowledge been thoroughly examined. We hypothesised that adding it to a previously published model (based on age, TBSA%, full thickness burns, gender, and need for mechanical ventilation) would further improve its predictive power. Methods: We studied 772 patients admitted during the period 1997-2008 to the Linkoping University Hospital, National Burn Centre with any type of burns. We defined coexisting morbidity as any of the medical conditions listed in the Charlson list, as well as psychiatric disorders or drug or alcohol misuse. We added coexisting medical conditions to the model for predicting mortality (age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation) to determine whether it improved the model as assessed by changes in deviances between the models. Results: Mean (SD) age and TBSA% was 35 (26) years and 13 (17) %, respectively. Among 725 patients who survived, 105 (14%) had one or more coexisting condition, compared with 28 (60%) among those 47 who died. The presence of coexisting conditions increased with age (p &lt; 0.001) among patients with burns. The AUC of the mortality prediction model in this study, based on the variables age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation was 0.980 (n = 772); after inclusion of coexisting morbidity in the model, the AUC improved only marginally, to 0.986. The model was not significantly better either. Conclusion: Adding coexisting morbidity to a model for prediction of mortality after a burn based on age, TBSA%, and the need for mechanical ventilation did not significantly improve its predictive value. This is probably because coexisting morbidity is automatically adjusted for by age in the original model. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

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  • 173.
    Rein-Hedin, Erik
    et al.
    CTC Clin Trial Consultants AB, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. CTC Clin Trial Consultants AB, Sweden.
    Ganslandt, Cecilia
    Vicore Pharm AB, Sweden.
    Skoog, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Bengtsson, Thomas
    StatMind AB, Sweden.
    Dalsgaard, Carl-Johan
    Vicore Pharm AB, Sweden.
    Utilizing venous occlusion plethysmography to assess vascular effects: A study with buloxibutid, an angiotensin II type 2 receptor agonist2024In: Clinical and Translational Science, ISSN 1752-8054, E-ISSN 1752-8062, Vol. 17, no 2, article id e13735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Buloxibutid (also known as C21) is a potent and selective angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) agonist, in development for oral treatment of fibrotic lung disease. This phase I, open-label, pharmacodynamic study investigated vascular effects of buloxibutid in five healthy male volunteers. Subjects were administered intra-arterial infusions of buloxibutid for 5 min in ascending doses of 3, 10, 30, 100, and 200 mu g/min, infused sequentially in the forearm. Infusions of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) solution in doses of 0.8-3.2 mu g/min were administered as a positive control. Forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. Safety and tolerability of intra-arterial administrations of buloxibutid were evaluated. Following infusion of buloxibutid in doses of 3-200 mu g/min, the range of increase in FBF was 27.8%, 17.2%, 37.0%, 28.5%, and 60.5%, compared to the respective baseline. The largest increase was observed in the highest dose group. Infusions of SNP as a positive control, increased FBF 230-320% compared to baseline. Three adverse events (AEs) of mild intensity, not related to buloxibutid or SNP, were reported for two subjects. Two of these AEs were related to study procedures. There were no clinically relevant changes in arterial blood pressure during the study period. Intra-arterial infusion of buloxibutid in low, ascending doses increased FBF, indicating that buloxibutid may be effective in conditions associated with endothelial dysfunction. Venous occlusion plethysmography was found to be a useful method to explore pharmacodynamic vascular effects of novel AT2R agonists, while avoiding systemic adverse effects.

  • 174.
    Rein-Hedin, Erik
    et al.
    CTC Clin Trial Consultants AB, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. CTC Clin Trial Consultants AB, Sweden.
    Waters, Susanna
    Integrat Res Labs Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Sonesson, Clas
    Integrat Res Labs Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Waters, Nicholas
    Integrat Res Labs Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Huss, Fredrik
    CTC Clin Trial Consultants AB, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Tedroff, Joakim
    Integrat Res Labs Sweden AB, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    First-in-Human Study to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Pirepemat, a Cortical Enhancer, in Healthy Volunteers2021In: Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development, ISSN 2160-763X, E-ISSN 2160-7648, Vol. 10, no 12, p. 1485-1494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pirepemat (IRL752) is a cortical enhancer being developed for the prevention of falls in patients with Parkinson disease. This first-in-human, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1 study evaluated safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of pirepemat administered as oral single ascending doses (10, 35, 75, 175, 350 mg) and multiple ascending doses (100 and 250 mg 3 times daily) for 7 days to healthy male volunteers. Twenty and 24 subjects were randomly assigned in the single ascending dose and multiple ascending doses parts of the study, respectively. Pirepemat was generally well tolerated, although an increased frequency of adverse events of mild intensity within nervous system disorders (headache and dizziness) was seen after administration of 350 mg as a single dose and after multiple doses of 100 and 250 mg. PK of pirepemat showed a linear relationship over the dose range studied and exhibited dose proportionality after multiple-dose administration. Accumulation after 7 days of multiple dosing was minor. Absorption was rapid, with a median time to maximum concentration of 2.0 hours on day 1 and day 7 (100 and 250 mg) and a mean terminal half-life between 3.7 and 5.2 hours. Food intake had no (obvious) impact on PK. The results support 3-times-daily dosing and further clinical development.

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  • 175. Reske, A
    et al.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Morales, Olallo
    Seiwerts, M
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Computed tomography - A possible aid in the diagnosis of smoke inhalation injury?2005In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 257-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhalation injury is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in burn victims and can trigger acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (1-3). Early diagnosis and treatment of inhalation injury are important, but a major problem in planning treatment and evaluating the prognosis has been the lack of consensus about diagnostic criteria (4). Chest radiographs on admission are often non-specific (5, 6), but indicators include indoor fires, facial burns, bronchoscopic findings of soot in the airways, and detection of carbon monoxide or cyanide in the blood (7). Changes in the lungs may be detected by bronchoscopy with biopsy, xenon imaging, or measurement of pulmonary extracellular fluid (4, 5, 8). These methods have, however, been associated with low sensitivity and specificity, as exemplified by the 50% predictive value in the study of Masanes et al. (8). Computed tomographs (CTs) are better than normal chest radiographs in the detection of other pulmonary lesions such as pulmonary contusion (9, 10). The importance of CT scans in patients with ARDS has been reviewed recently (9), but unfortunately there has been no experience of CT in patients with smoke inhalation injury. To our knowledge, there are only two animal studies reporting that smoke inhalation injury can be detected by CT (4, 11), specific changes in human CT scans have not yet been described. Therefore, confronted with a patient with severe respiratory failure after a burn who from the history and physical examination showed the classic risk factors for inhalation injury, we decided to request a CT. © Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 49 (2005).

  • 176.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hyperoxaemia does not change concentrations of serotonin and beta‐thromboglobulin in blood of healthy humans2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 81-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The mechanisms of oxygen‐induced effects on blood vessels (vasoconstriction in hyperoxaemia and vasodilatation during hypoxaemia) are uncertain. Many investigators have suggested that the vasoconstriction seen during hyperoxia/hyperoxaemia is mediated through the endothelium as a result of either increased release or activity of vasoconstrictors (oxygen radicals, endothelin, norepinephrine, angiotensin II, or serotonin (5‐HT)), or reduced activity of vasodilators (prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide). Serotonin has been assumed to have a central role.

    Methods: Eight healthy volunteers were exposed to FiO2 of 1.0 for 20 min and serum concentrations of serotonin and activated platelets were measured (indicated by concentrations of β‐thromboglobulin (β‐TG)).

    Results. During hyperoxaemia in humans, serum concentrations of serotonin and β‐TG remained unchanged.

    Conclusion: If serotonin is involved in oxygen‐induced vasoconstriction, the mechanism is more likely to be either a potentiating effect of serotonin on other vasoconstrictors or increased activity of serotonin on its receptor.

  • 177.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Acute hyperoxaemia-induced effects on regional blood flow, oxygen consumption and central circulation in man2005In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 183, no 3, p. 231-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  Despite numerous in vitro and animal studies, circulatory effects and mechanisms responsible for the vasoconstriction seen during hyperoxaemia are yet to be ascertained. The present study set out to: (i) set up a non-invasive human model for the study of hyperoxia-induced cardiovascular effects, (ii) describe the dynamics of this effect and (iii) determine whether hyperoxaemia also, by vasoconstriction alters oxygen consumption (O2).

    Methods:  The study comprised four experiments (A, B, C and D) on healthy volunteers examined before, during and after 100% oxygen breathing. A: Blood flow (mL min−1·100 mL−1 tissue), venous occlusion plethysmography was assessed (n = 12). B: Blood flow was recorded with increasing transcutaneous oxygen tension (PtcO2) levels (dose–response) (n = 8). C: Heart rate (HR), stroke volume, cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) was assessed using echocardiography (n = 8). D: O2 was measured using an open circuit technique when breathing an air-O2 mix (fraction of inhaled oxygen: FiO2 = 0.58) (n = 8).

    Results:  Calf blood flow decreased 30% during O2 breathing. The decrease in calf blood flow was found to be oxygen dose dependent. A similar magnitude, as for the peripheral circulation, of the effect on central parameters (HR/CO and SVR) and in the time relationship was noted. Hyperoxia did not change O2. An average of 207 (93) mL O2 per subject was washed in during the experiments.

    Conclusion:  This model appears suitable for the investigation of O2-related effects on the central and peripheral circulation in man. Our findings, based on a more comprehensive (central/peripheral circulation examination) evaluation than earlier made, suggest significant circulatory effects of hyperoxia. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  • 178.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Den okritiska syrgasbehandlingens tid är förbi2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, no 14, p. 1100-1104Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    The time of the uncritical oxygen treatment is over2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, no 14, p. 1100-1104Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinwall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Woodson, RD
    Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hyperoxia decreases cutaneous blood flow in high-perfusion areas2007In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism by which hyperoxia decreases blood flow is still not understood. Hyperoxemia-induced vasoconstriction is known to occur in many organs, including brain and retina, skeletal muscle, and myocardium. Whether this also occurs in skin is unknown.

    This study was conducted in healthy volunteers exposed intermittently to 100% oxygen (FIO2 1.0). Perfusion of forearm skin was measured by laser Doppler imaging (LDI). In series 1, it was measured in 7 subjects before, during, and after 15 min of oxygen breathing. In series 2, flow was measured, also during air and O2 breathing, after perfusion was raised by (a) sympathetic blockade (induced by a topically applied local anesthetic) (n = 9) and by (b) current-induced vasodilation (n = 8).

    In normal unperturbed skin, there was no significant change with hyperoxia. When basal perfusion was raised by topical anesthesia or by current, there was also no change in mean perfusion overall with hyperoxia. However, areas with the highest perfusion (upper decile) showed a significant perfusion decrement with hyperoxia (− 30% and − 20%, respectively; p < 0.001).

    Vasoconstriction with hyperoxia has been demonstrated in human skin. The fact that it is observed only when flow is increased above basal levels and then only in high-flow vessels suggests that cutaneous blood flow control is primarily regulated by variables other than oxygen.

  • 181.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Prostaglandins and Radical Oxygen Species Are Involved in Microvascular Effects of Hyperoxia2010In: JOURNAL OF VASCULAR RESEARCH, ISSN 1018-1172, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 441-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hyperoxia causes vasoconstriction in most tissues, by mechanisms that are not fully understood. We investigated microvascular effects of breathing 100% oxygen in healthy volunteers, using iontophoresis to deliver acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Aspirin and vitamin C were used to test for involvement of prostaglandins and radical oxygen species. Forearm skin perfusion was measured using laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Results were analysed using dose-response modelling. The response to ACh was reduced by 30% during oxygen breathing compared to air breathing [0.98 (0.81-1.15) PU vs. 1.45 (1.30-1.60) PU, p andlt; 0.001]. ED50 values were unchanged [2.25 (1.84-2.75) vs. 2.21 (1.79-2.74), not significant]. Aspirin pre-treatment abolished the difference in response between oxygen breathing and air breathing [maximum: 1.03 (0.90-1.16) vs. 0.89 (0.77-1.01), not significant; ED50: 1.83 (1.46-2.30) vs. 1.95 (1.65-2.30), not significant]. ACh-mediated vasodilatation during 100% oxygen breathing was partially restored after pre-treatment with vitamin C. Breathing 100% oxygen did not change the microvascular response to SNP [1.45 (1.28-1.62) vs. 1.40 (1.26-1.53), not significant]. These results favour the hypothesis that hyperoxic vasoconstriction is mediated by inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Radical oxygen species may be involved as vitamin C, independently of aspirin, partially restored ACh-mediated vasodilatation during hyperoxia.

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  • 182.
    Rousseau, Andréas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hyperoxia inhibits production of endothelial nitric oxide in humansManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypceoxia causes vasoconstriction in most tissues, but the mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. One hypothesis is that hyperoxia affects the production of free oxygen radicals (ROS), which reduce the concentration of the vasorelaxing agent nitric oxide (NO). It is not clear whether ROS reduce the synthesis of NO or inactivate NO that is already present. We investigated the effects of breathing 100% oxygen on NO-mediated vasodilation. Iontophoresis was used to deliver acetylcholine (ACh) (which stimulates endothelium-dependent production of NO) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) (a NO-donor) through the skin of healthy volunteers (n=9). The blood flow in the skin was measured with a laser Doppler perfusion imager and dose-response curves were plotted. The drug dose at which 50% of the total perfusion increase was reached was calculated (ED50). The ED50 was significantly higher (right-shifted curve) while breathing oxygen compared with breathing air, when ACh was given by iontophoresis (95% CI 0.26 to 2.2). When ACh iontophoresis was preceded by oral intake of vitamin C (2.5 g daily for 3 days), this effect was abolished. Hyperoxla had no effect on vasodilation after iontophoresis with SNP. These results favour the hypothesis that hyperoxic vasoconstriction is mediated through inhibition of synthesis of NO by free oxygen radicals inside the endothelial cells.

  • 183.
    Rydenfelt, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
    Engerström, Lars
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Strömberg, Ulf
    Department of Research, Development and Education, Halland Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Carolina
    Department of Intensive and Perioperative Care, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö/Lund, Sweden/Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Halland Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    In-hospital versus 30-day mortality in the critically ill – a 2-year Swedish intensive care cohort analysis.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Standardised mortality ratio (SMR) is a common quality indicator in critical care and is the ratio between observed mortality and expected mortality. Typically, in-hospital mortality is used to derive SMR, but the use of a time-fixed, more objective, endpoint has been advocated. This study aimed to determine the relationship between in-hospital mortality and 30-day mortality on a comprehensive Swedish intensive care cohort.

    Methods: A retrospective study on patients >15 years-old, from the Swedish Intensive Care Register (SIR), where intensive care unit (ICU) admissions in 2009-2010 were matched with the corresponding hospital admissions in the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register. Recalibrated SAPS (Simplified Acute Physiology Score) 3 models were developed to predict and compare in-hospital and 30-day mortality. SMR based on in-hospital mortality and on 30-day mortality were compared between ICUs and between groups with different case-mixes, discharge destinations and length of hospital stays.

    Results: Sixty-five ICUs with 48861 patients, of which 35610 were SAPS 3 scored, were included. Thirty-day mortality (17%) was higher than in-hospital mortality (14%). The SMR based on 30-day mortality and that based on in-hospital mortality differed significantly in 7/53 ICUs, for patients with sepsis, for elective surgery-admissions and in groups categorised according to discharge destination and hospital length of stay.

    Conclusion: Choice of mortality end-point influences SMR. The extent of the influence depends on hospital-, ICU- and patient cohort characteristics as well as inter-hospital transfer rates, since all these factors influence the difference between SMR based on 30-day mortality and SMR based on in-hospital mortality.

  • 184.
    Rydenfelt, Kristina
    et al.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Engerström, Lars
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Strömberg, Ulf
    Halland Hospital, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Carolina
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden; Halland Hospital, Sweden.
    In-hospital vs. 30-day mortality in the critically ill - a 2-year Swedish intensive care cohort analysis2015In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 59, no 7, p. 846-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Standardised mortality ratio (SMR) is a common quality indicator in critical care and is the ratio between observed mortality and expected mortality.

    Typically, in-hospital mortality is used to derive SMR, but the use of a time-fixed, more objective, end-point has been advocated. This study aimed to determine the relationship between in-hospital mortality and 30-day mortality on a comprehensive Swedish intensive care cohort.

    Methods

    A retrospective study on patients >15 years old, from the Swedish Intensive Care Register (SIR), where intensive care unit (ICU) admissions in 2009–2010 were matched with the corresponding hospital admissions in the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register. Recalibrated SAPS (Simplified Acute Physiology Score) 3 models were developed to predict and compare in-hospital and 30-day mortality. SMR based on in-hospital mortality and on 30-day mortality were compared between ICUs and between groups with different case-mixes, discharge destinations and length of hospital stays.

    Results

    Sixty-five ICUs with 48861 patients, of which 35610 were SAPS 3 scored, were included. Thirty-day mortality (17%) was higher than in-hospital mortality (14%). The SMR based on 30-day mortality and that based on in-hospital mortality differed significantly in 7/53 ICUs, for patients with sepsis, for elective surgery-admissions and in groups categorised according to discharge destination and hospital length of stay.

    Conclusion

    Choice of mortality end-point influences SMR. The extent of the influence depends on hospital-, ICU- and patient cohort characteristics as well as inter-hospital transfer rates, as all these factors influence the difference between SMR based on 30-day mortality and SMR based on in-hospital mortality.

  • 185.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Wackenfors, Angelica
    Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery Linköpings Universitet.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Serotonin kinetics in patients with burn injuries: A comparison between the local and systemic responses measured by microdialysis-A pilot study2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 617-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate serotonin (5HT) locally in burned and uninjured skin (intracutaneous) by microdialysis, and simultaneously record urinary and blood values in the same subjects. For comparison, serotonin values were also measured in skin of healthy controls. Design and setting: An experimental study in burned patients with of more than 25% TBSA (total burn surface area) % in an 8-bed tertiary burns unit, serving about 3.5 million persons. Patients and methods: Six subjects with a median TBSA% of 59% (range 33.5-90), and five healthy controls were examined by intracutaneous microdialysis of the skin. Results: 5HT was increased in burned patients, compared with controls. This increase was tenfold in skin and was noted both in uninjured and burned skin. The highest values were recorded on day 1 (median 16.1 nmol in uninjured and 9.5 nmol in burned skin) and day 2 (15.6 nmol in uninjured and 13.4 nmol in burned skin). A rapid reduction was noted on day 3 (4.9 nmol in uninjured and 3.8 nmol in burned skin). The corresponding value for control subjects was 1.3 nmol. The 5HT in blood was twice normal on day 2, and gradually reduced on days 3 and 4 (3189, 3035 and 2573 nmol, respectively). Urinary 5HT concentrations were increased only on day 2 at 1755 nmol and thereafter returned to the normal range on days 3 and 4 (1248 and 1344 nmol, respectively). Conclusions: We showed that microdialysis may be used in the critical care of burns, and local skin serotonin concentrations examined continuously for several days. The findings of significantly raised tissue serotonin concentrations, compared to that in blood and urine, suggests that serotonin may be important in local vascular control and formation of oedema. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

  • 186.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Implications for critical care of a new in vivo human vascular microdosing technique for giving noradrenaline and nitroglycerine by microdialysisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Skin has a large dynamic capacity for alterations in blood flow, and is therefore often used for recruitment of blood during states of hypoperfusion. Little is known, however, about the metabolic consequences seen in skin secondary to hyporperfusion, particularly when the effects of vasoactive drugs are involved. The aims of this study were: to develop an in vivo, human microdosing model based on microdialysis in skin; and to investigate the effects on blood flow and metabolism of administering noradrenaline and nitroglycerine locally.

    Method: Nine healthy volunteers each had two or three microdialysis catheters placed intradermally in the volar surface of the lower arm. After a stabilisation period, the catheters were perfused with buffers containing noradrenaline 0.5 or 5 μg/ml for 60 minutes, and after a second period of equilibrium of 60 minutes, all catheters were perfused with buffer containing nitroglycerine (0.5mg/ml). Changes in the blood flow in the skin were measured by laser Doppler imaging urea and ethanol clearance. Simultaneous changes in tissue glucose, lactate, and pyruvate concentrations were recorded.

    Results: Perfusing skin with noradrenaline and nitroglycerine induced appreciable changes in all variables studied, depending on time and dose. The changes in glucose and lactate concentrations correlated with the change in blood flow assessed by either laser Doppler imaging or urea clearance. The changes in glucose and lactate that were induced by vasoconstriction (noradrenaline) continued until vasodilatation was induced by nitroglycerine.

    Conclusion: Noradrenaline given by microdialysis in healthy volunteers induced reproducible and dose-dependent hypoperfusion and ischaemia with simultaneous metabolic consequences. Among these, we particularly note that: tissue glucose concentrations responded rapidly to hypoperfusion but remained considerably higher than zero, which suggests an energy-dependent deficiency in cellular uptake; and vasoconstriction remained after cessation of the noradrenaline perfusion, implicating vasospasm and a lack of autoregulatory (recovery) capacity in skin. These findings are particularly interesting from the critical care perspective, where noradrenaline is used extensively for circulatory support. The metabolic consequences may be underestimated and our results suggest that further investigations are warranted.

  • 187.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Magnusson, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zettersten, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Implications for burn shock resuscitation of a new in vivo human vascular microdosing technique (microdialysis) for dermal administration of noradrenaline2012In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 975-983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Skin has a large dynamic capacity for alterations in blood flow, and is therefore often used for recruitment of blood during states of hypoperfusion such as during burn shock resuscitation. However, little is known about the blood flow and metabolic consequences seen in the dermis secondary to the use vasoactive drugs (i.e. noradrenaline) for circulatory support. The aims of this study were therefore: to develop an in vivo, human microdosing model based on dermal microdialysis; and in this model to investigate effects on blood flow and metabolism by local application of noradrenaline and nitroglycerin by the microdialysis system simulating drug induced circulatory support. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod: Nine healthy volunteers had microdialysis catheters placed intradermally in the volar surface of the lower arm. The catheters were perfused with noradrenaline 3 or 30 mmol/L and after an equilibrium period all catheters were perfused with nitroglycerine (2.2 mmol/L). Dermal blood flow was measured by the urea clearance technique and by laser Doppler imaging. Simultaneously changes in dermal glucose, lactate, and pyruvate concentrations were recorded. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Noradrenaline and nitroglycerine delivered to the dermis by the microdialysis probes induced large time- and dose-dependent changes in all variables. We particularly noted that tissue glucose concentrations responded rapidly to hypoperfusion but remained higher than zero. Furthermore, vasoconstriction remained after the noradrenaline administration implicating vasospasm and an attenuated dermal autoregulatory capacity. The changes in glucose and lactate by vasoconstriction (noradrenaline) remained until vasodilatation was actively induced by nitroglycerine. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: These findings, i.e., compromised dermal blood flow and metabolism are particularly interesting from the burn shock resuscitation perspective where noradrenaline is commonly used for circulatory support. The importance and clinical value of the results obtained in this in vivo dermal model in healthy volunteers needs to be further explored in burn-injured patients.

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  • 188.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Letter: Subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring in severe burn patients2007In: Clinical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 1445-1446Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 189.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Microdialysis shows metabolic effects in skin during fluid resuscitation in burn-injured patients2006In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 10, no 6, p. Art.no: R172-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Established fluid treatment formulas for burn injuries have been challenged as studies have shown the presence of tissue hypoxia during standard resuscitation. Such findings suggest monitoring at the tissue level. This study was performed in patients with major burn injuries to evaluate the microdialysis technique for the continuous assessment of skin metabolic changes during fluid resuscitation and up to four days postburn. Methods: We conducted an experimental study in patients with a burn injury, as represented by percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA), of more than 25% in a university eight-bed burns intensive care unit serving about 3.5 million inhabitants. Six patients with a median TBSA percentage of 59% (range 33.5% to 90%) and nine healthy controls were examined by intracutaneous MD, in which recordings of glucose, pyruvate, lactate, glycerol, and urea were performed. Results: Blood glucose concentration peaked on day two at 9.8 mmol/l (6.8 to 14.0) (median and range) and gradually declined on days three and four, whereas skin glucose in MD continued to increase throughout the study period with maximum values on day four, 8.7 mmol/l (4.9 to 11.0). Controls had significantly lower skin glucose values compared with burn patients, 3.1 mmol/l (1.5 to 4.6) (p < 0.001). Lactate from burn patients was significantly higher than controls in both injured and uninjured skin (MD), 4.6 mmol/l (1.3 to 8.9) and 3.8 mmol/l (1.6 to 7.5), respectively (p < 0.01). The skin lactate/pyruvate ratio (MD) was significantly increased in burn patients on all days (p < 0.001). Skin glycerol (MD) was significantly increased at days three and four in burn patients compared with controls (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite a strategy that fulfilled conventional goals for resuscitation, there were increased lactate/pyruvate ratios, indicative of local acidosis. A corresponding finding was not recorded systemically. We conclude that MD is a promising tool for depicting local metabolic processes that are not fully appreciated when examined systemically. Because the local response in glucose, lactate, and pyruvate metabolism seems to differ from that recorded systemically, this technique may offer a new method of monitoring organs. © 2006 Samuelsson et al., licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 190.
    Samuelsson, Carolina
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden; Halland Hospital, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Karlstrom, Goran
    Swedish Intens Care Registry, Sweden.
    Nolin, Thomas
    Kristianstad Central Hospital, Sweden.
    Walther, Sten
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Gender differences in outcome and use of resources do exist in Swedish intensive care, but to no advantage for women of premenopausal age2015In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 19, no 129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Preclinical data indicate that oestrogen appears to play a beneficial role in the pathophysiology of and recovery from critical illness. In few previous epidemiologic studies, however, have researchers analysed premenopausal women as a separate group when addressing potential gender differences in critical care outcome. Our aim was to see if women of premenopausal age have a better outcome following critical care and to investigate the association between gender and use of intensive care unit (ICU) resources. Methods: On the basis of our analysis of 127,254 consecutive Simplified Acute Physiology Score III-scored Swedish Intensive Care Registry ICU admissions from 2008 through 2012, we determined the risk-adjusted 30-day mortality, accumulated nurse workload score and ICU length of stay. To investigate associations with sex, we used logistic regression and multivariate analyses on the entire cohort as well as on two subgroups stratified by median age for menopause (up to and including 45 years and older than 45 years) and six selected diagnostic subgroups (sepsis, multiple trauma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia and cardiac arrest). Results: There was no sex difference in risk-adjusted mortality for the cohort as a whole, and there was no sex difference in risk-adjusted mortality in the group 45 years of age and younger. For the group of patients older than 45 years of age, we found a reduced risk-adjusted mortality in men admitted for cardiac arrest. For the cohort as a whole, and for those admitted with multiple trauma, male sex was associated with a higher nurse workload score and a longer ICU stay. Conclusions: Using information derived from a large multiple ICU register database, we found that premenopausal female sex was not associated with a survival advantage following intensive care in Sweden. When the data were adjusted for age and severity of illness, we found that men used more ICU resources per admission than women did.

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  • 191.
    Samuelsson, Line
    et al.
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Östersund), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Tydén, Jonas
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Östersund), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Herwald, Heiko
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Walldén, Jakob
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Sundsvall) Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA). Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Johansson, Joakim
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Östersund), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Renal clearance of heparin-binding protein and elimination during renal replacement therapy: Studies in ICU patients and healthy volunteers2019In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 8, article id e0221813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is released by neutrophils upon activation, and elevated plasma levels are seen in inflammatory states like sepsis, shock, cardiac arrest, and burns. However, little is known about the elimination of HBP. We wanted to study renal clearance of HBP in healthy individuals and in burn patients in intensive care units (ICUs). We also wished to examine the levels of HBP in the effluent of renal replacement circuits in ICU patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT).less thanbr /greater thanMethods: We measured plasma and urine levels of HBP and urine flow rate in 8 healthy individuals and 20 patients in a burn ICU. In 32 patients on CRRT, we measured levels of HBP in plasma and in the effluent of the CRRT circuit.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Renal clearance of HBP (median (IQR) ml/min) was 0.19 (0.08-0.33) in healthy individuals and 0.30 (0.01-1.04) in burn ICU patients. In ICU patients with cystatin C levels exceeding 1.44 mg/l, clearance was 0.45 (0.15-2.81), and in patients with cystatin C below 1.44 mg/l clearance was lower 0.28 (0.14-0.55) (p = 0.04). Starting CRRT did not significantly alter plasma levels of HBP (p = 0.14), and the median HBP level in the effluent on CRRT was 9.1 ng/ml (IQR 7.8-14.4 ng/ml).less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: In healthy individuals and critically ill burn patients, renal clearance of HBP is low. It is increased when renal function is impaired. Starting CRRT in critically ill patients does not alter plasma levels of HBP significantly, but HBP can be found in the effluent. It seems unlikely that impaired kidney function needs to be considered when interpreting concentrations of HBP in previous studies. Starting CRRT does not appear to be an effective way of reducing HBP concentrations.

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  • 192.
    Shahin, Hady
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Modern Sci & Arts Univ, Egypt.
    Abdallah, Sallam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Das, Jyotirmoy
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Core Facility.
    He, Weihai
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    El Serafi, Ibrahim
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ajman Univ, U Arab Emirates; Port Said Univ, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elserafy, Ahmed
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    miRNome and Proteome Profiling of Human Keratinocytes and Adipose Derived Stem Cells Proposed miRNA-Mediated Regulations of Epidermal Growth Factor and Interleukin 1-Alpha2023In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1661-6596, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 24, no 5, article id 4956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wound healing is regulated by complex crosstalk between keratinocytes and other cell types, including stem cells. In this study, a 7-day direct co-culture model of human keratinocytes and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) was proposed to study the interaction between the two cell types, in order to identify regulators of ADSCs differentiation toward the epidermal lineage. As major mediators of cell communication, miRNome and proteome profiles in cell lysates of cultured human keratinocytes and ADSCs were explored through experimental and computational analyses. GeneChip(R) miRNA microarray, identified 378 differentially expressed miRNAs; of these, 114 miRNAs were upregulated and 264 miRNAs were downregulated in keratinocytes. According to miRNA target prediction databases and the Expression Atlas database, 109 skin-related genes were obtained. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed 14 pathways including vesicle-mediated transport, signaling by interleukin, and others. Proteome profiling showed a significant upregulation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and Interleukin 1-alpha (IL-1 alpha) compared to ADSCs. Integrated analysis through cross-matching the differentially expressed miRNA and proteins suggested two potential pathways for regulations of epidermal differentiation; the first is EGF-based through the downregulation of miR-485-5p and miR-6765-5p and/or the upregulation of miR-4459. The second is mediated by IL-1 alpha overexpression through four isomers of miR-30-5p and miR-181a-5p.

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  • 193.
    Shahin, Hady
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Modern Sci & Arts Univ, Egypt.
    Belcastro, Luigi
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Das, Jyotirmoy
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Core Facility.
    Perdiki Grigoriadi, Marina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Saager, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elserafy, Ahmed
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    MicroRNA-155 mediates multiple gene regulations pertinent to the role of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in skin regeneration2024In: Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology, E-ISSN 2296-4185, Vol. 12, article id 1328504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The role of Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) in skin wound healing remains to be fully characterized. This study aims to evaluate the regenerative potential of autologous AD-MSCs in a non-healing porcine wound model, in addition to elucidate key miRNA-mediated epigenetic regulations that underlie the regenerative potential of AD-MSCs in wounds.Methods: The regenerative potential of autologous AD-MSCs was evaluated in porcine model using histopathology and spatial frequency domain imaging. Then, the correlations between miRNAs and proteins of AD-MSCs were evaluated using an integration analysis in primary human AD-MSCs in comparison to primary human keratinocytes. Transfection study of AD-MSCs was conducted to validate the bioinformatics data.Results: Autologous porcine AD-MSCs improved wound epithelialization and skin properties in comparison to control wounds. We identified 26 proteins upregulated in human AD-MSCs, including growth and angiogenic factors, chemokines and inflammatory cytokines. Pathway enrichment analysis highlighted cell signalling-associated pathways and immunomodulatory pathways. miRNA-target modelling revealed regulations related to genes encoding for 16 upregulated proteins. miR-155-5p was predicted to regulate Fibroblast growth factor 2 and 7, C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 and Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Transfecting human AD-MSCs cell line with anti-miR-155 showed transient gene silencing of the four proteins at 24 h post-transfection.Discussion: This study proposes a positive miR-155-mediated gene regulation of key factors involved in wound healing. The study represents a promising approach for miRNA-based and cell-free regenerative treatment for difficult-to-heal wounds. The therapeutic potential of miR-155 and its identified targets should be further explored in-vivo.

  • 194.
    Shahin, Hady
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Modern Sciences and Arts University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Markland, Katrin
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Pontus
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    El-Serafi, Ahmed Taher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Human serum albumin as a clinically accepted cell carrier solution for skin regenerative application2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 14486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rules governing Medicinal Products in the European Union necessitates the production of cell-based therapy in good manufacturing practice facilities. The produced cells may need several hours in transportation to reach the application sites. In this study, we investigated four candidate solutions for transporting human keratinocytes. The solutions are (1) normal saline, (2) saline with 2.5% human serum albumin (Saline + HSA), (3) chemically defined, xeno-free keratinocyte media and (4) keratinocyte media with pituitary bovine extract (PBE-media). One million keratinocytes from three donors were suspended in each solution and kept at 4 °C for up to 24 h. Cells kept in Saline + HSA showed higher viability after 1, 3 and 24 h. Then, equal number of viable cells were seeded on collagenous matrix and cultured for 48 h. The adhesion and colonization were higher in the cells kept in PBE-media, while the keratinocyte surface marker, cytokeratin 14, was present in all studied groups. These results confirmed the suitability of Saline + HSA as a cell transportation solution for clinical use, which will be the choice for the planned clinical trial. Keratinocyte PBE-media can be an alternative for cells transported for research purpose, if the same media type is going to be used in the following experiments.

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  • 195.
    Shahin, Hady
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. MSA University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    El-Serafi, Ahmed Taher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vascularization is the next challenge for skin tissue engineering as a solution for burn management2020In: Burns & trauma, ISSN 2321-3868, Vol. 8, article id tkaa022Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin regeneration represents a promising line of management for patients with skin loss, including burn victims. The current approach of spraying single cells over the defective areas results in variable success rates in different centers. The modern approach is to synthesize a multilayer skin construct that is based on autologous stem cells. One of the main complications with different types of transplants is sloughing due to the absence of proper vascularization. Ensuring proper vascularization will be crucial for the integration of skin constructs with the surrounding tissues. Combination of the right cells with scaffolds of proper physico-chemical properties, vascularization can be markedly enhanced. The material effect, pore size and adsorption of certain proteins, as well as the application of appropriate growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factors, can have an additive effect. A selection of the most effective protocols is discussed in this review.

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  • 196.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Combined neuraxial and general anaesthesia - A dangerous combination? [6]2007In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 265Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 197.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre.
    Combined neuraxial and general anaesthesia - Do not ignore complications2008In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 161-162Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 198.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Fluid therapy in burns2012In: Acta Medica Lituanica, ISSN 1392-0138, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 213-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outcome after burn injury, as also paralleled by other trauma, has been improving steadily over the years. In this aspect a significant improvement was seen especially in the 1970-ties when the 50% survival chance from a burn injury increased from 45% total body surface area burned (TBSA%) in a 21 year old patient up to almost 80% (TBSA%). Although this improvement may be claimed to have many reasons, a significant one that needs to be stressed is the introduction of more thorough use of protocolized fluid treatment strategies

  • 199.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Focus on early Phase Studies in Humans: A New Concept for the Conduct of Phase 0/1/IIaStudies2005In: Global Outsourcing Review, ISSN 1344-8439, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 36-38Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 200.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Incidents Caused by Fire and Toxic Gas2012In: Medical Response to Major Incidents and Disasters: A Practical Guide for All Medical Staff / [ed] Sten Lennquist, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, p. 197-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning for major incidents includes knowledge of and routines for mastering the effects of thermal injury. It is important to realize that such skills are not only needed in large isolated fires but are important in other types of incidents as well because burn injuries may be present among other injuries. When describing modern planning for response to major burn incidents, it is important to be aware that modern burn care has changed significantly as medical progress has been made within this field, especially during the last decades. This implies that modern management of major burn injuries also has changed, which underlines the need for proper planning, management, and training. Addressing such issues, this chapter also describes other facts with implications for burn disaster management. One is that the incidence and prevalence of burns are declining and have been approximately 30% for the last 20 years, and burn care is concomitantly being centralized in many parts of the western world. Consequently, medical staff at different levels of care throughout various countries will have less practical experience in the field of burns. The described changes have implications for the modern management of major burn incidents. Lastly, an increased international cooperation and exchange of ideas have made burn care more global, especially when those injured in recent accidents have been transported between countries over long distances.

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