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  • 51.
    Larsen, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Bäckström, Denise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Decreased risk adjusted 30-day mortality for hospital admitted injuries: a multi-centre longitudinal study2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 26, no 1, article id 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The interpretation of changes in injury-related mortality over time requires an understanding of changes in the incidence of the various types of injury, and adjustment for their severity. Our aim was to investigate changes over time in incidence of hospital admission for injuries caused by falls, traffic incidents, or assaults, and to assess the risk-adjusted short-term mortality for these patients.less thanbr /greater thanMethods: All patients admitted to hospital with injuries caused by falls, traffic incidents, or assaults during the years 2001-11 in Sweden were identified from the nationwide population-based Patient Registry. The trend in mortality over time for each cause of injury was adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity and severity of injury as classified from the International Classification of diseases, version 10 Injury Severity Score (ICISS).less thanbr /greater thanResults: Both the incidence of fall (689 to 636/100000 inhabitants: p = 0.047, coefficient - 4.71) and traffic related injuries (169 to 123/100000 inhabitants: p less than 0.0001, coefficient - 5.37) decreased over time while incidence of assault related injuries remained essentially unchanged during the study period. There was an overall decrease in risk-adjusted 30-day mortality in all three groups (OR 1.00; CI95% 0.99-1.00). Decreases in traffic (OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.93 to 0.97) and assault (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.87 to 0.99) related injuries was significant whereas falls were not during this 11-year period.less thanbr /greater thanDiscussion: Risk-adjustment is a good way to use big materials to find epidemiological changes. However after adjusting for age, year, sex and risk we find that a possible factor is left in the pre- and/or in-hospital care.less thanbr /greater thanConclusions: The decrease in risk-adjusted mortality may suggest changes over time in pre- and/or in-hospital care. A non-significantdecrease in risk-adjusted mortality was registered for falls, which may indicate that low-energy trauma has not benefited for the increased survivability as much as high-energy trauma, ie traffic- and assault related injuries.

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  • 52.
    Larsen, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Bäckström, Denise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping. Life Regiment Hussars, K3 Karlsborg, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Rolf, Gedeborg
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Female risk-adjusted survival advantage after injuries caused by falls, traffic or assault: a nationwide 11-year study2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 27, no 1, article id 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A female survival advantage after injury has been observed, and animal models of trauma have suggested either hormonal or genetic mechanisms as component causes. Our aim was to compare age and riskadjusted sex-related mortality in hospital for the three most common mechanisms of injury in relation to hormonal effects as seen by age.

    Methods: All hospital admissions for injury in Sweden during the period 2001–2011 were retrieved from the National Patient Registry and linked to the Cause of Death Registry. The International Classification of Diseases Injury Severity Score (ICISS) was used to adjust for injury severity, and the Charlson Comorbidity Index to adjust for comorbidity. Age categories (0–14, 15–50, and ≥ 51 years) were used to represent pre-menarche, reproductive and post- menopausal women.

    Results: Women had overall a survival benefit (OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.50 to 0.53) after adjustment for injury severity and comorbidity. A similar pattern was seen across the age categories (0–14 years OR 0.56 (95% CI 0.25 to 1.25), 15–50 years OR 0.70 (95% CI 0.57 to 0.87), and ≥ 51 years OR 0.49 (95% CI 0.48 to 0.51)).

    Conclusion: In this 11-year population-based study we found no support for an oestrogen-related mechanism to explain the survival advantage for females compared to males following hospitalisation for injury.

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  • 53.
    Larsson Viksten, Jessica
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engerström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Children aged 0-16 admitted to Swedish intensive care units and paediatric intensive care units showed low mortality rates.2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 8, p. 1460-1466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study described the basic characteristics of children aged 0-16 years who were treated in intensive care units (ICUs) and paediatric ICUs (PICUs), compared their outcomes and examined any causes of death.

    METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of admissions to 74 ICUs and three PICUs in Sweden that were recorded in the Swedish Intensive Care Registry from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2012.

    RESULTS: We retrieved data on 12 756 children who were admitted 17 003 times. The case mix differed between the ICUs, which were mainly admissions for injuries, accidents and observation, and PICUs, which were mainly admissions for malformations, genetic abnormalities and respiratory problems (p < 0.001). The median stays in the ICUs and PICUs were 1.4 and 3.5 days (p < 0.001), respectively. The respective crude mortality rates were 1.1% and 2.0, and the Paediatric Index of Mortality version 2 standardised mortality ratios were 0.43 and 0.50. None of these differences were significant. Most deaths were within 24 hours: About 57% in the ICUs, mainly from brain anomalies, and 13% in the PICUs, mainly from circulatory problems.

    CONCLUSION: Sweden had a low mortality rate in both ICUs and PICUs and the children admitted to these two types of unit differed.

  • 54.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Letter: Patient controlled sedation using a standard protocol for dressing changes in burns: Patients preference, procedural details and a preliminary safety evaluation. Are studies always adequately powered and analyzed? Response2010In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 948-950Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 55.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Liköping University hospital.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Patient controlled sedation using a standard protocol for dressing changes in burns: Patients' preference, procedural details and a preliminary safety evaluation2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 929-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patient controlled sedation (PCS) enables patients to titrate doses of drugs by themselves during different procedures involving pain or discomfort. Methods: We studied it in a prospective crossover design using a fixed protocol without lockout time to examine it as an alternative method of sedation for changing dressings in burned patients. Eleven patients with >10% total burn surface area (TBSA) had their dressings changed, starting with sedation by an anaesthetist (ACS). The second dressing change was done with PCS (propofol/alfentanil) and the third time the patients had to choose ACS or PCS. During the procedures, data on cardiopulmonary variables, sedation (bispectral index), pain intensity (VAS), procedural details, doses of drugs, and patients' preferences were collected to compare the two sedation techniques. Results: The study data indicated that wound care in burned patients is feasible with a standardized PCS protocol. The patients preferred PCS to ACS on the basis of self-control, and because they had less discomfort during the recovery period. Wound care was also considered adequate by the staff during PCS. No respiratory (respiratory rate/transcutaneous PCO2) or cardiovascular (heart rate/blood pressure) adverse events were recorded at any time during any of the PCS procedures. The doses of propofol and alfentanil and BIS index decrease were less during PCS than ACS. Procedural pain was higher during PCS but lower after the procedure. Conclusion: We suggest that PCS using a standard protocol is an interesting alternative to anaesthetist-provided sedation during dressing changes. It seems effective, saves resources, is safe, and at same time is preferred by the patients. The strength of these conclusions is, however, hampered by the small size of this investigation and therefore further studies are warranted. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

  • 56.
    Nööjd, Mari
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Wyckman, Alexander
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Flap Survival after Reconstructive Surgery for Pressure Ulcers: A Cohort Study2023In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open, E-ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 11, no 12, p. e5451-e5451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pressure ulcers are troublesome for patients and require considerable resources to resolve. Previous studies have focused on recurrence, whereas there are few studies on flap survival. The aim was to describe the group and to analyze possible factors for flap survival.

    Method: A descriptive retrospective analysis of all operations between 2008 and 2020 was carried out. Flap survival at 40 days was assessed. A flap was classified as a failure if a reoperation with removal or replacement was planned before, or in connection with, the first return visit. Variables of patient demographics, details of the pressure ulcers, and surgical treatment and care were analyzed with multivariable logistic regression for their effect on flap survival.

    Results: A total of 111 flaps were included [78 (70%) with random blood supply and 33 (30%) with axial or perforator-based blood supply]; 54 (49%) of the flaps were fasciocutaneous. Body mass index was 25 (IQR 22–28). Flap survival rate was 90%. Variables associated with flap failure were higher body mass index, congenital spinal cord injury, type of blood supply to the flap, and the use of methylene blue to guide debridement of the wound.

    Conclusions: The findings show factors that can be modified to improve future results, including a normalized body mass index and use of methylene blue in surgery to outline wound edges and depth, as this has been shown to protect against flap failure. Our data suggest that random flaps, such as V-Y, are preferable to axial flaps in the studied group.

  • 57.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Drake Af Hagelsrum, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Ydenius, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Patient Reported Experiences at a Swedish National Burn Centre2022In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 249-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that burn patients were satisfied with the received care. Satisfaction was not strongly associated to burns or to psycho-social characteristics, suggesting that other factors, related to burn care specific aspects, may be important. The aim of this study was to analyze the independent effect of provided workload on the general satisfaction in adult patients at a Swedish national Burn Centre. The study population (n = 122) included patients ≥18 years, treated at the Linköping Burn Centre between 2016 and 2017. Experienced burn care was evaluated with the PS-RESKA survey (score range: 0-4), and provided workload was scored with the Burn Scoring System (BSC). Groups were compared with χ 2 test, MW test, or Fisher´s exact test. Multivariable logistic regression analyzed the independent effect of BSC on the outcome High Satisfaction (= score ≥3 to the survey-question: "How would you score your global experience at the Burn Centre?"). In-patients (n = 60) had more often larger burns and required more workload than out-patients (median[IQR]: TBSA% = 6.3 [3-12.3] % vs. 0.7 [0.3-2] %, p < .001; BSC = 65 [25.5-135.5] vs. 6 [4-9], p < .001). Both groups were highly satisfied with the experienced care (mean score [SD] = 3.68 [0.57] vs. 3.41 [0.77], p = .03). Neither characteristics of the patients (age, sex), nor TBSA% nor provided workload (BSC) were independently associated with High Satisfaction. Regardless of burn severity, demographics and provided workload, adult patients with burns were highly satisfied with the experienced burn care. This finding suggested that the reason of the satisfaction was multifactorial.

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  • 58.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Department of Surgery, Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Are there any differences in the provided burn care between men and women? A retrospective study2018In: Burns & Trauma, E-ISSN 2321-3876, Vol. 6, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Disparity between medical treatment for men and women has been recorded worldwide. However, it is difficult to find out if the disparities in both the use of resources and outcome depend entirely on sex-related discrimination. Our aim was to investigate if there are differences in burn treatments between the sexes.

    Methods

    All patients admitted with burns to Linköping University Hospital during the 16-year period 2000–2015 were included. Interventions were prospectively recorded using the validated Burn SCoring system (BSC). Data were analysed using a multivariable panel regression model adjusted for age, percentage total body surface area (%TBSA), and in-hospital mortality.

    Results

    A total of 1363 patients were included, who generated a total of 22,301 daily recordings while they were inpatients. Males were 70% (930/1363). Sex was not an independent factor for daily scores after adjustment for age, %TBSA, and mortality in hospital (model R2=0.60, p < 0.001).

    Conclusion

    We found no evidence of inequity between the sexes in treatments given in our burn centre when we had adjusted for size of burn, age, and mortality. BSC seems to be an appropriate model in which to evaluate sex-related differences in the delivery of treatments.

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  • 59.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Self-inflicted burns in a National Swedish Burn Centre [BRÛLURES VOLONTAIRES DANS UN CTB SUÉDOIS]: an overview [REVUE D’UNE SÉRIE]2019In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 272-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Western world, self-inflicted burns are often associated with mental health disorders, and the management, particularly the pain treatment, can often be complicated by the psycho-social background of the patients. The aim was to describe a group of patients with self-inflicted burns by analysing their in-hospital mortality and the use of sedation during procedures. All patients with self-inflicted burns admitted to the Linköping Burn Centre during 2000-2017 were included. The control group consisted of adults (≥17 years) with accidental burns, admitted during the same period. Multivariable logistic and linear regression was used for analysis. Three percent of all patients (47/1601) had self-inflicted burns: most of them were men (60%, 28/47), none was younger than 17 years, and flame was the major cause of injury. Self-inflicted burn patients were younger and had larger burns: mean age (SD) was 42 (16) and 49 (20) years, respectively; mean TBSA (SD) was 29% (26) and 14% (17), respectively. The crude rate of procedures done under sedation was higher (mean (SD) 0.37 (0.23) compared with 0.24 (0.25)) as was crude in-hospital mortality (8/47, 17% compared with 72/1018, 7%). Multivariable analyses showed no difference in the use of sedation for procedures or in-hospital mortality after adjustment for TBSA%, full thickness burns, age and sex. Age and TBSA% were associated with in-hospital mortality, whereas the intentionality of the burn was not. TBSA% and female sex were associated with increased use of sedation for wound care procedures, whereas self-inflicted burns were not.

  • 60.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Jose, Adorno
    Reg Hosp, Brazil.
    Nikki, Allorto
    Univ KwaZulu Natal, South Africa; Univ KwaZulu Natal, South Africa.
    Khaled, Altarrah
    Alsabah Hlth Reg, Kuwait.
    Barret, Juan
    Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Jeffery, Carter
    Louisiana State Univ, LA USA.
    Shobha, Chamania
    Choithram Hosp & Res Ctr, India.
    Jack, Chong Si
    Singapore Gen Hosp, Singapore.
    Scott, Corlew
    Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Nadia, Depetris
    Citta Salute & Sci Torino, Italy.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Liao, Junlin
    Univ Iowa, IA 52242 USA.
    Josef, Haik
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel; Sheba Med Ctr, Israel.
    Briana, Horwath
    Univ Iowa, IA 52242 USA.
    Sunil, Keswani
    Natl Burns Ctr Airoli, India.
    Tetsuro, Kiyozumi
    Natl Def Med Coll, Japan.
    Jorge, Leon-Villapalos
    Chelsea & Westminster Hosp, England.
    Gaoxing, Luo
    Army Third Mil Med Univ, Peoples R China.
    Hajime, Matsumura
    Tokyo Med Univ, Japan.
    Ariel, Miranda-Altamirano
    Hosp Civil Guadalajara, Mexico.
    Naiem, Moiemen
    Birmingham Womens & Childrens Hosp, England; Univ Birmingham, England.
    Kiran, Nakarmi
    Kirtipur Hosp, Nepal.
    Nawar, Ahmed
    Cairo Univ, Egypt.
    Faustin, Ntirenganya
    Univ Rwanda, Rwanda.
    Anthony, Olekwu
    Fed Med Ctr Owo, Nigeria.
    Tom, Potokar
    Swansea Univ, Wales; Swansea Univ, Wales.
    Liang, Qiao
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Man, Rai Shankar
    Kirtipur Hosp, Nepal; Natl Acad Med Sci, Nepal.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Ahmed, Tanveer
    Sheikh Hasina Natl Inst Burn & Plast Surg, Bangladesh.
    Molina, Philipe Luiz Vana
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Shelley, Wall
    Univ KwaZulu Natal, South Africa; Univ KwaZulu Natal, South Africa; Univ KwaZulu Natal, South Africa.
    Mark, Fisher
    Univ Iowa, IA 52242 USA.
    Impact of COVID-19 on global burn care2022In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1301-1310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Worldwide, different strategies have been chosen to face the COVID-19-patient surge, often affecting access to health care for other patients. This observational study aimed to investigate whether the standard of burn care changed globally during the pan-demic, and whether country acute accent s income, geographical location, COVID-19-transmission pat-tern, and levels of specialization of the burn units affected reallocation of resources and access to burn care.Methods: The Burn Care Survey is a questionnaire developed to collect information on the capacity to provide burn care by burn units around the world, before and during the pandemic. The survey was distributed between September and October 2020. McNemar`s test analyzed differences between services provided before and during the pandemic, chi 2 or Fishers exact test differences between groups. Multivariable logistic regression analyzed the independent effect of different factors on keeping the burn units open during the pandemic.Results: The survey was completed by 234 burn units in 43 countries. During the pandemic, presence of burn surgeons did not change (p = 0.06), while that of anesthetists and dedi-cated nursing staff was reduced (&lt; 0.01), and so did the capacity to manage patients in all age groups (p = 0.04). Use of telemedicine was implemented (p &lt; 0.01), collaboration be-tween burn centers was not. Burn units in LMICs and LICs were more likely to be closed, after adjustment for other factors.Conclusions: During the pandemic, most burn units were open, although availability of standard resources diminished worldwide. The use of telemedicine increased, suggesting the implementation of new strategies to manage burns. Low income was independently associated with reduced access to burn care.(c) 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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  • 61.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Eladany, Mostafa M.
    Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Long-term mortality after self-inflicted burns2024In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 252-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Those with self-inflicted burns are a small but consistent group among burn patients, with large injuries and conflicting findings regarding their in-hospital mortality. Overall, burn survivors have a shorter life expectancy, as compared with national controls, but long-term mortality after self-inflicted burns is understudied. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate possible differences in long-term mortality among survivors after self-inflicted and accidental burns.Methods: All adult patients with burns admitted at the Linkoping Burn Centre and discharged alive between 2000 and 2017 were included, and end of follow up was April 26, 2021. Those with unknown survival status at that time were excluded. A Cox proportional hazards regression model, adjusted for age and sex, was used to analyse long term mortality.Results: Among the 930 patients included in this study, 37 had self-inflicted burns. Overall, median follow up period was 8.8 years and crude mortality was 24.7%. After adjustment for age and sex, self-inflicted burns were independently associated with long-term mortality, Hazard Ratio= 2.08 (95% CI 1.13-3.83). Post hoc analysis showed that the effect was most pronounced during the first years after discharge although it was noticeable over the whole study period.Conclusion: Long-term risk of mortality after discharge from a burn centre was higher in patients with self-inflicted burns than in patients with accidental burns. The effect was noticeable over the whole study period although it was most pronounced during the first years after discharge.

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  • 62.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: a national exploratory study2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 280-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The Baux score - the sum of age and total body surface area burned (TBSA %) - is a good predictor of mortality has a high specificity but low sensitivity. Our aim was to examine the causes of death in patients who die with Baux scores of <100, which may explain the lower sensitivity and possibly affect the prediction of mortality.

    METHODS: All patients admitted to our centre for burn care from 1993 to 2015 (n=1946) were included in this retrospective, descriptive, exploratory study. The study group comprised those patients who died with Baux scores of <100 (n=23), and their medical charts were examined for the cause of death and for coexisting diseases.

    RESULTS: Crude mortality was 5% (93/1946) for the overall cohort, and a quarter of the patients who died (23/93) had Baux scores of less than 100 (range 64-99). In this latter group, flame burns were the most common (18/23), the median (10th-90th centile) age was 70 (46-86) years and for TBSA 21 (5.0-40.5) %, of which 7 (0-27.0) % of the area was full thickness. The main causes of death in 17 of the 23 were classified as "other than burn", being cerebral disease (n=9), cardiovascular disease (n=6), and respiratory failure (n=2). Among the remaining six (burn-related) deaths, multiple organ failure (predominantly renal failure) was responsible. When we excluded the cases in which the cause of death was not related to the burn, the Baux mortality prediction value improved (receiver operating characteristics area under the curve, AUC) from 0.9733 (95% CI 0.9633-0.9834) to 0.9888 (95% CI 0.9839-0.9936) and the sensitivity estimate increased from 45.2% to 53.9%.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with burns who died with a Baux score <100 were a quarter of all the patients who died. An important finding is that most of these deaths were caused by reasons other than the burn, usually cerebrovascular disease. This may be the explanation why the sensitivity of the Baux score is low, as factors other than age and TBSA % explain the fatal outcome.

  • 63.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Response to comments on: Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: A national exploratory study2017In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 1827-1827Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 64.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Inclusion of coexisting morbidity in a TBSA% and age based model for the prediction of mortality after burns does not increase its predictive power2015In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1868-1876Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several models for predicting mortality have been developed for patients with burns, and the most commonly used are based on age and total body surface area (TBSA%). They often show good predictive precision as depicted by high values for area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). However the effect of coexisting morbidity on such prediction models has not to our knowledge been thoroughly examined. We hypothesised that adding it to a previously published model (based on age, TBSA%, full thickness burns, gender, and need for mechanical ventilation) would further improve its predictive power. Methods: We studied 772 patients admitted during the period 1997-2008 to the Linkoping University Hospital, National Burn Centre with any type of burns. We defined coexisting morbidity as any of the medical conditions listed in the Charlson list, as well as psychiatric disorders or drug or alcohol misuse. We added coexisting medical conditions to the model for predicting mortality (age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation) to determine whether it improved the model as assessed by changes in deviances between the models. Results: Mean (SD) age and TBSA% was 35 (26) years and 13 (17) %, respectively. Among 725 patients who survived, 105 (14%) had one or more coexisting condition, compared with 28 (60%) among those 47 who died. The presence of coexisting conditions increased with age (p &lt; 0.001) among patients with burns. The AUC of the mortality prediction model in this study, based on the variables age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation was 0.980 (n = 772); after inclusion of coexisting morbidity in the model, the AUC improved only marginally, to 0.986. The model was not significantly better either. Conclusion: Adding coexisting morbidity to a model for prediction of mortality after a burn based on age, TBSA%, and the need for mechanical ventilation did not significantly improve its predictive value. This is probably because coexisting morbidity is automatically adjusted for by age in the original model. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

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  • 65.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Long-term survival after burns in a Swedish population2017In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 157-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: As widely reported, the progress in burn care during recent decades has reduced the hospital mortality. The effect of the burns on long-term outcome has not received so much attention, and more study is indicated. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the long-time survival among patients who had been treated for burns.

    METHODS: We studied 1487 patients who were discharged alive from the Linköping University Hospital Burn Centre during the period 1993 until the end of December 2012. We used Cox's regression analysis to study the effect of burns on long-term survival after adjustment for different factors.

    RESULTS: Age and a full-thickness burn were significantly associated with mortality after discharge (p<0.001), whereas percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA %), need for mechanical ventilation, and gender were not. Less than 1% of the patients with burns (13/1487) died within 30 days of discharge and a total of 176/1487 (12%) died during follow-up.

    CONCLUSION: Age and full-thickness burns reduce the long-time survival after discharge from the Burn Centre, whereas the effect of TBSA% and need for artificial ventilation ends with discharge.

  • 66.
    Rakkolainen, Ilmari
    et al.
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki Burn Centre, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Surgery Department, Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt .
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vuola, Jyrki
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki Burn Centre, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    N-Terminal Brain Natriuretic Peptide First Week After Burn Injury2018In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 805-810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    B-type natriuretic peptide has shown promising results as a biomarker for acute kidney injury in general intensive care patients. It may also indirectly reflect fluid balance of the circulation. Among burn patients, it has been observed to indicate excessive fluid resuscitation and organ dysfunction, although its clinical use to indicate acute kidney injury or guide fluid resuscitation has not been validated. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values are related to the amount of fluids given after severe burn injury and whether it can act as a novel biomarker for acute kidney injury in these patients. Nineteen consecutive burn patients were included. Plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide was measured daily during 1 week from admission. Other variables such as laboratory values and intravenous infusions were also recorded. The association between acute kidney injury and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values was analyzed with a multivariable panel regression model, adjusted for burned total body surface area, age, body mass index, and laboratory values. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values varied between single patients, and even more between the patients who developed acute kidney injury. Older age, lower body mass index, and cumulative infusions were independently associated with higher N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values, whereas acute kidney injury was not. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values correlated with cumulative infusions given during the first week. The authors could not validate the role of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as a biomarker for acute kidney injury in burns.

  • 67.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinwall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Woodson, RD
    Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hyperoxia decreases cutaneous blood flow in high-perfusion areas2007In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism by which hyperoxia decreases blood flow is still not understood. Hyperoxemia-induced vasoconstriction is known to occur in many organs, including brain and retina, skeletal muscle, and myocardium. Whether this also occurs in skin is unknown.

    This study was conducted in healthy volunteers exposed intermittently to 100% oxygen (FIO2 1.0). Perfusion of forearm skin was measured by laser Doppler imaging (LDI). In series 1, it was measured in 7 subjects before, during, and after 15 min of oxygen breathing. In series 2, flow was measured, also during air and O2 breathing, after perfusion was raised by (a) sympathetic blockade (induced by a topically applied local anesthetic) (n = 9) and by (b) current-induced vasodilation (n = 8).

    In normal unperturbed skin, there was no significant change with hyperoxia. When basal perfusion was raised by topical anesthesia or by current, there was also no change in mean perfusion overall with hyperoxia. However, areas with the highest perfusion (upper decile) showed a significant perfusion decrement with hyperoxia (− 30% and − 20%, respectively; p < 0.001).

    Vasoconstriction with hyperoxia has been demonstrated in human skin. The fact that it is observed only when flow is increased above basal levels and then only in high-flow vessels suggests that cutaneous blood flow control is primarily regulated by variables other than oxygen.

  • 68.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Microdialysis shows metabolic effects in skin during fluid resuscitation in burn-injured patients2006In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 10, no 6, p. Art.no: R172-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Established fluid treatment formulas for burn injuries have been challenged as studies have shown the presence of tissue hypoxia during standard resuscitation. Such findings suggest monitoring at the tissue level. This study was performed in patients with major burn injuries to evaluate the microdialysis technique for the continuous assessment of skin metabolic changes during fluid resuscitation and up to four days postburn. Methods: We conducted an experimental study in patients with a burn injury, as represented by percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA), of more than 25% in a university eight-bed burns intensive care unit serving about 3.5 million inhabitants. Six patients with a median TBSA percentage of 59% (range 33.5% to 90%) and nine healthy controls were examined by intracutaneous MD, in which recordings of glucose, pyruvate, lactate, glycerol, and urea were performed. Results: Blood glucose concentration peaked on day two at 9.8 mmol/l (6.8 to 14.0) (median and range) and gradually declined on days three and four, whereas skin glucose in MD continued to increase throughout the study period with maximum values on day four, 8.7 mmol/l (4.9 to 11.0). Controls had significantly lower skin glucose values compared with burn patients, 3.1 mmol/l (1.5 to 4.6) (p < 0.001). Lactate from burn patients was significantly higher than controls in both injured and uninjured skin (MD), 4.6 mmol/l (1.3 to 8.9) and 3.8 mmol/l (1.6 to 7.5), respectively (p < 0.01). The skin lactate/pyruvate ratio (MD) was significantly increased in burn patients on all days (p < 0.001). Skin glycerol (MD) was significantly increased at days three and four in burn patients compared with controls (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite a strategy that fulfilled conventional goals for resuscitation, there were increased lactate/pyruvate ratios, indicative of local acidosis. A corresponding finding was not recorded systemically. We conclude that MD is a promising tool for depicting local metabolic processes that are not fully appreciated when examined systemically. Because the local response in glucose, lactate, and pyruvate metabolism seems to differ from that recorded systemically, this technique may offer a new method of monitoring organs. © 2006 Samuelsson et al., licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 69.
    Samuelsson, Line
    et al.
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Östersund), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Tydén, Jonas
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Östersund), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Herwald, Heiko
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Walldén, Jakob
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Sundsvall) Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA). Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Johansson, Joakim
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Östersund), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Renal clearance of heparin-binding protein and elimination during renal replacement therapy: Studies in ICU patients and healthy volunteers2019In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 8, article id e0221813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is released by neutrophils upon activation, and elevated plasma levels are seen in inflammatory states like sepsis, shock, cardiac arrest, and burns. However, little is known about the elimination of HBP. We wanted to study renal clearance of HBP in healthy individuals and in burn patients in intensive care units (ICUs). We also wished to examine the levels of HBP in the effluent of renal replacement circuits in ICU patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT).less thanbr /greater thanMethods: We measured plasma and urine levels of HBP and urine flow rate in 8 healthy individuals and 20 patients in a burn ICU. In 32 patients on CRRT, we measured levels of HBP in plasma and in the effluent of the CRRT circuit.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Renal clearance of HBP (median (IQR) ml/min) was 0.19 (0.08-0.33) in healthy individuals and 0.30 (0.01-1.04) in burn ICU patients. In ICU patients with cystatin C levels exceeding 1.44 mg/l, clearance was 0.45 (0.15-2.81), and in patients with cystatin C below 1.44 mg/l clearance was lower 0.28 (0.14-0.55) (p = 0.04). Starting CRRT did not significantly alter plasma levels of HBP (p = 0.14), and the median HBP level in the effluent on CRRT was 9.1 ng/ml (IQR 7.8-14.4 ng/ml).less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: In healthy individuals and critically ill burn patients, renal clearance of HBP is low. It is increased when renal function is impaired. Starting CRRT in critically ill patients does not alter plasma levels of HBP significantly, but HBP can be found in the effluent. It seems unlikely that impaired kidney function needs to be considered when interpreting concentrations of HBP in previous studies. Starting CRRT does not appear to be an effective way of reducing HBP concentrations.

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  • 70.
    Shahin, Hady
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Modern Sci & Arts Univ, Egypt.
    Abdallah, Sallam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Das, Jyotirmoy
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Core Facility.
    He, Weihai
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    El Serafi, Ibrahim
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ajman Univ, U Arab Emirates; Port Said Univ, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elserafy, Ahmed
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    miRNome and Proteome Profiling of Human Keratinocytes and Adipose Derived Stem Cells Proposed miRNA-Mediated Regulations of Epidermal Growth Factor and Interleukin 1-Alpha2023In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1661-6596, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 24, no 5, article id 4956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wound healing is regulated by complex crosstalk between keratinocytes and other cell types, including stem cells. In this study, a 7-day direct co-culture model of human keratinocytes and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) was proposed to study the interaction between the two cell types, in order to identify regulators of ADSCs differentiation toward the epidermal lineage. As major mediators of cell communication, miRNome and proteome profiles in cell lysates of cultured human keratinocytes and ADSCs were explored through experimental and computational analyses. GeneChip(R) miRNA microarray, identified 378 differentially expressed miRNAs; of these, 114 miRNAs were upregulated and 264 miRNAs were downregulated in keratinocytes. According to miRNA target prediction databases and the Expression Atlas database, 109 skin-related genes were obtained. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed 14 pathways including vesicle-mediated transport, signaling by interleukin, and others. Proteome profiling showed a significant upregulation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and Interleukin 1-alpha (IL-1 alpha) compared to ADSCs. Integrated analysis through cross-matching the differentially expressed miRNA and proteins suggested two potential pathways for regulations of epidermal differentiation; the first is EGF-based through the downregulation of miR-485-5p and miR-6765-5p and/or the upregulation of miR-4459. The second is mediated by IL-1 alpha overexpression through four isomers of miR-30-5p and miR-181a-5p.

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  • 71.
    Shahin, Hady
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Modern Sci & Arts Univ, Egypt.
    Belcastro, Luigi
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Das, Jyotirmoy
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Core Facility.
    Perdiki Grigoriadi, Marina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Saager, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elserafy, Ahmed
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    MicroRNA-155 mediates multiple gene regulations pertinent to the role of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in skin regeneration2024In: Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology, E-ISSN 2296-4185, Vol. 12, article id 1328504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The role of Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) in skin wound healing remains to be fully characterized. This study aims to evaluate the regenerative potential of autologous AD-MSCs in a non-healing porcine wound model, in addition to elucidate key miRNA-mediated epigenetic regulations that underlie the regenerative potential of AD-MSCs in wounds.Methods: The regenerative potential of autologous AD-MSCs was evaluated in porcine model using histopathology and spatial frequency domain imaging. Then, the correlations between miRNAs and proteins of AD-MSCs were evaluated using an integration analysis in primary human AD-MSCs in comparison to primary human keratinocytes. Transfection study of AD-MSCs was conducted to validate the bioinformatics data.Results: Autologous porcine AD-MSCs improved wound epithelialization and skin properties in comparison to control wounds. We identified 26 proteins upregulated in human AD-MSCs, including growth and angiogenic factors, chemokines and inflammatory cytokines. Pathway enrichment analysis highlighted cell signalling-associated pathways and immunomodulatory pathways. miRNA-target modelling revealed regulations related to genes encoding for 16 upregulated proteins. miR-155-5p was predicted to regulate Fibroblast growth factor 2 and 7, C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 and Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Transfecting human AD-MSCs cell line with anti-miR-155 showed transient gene silencing of the four proteins at 24 h post-transfection.Discussion: This study proposes a positive miR-155-mediated gene regulation of key factors involved in wound healing. The study represents a promising approach for miRNA-based and cell-free regenerative treatment for difficult-to-heal wounds. The therapeutic potential of miR-155 and its identified targets should be further explored in-vivo.

  • 72.
    Shahin, Hady
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Modern Sciences and Arts University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Markland, Katrin
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Pontus
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    El-Serafi, Ahmed Taher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Human serum albumin as a clinically accepted cell carrier solution for skin regenerative application2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 14486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rules governing Medicinal Products in the European Union necessitates the production of cell-based therapy in good manufacturing practice facilities. The produced cells may need several hours in transportation to reach the application sites. In this study, we investigated four candidate solutions for transporting human keratinocytes. The solutions are (1) normal saline, (2) saline with 2.5% human serum albumin (Saline + HSA), (3) chemically defined, xeno-free keratinocyte media and (4) keratinocyte media with pituitary bovine extract (PBE-media). One million keratinocytes from three donors were suspended in each solution and kept at 4 °C for up to 24 h. Cells kept in Saline + HSA showed higher viability after 1, 3 and 24 h. Then, equal number of viable cells were seeded on collagenous matrix and cultured for 48 h. The adhesion and colonization were higher in the cells kept in PBE-media, while the keratinocyte surface marker, cytokeratin 14, was present in all studied groups. These results confirmed the suitability of Saline + HSA as a cell transportation solution for clinical use, which will be the choice for the planned clinical trial. Keratinocyte PBE-media can be an alternative for cells transported for research purpose, if the same media type is going to be used in the following experiments.

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  • 73.
    Shahin, Hady
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. MSA University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    El-Serafi, Ahmed Taher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vascularization is the next challenge for skin tissue engineering as a solution for burn management2020In: Burns & trauma, ISSN 2321-3868, Vol. 8, article id tkaa022Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin regeneration represents a promising line of management for patients with skin loss, including burn victims. The current approach of spraying single cells over the defective areas results in variable success rates in different centers. The modern approach is to synthesize a multilayer skin construct that is based on autologous stem cells. One of the main complications with different types of transplants is sloughing due to the absence of proper vascularization. Ensuring proper vascularization will be crucial for the integration of skin constructs with the surrounding tissues. Combination of the right cells with scaffolds of proper physico-chemical properties, vascularization can be markedly enhanced. The material effect, pore size and adsorption of certain proteins, as well as the application of appropriate growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factors, can have an additive effect. A selection of the most effective protocols is discussed in this review.

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  • 74.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nyberg, Gusten
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    T-Elserafi, Ahmed
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Ursing, Eric
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    The impact and validity of the Berlin criteria on burn-induced ARDS: Examining mortality rates, and inhalation injury influences. A single center observational cohort study.2024In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, article id S0305-4179(24)00149-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: As several recent studies have shown low mortality rates in burn injury induced ARDS early (≤7 days) after the burn, the Berlin criteria for the ARDS diagnosis in this setting may be disputed. Related to this issue, the present study investigated the incidence, trajectory and risk factors of early Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and outcome in burn patients, as per the Berlin criteria, along with the concurrent prevalence and influence of inhalation injury, and ventilator-acquired pneumonia (VAP).

    METHODS: Over a 2.5-year period, burn patients with Total Burn Surface Area (TBSA) exceeding 10% admitted to a national burn center were included. The subgroup of interest comprised patients with more than 48 h of ventilatory support. This group was assessed for ARDS, inhalation injury, and VAP.

    RESULTS: Out of 292 admissions, 62 sustained burns > 10% TBSA. Of these, 28 (45%) underwent ventilatory support for over 48 h, almost all, 24 out of 28, meeting the criteria for ARDS early, within 7 days post-injury and with a PaO2/FiO2 (PF) ratio nadir at day 5. The mortality rate for this early ARDS group was under 10%, regardless of PF ratios (mean TBSA% 34,8%). Patients with concurrent inhalation injury and early ARDS showed significantly lower PF ratios (p < 0.001), and higher SOFA scores (p = 0.004) but without impact on mortality. Organ failure, indicated by SOFA scores, peaked early (day 3) and declined in the first week, mirroring PF ratio trends (p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: The low mortality associated with early ARDS in burn patients in this study challenges the Berlin criteria's for the early ARDS diagnosis, which for its validity relies on that higher mortality is linked to worsening PF ratios. The finding suggests alternative mechanisms, leading to the early ARDS diagnosis, such as the significant impact of inhalation injury on early PF ratios and organ failure, as seen in this study. The concurrence of early organ failure with declining PF ratios, supports, as expected, the hypothesis of trauma-induced inflammation/multi-organ failure mechanisms contributing to early ARDS. The study highlights the complexity in differentiating between the contributions of inhalation injury to early ARDS and the related organ dysfunction early in the burn care trajectory. The Berlin criteria for the ARDS diagnosis may not be fully applicable in the burn care setting, where the low mortality significantly deviates from that described in the original Berlin ARDS criteria publication but is as expected when considering the actual not very extensive burn injury sizes/Baux scores as in the present study.

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  • 75.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Bäckström, Denise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Könsperspektiv på traumatologin - män skadar sig oftare och blir sjukare av ett fysiskt trauma2010In: Genus och kön inom medicin- och vårdutbildningar / [ed] Barbro Wijma, Goldina Smirthwaite och Katarina Swahnberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2010, 1, p. 416-426Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kvinnor och män är delvis lika, delvis olika. Det innebär att kvinnor och män både har behov av likadan behandling och av behandling som är anpassad till det egna könets förutsättningar. Denna antologi belyser kvinnors och mäns förutsättningar och behov inom en rad olika medicinska områden och tar upp både biologiska och sociala faktorer som påverkar hälsa och behandling. Den behandlar även den roll som kön spelar inom vårdens arbetsliv samt hur köns- och genusperspektiv kan integreras inom olika typer av medicin- och vårdutbildningar. Ett av bokens teman är våld, kränkningar och diskriminering, och inom ramen för detta behandlas några av de olika maktordningar som kommer till uttryck vid behandlingar inom hälso- och sjukvården. Antologin har en stor spännvidd när det gäller ämnen och författare. Förhoppningsvis ska den bredd som antologin uppvisar, leda fram till frågeställningar där läsaren utmanar sina förgivettaganden inom både genusvetenskap och mer traditionell medicin samt väcka nya frågor: Om könet snarare ses som en konstruktion än en fysisk realitet - kan då kvinnor lika gärna äta mediciner som är utprovade på män och opereras med metoder och verktyg anpassade till mäns fysiologi? Å andra sidan - hur objektiv är den naturvetenskapligt inriktade medicinska forskningen egentligen om man börjar granska den utifrån frågeställningar om perspektivval och genus? Antologin vänder sig till lärare på utbildningar inom medicin, hälsa och vård. Andra målgrupper är studenter på sådana utbildningar, vårdpersonal och en intresserad allmänhet.

  • 76.
    Skog, Mårten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sivlér, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    The Effect of Enzymatic Digestion on Cultured Epithelial Autografts2019In: Cell Transplantation, ISSN 0963-6897, E-ISSN 1555-3892, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 638-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Severe burns are often treated by means of autologous skin grafts, preferably following early excision of the burnt tissue. In the case of, for example, a large surface trauma, autologous skin cells can be expanded in vitro prior to transplantation to facilitate the treatment when insufficient uninjured skin is a limitation. In this study we have analyzed the impact of the enzyme (trypsin or accutase) used for cell dissociation and the incubation time on cell viability and expansion potential, as well as expression of cell surface markers indicative of stemness. Skin was collected from five individuals undergoing abdominal reduction surgery and the epidermal compartment was digested in either trypsin or accutase. Trypsin generally generated more cells than accutase and with higher viability; however, after 7 days of subsequent culture, accutase-digested samples tended to have a higher cell count than trypsin, although the differences were not significant. No significant difference was found between the enzymes in median fluorescence intensity of the analyzed stem cell markers; however, accutase digestion generated significantly higher levels of CD117- and CD49f-positive cells, but only in the 5 h digestion group. In conclusion, digestion time appeared to affect the isolated cells more than the choice of enzyme.

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  • 77.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Brännskadad2005In: Sjukdomsvärldar: om människors erfarenhet av kroppslig ohälsa / [ed] Bengt Richt, Gunilla Tegern, Lund, 2005, p. 197-230Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En stor andel av befolkningen i de västerländska samhällena och en växande andel världen över lever med långvarig kroppslig ohälsa. Den utbredda förekomsten har en djupgående påverkan på sättet att leva, både bland de redan sjuka och bland dem som är friska. Kunskap om den kroppsliga ohälsans personliga, sociala och kulturella dimensioner är därför av grundläggande betydelse för förståelsen av tendenser och processer i samtiden. Boken bygger på berättelser från personer som själva lever med olika former av långvarig och ibland svår kroppslig ohälsa. Några kapitel är rättframt rapporterande, medan andra ansluter till sådana förståelseramar som fenomenologi, symbolisk interaktionism och analytisk filosofi. Texten ansluter sig till den internationella vetenskapliga tradition som under senare tid har försökt ge den levda erfarenheten av ohälsa ett språk och en röst, i opposition mot eller som komplement till ett rent biomedicinskt perspektiv. Den är utpräglat tvärvetenskaplig och skriven av personer med olika ämnesbakgrund, alltifrån omvårdnadsvetenskap, filosofi, sociologi och pedagogik till sjukgymnastik och arbetsterapi. Sjukdomsvärldar vänder sig till alla med intresse för vad det kan innebära att leva med kroppslig ohälsa i vardagslivet och för hur de möjliga innebörderna formas av mer övergripande sociala och kulturella omständigheter. Den tvärvetenskapliga inriktningen gör boken väl användbar på såväl olika vårdutbildningar som kurser i både samhällsvetenskap och humaniora.

  • 78. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Organ dysfunction among patients with major burns2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of patients who are admitted for in-hospital care in Sweden because of burns is about 12/100,000, and only a small proportion of these have larger burns. Among them, and particularly among those who die in hospital, a condition referred to as “organ dysfunction” is common and an important factor in morbidity and mortality. The fact that the time of the initial event is known, and the magnitude of the insult is quantifiable, makes the burned patient ideal to be studied. In this doctoral thesis organ dysfunction and mortality were studied in a descriptive, prospective, exploratory study (no interventions or control groups) in patients admitted consecutively to a national burn centre in Sweden.

    The respiratory dysfunction that is seen after burns was found to be equally often the result of acute respiratory distress syndrome and inhalation injury. We found little support for the idea that this early dysfunction is caused by pneumonia, ventilator-induced lung injury, or sepsis. Acute kidney injury (AKI) was also common, and mortality was associated with severity. Importantly, renal dysfunction recovered among the patients who survived. Pulmonary dysfunction and systemic inflammatory response syndrome developed before the onset of AKI. Sepsis was a possible aggravating factor for AKI in 48% of 31 patients; but we could find no support for the idea that late AKI was mainly associated with sepsis. We found that older age (over 60 years), greater TBSA%, and respiratory dysfunction were associated with increased mortality, but there was no association between the overall mortality and sex. We also found that early transient liver dysfunction was common, and recorded early hepatic “hyper”- function among many young adults. Persistent low values indicating severe liver dysfunction were found among patients who eventually died.

    We conclude from this investigation that overall organ dysfunction is an early and common phenomenon among patients with severe burns. Our data suggest that the prognosis of organ dysfunction among these patients is good, and function recovers among most survivors. Multiple organ failure was, however, the main cause of death. The findings of the early onset in respiratory dysfunction and a delay in signs of sepsis are congruous with the gutlymphatic hypothesis for the development of organ dysfunction, and the idea of the lung as an inflammatory engine for its progression. We think that the early onset favours a syndrome in which organ dysfunction is induced by an inflammatory process mediated by the effect of the burn rather than being secondary to sepsis.

    Our data further suggest that clinical strategies to improve burn care further should be focused on early interventions, interesting examples of which include: selective decontamination of the gastrointestinal tract to prevent translocation of gut-derived toxic and inflammatory factors; optimisation of fluid replacement during the first 8 hours after injury by goal-directed resuscitation; and possible improvement in the fluid treatment given before admission.

    List of papers
    1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is as important as inhalation injury for the development of respiratory dysfunction in major burns
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute respiratory distress syndrome is as important as inhalation injury for the development of respiratory dysfunction in major burns
    2008 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 441-451Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Respiratory dysfunction is common after major burns. The pathogenesis is, however, still under debate. The aim was to classify and examine underlying reasons for respiratory dysfunction after major burns. Consecutive adult patients (n = 16) with a total burned body surface area of 20% or more who required mechanical ventilation were assessed for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), inhalation injury, sepsis, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), using conventional criteria, together with measurements of cardiovascular variables and viscoelastic properties of the lung including extravascular lung water.

    Nine patients developed ARDS within 6 days of injury. ARDS was characterized by a large reduction in the PEEP-adjusted PaO2:FiO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, and increased extra vascular lung water together with increased renal dysfunction rates. Seven patients fulfilled the criteria for inhalation injury. They also had decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratios. There was an increase in extra vascular lung water and a decrease in compliance measures though not to the same extent as in the ARDS group. White blood cell counts dropped from (mean) 21.4 x 10exp9 /l (95% CI 15.3-27.5) in day 1 to 4.3 x 10exp9 /l (2.2-6.5) on day 3, and lower values tended to correlate with the development of ARDS. Sepsis occurred before onset of ARDS in only three cases. One patient fulfilled the criteria for VAP, but none was thought to have VILI.

    We found that respiratory dysfunction after burns is multifactorial, and ARDS and inhalation injury are most important. The early onset of ARDS, together with the changes in white blood cell count and organ dysfunction, favours a syndrome in which respiratory distress is induced by an inflammatory process mediated by the effect of the burn rather than being secondary to sepsis. The power of these conclusions is, however, hampered by the small number of patients in this study.    

    Keywords
    Burns, Inflammation, Leukocytes, Organ dysfunction, Permeability, Viscoelastic properties
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43096 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2007.10.007 (DOI)71559 (Local ID)71559 (Archive number)71559 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2021-12-28Bibliographically approved
    2. Acute kidney injury is common, parallels organ dysfunction or failure, and carries appreciable mortality in patients with major burns: a prospective exploratory cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute kidney injury is common, parallels organ dysfunction or failure, and carries appreciable mortality in patients with major burns: a prospective exploratory cohort study
    2008 (English)In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 12, no R124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, time course, and outcome of acute kidney injury after major burns and to evaluate the impact of possible predisposing factors ( age, gender, and depth and extent of injury) and the relation to other dysfunctioning organs and sepsis.

    Method: We performed an explorative cohort study on patients with a TBSA% (percentage burned of total body surface area) of 20% or more who were admitted to a national burn centre. Acute kidney injury was classified according to the international consensus classification of RIFLE ( Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease). Prospectively collected clinical and laboratory data were used for assessing organ dysfunction, systemic inflammatory response, and sepsis.

    Results: The incidence of acute kidney injury among major burns was 0.11 per 100,000 people per year. Of 127 patients, 31 (24%) developed acute kidney injury (12% Risk, 8% Injury, and 5% Failure). Mean age was 40.6 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 36.7 to 44.5), TBSA% was 38.6% (95% CI 35.5% to 41.6%), and 25% were women. Mortality was 14% and increased with increasing RIFLE class (7% normal, 13% Risk, 40% Injury, and 83% Failure). Renal dysfunction occurred within 7 days in 55% of the patients and recovered among all survivors. Age, TBSA%, and extent of full thickness burns were higher among the patients who developed acute kidney injury. Pulmonary dysfunction and systemic inflammatory response syndrome were present in all of the patients with acute kidney injury and developed before the acute kidney injury. Sepsis was a possible aggravating factor in acute kidney injury in 48%. Extensive deep burns (25% or more full thickness burn) increased the risk for developing acute kidney injury early (risk ratio 2.25).

    Conclusions: Acute kidney injury is common, develops soon after the burn, and parallels other dysfunctioning organs. Although acute kidney injury recovered in all survivors, in higher acute kidney injury groups, together with cardiovascular dysfunction, it correlated with mortality.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16218 (URN)10.1186/cc7032 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-02-27 Created: 2009-01-09 Last updated: 2021-12-28Bibliographically approved
    3. Mortality After Thermal Injury: No Sex-Related Difference
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mortality After Thermal Injury: No Sex-Related Difference
    2011 (English)In: JOURNAL OF TRAUMA-INJURY INFECTION AND CRITICAL CARE, ISSN 0022-5282, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 959-964Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Young women have been reported to be more likely to survive than men after severe trauma. Girls also have less inflammation and hypermetabolism after major burns. Yet burned women have been found to have a twofold greater risk of death than men. Our aim was to find out if there is a sex-related difference in mortality after thermal injury, particularly in the age group between 16 years and 49 years, when hormonal differences would be most influential. Methods: All patients admitted to the Linkoping University Hospital Burn Unit with thermal injuries during the years 1993-2008 were included and the variables percentage burned total body surface area (TBSA%), age, type of burn, mechanical ventilation, and year were included in a multiple regression (Poisson log) model. Results: Of 1,119 patients with thermal injury, 792 (71%) were men. Crude mortality was 5% among men, and 8% among women (p = 0.04). After adjustment for age and TBSA%, there was no correlation between mortality and sex, in any age group. Eight men and four women died in the group of young adults (16-49 years) in which TBSA% correlated with mortality (p andlt; 0.01) but age did not. Mortality was 14% (32 of 221) among the men and 23% (23 of 102) of women in the group of older adults (50 years and older), and both age and TBSA% correlated with mortality (p andlt; 0.001). Conclusions: There is no relevant sex-related difference in survival after thermal injury. The conclusion is, however, tempered by the few deaths, particularly among younger adults.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS and WILKINS, 530 WALNUT ST, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19106-3621 USA, 2011
    Keywords
    Burns, Outcome, Dimorphism, Age, Total body surface area
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67966 (URN)10.1097/TA.0b013e3181e59dbe (DOI)000289558700039 ()
    Available from: 2011-05-04 Created: 2011-05-04 Last updated: 2021-12-28
    4. Incidence of early burn-induced effects on liver functionas reflected by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green: a prospective descriptive cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incidence of early burn-induced effects on liver functionas reflected by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green: a prospective descriptive cohort study
    2012 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 214-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Organ dysfunction and failure are important for burned patients as they increase morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence has suggested that organ injuries are occurring earlier after burns, and are more common, than previously thought. In this study we have assessed the extent to which liver function, assessed by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green (PDRICG), is affected in patients with severe burns. This is a prospective, descriptive exploratory study at a national burn centre. Consecutive adult patients with a total burned body surface area (TBSA%) of 20% or more, were examined prospectively by dynamic (PDRICG) and static liver function tests (plasma: bilirubin concentration, prothrombin complex, and alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities). Early liver dysfunction was common, as assessed by both dynamic (7 of 17) and static liver function tests (6-17 of 17). A regression model showed that changes in PDRICG were associated with age, TBSA%, plasma bilirubin concentration, plasma C-reactive protein concentration, and cardiac index. Persistent and advanced hepatic dysfunction was associated with mortality. The PDRICG seems to give a comprehensive assessment of liver function after major burns. Hepatic dysfunction seems to be as common as dysfunction in other organs. We interpret the recorded effects on liver function as part of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, primarily induced by the burn itself. However, this needs to be further investigated.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2012
    Keywords
    Burns, organ dysfunction, hepatic dysfunction, plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green, age, cardiac index, sepsis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70059 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2011.08.017 (DOI)000301621500010 ()
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the status of this article was "Manuscript".

    Funding agencies|Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Linkoping University Hospital||PULSION Medical Systems AG, Munich, Germany||

    Available from: 2011-08-17 Created: 2011-08-17 Last updated: 2021-12-28Bibliographically approved
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    Organ dysfunction among patients with major burns
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  • 79.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Acute kidney injury is common, parallels organ dysfunction or failure, and carries appreciable mortality in patients with major burns: a prospective exploratory cohort study2008In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 12, no R124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, time course, and outcome of acute kidney injury after major burns and to evaluate the impact of possible predisposing factors ( age, gender, and depth and extent of injury) and the relation to other dysfunctioning organs and sepsis.

    Method: We performed an explorative cohort study on patients with a TBSA% (percentage burned of total body surface area) of 20% or more who were admitted to a national burn centre. Acute kidney injury was classified according to the international consensus classification of RIFLE ( Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease). Prospectively collected clinical and laboratory data were used for assessing organ dysfunction, systemic inflammatory response, and sepsis.

    Results: The incidence of acute kidney injury among major burns was 0.11 per 100,000 people per year. Of 127 patients, 31 (24%) developed acute kidney injury (12% Risk, 8% Injury, and 5% Failure). Mean age was 40.6 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 36.7 to 44.5), TBSA% was 38.6% (95% CI 35.5% to 41.6%), and 25% were women. Mortality was 14% and increased with increasing RIFLE class (7% normal, 13% Risk, 40% Injury, and 83% Failure). Renal dysfunction occurred within 7 days in 55% of the patients and recovered among all survivors. Age, TBSA%, and extent of full thickness burns were higher among the patients who developed acute kidney injury. Pulmonary dysfunction and systemic inflammatory response syndrome were present in all of the patients with acute kidney injury and developed before the acute kidney injury. Sepsis was a possible aggravating factor in acute kidney injury in 48%. Extensive deep burns (25% or more full thickness burn) increased the risk for developing acute kidney injury early (risk ratio 2.25).

    Conclusions: Acute kidney injury is common, develops soon after the burn, and parallels other dysfunctioning organs. Although acute kidney injury recovered in all survivors, in higher acute kidney injury groups, together with cardiovascular dysfunction, it correlated with mortality.

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  • 80.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is as important as inhalation injury for the development of respiratory dysfunction in major burns2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 441-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Respiratory dysfunction is common after major burns. The pathogenesis is, however, still under debate. The aim was to classify and examine underlying reasons for respiratory dysfunction after major burns. Consecutive adult patients (n = 16) with a total burned body surface area of 20% or more who required mechanical ventilation were assessed for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), inhalation injury, sepsis, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), using conventional criteria, together with measurements of cardiovascular variables and viscoelastic properties of the lung including extravascular lung water.

    Nine patients developed ARDS within 6 days of injury. ARDS was characterized by a large reduction in the PEEP-adjusted PaO2:FiO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, and increased extra vascular lung water together with increased renal dysfunction rates. Seven patients fulfilled the criteria for inhalation injury. They also had decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratios. There was an increase in extra vascular lung water and a decrease in compliance measures though not to the same extent as in the ARDS group. White blood cell counts dropped from (mean) 21.4 x 10exp9 /l (95% CI 15.3-27.5) in day 1 to 4.3 x 10exp9 /l (2.2-6.5) on day 3, and lower values tended to correlate with the development of ARDS. Sepsis occurred before onset of ARDS in only three cases. One patient fulfilled the criteria for VAP, but none was thought to have VILI.

    We found that respiratory dysfunction after burns is multifactorial, and ARDS and inhalation injury are most important. The early onset of ARDS, together with the changes in white blood cell count and organ dysfunction, favours a syndrome in which respiratory distress is induced by an inflammatory process mediated by the effect of the burn rather than being secondary to sepsis. The power of these conclusions is, however, hampered by the small number of patients in this study.    

  • 81.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    El-Serafi, Ahmed Taher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    ABO blood group and effects on ventilatory time, length of stay and mortality in major burns a retrospective observational outcome study2022In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 785-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood group has been found to be important in the development of many diseases and the outcome of several disease processes, especially cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, such as caused by trauma and sepsis. The main reason is claimed to be related to glycobiology and effects mediated through the endothelium. This study investigated the possible effect of blood group (ABO) on burn care outcome. Burn outcome prediction models are extremely accurate and as such can be used to identify outcome effects even in single centre settings. In this retrospective risk adjusted observational study, we investigated the effect of ABO blood group on ventilatory time, length of hospital stay (LOS), and 90 day mortality among patients with burns. RESULTS: A total of 225 patients were included (2008-2019) with median TBSA of 26%; interquartile range (IQR) of 20-37%; median age 45 years (IQR 22-65 years); median Baux score (age + TBSA%); 76 (IQR 53- 97); 168 (75%) were male; median duration of hospital stay was 31 days (IQR 19-56); a total of 138 (61%) received treatment with mechanical ventilation; and 29 (13%) died. In a multivariable regression model, we were unable to isolate any significant effect of any blood group (O, A, B, AB) on the outcome measures studied (ventilatory time, LOS, and mortality). IN SUMMARY: contrary to many other major areas of disease in which ABO blood groups affect outcome, we were unable to find any such effect on patients with burns. Given the precision of the outcome models presented (AUC 0.93) any such an effect, if missed due to the limited study cohort, may be considered limited and to have only a minor clinical impact.

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  • 82.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elserafy, Ahmed Taher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Addition of admission lactate levels to Baux score improves mortality prediction in severe burns.2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 18038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Risk adjustment and mortality prediction models are central in optimising care and for benchmarking purposes. In the burn setting, the Baux score and its derivatives have been the mainstay for predictions of mortality from burns. Other well-known measures to predict mortality stem from the ICU setting, where, for example, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS 3) models have been found to be instrumental. Other attempts to further improve the prediction of outcome have been based on the following variables at admission: Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (aSOFA) score, determinations of aLactate or Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio (aNLR). The aim of the present study was to examine if estimated mortality rate (EMR, SAPS 3), aSOFA, aLactate, and aNLR can, either alone or in conjunction with the others, improve the mortality prediction beyond that of the effects of age and percentage total body surface area (TBSA%) burned among patients with severe burns who need critical care. This is a retrospective, explorative, single centre, registry study based on prospectively gathered data. The study included 222 patients with median (25th-75th centiles) age of 55.0 (38.0 to 69.0) years, TBSA% burned was 24.5 (13.0 to 37.2) and crude mortality was 17%. As anticipated highest predicting power was obtained with age and TBSA% with an AUC at 0.906 (95% CI 0.857 to 0.955) as compared with EMR, aSOFA, aLactate and aNLR. The largest effect was seen thereafter by adding aLactate to the model, increasing AUC to 0.938 (0.898 to 0.979) (p < 0.001). Whereafter, adding EMR, aSOFA, and aNLR, separately or in combinations, only marginally improved the prediction power. This study shows that the prediction model with age and TBSA% may be improved by adding aLactate, despite the fact that aLactate levels were only moderately increased. Thereafter, adding EMR, aSOFA or aNLR only marginally affected the mortality prediction.

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    fulltext
  • 83.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Standardised mortality ratio based on the sum of age and percentage total body surface area burned is an adequate quality indicator in burn care: An exploratory review2016In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 28-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standardised Mortality Ratio (SMR) based on generic mortality predicting models is an established quality indicator in critical care. Burn-specific mortality models are preferred for the comparison among patients with burns as their predictive value is better. The aim was to assess whether the sum of age (years) and percentage total body surface area burned (which constitutes the Baux score) is acceptable in comparison to other more complex models, and to find out if data collected from a separate burn centre are sufficient for SMR based quality assessment. The predictive value of nine burn-specific models was tested by comparing values from the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and a non-inferiority analysis using 1% as the limit (delta). SMR was analysed by comparing data from seven reference sources, including the North American National Burn Repository (NBR), with the observed mortality (years 1993-2012, n = 1613, 80 deaths). The AUC values ranged between 0.934 and 0.976. The AUC 0.970 (95% CI 0.96-0.98) for the Baux score was non-inferior to the other models. SMR was 0.52 (95% CI 0.28-0.88) for the most recent five-year period compared with NBR based data. The analysis suggests that SMR based on the Baux score is eligible as an indicator of quality for setting standards of mortality in burn care. More advanced modelling only marginally improves the predictive value. The SMR can detect mortality differences in data from a single centre. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 84.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Incidence of early burn-induced effects on liver functionas reflected by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green: a prospective descriptive cohort study2012In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 214-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organ dysfunction and failure are important for burned patients as they increase morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence has suggested that organ injuries are occurring earlier after burns, and are more common, than previously thought. In this study we have assessed the extent to which liver function, assessed by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green (PDRICG), is affected in patients with severe burns. This is a prospective, descriptive exploratory study at a national burn centre. Consecutive adult patients with a total burned body surface area (TBSA%) of 20% or more, were examined prospectively by dynamic (PDRICG) and static liver function tests (plasma: bilirubin concentration, prothrombin complex, and alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities). Early liver dysfunction was common, as assessed by both dynamic (7 of 17) and static liver function tests (6-17 of 17). A regression model showed that changes in PDRICG were associated with age, TBSA%, plasma bilirubin concentration, plasma C-reactive protein concentration, and cardiac index. Persistent and advanced hepatic dysfunction was associated with mortality. The PDRICG seems to give a comprehensive assessment of liver function after major burns. Hepatic dysfunction seems to be as common as dysfunction in other organs. We interpret the recorded effects on liver function as part of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, primarily induced by the burn itself. However, this needs to be further investigated.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 85.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Mortality After Thermal Injury: No Sex-Related Difference2011In: JOURNAL OF TRAUMA-INJURY INFECTION AND CRITICAL CARE, ISSN 0022-5282, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 959-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Young women have been reported to be more likely to survive than men after severe trauma. Girls also have less inflammation and hypermetabolism after major burns. Yet burned women have been found to have a twofold greater risk of death than men. Our aim was to find out if there is a sex-related difference in mortality after thermal injury, particularly in the age group between 16 years and 49 years, when hormonal differences would be most influential. Methods: All patients admitted to the Linkoping University Hospital Burn Unit with thermal injuries during the years 1993-2008 were included and the variables percentage burned total body surface area (TBSA%), age, type of burn, mechanical ventilation, and year were included in a multiple regression (Poisson log) model. Results: Of 1,119 patients with thermal injury, 792 (71%) were men. Crude mortality was 5% among men, and 8% among women (p = 0.04). After adjustment for age and TBSA%, there was no correlation between mortality and sex, in any age group. Eight men and four women died in the group of young adults (16-49 years) in which TBSA% correlated with mortality (p andlt; 0.01) but age did not. Mortality was 14% (32 of 221) among the men and 23% (23 of 102) of women in the group of older adults (50 years and older), and both age and TBSA% correlated with mortality (p andlt; 0.001). Conclusions: There is no relevant sex-related difference in survival after thermal injury. The conclusion is, however, tempered by the few deaths, particularly among younger adults.

  • 86.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    C-reactive protein response patterns after antibiotic treatment among children with scalds2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, p. 718-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Scalds are the most common cause of burns in children, yet there is little information available about the inflammatory response. The aim of the study was to investigate the response to treatment with antibiotics among scalded children by following the C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration, procalcitonin (PCT) concentration, and white blood cell count (WCC) during the first two weeks after injury.

    Methods

    All children with scalds who presented to the Burn Centre during 2010–2016 were included in this retrospective study. All measurements of CRP, PCT, and WCC from the first 14 days after injury were recorded, and each patient’s maximum values during days 0–2, 3–7, and 8–14 were used for calculations. Multivariable regression for panel data was used to study the inflammatory response after antibiotic treatment.

    Results

    A total of 216 children were included. C-reactive protein was 45 mg/L (p < 0.001) higher in the group treated with antibiotics, and decreased with 8.8 mg/L per day over the studied time in this group, which was more than twice as fast as among the children who were not given antibiotics.

    Conclusion

    The CRP response, among children with minor scalds treated with antibiotics, shows an appreciable rise during the first week of injury that subsided rapidly during the second week.

  • 87.
    Vieweg, Rosa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Järemo, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Renin signals renal hypoperfusion during Parkland fluid resuscitation of severe burns - a prospective longitudinal cohort study2020In: International Journal of Burns and Trauma, ISSN 2160-2026, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 331-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Previous investigations have shown that fluid resuscitation of burns using the Parkland formula results in controlled hypovolaemia and that kidney injury is a common complication. Enhancing monitoring of tissue perfusion might reduce complications. Plasma renin has recently been suggested to be a promising marker for tissue hypoperfusion in intensive care patients. The aim of this study was to explore plasma renin levels during the first 48 hours after major burns in patients resuscitated using the Parkland formula.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients 18 years or older of age with 10% or more total body surface area (TBSA) burned, admitted to Linköping Burn Intensive Care Unit, and resuscitated using the Parkland formula were included. Samples for plasma renin were drawn at admission and eight-hourly thereafter for 48 hours.

    RESULTS: Fifteen patients were included. Median TBSA burned was 36% and age 53 years. The fluid volumes provided were in accordance with the Parkland formula. Mean arterial pressure, urinary output, and lactate remained within reference ranges during the first 48 hours. At eight hours after burn median plasma renin was elevated to more than 25 times the upper reference value, decreasing to about four times the upper reference at 48 hours. Renin concentration was associated with lactate levels and TBSA burned.

    CONCLUSION: During Parkland fluid resuscitation of severe burns, plasma renin levels were extremely elevated. The fact that the traditionally used endpoints for Parkland fluid resuscitation remained within the reference range raises concerns about whether the increased renin concentrations may signal a relative renal hypoperfusion.

  • 88.
    Westlund Firchal, Emmelie Westlund
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Long-term survival among elderly after burns compared with national mean remaining life expectancy2021In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1252-1258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: As compared to younger adults, older people have a greater risk of domestic accidents, such as burns, and their prognosis is worsened by a diminished physiological ability to face a thermal trauma. The in-hospital mortality is adversely affected by old age and burn size, whereas less is known about the long-term-survival in elderly patients who survive a burn injury. The aim of this study was to investigate if elderly burn patients after discharge from a Swedish National Burn Centre have a shorter remaining life compared to the national population, by using calculated remaining Life Expectancy (rLE).

    METHODS: In this retrospective study we included all patients who were admitted for burns to the Linköping Burn Centre during 1993-2016 and who were 60 years or older and alive, at the time of discharge. The control group was extracted from Statistics Sweden, the national statistics database, and consisted of all individuals from the Swedish population matched for each patient in the study group, by sex and age at the year of discharge. The proportion who died before reaching the rLE was compared between the study population and the control group by calculating risk ratio.

    RESULTS: The study group consisted of 111 former patients and 77 of them (69%) died before reaching the rLE, with mean 4.7 years of life lost (YLL), which was 33% more than that (52%) of the control group (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.18-1.51). Burn related factors, such as TBSA % or FTB % were not found to account for this effect.

    CONCLUSION: We found that the long-time survival of elderly patients after burns is shorter than that of a national control, the magnitude of which is quantitatively important. The current study does not support that burn related factors account for this effect and the reason should therefore be sought in other factors, such as e.g., co-morbidity or psychosocial issues.

  • 89.
    Wyckman, Alexander
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University,Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nettelblad, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Reconstruction of sternal defects after sternotomy with postoperative osteomyelitis, using a unilateral pectoralis major advancement muscle flap2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 8380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The pectoralis major flap, which is usually harvested bilaterally, is considered a workhorse flap in the reconstruction of sternal defects. After a median sternotomy for open heart surgery, 1%-3% of patients develop deep infection and dehiscence of the sternal wound, some of which will eventually require reconstructive surgery. Our aim was to describe the clinical feasibility and associated complications of the unilateral pectoralis major advancement flap in the reconstruction of sternal defects.

    METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all adult patients who were operated on using a unilateral pectoralis major flap for reconstruction of the chest wall at the Linköping University Hospital during 2008-18 was made using data retrieved from medical records.

    RESULTS: Forty-three patients had reconstructions with unilateral pectoralis major flaps. Three flaps failed completely, and another 10 patients developed complications that required further operation. The factors that were independently associated with loss of the flaps and complications were: older age, male sex, the number of different antibiotics used, and a long duration of treatment with negative wound pressure. Fewer wound revisions before the reconstruction resulted in more complications. The factors that were independently associated with prolonged time to complete healing were emergency reoperation after the initial operation and complications after reconstruction.

    CONCLUSION: The unilateral pectoralis major advancement flap has proved to be a useful technique in the reconstruction of most sternal defects after sternal wound infection in older patients. There is, however, need for a follow-up study on a larger number of procedures to evaluate the long-term outcome compared with other methods of sternal reconstruction.

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  • 90.
    Wyckman, Alexander
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Assareh, Armin
    Plastic surgeon in private practice in Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Breast Reconstruction Using the Extended Latissimus Dorsi Myocutaneous Flap—A Long-term Follow-up Utilizing BREAST-Q2024In: Aesthetic Surgery Journal Open Forum, E-ISSN 2631-4797, Vol. 6, article id ojae002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The latissimus dorsi (LD) flap is a commonly used method for breast reconstruction after mastectomy. In this study, we present a long-term follow-up and effects of refining surgery on patient satisfaction and quality of life after breast reconstruction with the extended LD flap, using the BREAST-Q questionnaire.

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the patient-reported long-term results after breast reconstruction with the extended LD myocutaneous flap.

    Methods A retrospective cohort study of adult patients (n = 101) who were operated on using the extended LD flap for breast reconstruction at the Linköping University Hospital during 1997 to 2012 was made using data retrieved from medical records. The patients were asked to complete the BREAST-Q questionnaire at 2 different postoperative time points.

    Results Eighty-three patients replied to the first questionnaire, and 56 patients also replied to the second. Mean follow-up was 11.7 years. Higher age and living together with someone correlated to higher BREAST-Q results, while postoperative infection, bilateral LD flaps, smoking, and prior breast surgery had a negative impact on the results. Overall BREAST-Q results increased over time. No independent effect of refining surgery could be shown.

    Conclusions Patient satisfaction after breast reconstruction with the LD flap as measured with the BREAST-Q questionnaire is high and in line with other studies. The overall satisfaction with the reconstruction method seems to increase with time, but no further increase in satisfaction after refining surgery could be established. Level of Evidence: 3 

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  • 91.
    Ydenius, Viktor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Larsen, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Bäckström, Denise
    Life Regiment Hussars, Karlsborg, Sweden.
    Chew, Michelle S
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Impact of hospital type on risk-adjusted, traffic-related 30-day mortality: a population-based registry study2021In: Burns & Trauma, ISSN 2321-3876, Vol. 9, article id tkaa051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Traffic incidents are still a major contributor to hospital admissions and trauma-relatedmortality. The aim of this nationwide study was to examine risk-adjusted traffic injury mortality todetermine whether hospital type was an independent survival factor.

    Methods: Data on all patients admitted to Swedish hospitals with traffic-related injuries, basedon International Classification of Diseases codes, between 2001 and 2011 were extracted fromthe Swedish inpatient and cause of death registries. Using the binary outcome measure of deathor survival, data were analysed using logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, comorbidity,severity of injury and hospital type. The severity of injury was established using the InternationalClassification of Diseases Injury Severity Score (ICISS).

    Results: The final study population consisted of 152,693 hospital admissions. Young individuals(0–25 years of age) were overrepresented, accounting for 41% of traffic-related injuries. Menwere overrepresented in all age categories. Fatalities at university hospitals had the lowest mean(SD) ICISS 0.68 (0.19). Regional and county hospitals had mean ICISS 0.75 (0.15) and 0.77 (0.15),respectively, for fatal traffic incidents. The crude overall mortality in the study population was 1193,with a mean ICISS 0.72 (0.17). Fatalities at university hospitals had the lowest mean ICISS 0.68(0.19). Regional and county hospitals had mean ICISS 0.75 (0.15) and 0.77 (0.15), respectively, forfatal traffic incidents. When regional and county hospitals were merged into one group and itsrisk-adjusted mortality compared with university hospitals, no significant difference was found. Acomparison between hospital groups with the most severely injured patients (ICISS ≤0.85) also didnot show a significant difference (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.97–1.32).

    Conclusions: This study shows that, in Sweden, the type of hospital does not influence risk adjustedtraffic related mortality, where the most severely injured patients are transported to the universityhospitals and centralization of treatment is common. 

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  • 92.
    Ydreborg, Karin
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Engstrand, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Larsson, Eva-Lena
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hand function, experienced pain, and disability after distal radius fracture.2015In: The American journal of occupational therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, Vol. 69, no 1, article id 6901290030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We sought to explore differences in range of motion (ROM), grip strength, and self-reported pain and disability over time after plate-fixation surgery for distal radius fracture.less thanbr /greater thanMethod: We used a prospective repeated-measures research design with four measure points for a study sample of 101 patients. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) Questionnaire; the Global Assessment Scale; and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure were used to assess ROM, grip strength, and pain level.less thanbr /greater thanResults: ROM and grip strength improved over time. Pain improved until 6 mo after surgery but greatly deteriorated from 6 to 24 mo. Concurrently, overall discomfort (global index) from the wrist extensively improved from 12 to 24 mo. DASH score decreased 20.1 points from 6 wk to 6 mo and remained stable until 24 mo.less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Even when ROM and grip strength were almost fully regained at 12 mo, pain at rest and during activity was still an issue at 24 mo.less thanbr /greater than (Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.)

  • 93.
    Zötterman, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Surgery Department, Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Better Protection of Glass-Fronted Stoves Is Needed in Sweden Because of the Increase in the Number of Contact Burns Among Small Children2018In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 618-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impression among the attending physicians at their Burn Centre is that the number of contact burns caused by glass-fronted stoves is increasing, particularly in the youngest group of patients. It is an interesting subgroup, as these injuries are preventable. The authors’ aim of this study was to find out whether the incidence of burns after contact with glass-fronted stoves has increased.

    The authors included all patients aged between 0 and 3.9 years who presented to the National Burn Centre during the period 2008–2015 with contact burn injuries caused by glass-fronted stoves. The change in incidence over time was calculated from national records and analyzed with simple linear regression.

    Fifty-six patients were included, of whom 20 were treated during the past 2 years of the study. Thirty-seven of the 56 were boys (66%), median (10–90 percentiles) age was 1.1 (0.7–2.5) years, percentage total body surface area burned was 0.6% (0.1–2.0), 12 were admitted for overnight stay in hospital, and seven needed operations. The incidence was 0.34/100 000 children-years during the first 2 years, and it was three times as high during the past 2 years. The increase in incidence was 0.24/100 000 children-years by each 2-year period (P = .02).

    The authors’ results indicate that contact burns among children caused by glass-fronted stoves are increasing in Sweden. The authors propose that there should be a plan for their prevention put in place.

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